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MacEngineer

The

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 31

NUMBER 2

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

SPRING 2006

Applause and Accolades... See page 5


A message from the Dean

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n the Faculty of Engineering, we continue to look at ways to improve and expand our course offerings so that we may provide the most relevant programs to our students. In this issue of the MacEngineer, I wish to share with you developments in the Department of Computing and Software (CAS), the newest of our seven engineering departments. This Department was created in 1998 to house the new Software Engineering program. Later that year members of Computer Science moved from the Faculty of Science to the Faculty of Engineering. It’s well over five years since the dot.com bust and, I must say, the need for experienced personnel in information technology (IT) continues to grow. It has become increasingly important for businesses in the networked and global economy of this century to have highly qualified personnel trained in IT applications. In many aspects of business, the development of IT has accelerated the

inside this issue Engineering News...................4 Alumni Profiles .......................8 Philips Engineering ..............10 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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introduction of new methods, processes and solutions. But recently there has been a significant drop in enrolment in education programs catering to IT needs, particularly in computer science. This is due in part to the dot.com bust, and the trend has been occurring throughout North America. Because fewer students seemed interested in computer science, we realized that we needed to consider some changes to the Computer Science curriculum at McMaster. In consultation with, faculty, employers and our students, we learned that our graduates have judged the viability of the program based on the job market. Our students want to know what kind of jobs they can expect to secure after graduation. It was clear that we needed to review the undergraduate curriculum to see how we can make this program more responsive to the job market. We offer a 4-year Honors Computer Science B.Sc. degree. For those students that already have an undergraduate degree, the Second Degree Program in Computer Science will allow a student to obtain a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science in two years and, if a student wishes, he/she can get an Accelerated Master’s Degree in Computer Science in one additional year, with a focus on information systems security, computer graphics and animation, and data base systems, (approval pending). We offer a Thesis Master in Computer Science (20-months) and Doctorate in Computer Science (three to four years). Another innovation we have made to the Computer Science program is the introduction of a Business Informatics degree by combining Computer Science with the School of Business. Business Informatics is about designing information systems for maximum utility and value in an organization. This involves looking at how people work and how organizations function, as well as the design and implementation of IT systems that support their operation. The Bachelor of Science in Business Informatics meets a strong current need for IT professionals with skills in areas such as business analysis. By combining the core of computer science with the core of a business degree, students study the leading issues of both business and Information Technology. The focus lies on the planning, development, c

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

implementation, operation, optimization and the economic use of information and communication systems. Business Informatics specialists are often considered the interpreters between IT and business administration staff, people who often live in completely different worlds and talk at cross purposes. Job opportunities in Business Informatics can be found in financial institutions such as banks and insurance companies, e-business applications with commerce applications, database systems, and modeling ITsupported optimization of business processes. According to Software Human Resources Council, there are 20,000 unfilled positions for people in the software field in Canada. I am confident that our interdisciplinary approach to Computer Science will be well received by our students and their future employers. Similarly we are looking to Health Sciences to create a Computer Science program in Medical Informatics, to be launched in 2007. Other developments in the Department include the introduction of the first undergraduate university degree program in software engineering that focuses on game design. In September 2006 the new Mechatronics Engineering program will begin. An Accelerated Master’s degree in Mechatronics and one in Software Engineering and Game Design is in development.

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A message from the Associate Dean Opportunities with Study Abroad program

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lobalization is having a profound impact on the nature of the engineering profession. Few design projects these days are carried out locally for the local market. Instead, multinational design teams design products which are built offshore for the international market. In this respect, Canada is particularly well placed to succeed, given that its population has roots in, and relationships with, many countries. This has been one of the motivations for our Study Abroad program. As I write this, twelve of our students are about to leave on a trip to St. Petersburg, Moscow and Volgograd in Russia, where they will join about 65 students from Michigan State University for eight weeks. Once in Volgograd, they will be hosted by the Volgograd State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering and will take courses for credit towards their McMaster Engineering degrees. Next year, we plan to inaugurate Natal

shines on average 360 days a year! Natal has a population of 500,000 and is surrounded by hundreds of kilometers of sandy beaches. Students from McMaster and from Michigan State will take courses toward their degrees at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. They will have opportunities to travel to the Amazon, to the pristine islands of Fernando de Noronha (often referred to as the Galapagos of the Atlantic) and to the Iguaçu Falls. They will also participate in several community support activities that will help them better understand the local culture. We hope that other universities will see the benefits of this program and will choose to join us and take the lead with other destinations. Our students will all benefit from an increased number of destinations and the understanding that is gained by visiting communities around the world. Peter Smith Associate Dean (Academic)

Dr. Peter Smith Associate Dean of Engineering

as the second destination of our Study Abroad program. Located on the north east coast of Brazil, Natal is little known outside that country. It is referred to locally as the City of the Sun because the sun

Research & External Relations Update by Peter Mascher, Associate Dean (Research and External Relations) Over the past few months, members of the Faculty of Engineering, in collaboration with colleagues from the Faculties of Science and Health Sciences, have worked very hard to develop exciting proposals for the current Canada Foundation of Innovation (CFI) competitions. In the Leading Edge category, proposals are based on infrastructure previously funded by CFI, and are meant to upgrade existing equipment and/or expand the scope of research. The two Leading Edge proposals by members of the Faculty of Engineering are: • “Advanced Device Technologies” (R. Kleiman, Engineering Physics) – to develop new highly engineered materials and associated fabrication and characterization processes to build novel devices; includes participants from Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), Engineering Physics (EP), Materials Science and Engineering (MSE), Mechanical Engineering (ME), Chemistry, and Physics. • “Advanced Construction Infrastructure Laboratory for Materials and Seismic Research” (S. Chidiac, Civil Engineering) – to investigate how damage initiates and propagates in construction materials and building sites under heavy loads; includes participants from Civil Engineering and MSE.

