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MacEngineer

The

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 28

NUMBER 1

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

WINTER 2003

Creating a New Breed of Engineer See page 2


A message from the Dean Meeting new demands Society has placed new demands on today’s engineer and as a result has placed new pressures on engineering facilities to meet these demands. At McMaster University, while our Engineering Faculty has a fine record of accomplishment and has adapted well to rapid changes in science and technology, the new era presents us with challenges as the result of this changing and broadening engineering role. We must keep current. Emerging engineering disciplines have evolved requiring a more global attitude to engineering education. Approaches of an interdisciplinary nature, that embrace engineering entrepreneurship and innovation, team leadership, health, safety and the environment, are all emerging trends that will be integrated into new engineering programs, creating a new breed of engineer. The basic premise for our approach at McMaster is to provide a fundamental role

inside this issue Golf Tournament .....................4 Distinguished Alumni .............8 Alumni Profiles.......................9 Toronto Alumni Event...........14 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. Publication Number 40063416

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to prepare young engineers to work in various capacities in an ever-changing world. They will be prepared with an education which is technically focussed, yet with adequate breadth to deal with multiple problems and tasks. We maintain, given that we are a research-intensive Faculty, that quality research will continue to enhance the learning of both faculty and students, thus contributing to the industrial and societal innovation base. We continually hear from automotive and manufacturing industries that we have to live in a world of increasing global competition and rapid technological change. There is a need for designers, problemsolvers and people with diverse skills to meet new demands. To meet the changing needs, the Faculty of Engineering is currently investigating the creation of The McMaster School for Engineering Practice (MSEP). The proposed school will include three new research centers focusing on Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Engineering and Public Policy, and Engineering Design. These three areas will work together to create a unique learning environment, second to none. The Centre for Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation (CEEI) will focus on how to commercialize new engineering ideas and technical expertise. The Centre for Engineering and Public Policy (CEPP) will conduct policy-focused research on the development and implementation of strategies to ensure technologies are employed in a way that benefits society. The Centre for Engineering Design (CED) will provide a focus for design education and research throughout the faculty. Increasingly, engineers must manage complex issues that require an in-depth knowledge of design, innovation, entrepreneurship and the impact of technology on society. To help meet the growing demand for engineers with a broad, interdisciplinary range of skills, the Faculty is investigating

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

the establishment of two new professional master’s degree programs: M.Eng in Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation and M.Eng in Engineering and Public Policy. The new graduate programs will complement two existing undergraduate programs: Engineering and Management and Engineering and Society. In addition, a new 5-year combined Bachelor’s/Master’s degree in Design Engineering will be created. The program will emphasize interdisciplinary education and students will undertake industry-based team design projects. McMaster’s engineering will meet the new demands of today’s engineers.

Mo Elbestawi

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A message from the Associate Dean New programmes As you know, McMaster University has been a leader in identifying new trends in the engineering profession and in introducing unique programmes to cater to these trends. McMaster was the first university in Canada to offer a Computer Engineering programme. It was the first university to offer an undergraduate programme in Manufacturing Engineering. It was also the first to offer an accredited programme in Software Engineering. The five-year Engineering and Management and Engineering and Society programmes remain unique. Over the past few months, the Faculty of Engineering has been hard at work designing programmes that cater to the latest developments in engineering. I am delighted to report that, starting next year, several new programmes and programme options will be offered to our undergraduate students.

The first change involves our common Engineering 1 programme, which provides incoming students with the opportunity to explore all of the engineering disciplines before having to commit to a Level 2 programme. Recently, to assist them in their choice, students have been offered seminars that provide insight into the various disciplines. Next year, all Engineering 1 students will participate in discipline-specific projects that will provide them with the opportunity to experience the disciplines at a much greater depth. These projects will be carefully designed to motivate and challenge all participants, and will feature the active involvement of senior undergraduate students, both as “expert consultants” and as mentors. Upon completing Engineering 1, students will have some new and exciting programme choices. One will be Photonics

Dr. Peter Smith, Associate Dean of Engineering

Engineering – the first programme of its type in Canada – which will be offered by the Dept. of Engineering Physics. In addition to fibre optic communications systems, this programme will focus on such areas as nanotechnology, biophotonics, sensors, displays and traditional optical engineering. Within the Dept. of Civil Engineering, students will be able to choose between Water/Environmental Engineering and Structural/Geotechnical Engineering streams. These streams will provide a structured sequence of courses in two areas that are becoming increasingly important to society. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering department will offer a new programme in Electrical and Biomedical Engineering. This programme has been designed to be offered as a 5-year combined B.Eng./M.Eng. degree, with an option of a 4-year B.Eng. degree. It will focus on the application of electrical sciences to the medical profession in such areas as medical imaging, diagnostic equipment and tele-robotic surgery. It will also contain the full pre-med curriculum for students who opt to pursue a medical career. As such, it will complement our current Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering programme, with its focus on chemical processes, to position McMaster as the leader in this rapidly evolving field. These new programmes show that the spirit of innovation in education is alive and well at McMaster University. I encourage you to visit our web sites to stay apprised of these and other developments.

COM DEV President on Dean’s Advisory Board Mike Pley graduated Summa Cum Laude from McMaster University in 1983 with a Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical) and Management, and was the recipient of the McMaster Alumni Association scholarship. Since 1983, he has held progressive positions at COM DEV, one of the world’s leading equipment suppliers for on-board satellites. In addition to positions in marketing, program management and business unit leadership, he was instrumental in introducing advanced active electronics products and capabilities into the Cambridge-based company. As Vice President of Operations for COM DEV from 1995-98, he played a major role in the expansion of the Ontario firm’s space business. After a two year hiatus working as Vice President and General Manager at Unitron Industries Ltd. in Kitchener, Pley returned to COM DEV in the role of Vice President of Space Programs and, in 2001, was appointed President of the company. Pley says that although he always considered himself an engineer first, he was intrigued by the engineering and management program at the time he enrolled at McMaster. “I sensed it would provide me with good opportunities to learn the business side.” He was right and has no regrets about his decision. “The program offered a more M

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holistic experience,” he explains. “We were working with people who were working on real applications. It provided good exposure to the kinds of things we would work at in the real world.” This, he Mike Pley adds, is one of the true strengths of Mac’s unique program. Asked to comment on his university experience, Pley noted that a number of professors took the time to introduce their classes to various companies. He mentions Dr. Colin Campbell in particular as an engineering professor who took a real interest in the students. He is certain the Campbell is “remembered fondly by many electrical engineering grads”. Pley, who also serves on the Board of Directors of the Sunnyside Home Foundation, is actively involved in the coaching of minor sports. He lives in Ayr with his wife Adele and his three children. He is very pleased to be on the University’s Faculty of Engineering Dean’s Advisory Board. “It is interesting to see how McMaster has grown and changed. It really is a world-class institution!” U

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First Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament Thursday, May 22, 2003

Tyandaga Municipal Golf Course 1265 Tyandaga Park Drive, Burlington, Ontario

“Shotgun” Start at 1:00 p.m. Cost per participant: $100

Tournament Includes: 18 hole Tournament – Scramble Format Shared golf cart Includes a sausage or hamburger and a drink after the 9th hole Welcome package Fabulous prize table Great contests throughout the course Closing Dinner Banquet Please RSVP by May 1,2003 to Carm Vespi, (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906, e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca or register on-line: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/

BOOK EARLY, SPACE IS LIMITED!

Get a foursome together and support your Alumni Association!


Research News Mac’s Lighter Cars Research Team If Andrew Hrymak’s research pays off, we could be speeding down the highway one day soon in a light-weight, super fuelefficient vehicle. Hrymak, Chair, Chemical Engineering and Director, MMRI, is heading a research team that is exploring a way

of making such a car without compromising on strength and safety. Along with researchers based at the universities of Toronto, Waterloo and Ecole Polytechnique in Montreal, the group is focusing on materials systems and pro-

cesses, specifically the use of polymers. Polymers, or foamed plastic, can be shaped into a wide variety of parts and have been used in the auto industry for years, replacing metal in bumpers, for example. But Hrymak’s team is pushing the boundaries of current knowledge. “We’re looking for more far-out applications,” Hrymak explains. “We’re looking at material systems to see if they can be pushed to get better fuel efficiency without having to trade off against other factors like the strength of the part or the safety or appearance of the vehicle.” One of the team’s project, for example, uses plastics and other polymers that have known properties, and searches for ways of making the material lighter by filling it with a gas (actually, by blowing gas into the melted polymer) that then reacts with the material during processing. “The whole trick is how to do that in a controlled way so that the bubble distribution is known, controlled and of a size that you’re not disadvantaging the material in terms of final properties,” he adds. A team member in Montreal is working on understanding how foams flow into moulds with the goal of being able to make more complex parts from the material. Another is looking for ways to increase the strength of plastic parts by mixing the plastic with reinforcing materials such as Fiberglas. Already two years into the research, Hrymak acknowledges that it may be another five years before consumers see the results in their new cars. “We are still trying to understand what’s going on, so they’re quite a ways from going into regular production.” The research being conducted by Hrymak’s team is under the umbrella of the AUTO21 Centre of Excellence network, established by the federal government in 2001. The goal is to position Canada as a leader in automotive R & D. The initiative is financed by an initial four-year grant of more than $23 million plus an additional $11 million from industry and institutions. The funds are supporting a total of 28 research projects, involving 200 researchers in 28 universities and 100 industry and government bodies.

Synergy Prize Awarded for Intelligent Machining McMaster University’s School of Engineering recently won a $25,000 Synergy prize for work on intelligent machining. While the prize also honours University partner Siemens-Westinghouse, the cash goes to the University. This is the second consecutive year that McMaster researchers have won the award which was created in 1995 between Ottawa-based Conference Board of Canada and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). Six awards are given annually. Engineering Dean Mo Elbestawi says that the award “is a recognition of our efforts to develop a strong and lasting partnership with industry”. The collaborative project involved “smart” monitoring sensors, computer programming and a wealth of studies that deal with the problems in machining certain materials. The research focused on metallurgy, computer software and predictive modelling, machining expertise and working with exotic materials such as titanium alloys and hardened steel. It included the study of the physics of what is happening to the materials as they are being worked on. “McMaster has helped us with the development of machine-tool testing and acceptance standards,” says Mazhar Khan, manager of technical services for SiemensWestinghouse. “We’re very pleased with the improvement we’ve seen in the operations of our Hamilton plant. We attribute them directly to results generated from our collaboration with McMaster.” Elbestawi believes the award demonstrates the effectiveness of developing

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industry partnerships. By working with industry, the Department of Engineering can assist with the development of technology while at the same time offering an expanded real-world education for its students. “We’re always looking to expand our relationships,” said Elbestawi. “There are many companies we haven’t worked with before. Each has a different set of problems and different research challenges.” In addition to Siemens, other companies that have begun research partnerships with McMaster include General Motors Canada, Pratt & Whitney Canada and United Technologies, as well as Hamilton-based firms Orlick Industries and Liburdi Engineering. Last year, McMaster won a Synergy prize for research on predictive computer models that looked at the toxic impact of silver on aquatic organisms, in partnership with Eastman Kodak. Kodak uses silver, a lightsensitive element, in its films and processing. Elbestawi, who is an authority on advanced machining technology, heads the machining-systems lab at the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute (MMRI). The MMRI is the largest centre of its kind in Canada, with more than 20,000 square feet in two locations.

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Jump in Research Dollars for McMaster An independent ranking shows that McMaster University realized $184.8 million in research funds for fiscal year 2001 – a 74 per cent increase over the previous year ($106.8 million). As a result of the findings, the University jumped to seventh spot nationally in the amount of research dollars flowing in, from 10th place last year. The Toronto-based data specialist, Research Info-source Inc., obtained the information from a survey of Canadian universities, from federal sources and from its own university R&D database. The University of Toronto, led the rankings at $470 million for fiscal 2001. Université de Montréal ($349.5m) and McGill University ($280.2m) came in second and third. According to Research Info-source findings, McMaster also vaulted to third spot in total research money per full-time faculty position. Last year, the school stood seventh in this category. The fatter research coffers are the result of an aggressive campaign to seek more funding and to hire high-profile researchers from around the world. “Among experts, it is well known the quality and intensity of research that comes out of McMaster,” notes Mamdouh Shoukri, Vice-President of Research and International Affairs. “But in the public’s eyes, it is not as well known.” Shoukri says the University, which has always placed a high priority on research, has been actively pursuing grant money wherever possible. McMaster has also raised its profile by hiring top people. For example, steel centre researcher Geoff Brooks comes from Australia; biomedical engineer Ian Bruce came from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Bringing in top talent is selfrewarding, Shoukri adds. More research expertise and research centres allow McMaster to chase funds it might not previously have pursued. Research funds come from both government and industry. In many cases, Ontario matches dollar for dollar the money awarded by the federal government. While the study doesn’t say how much money goes to each faculty, Shoukri says the Faculty of Health Sciences traditionally receives about 40 per cent of the funding. In general, the three big research winners are health sciences, science and engineering. The study looked at total research dollars going to schools, regardless of their

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size. But it also established another category called research intensity. It is in this category that McMaster jumped to third from seventh place. The research-intensity niche looks at total dollars and full-time faculty. McMaster has 940 full-time members. The University of Toronto, for example, has 2,600 full-time members, and ranked fourth in this category. McMaster, with fewer people, gets relatively more research cash. The study did not include information on the impact of research on the economy. Shoukri admits that while McMaster has a

reputation of being a great research school, that research has not produced big commercial spin-offs in the past. That’s changing, he says. The University is becoming more entrepreneurial; a recent good example is its link with the city in creating a biotechnology incubator program. The federal government has increased the flow of research dollars as part of its goal to make the country more competitive. Last year, Canada was in 15th place in global research funding. The government has stated it wants to raise that to fifth place by 2010.

“The Bonds That Bind Us” by Doug Wittenburg, Engineering Alumni Committee Member It has been a while for most of us since we first stepped foot onto McMaster University campus and celebrated Frosh Week. It was an interesting time for all. For many of us, we were entering our adulthood with all the excitement and fear that comes with it. We shared this new life with our classmates. Many new friendships were made at McMaster Engineering. The experiences and memories created friendships that we have carried through our lives. Through the years with our commitments to family, career and just living life, most of those friendships have been lost, but not forgotten. Those friendships helped create the person you are today. The goal of the McMaster Engineering Alumni association is to help rekindle and strengthen those bonds of friendship that were made at MAC. We have started planning events and using the Internet to open up more communication with the alumni. This year we started with an event at the annual MAC Engineering Bus Pull in downtown Hamilton. We are continuing to plan more activities and to provide a platform for all alumni to rekindle those old friendships. The demands on all of our lives have grown significantly since we left university and we are scattered across the globe to follow the paths we have chosen. I hope you can find an opportunity to maintain contact with the McMaster Engineering Alumni by either sending an E-mail message, visiting the Mac Engineer website, visiting the campus or simply by a phone call. There are some old friends who would enjoy hearing how you are doing. It’s amazing how the years disappear when you are talking to an old friend with whom you have grown and shared life experiences. Take the time to touch base with your classmates. Let’s keep the friendships alive, create new memories and pass on some of our experiences to those who follow. It will take us time to grow the alumni organization, but let’s take this first step together like we all did when we first came to McMaster. One expression brought us together and still binds us together: “We are, we are, we are the Engineers!”