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In the New Initiatives category: • The “Centre for Biomedical Technologies and Materials” (J. Brash, Chemical Engineering) – a joint venture of the Faculties of Engineering and Health Sciences to build the laboratory infrastructure of the new School of Biomedical Engineering. If funded, it will see the creation of major laboratories in Biomaterials, Medical Robotics, and Medical Imaging. • The “Micro- and Nanosystems Laboratory” (M.J. Deen, ECE) – would enable researchers to combine dissimilar materials, devices, and components to create fully integrated micro- and nanosystems for targeted applications. The multi-disciplinary team includes members from Chemical Engineering, EP, MSE, Medicine, and Pathology, as well as researchers from the Universities of Toronto and Waterloo. • The proposal to create a “Sustainable Energy Systems Laboratory” is a joint initiative between McMaster University and the University of Waterloo and is spearheaded by D.P. Jackson (EP), the recently appointed director of the McMaster Institute for Energy Studies (MIES). It involves participants from several departments continued on page 11

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Engineering news CFI announces research funding

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he Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) has announced that four McMaster researchers will receive funding for essential infrastructure costs that will accelerate their cutting edge research and provide an enriched researchtraining environment for students. The research of associate professors Kim Jones (Chemical Engineering), Gianni Parise (Kinesiology and Medical Physics), Ravi Selvaganapathy (Mechanical Engineering) and Michael Tait (Civil Engineering) will benefit greatly from new equipment in their labs. The equipment will be used to: • measure biological responses to biomaterials (Kim Jones), $99,331 • determine the function and regulation of myogenic progenitors during aging and exercise (Gianni Parise), $120,000 • develop an integrated facility for advanced structural control testing and full-scale monitoring system (Michael Tait), $106,334

Kim Jones

Gianni Parise

Ravi Selvaganapathy

• construct and test plastic/polymer based LoC (Lab on Chip) systems (Ravi Selvaganapathy), $98,418 Jones’ research focuses on the problem of inflammation and scarring when biomaterials are implanted in patients. The new equipment will allow her to evaluate biomaterials at the cellular and molecular level, and to screen the biomaterials more efficiently and inexpensively. Ultimately, her research will lead to the design of the next generation of biomaterials that are themselves biologically active. “Long term, my research might contribute

Alumni Gallery Inductee Mechanical engineering graduate Dave Armstrong (’85) is this year’s McMaster Alumni Gallery of Distinction inductee for Engineering. After many years with Cango Inc, Armstrong left to start Global Fuels Inc in 2002. The Ancaster-based company began as a wholesale supplier of gasoline to 18 locations in Southern Ontario. In the fall of 2003, Global Fuels purchased Olco Petroleum Group Inc. and its 142 gasoline retail outlets, the majority of which are operated by dealers under a branded supply agreement. Subsequently, in 2004, the company entered into a supply agreement with Imperial Oil Limited for operation and distribution of 82 ESSO stations in Quebec and northern New Brunswick. This was followed by the acquisition of all the retail assets of Olco in Quebec. Global Fuels currently has a network of 353 ESSO and Olco stations in three provinces, and plans

Dave Armstrong (front row, second from left) surrounded by his family.

to continue growth through asset acquisition. With offices in Montreal and Moncton, the company’s annual sales will exceed $450 million this year. The success of Global Fuels, says Armstrong, is the result of strong partnerships. His partners include Gary Maddock, former NHL player, “legendary gasoline operations expert” and Vice President of Gas Rite International, and John and Peter Demik, principles of Demik Construction, a Canadian petroleum contractor.

Michael Tait

to solving the problem of the shortage of donor organs for transplant. A patient undergoing a kidney transplant, for example, will not reject it, or need anti-rejection drugs, because the biomaterials have been chosen properly for the individual.” Parise’s research is focused on discovering the mechanisms associated with the loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs as we age. Over the long term, he hopes to identify the factors that result in the loss of muscle mass so that appropriate therapies – either pharmaceutical or physical – can be applied to ease and possibly reverse the rate of muscle aging. Ravi Selvaganapathy is using his materials and manufacturing expertise to develop Lab-on-Chip (LoC) systems that will have applications in many fields, including medical diagnostics, drug delivery and tissue engineering. “Without the funding for this lab equipment, I quite simply could not do this type of research. I can now build up a lab that will construct and test systems that can be used in three areas: the early detection of diseases like cancer; drug delivery via Band-Aid size patches that can also monitor and provide feedback for the patient; and the creation of blood supply networks for constructing tissues,” he says. Michael Tait’s research focuses on improving the response of buildings when excited by windstorms or earthquakes. “My plan is to develop an integrated lab that will be unique in Canada. The equipment I require will be used to develop control systems that will aid in improving the safety and performance of both new continued on page 11

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Engineering Gala acknowledges successes The 2006 Faculty of Engineering Applause and Accolades event offered alumni, faculty, visitors and guests an opportunity to recognize the people who have helped to make the Faculty and its programs successful. Two awards were presented during the May 3rd banquet and gala reception at Liuna Station in Hamilton. The Faculty of Engineering Leadership Award was presented to Dr. Joseph Ng, president of JNE Consulting Limited. He is recognized as a corporate partner who has assisted greatly with the research and educational programs, providing leadership, vision and contributions to the Faculty over many years. The new L.W. Shemilt Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award is intended