Engineering Alumni... Join our Engineering Alumni E-mail Database http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/ just for ENGINEERS! This is a great opportunity to keep in touch with your fellow classmates. Check out McMaster Alumni Association’s new on-line McMaster @lumni Community http://www.mcmaster.ca/ua/ c

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Engineering Olympics Attract 600 This year’s McMaster Engineering and Science Olympics and Open House attracted 600 high school students from 41 secondary schools across Ontario. The students spent most of October 10th putting their engineering and science skills to the test in a series of challenges, meeting Engineering faculty and undergraduates, and having loads of fun. The focus of the

challenges is to highlight McMaster’s engineering and science programs. Bob Loree, director of Engineering 1, notes that the event provides an opportunity to showcase the University’s labs, view displays and watch demonstrations, and tour the campus. “It shows students that engineering and science is very broad.” The annual event has also become an

important recruitment tool for Engineering, he adds. “Many first-year students come to me and say they chose McMaster because they came to this when they were in high school and they had a really great time.” In fact, many of these undergrads go on to become volunteers in subsequent years. This year, over 300 undergraduate engineering students volunteered to assist with the program.

In Memorium: Professor Sowerby A Memorial Session for Late Professor Bob Sowerby of the Department of Mechanical Engineering was organized at the 7th International Conference on Technology of Plasticity in Yokohama, Japan, in October. Prof. Sowerby passed away on June 18, 2001. Prof. Sowerby joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering at McMaster in 1971 after completing his Ph. D. from University of Manchester Institute of Technology (UMIST) and a visiting Assistant Professorship at the University of Waterloo. Prof. Sowerby was well known for his rigorous treatment of metal forming research problems that clarify and illustrate the underlying principles of plasticity theory and damage. continued on back page

Interested in helping the environment? How about the local students at McMaster University who are working hard at completing the 2003 solar car “Fireball II” model for the 2003 American Solar Challenge? This test of “solar endurance” involves over 30 teams from around the globe to compete in a race that covers over 3000 km. The race kicks off from Chicago and ends up in California. We will be cruising along the famous Route 66 at speeds in excess of 80 km/h, all without burning a drop of gasoline. By donating $25, the cost of a solar cell, you can be a part of this exciting event and bring us one step closer to our goal of purchasing an 800-cell solar array for Fireball II. In recognition of your support, your name will be included on one of the cells of our solar appreciation diagram, similar to the one pictured above. A giant decal will be made from the final diagram and mounted on the side of our racing trailer, to be displayed throughout Canada and the USA. As well, your name will be entered in a draw. One lucky supporter will be chosen to drive Fireball II! Please logon to www.solarcar.mcmaster.ca to download an adoption form today. Thank you for your support!

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Convocation news Distinguished Alumni Awards Two McMaster graduates who have made significant contributions in their fields are the recipients of this year’s Distinguished Alumni Awards. These awards are made to alumni who have distinguished themselves through outstanding scholarship, research, creative contributions to the arts or sciences, or service to society.

Kevin Lynch During his 24-year career with Canada’s public service, Kevin Lynch has worked in a number of key economic departments and agencies, most notably and recently as deputy minister of the Department of Finance. Born in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Lynch received his BA in economics from Mount Allison University, his master’s degree from the University of Manchester and his PhD in economics from McMaster University. He began his career in 1976 with the Bank of Canada and joined the finance department within five years, becoming the youngest director in the history of the department. Before being named federal deputy minister of finance in 2000, Lynch held such senior positions as assistant deputy minister for international trade and financial, assis-

tant deputy minister for fiscal policy, and senior assistant deputy minister of finance. He is former deputy minister of industry (1995-2000) and in this capacity also served as director of the Business Development Bank of Canada for five years. He is a former secretary to the Prime Minister’s Advisory Council on Science and Technology. Earlier this year, Maclean’s magazine named Lynch among its 50 “most influential Canadians.” The magazine said his chances of becoming Canada’s chief bureaucrat, the clerk of the Privy Council, are good. He is credited with shifting the department’s focus from fundamentals to new departures. Lynch leads the civil service in tackling such major economic issues as an aging population, coping with growing income inequality and providing funding for health care and education, and has shown both an ability to make bold decisions and a balanced approach.

Respected Architect Honored At its Spring 2002 Convocation, McMaster awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws degree to Toronto-based, internationally recognized architect, Raymond Moriyama. Born in Vancouver, Moriyama attended Ryerson Senior Public School and Westdale Collegiate in Hamilton, prior to receiving his bachelor of architecture degree from the University of Toronto in 1954. In 1957, he obtained a master of architecture specializing in urban design from McGill University. In 1958, he founded Moriyama & Teshima, a Toronto-based Canadian architecture firm that today has a worldwide reputation for excellence in design. Moriyama himself is one of Canada’s most respected architects. Moriyama has applied his expert and unique vision to many projects including the Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre, the

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Bata Shoe Museum, the Bank of Montreal Institute for Learning, the Saudi Arabian National Museum, the Ontario Science Centre, Science North in Sudbury, the Scarborough Civic Centre, the Raymond Moriyama Toronto Reference Library, the new Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, and the Canadian Embassy in Tokyo. His firm, which has won more than 100 awards, has completed many successful projects for 10 universities and colleges over the years. In the spring of 1998, Moriyama & Teshima was named architect of the McMaster University Student Centre. continued on page 10 c

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Martin Green Martin Green is Scientia Professor at the University of New South Wales, Sydney Australia, and research director of Pacific Solar Pty. Ltd, a firm established to commercialize the university’s polycrystalline silicon thin-film solar cell technology. An expert in the area of photovoltaics and the utilization of solar energy, Green received his doctorate in electrical engineering from McMaster University in 1974. His bachelor’s and master’s degrees in engineering were obtained from the University of Queensland in 1970 and 1971. The process whereby sunlight is converted to electricity using solar cells is called photovoltaics. Green’s fundamental work in this field identified the factors that limit silicon solar cell performance. Since then, the work of his research group has improved the performance of silicon solar cells by over 50 per cent. Green has invented or co-invented (with former student Stuart Wenham), seven distinct cell technologies over the past 15 years and these solar cells have held the world efficiency record for converting sunlight into electricity for more than a decade. He is the author of a popular textbook on solar cells and founding director of the Photovoltaics Special Research Centre. Green’s work has been recognized internationally. His team received the gold medal from the Spanish Royal Academy in 2000 for their work in the technology of photovoltaic engineering. Other awards Green has won include the 1990 William R. Cherry Award, the 1995 J.J. Ebers Award and the 1999 Australia Prize. The World Renewable Energy Network Congress awarded him the 2000 Millennium Award for outstanding scientist in his field. Last year Green received the Humboldt Foundation Research Award for his lifetime achievements in science N

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Alumni profiles Eloise Harvey – sets the perfect example Since graduating from McMaster in 1999, Mechanical Engineering & Management, Eloise Harvey has experienced a successful career in a small – but rapidly growing – Quebec company. “I am the perfect example of what a graduate from Engineering & Management can do!” she says in a recent e-mail to the Engineering Alumni Office. Harvey currently holds the position of Director of Business Development at Mecfor (www.mecfor.com), a company specializing in the concept and fabrication of specialized fixed and mobile equipment for aluminium mills. Since assuming her position three years ago, Harvey says exports have increased from zero to 20 per cent of the company’s total sales volume. Today, Mecfor’s annual sales are $8 million. The company has over 50 employees, half of whom are engineers and technicians working on new product development; the other half comprise the fabrication team.

When not on the job Harvey enjoys caring for her two horses.

This speaks volumes for Harvey’s management skills. When she first joined Mecfor, the company employed 15 and had sales of $3.8 million, and all business was done with Quebec clients. Harvey explains that the company develops a high volume of specialized equipment, custom-made and highly technical. “My role within the organization is to develop new markets and to bring in business volume. I work out joint ventures and partnership agreements, and participate in the day-today operations planning as well as in the M

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long term vision/decision making process.” Responsibilities include generating a list of potential clients within Quebec and the United States, researching the business opportunities within these firms, and establishing contacts in the primary aluminum industry in both locales. She also plans and delivers presentations on site, acts as the technical representative for the firm, organizes trade shows, and is responsible for the promotional material, publicity and any other marketing aspect for the company including the write-up of technical essays. Harvey is proud to announce that she is now also the major shareholder of the company and between her holdings and that of her father’s company, “we hold a majority of the shares (decision making power)”. They plan to expand operations to steel mills, mines and other heavy industrial busi-

nesses in the future. When not working or off on business trips (“I travel a lot!”) she takes care of her two horses, works out and plays tennis to keep in shape, and dotes on her great dane. “She’s my Eloise Harvey baby. She spends a lot of time with me at the stable.” Harvey lives near Chicoutimi, Quebec, in a log house on the riverside. A mountain across the road provides the perfect venue for walking the dog. Of her picture-perfect locale she says: “I love the setting even though it gets very, very cold here in the winter time.”

David Quinn – expert in wireless communications Mac alumnus David Quinn, P.Eng., has made a name for himself in the wireless and telecommunications industries. With over 18 years of engineering and management experience, Quinn is now recognized as a leading expert in large wide-area wireless communications systems. After graduating from McMaster’s computer engineering program in 1983, Quinn was the senior technical supervisor for an engineering task force based in the United States. The task force was responsible for the evaluation and troubleshooting of large wide-area trunking systems throughout the U.S.A., Europe and Asia. In addition he was senior Engineering Manager of Motorola Inc for many years. In Canada, he has designed and implemented large radio communications systems including conventional and trunked radio systems, and simulcast and multicast systems, for both public and private clients. In 1996, Quinn joined Markham-based Kaval Wireless Technologies Inc, where he is currently President and CEO. The 43year-old engineer is responsible for spearheading the company’s strategic initiatives, as well as providing business and technoU

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logical direction to Kaval’s management team. Of his McMaster experience Quinn recalls having several good professors. One, in particular, was made a vivid impression. “Dr. Carter, who had David Quinn been employed in the corporate world, helped me by providing me with a strong sense of the difference between theory and practice. The numerous and very difficult and challenging RF communications courses definitely opened doors for me, in particular with Motorola.” Quinn credits the university’s emphasis on a structured learning discipline for much of his success. “The engineering program presented many barriers to success,” he says. “The MacEng environment required me to develop a structured problem solving discipline that I continued to apply after graduation and in the workplace. The structured problem solving continued on page 15 T

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New Faculty Members Civil Engineering

Ltd. Ontario Power Generation and Ontario Hydro were among the company’s clients.

Peijun Guo joined us in September 2002 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering. He came to us from C-CORE, Memorial University of Newfoundland, where he conducted two years’ Peijun Guo industry-orientated research on geomechanics in petroleum engineering since he obtained his Ph.D. degree from the University of Calgary in 2000. He also holds a Master’s and a Ph.D. degree from Southwest Jiaotong University, China. His research interests include computational geomechanics, experimental study and constitutive models for geomaterials as well as numerical modeling of soil-structure interactions in geotechnical engineering.

Computing and Software Alan Wassyng joined the Department as an Associate Professor in September, 2002. He will be doing research in the area of safety-critical software development. Prior to this appointAlan Wassyng ment, he was an Adjunct Professor and a member of the Software Quality Research Laboratory, and had contributed his expertise to curriculum development in the new Software Engineering programs and taught a software engineering course. He holds Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Before coming to McMaster, he taught at Witwatersrand and at the University of Minnesota before leaving academia to run his own computer consulting company, Alan Wassyng Consulting

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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Electrical & Computer Engineering Xiaolin Wu, who is a world expert in video compression, came to us from the University of Waterloo in May, 2002. Dr. Wu is soon to be an NSERC Industrial Research Chair (IRC) Xiaolin Wu holder in Digital Cinema. His IRC proposal has received technical approval, and is now awaiting completion of negotiation on IP issues which will be addressed very shortly. The ECE Department is proud and honoured to welcome a colleague of Dr. Wu’s stature.

Mechanical Engineering

Materials Engineering David Conochie comes to McMaster from Australia where he has had over 30 years of experience in research and development, both in industry and CSIRO. The focus of his career has been the developDavid Conochie ment of novel process technologies, from concept, research and development, pilot plant demonstration and scale up, to project evaluation and competitor analysis. While he has focused mainly on rapid progression of new process technology through demonstration and scale up, he has also studied the fundamentals of the reaction system in order to be able to design, model and optimise the process design. As a result of seven years work (’74 – 76, and ’80 – 84) on the early development of the Sirosmelt submerged combustion technology, Conochie made a significant contribution to a process that is now in commercial operation in some 20 plants around the world as Ausmelt, and Isasmelt technology. He was then employed as Principal Research Scientist in CSIRO. From 1987 to 1990, he was a project leader in CSIRO and subsequent work as a consultant to the project led to the development of a patented reactor for the production of titanium

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diboride. That process is in semi-commercial production at a plant operated by Comalco Aluminium. Since 1995, Conochie has worked as principal technologist in Rio Tinto Research and Technology Development at Bundoora, in Victoria, Australia. That research group is a main recruiting area for the company, and attracts some of the best young graduates in Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering from universities around Australia. As one of the senior team of experienced process technologists, David Conochie would provide high level technical input to projects and would further train and guide young professionals involved in those projects. Dr. Conochie joins the Steel Research Centre, and is also making a contribution to innovation in the Engineering Faculty.

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Mohamed Hamed joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering on September 1, 2002. Dr. Hamed came to McMaster from CanEng. Ltd., Niagara Falls where he was Director of Research and Product Mohamed Hamed Development. Dr. Hamed graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a Ph.D degree in Mechanical & Materials Engineering in 1997. Prior to coming to Canada, Dr. Hamed earned his M.Bc. And M.Sc. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Alexandria, Egypt. Dr. Hamed’s research interests are in the area of thermo-fluid engineering and materials science.

Raymond Moriyama continued from page 8

Raymond Moriyama has received numerous honours including the Confederation of Canada Medal, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Gold Medal, an honorary fellowship from the American Institute of Architects, and the Golden Jubilee Medal. He is an Officer of the Order of Canada and has received the Order of Ontario.

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Departmental Newsbriefs Department and Dora Kourti, Research Manager with the McMaster Advanced Control Consortium in the Chemical Engineering Department. Participants represented 20 companies from Canada, USA and Europe and a diverse spectrum of products and technologies: petroleum (PetroCanada, ExxonMobile), chemicals (Dupont, Air Products and Chemicals, Wacker Polymer Systems, FMC Corp.), materials (Dofasco, Alcoa), forest products (Tembec, Weyerhaueser), food products

Chemical Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Congratulations to Carlos Filipe on Dr. Thia Kirubarajan’s paper entitled: receiving the prestigious Harrison Prescott “T. Kirubarajan, Y. Bar-Shalom, K.R. Eddy Medal from the Water Environment Pattipati and I. Kadar, “Ground Target Federation (WEF). He won this award Tracking with Variable Structure IMM along with his team of Glen T. Diagger and Estimator”, IEEE Trans. Aerospace and C.P. Leslie Grady for their paper, “pH as a Electronic Systems, AES-36(1), pp. 26-46, Key Factor in the Competition Between January 2000” received the Barry Carlton Glycogen-Accumulating Organisms and Award for the Best Paper Published in the Phosphorus-Accumulating Organisms”. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and They received the award at the Electronic Systems in 2000 (there is usualFederation’s 75th annual technily a lag in the selection!). Official cal conference and exposition, announcement and citation will be pubOctober 1st. in Chicago. lished in the next IEEE Systems Magazine. Congratulations again, to Carlos This award is in addition to the PREA prize and his wife Sophia on the birth Dr. Kirubarajan received early this year. of their baby daughter on Two recent awards have been bestowed October 20th at MUMC. Rita upon our esteemed colleague University Filipe weighed 5 lbs. 7 oz. Professor Simon Haykin. He has been Don Woods presented a week awarded the inaugural 2002 Booker Gold long series of workshops and medal from the International USRI Society. From Left to Right: Deputy Director Ang, Director of the consultancies at Temasek This award will be given every three years Centre for PBL Dr. Lynda Wee, Principal and CEO Boo of Polytechnic, Singapore, from and Prof. Haykin received his medal at the Temasek Polytechnic and Don Woods. Sept 30th to Oct 4th. The seven URSI General Assembly on Ceremony on (Frito Lay), consumer products (Kodak, workshops were on problem-based learning August 18, 2002, in Maastricht, the 3M), and automotive (Ford). Recent develand included: How to Select a Version of Netherlands. More details can be found at: opments and industrial applications of multiPBL for You, PBL and the Large Class, http://www.usnc-ursi.org/ursivariate image analysis for on-line process Implementing PBL, and Evaluating the awards/awd_rules_boo.pdf monitoring and automatic control of product Effectiveness of PBL. In addition he preProfessor Haykin has been one of the quality were introduced, and a number of sented question and answer sessions on the most outstanding colleagues at McMaster, impressive industrial results were presented. myths of PBL, and held sessions with faccontinued on page 12 ulty from different departments. Dr. Woods also presented a two-hour workshop at the national conference of the American Institute for Chemical Engineers in November in Indianapolis. The session was University Professor David Embury, professor of materials on a Socratic approach for understanding science & engineering, has been elected into the U.S. National chemical plant operability. Academy of Engineering (NAE). He has been recognized for The 27th Fall Meeting of the Association his contributions to engineering theory and practice and of Rotational Moulders was held in Toronto unusual accomplishment in the pioneering of new and develfrom October 6-9. This year there was a oping fields of technology. student workshop where the students preEmbury, one of only seven foreign members elected at this sented their latest results on research. time by the NAE, joined 74 new American members to the Chemical Engineering’s MASc student Academy. He was chosen for his “outstanding contributions David D’Agostino gave an excellent talk to fundamental structure/mechanical property relations of mateon his research. rials and their applications”. Election to the U.S. National David Embury Seventy engineers and scientists from Academy of Engineering is one of the highest professional distinctions that can be industry and academia participated in a accorded an engineer. two-day Workshop on Image Analysis for “The election to the NAE is a great honour for me because there are only 158 foreign Process Monitoring and Control, sponsored members, six of whom are Canadians,” Embury says. “However, I want to emphasize by the McMaster Advanced Control that the honour reflects not my own abilities but the wonderful collaborations I have had Consortium (MACC). The workshop, at the at McMaster with colleagues in both engineering and science, and particularly my good Hamilton Sheraton on October 16 and 17, fortune in having many excellent graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in the was organized by John MacGregor, protime I have been at McMaster.” fessor in the Chemical Engineering

David Embury elected to NAE

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Departmental Newsbriefs (cont’d) and this honor is a tribute to his many years of outstanding contributions in telecommunications. In fact, as many of you will already know, Prof. Haykin’s name is one of the most recognized ones in communications through both his publications and books in the field. In addition, Professor Haykin has been awarded the Signal Processing Society Education Award for “authoring books of high quality, spanning basic signal processing, adaptive filters, communications, neural networks, and intelligent signal processing.” This award honours educators who have made pioneering and significant contributions to signal processing education based on a career of meritorious achievement as exemplified by the writing of books and texts, course materials, papers, and inspirational and innovative teaching and creativity in the development of curricula and methodology.

Engineering Physics

Mechanical Engineering

On July 1, 2002, John Preston assumed the role of Director of the Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research for a fiveyear term. As Director, he will be facilitating materials-based research in the faculties of Science and Engineering.

Dr. David Weaver, Chair of Mechanical Engineering, was the recipient of the C.N. Downing Award of CSME. Named after the Chairman of the Steering Committee and Founding President of CSME, this award recognizes distinguished service to CSME over many years.

Materials Science & Engineering

Professor Samir Ziada was invited by the Kajima Foundation to David Weaver visit Japan last summer for five weeks. He gave a series of lectures on flow oscillations and control at the University of Tokyo and at several Japanese companies. He also held a one-day course on industrial aeroacoustics, which was organized by the Japanese Society for Mechanical Engineers (JSME). If you were wondering about his new, leaner look, think about five weeks of Japanese cuisine!

Gary Purdy has been appointed to NSERC’s Chemical & Metallurgical GS Committee. This three-year appointment represents a significant commitment of his time, energy and wisdom, and the Department thank him for representing McMaster on this important committee.

Mechanical Engineering Grad Wins Poster Prize Ph.D. candidate Basel Ismail is the recipient of the Graduate Student Research Poster Prize sponsored by the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Technology (CRESTech). Ismail’s poster, Characterizing the Performance of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Cooling Devices for Diesel Engines Emissions Control, competed with over 40 others submitted from Canadian university graduates in CRESTech’s Innovation Network 2002 Conference competition. Ismail’s research, sponsored by CRESTech and Long Manufacturing, Dana Corporation, and supervised by Dr. Dan Ewing (Dept. Mech. Eng.) and Dr. JenShih Chang (Dept. Eng. Physics.), focuses on enhancing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems to reduce pollutant emissions from diesel engines. While there is a growing interest in replacing gasoline engines with diesel engines because of their higher thermal efficiency, diesel engines have higher emissions of many pollutants, in particular, nitrogen oxide (NOx). NOx is known to be very toxic and responsible for smog formation and

destruction of the ozone layer. As Ismail explains, the NOx produced by a diesel engine can be reduced by 50% to 65 % using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system with cooling Basel Ismail device. However the performance of EGR devices deteriorates over its lifetime because the fine particulate matter (carbon soot) in the exhaust gas stream tends to deposit on the tube surface causing fouling of the device. “My present research involves modeling and experimental studies of a generic EGR cooling device. The ultimate objective of this study is to develop an advanced EGR cooling device that would mitigate the effect of fouling and lead to a more effective performance of the EGR system resulting in less NOx emissions from diesel engines.” The prize was presented on October 1 at the Toronto Convention Centre.

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In Memorium: Professor Jiri Tlusty For nearly 50 years, Professor Jiri Tlusty was considered a worldwide legend in machine tool design research. Born in Czechoslovakia on January 5, 1921, he began Professor Jiri Tlusty his engineering career in the early 1940s. He founded and directed a worldclass machine tool research institute, the VUOSO, in Prague, where he started to publish on his well-known chatter theory in 1954. He was one of the first to model the relationship between the dynamic stiffness of the machine tool, the cutting force coefficient of the work material and chatter vibrations. Since then, he has contributed significantly to machine tool design, machine tool continued on page 15

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Fundraising 2002-2004 Investment in Engineering Education & Research With the conclusion of a major capital campaign, McMaster University and the Faculty of Engineering are beginning to realign their strategic priorities for future fundraising projects. The Faculty benefited tremendously from the campaign with eight new endowed chairs, support for student scholarships and funding for various major research initiatives in the area of Information Technology and Materials & Manufacturing. Investment from alumni, industry and friends has encourage the Faculty to continue with its fundraising efforts in order to maintain its place as a significant studentcentred, research-intensive Faculty of Engineering in Canada. Responding to the rapidly changing needs of Canadian industries that operate in the increasingly competitive national and international arena, as well as to high student demand, the Faculty of Engineering has developed an ambitious plan to significantly expand its undergraduate and graduate educational, research and training offerings. The plan calls for the creation of a new Biomedical Engineering Program and a new School for Engineering Practice. These proposed new programs are essential to meet the requirements for the changing roles of engineers in society, as well as societal needs. The plan contains a core commitment intrinsically linked to McMaster’s ability to build state-of the-art research and teaching faculties. We encourage all of our alumni, friends and industrial partners to invest in our new programs. Please contact Terry Milson, Faculty Advancement Officer at (905) 5259140, extension 27391.

Phone Program Supports our Young Engineers Many thanks to all our engineering alumni for their contributions through the 2002 MacFund Phone Program. The dollars increased by 7% over last year’s 2001 total, as did the number of donors. For the most part, donations were made to improve the learning environment of our engineering students. Our appeal for support in three major areas was well received. We asked for supM

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scholarship, award or bursary. In many cases, these funds bear the name of the donors, forever preserving their link to McMaster. Staff in the Office of Gift Planning would be pleased to work with you and your lawyer to provide sample wording to ensure that your personal objectives are met. All donors who confirm a bequest, or other future gift arrangements, are invited to join The William McMaster and Susan Moulton McMaster Society. For further information contact the Office of Gift Planning at (905) 525-9140 ext. 27595.

port for our new Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program – over 400 engineering alumni responded with a donation. The Faculty of Engineering Fund and the MACLAB Endowment Fund benefited as well. Thank you!

MACLAB Endowment Fund The McMaster University’s Faculty of Engineering MACLAB endowment fund assists with leading-edge undergraduate technology. This fund for the students by the students has grown at a significant rate since its inception in 1997. The fund is valued in excess of $750,000.00. Alumni, student and friends have all contributed. It is expected that $18,000 will be awarded from interest earned on the fund to purchase much needed equipment. The committee, largely made up of students, will decide where the money will go based on an application process. Donations to McMaster University’s Faculty of Engineering may be directed to Terry Milson, Faculty Advancement Officer, McMaster University, JHE-261, 1280 Main St., Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8.

Charitable Bequests: The Gifts of a Lifetime Did you know that charitable bequests continue to be the most popular method of making a planned gift to McMaster? How fitting for a University that was founded through a $900,000 bequest from Senator William McMaster in 1887! Many of our alumni and friends have planned for a bequest to McMaster as a way of saying thank you and giving back to an institution that has truly impacted their lives. Bequests also offer a wonderful opportunity to create a lasting legacy at McMaster and to help future generations of McMaster students. A bequest is a direction by will to transfer property to specific beneficiaries. This property can consist of cash, securities, real estate and other assets of value. When structured carefully, a charitable bequest can also offer significant tax relief to a donor’s estate and often provide a more sizeable gift than that which a donor could comfortably afford during his or her lifetime. Your bequest can be designated to establish an endowment for a research chair, U

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Mike Lazaridis speaks at MacLab fundraiser Mike Lazaridis, president and coCEO of Research in Motion (RIM), was the keynote speaker at the MACLAB fundraiser held in October. The student coordinated fundraiser was held at Liuna Station in downtown Hamilton on October 17th. Lazaridis, who is a proponent of the importance of innovation, spoke on “Science & Education Fuel Innovation”. A founder of RIM, Lazaridis is responsible for research and development and manufacturing. He has earned over 30 patents for his innovations in technology and software. RIM is well-known for its wireless handheld device known as the “Blackberry”.

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Reunion News Ottawa Alumni Event The first-ever Ottawa Alumni event was an outstanding success! Held in the Ottawa suburb of Kanata at the Corel Centre, the October 17th reunion attracted many engineering grads from the Class of 1977 right through to the Class of 2002. Dean of Engineering Mo Elbestawi hosted the event, which was attended by Alumni Office staff as well as University President Dr. Peter George. At a reception, attendees became reacquainted with former classmates and reminisced about their various

activities while at Mac, both in and outside of formal classes. Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer, expressed her delight at the good attendance for this first endeavour at connecting with Mac engineering alumni in the Ottawa area. “We definitely plan to host this event again at the same time in October next year.” Thanks to the following for coming out and for keeping the Mac Engineering spirit alive in Ottawa:

University President Peter George buys a round for alumni.

Don LeBlanc, Electrical ’83 Jacques Monnier, Phd., Chemical ’83 Stephen Coe, Mechanical and Society ’01 David Werry, Chemical and Management ’81 Arif Somji, Electrical and Management ’95 Tom Taylor, Computer ’83 Guillermo Ocamp, Matallurgy and Material Science ’84 Pierre Zaya, Metallurgy ’85 Go Simon Sunatori, Engineering Physics ’83 Guomin Yu, Engineering Physics ’98 Richard Thibodeau, Electrical ’76

Mike Jarabek, Electrical and Computer ’96 and ’98 Chris Airhart, Electrical and Computer ’85 Ken Smith, Electrical ’77 and ’80 Elza Seregelyi, Engineering Physics and Management ’87 Joe Seregelyi, Engineering Physics, ’85 Karinne Chan, Chemical Engineering and Society, ’01 Mike Borza, Electrical ’82 and ’85 Brian Hart, Mechancial ’00

Engineering Advisory Committee invites all Alumni to join us for a

TORONTO ENGINEERING ALUMNI EVENT INNOVATION IN EDUCATION EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH QUALITY OF STUDENT LIFE

on Thursday, February 27, 2003 at the Ontario Science Centre (Toronto)

Inspiring Innovation and Discovery 6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

Reception, Social Hour and Buffet Introduction and Welcome Pat Stevens, Chair, Engineering Alumni Advisory Committee

Please RSVP your attendance

7:10 p.m.

Opening Remarks: Dr. Peter George, President and Vice-Chancellor

to Carm Vespi (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 or register on-line at

7:30 p.m.

Key note speaker: Dr. Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering “Innovation in Engineering Education at McMaster University”

www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/ before February 15, 2003

FREE ADMISSION, FREE PARKING

Meet and Mingle Farewell

Visit our web site for more information http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/ Registration forms are available on the web.

Cash Bar

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8:00 p.m. 9:00 p.m.

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Professor Jiri Tlusty continued from page 12

structures and vibrations, metal cutting, machine tool metrology, high speed machining dynamics, sensors for machine tools, chatter avoidance and suppression, precision machine tool design and CNC systems. After leaving Prague in 1969, he spent two years at the University of Manchester, UMIST, where he directed research in Machine Tool Testing Standards. Prof. Tlusty then moved to McMaster University, where he pioneered manufacturing engineering and research culture in Canada. He contributed significantly to the fundamentals of machine tool dynamics, chatter in milling, adaptive control, tool condition monitoring, modeling of metal cutting process, chatter in rolling, robotics, grinding and machine tool testing. Well known

professors that studied with Prof. Tlusty at McMaster include Dr. M.A. Elbestawi (Dean of Engineering), Dr. D. Capson (Associate Dean of Graduate Studies), Dr. Y. Koren (Professor, University of Michigan), Dr. F. Ismail (Professor, University of Waterloo), Dr. T. Moriwakit (Professor, Kobe University, Japan), and Dr. Y. Altintas (Professor, The University of British Columbia). He retired from McMaster in 1985 at the mandatory retirement age of 65. After leaving McMaster, Prof. Tlusty began a new academic career at the University of Florida, where he founded a Machine Tool Research Centre. He focussed on the high speed machining, and contributed significantly to the acceptance of the technology in USA and worldwide. He designed and modeled high speed spindles, high speed feed drives, control systems and built a five axis high speed

machining centre for milling Aluminum alloys for aerospace industry, and a three axis high speed machining centre for die and mold machining industry. In parallel to his academic activities, he formed Manufacturing Laboratory Incorporated to bring the technology to the industry, designing precision machine tools and applying his legendary engineering skills and methods to chatter problems experienced by various companies. In addition to key articles in machine tool engineering, Professor Tlusty has also published the widely used classical reference book on Structures of Machine Tools (1971), and a comprehensive textbook titled Manufacturing Processes and Equipment (1999). Professor Tlusty passed away October 20, 2002.

Can you help us find? John Narine Charles Olive Joseph Pinski Saad Sallam Surendra Singh Kenneth Spencer K.C. Ricky Tam Peter Taylor Joeph Thibault Ringo Tso Chun Wong George Wong Sammy Yeung

1963 Robert Kulperger Michel Quigley Arthur Sheppard Malla Vuyyuru

1978 Ioannis Anastasiou Donald Barnett Yiannis Bertachas David Bromley Chung-Jun Chan Ming Chong Hector Chow Reginald Christmas Nagwa El-Kasabgy John Evensen Mohamed Hassan David Ho Man Ho Paul Ho Ragaa Ishak Arup Khaund Ho Kim John Kus Dennis lam Eric Lam Francis law Stuart Lawrence Ghislain LeRoy Damien Leung Harry Leung Mong Li Robert Mackenzie Cho Mak Magdi Mansour James Milan

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Jesse Awai Jeffrey Balmer Maurizio Battistuzzi Peter Birkwood C.H. Macky Cheung Tak Chiu Stephen Co John Cook Giles D’Souza Ratnesh Dwivedi Brian Garner Siang Goh Robert Hadden Kenneth James Hahn Ossama Ibrahim Kevin Johnston Paul Jowett Karim Kassam Eddy Kong Kevin Lagille Peter Lau Eric Law Michael Lee

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Glenn Lowe Ian McCredie Gary B. Mitchell Scott Morrison Se Oh Robert Pollock Swaroop Rangam Steven Read Duane Riddell Lorraine Servos Atif Shehata Hinu Sin Tommy Siu Vincent So Ivan Solorzano Naranjo Kalin Sparaiosu

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Boon Tan Michael Tan Peter Tang Francis Veloira Philip Watts Edward Williams David Witter Edward Williams Anna Wong Hiram Wong Peter Wyslocky Albert Yap Meng Khuen Kenneth Yong Eftikhar Zayan

skills made it possible for me to overcome obstacles and to succeed.” Quinn adds that he has applied these skills over the years in solving business problems outside of engineering such as in the areas of corporate finance and contract management. “It was this development in multiple disciplines, thanks to MacEng, that allowed me to rise to the rank of my current position of President and CEO.” Quinn is a member of the Professional Engineers Ontario, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), and has received certification (PMP) from the Project Management Institute.

Change of address card: Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________ New Address: _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________ Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine Hey Alumni! Have you moved, taken a new job, got something you would like to say, any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906, E-Mail vespi@mcmaster.ca

MacChemEng Kelly, Steve, ’92: Left Shell in 1996 and currently with Purvin & Gertz, a small oil and gas consulting company, based in Houston. Worked in the Calgary office till 2001; am now on a 3-4 year assignment in London, England. I follow the European oil markets and work with a variety of clients on crude oil/refined product studies, project evaluations, forecasts, etc. London is great – expensive – but great. Debbie and I live in Woking (near London), and with our boys, Matt (14) and Daniel (10), keep busy exploring England. Still running marathons (Steve) and triathlons (Debbie). I did the Boston Marathon last year, coming in 802nd at 2:58 hours. Keep in touch with us at sjkelly@purvingertz.com.

MacCivEng Cutting, Lesley, ’95: I left Enbridge Consumers Gas 2 years ago to do my MBA at Rotman fulltime and to make a career transition into finance. I graduated in the spring and now work at RBC Financial Group on a rotational program. This involves rotating across 4 different business platforms (Banking, Investments, Insurance, Capital Markets) over 2 years, so that I gain a broad perspective of the organization before settling on a specific area of interest.

To:

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This past summer, I completed my first Ironman (Ironman Canada in Penticton) and qualified for the Hawaii Ironman. Unfortunately I couldn’t go due to work commitments! Currently living in Toronto.

to China on a weekly basis. My e-address is felix.fong@fongng.com.

McClintock, Erin, ’94: Project Manager, Construction Department for McDonald’s Restaurants of Canada Limited. Living in Mississauga. Ryan, Morgan, ‘97: Living in New York and employed at Parsons Brinckerhoff Quade & Douglas. Applying to sit for the exam which will allow me to practice as a professional engineer in the State of New York.

MacMatEng Glass, Jill, ’84: Kevin and I are the proud parents of two boys, one is 20 months and the other is 4 year’s old now. We spent some time in Ontario this summer enjoying a chalet near Collingwood and visiting Kevin’s mom in the Finger Lakes area. Still at Sandia National Labs, Ceramic Materials Department, based in Albuquerque.

MacEngPhys Fong, Felix, ’74: A partner in Fong and Ng, I practice law in Hong Kong and travel

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Seager, Mike,’91: After a short stint with Ontario Hydro as Assistant Technical Engineer, Fuel & Physics, I headed west and completed an MBA in International Business at the University of Victoria (’97). During this time, I took part in the University’s exchange program, with a posting at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore in 1995, and as Regional Sales Manager for North Asia with a large computer services firm in Hong Kong in 1996. Promoted to Director & General Manager, Asia Pacific in 1998, and moved to Singapore to relocate our Asia Pacific headquarters from Hong Kong. After 3 years, decided to take some time off. Now in Thailand, soaking up the rays and learning how to surf on water! Shepherd, Tod, ’92: I am with SunCom, a wireless communications provider (a.k.a. cell phone company) in the southeast U.S.A. I am a network engineer, managing the data communications for North and South Carolina and Georgia. We are currently deploying a GSM/GPRS network in association with AT&T Wireless that will provide high speed data connections to our customers, allowing them access to the Internet and email anywhere they have cell phone coverage. This new technology provides much greater bandwidths to the handheld device. Pretty cool stuff. Married and living in Mt. Pleasant, just outside Charleston, S.C., about 5 minutes from the beach. Life is good!

Ms. Carm Vespi Managing Editor The MacEngineer Faculty of Engineering John Hodgins Building, Room A 201 McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer

Owen, Karen, ’02: I’m currently in Ottawa working at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission as a Safeguards Officer. I’m part of a group that works with the International Atomic Energy Agency to ensure that all of the nuclear material in Canada is accounted for and that none of it is being diverted for use in weapons programs. I’ve done some traveling, to New York and Algonquin Park, and am currently taking Spanish lessons with an eye to heading to Mexico for a while in the winter.

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You’re invited...

Reunion Classes of

Alumni 1963 Weekend 1978 Saturday June 7, 2003

For more information contact: Ms. Carm Vespi Phone: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/

1983 1963

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Alumni Grapevine (cont’d) Thomas, Trevor, ’97: Trevor would like to announce that he and Natalie Cubias (EngPhys ’97) finally got married this past June and live in Toronto. They first met at the Engineering Experience weekend in 1993 and have been together ever since. The wedding was like a Mac homecoming! The Maid of Honour and one of the groomsmen are both Engineering grads!

MacCiv.Eng.& Mgmt. Byrne, Mary, ’93: Currently on maternity leave from Enbridge Consumers Gas, where she is Manager of Special Projects Planning. She and husband David Rogers (Mech.& Mgmt.’90) are enjoying Brian, born April 2002. And yes, Mary can still sing all 10 verses of the Engineer’s Hymn!

MacCompEng&Mgmt Vallee, Sherri, ’89: After graduating from Mac, I worked for 11 years in software development and management at Nortel Networks, during which time I earned my MBA from the University of Ottawa through part-time studies, graduating in 1993. In 1999 I made a career change, and in June of this year, I graduated from Saint Paul University in Ottawa with a degree in Theology (B.Th.), magna cum laude. I am now in Collegeville, Minnesota, pursuing my MA in Liturgical Studies at Saint John’s University. I also write on contract for a well-respected liturgical journal, Celebrate!, published by Novalis (www.novalis.ca).

MacElectEng&Mgmt Lakhani, Karim, ’93: Now in my second year of the PhD program in Management of Technology at MIT Sloan School, with a research focus on innovation in open source software development. Also working with Boston Consulting Group on an internal project looking at innovation in organizations. My wife Shaheen is in her final year of her doctoral studies in Clinical Health Psychology. We really enjoy Boston but miss Canada.

MacChemEng&Mgmt Voora, Vivek, ’98: Just returned from a 13-month contract in the north of Ellesmere Island, where I was a lab technician employed by Environment Canada, in charge of the Global Atmospheric Watch lab, measuring air pollutants and greenhouse gases. It was a great experience! Now on a short contract with the National Water Research Institute in Burlington, Ontario, helping them progress with various wastewater studies. I am also working on a Masters of Environment and Management through the University of Royal Roads near Victoria, B.C. In February, I’ll be in Victoria for a 3-month residency at Royal Roads. I highly recommend this program if you are interested in sustainable development.

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During the past five summers, we took sailing trips around the Great Lakes which made us realize that we don’t want to spend our entire lives being in school and working! Spasic, Millie, ’98: Still at FM, Locomotive Division, in the Paint Department as supervisor, as part of the company’s career development assignment. Previously, I worked for 3 years as Project Engineer. In my spare time, I’ve traveled quite a bit, to Thailand last year, and Morocco and Spain this year. No marriage or kids, yet.

MacCompEng&Soc. Neff, Michael, ’96: Spent the first six months of this year wrestling large snakes in Africa. OK. He was actually teaching math and computer science at a rural girls’ high school on the slopes of Mt. Kenya – but he did cross paths with a mamba.

MacManufEng&Soc.

Markov, John, ’91: currently working for Bell-Internet Security. Just designed and built a house in the country. What an experience! The three kids and wife doing well. Life is abundant.

Freeman, Rob, ’00: In May 2000, I moved to Peterborough to work for General Electric. Bought a house, got married in June 2001 and now expecting a child in March of 2003. In June of this year, I graduated from the Technical Leadership Program at GE, and started Black Belt position (Six Sigma stuff). Recently at Mac for on-campus recruitment and saw the new Student Centre – makes me want to go back to school! I also volunteer with Junior Achievement, play volleyball and hockey, and enjoy spending time at the cottage.

MacMechEng & Mgmt.

MacMechEng&Soc.

Rogers, David, ‘90, M.Eng.’93: Currently working at MDS Sciex as Team Leader for Manufacturing Process Engineering. He and wife, Mary Byrne (Civ.Eng. & Mgmt. ’93), are pleased to announce the birth of Brian in April 2002.

Muschta, Mike, ’97: Ingrid and I got married on September 7, 2002 and went off to the south of Spain for a two-week honeymoon. We now live in Streetsville (Mississauga), Ontario. She has made me a very lucky and happy man!

MacChemEng&Soc. Nakajima, Nina,’98: I will be graduating in 2003 with a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto. My research focuses on engineering and business practices that improve competitiveness while reducing environmental burdens. My partner Jonathon and I own a sailboat that we keep on Toronto Island and live on in the summer months.

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Get your MacEngineer by e-mail! If you would like to receive your issue by e-mail (pdf format) please contact Carm Vespi, vespi@mcmaster.ca

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Upcoming Events...

3rd Annual McMaster

Optimization Conference: Theory and Applications

Thurs., Feb. 27, 2003 Engineering Toronto Alumni Event Ontario Science Centre 6:00 p.m. Free Admission, Cash Bar

(MOPTA 03)

July 30 – August 1, 2003 McMaster University

Tues., March 11, 2003 John Hodgins Lectureship Series featuring Carol Stephenson, CEO Lucent Technologies

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada http://www.cas.mcmaster.ca/~mopta The 3rd annual McMaster Optimization Conference (MOPTA 03) will be held at the campus of McMaster University. It will be hosted by the Advanced Optimization Lab at the Department of Computing and Software and it is co-sponsored by the Fields Institute and MITACS.

Friday, March 28, 2003

SCOPE

Thurs., May 22, 2003

The Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer (Kipling). All obligated engineers welcome. McMaster University Student Centre 4 p.m.

The conference aims to bring together a diverse group of people from both discrete and continuous optimization, working on both theoretical and applied aspects. We aim to bring together researchers from both the theoretical and applied communities who do not usually get the chance to interact in the framework of a medium-scale event.

First Annual Engineering Golf Tournament, Tyandaga Municipal Golf Course, Burlington, Ontario Cost: $100 person

Sat., June 7, 2003 Alumni Weekend Class ’63, ’78, ’83 McMaster University Cost: $35 person

Distinguished researchers will give one-hour long invited talks on topics of wide interest. Invited speakers include: Laurent El Ghaoui, University of California, Berkeley, CA

George Nemhauser, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

Lisa K. Fleischer, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, PA

Arkadi Nemrovski, TECHNION, Haifa, Israel

Minyue Fu, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Stratos Pistikopoulos, Imperial College, London, UK

Masakazu Kojima, Tokyo Institute of Technology,Tokyo, Japan

Margaret H.Wright, Courant Institute, New York University, NY

For additional information or to register for any of the above events, please contact Carm Vespi, (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906, or e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca, or register on-line: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/

MacEngineer

The

CONTRIBUTED TALKS

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Each accepted paper will be allotted a 25 minute talk. Authors wishing to speak should submit an abstract via the conference WEB page in ASCII or LaTex source, to terlaky@mcmaster.ca by April 30, 2003. Please use “MOPTA 03” in the email subject line.

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi

Notification of acceptance / Program available: May 31, 2003. Deadline for early registration: June 30, 2003.

Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising

On behalf of the Organizing Committee Tamás Terlaky, terlaky@mcmaster.ca (Chair, McMaster University)

Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, Carm Vespi and Judy Mair.

Further information is available at http://www.cas.mcmaster.ca/~mopta/

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Engineering

Memories Key Chain leather and gold-plated fireball

Fireball Pin

$35.00

gold-plated fireball

$25.00

If you would like to purchase one of these memorabilia, please send a cheque payable to “McMaster University� and we will mail it to you.

Professor Robert Sowerby continued from page 7

The memorial session was chaired by two prominent scientists and former collaborators of Prof. Sowerby; Prof. Nakamachi of Osaka University and Prof. Tomita of Kobe University. Papers were presented in the areas of constitutive modeling of plasticity and materials forming by several well international participants. McMaster was represented by Dr. Mukesh Jain from the Department of Mechanical Engineering who presented a paper on damage development in materials jointly with Prof. David Embury in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

For more information contact Ms. Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Phone: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca Visit us on the web:

http://venture.mcmaster.ca

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MacEngineer Winter 2003  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni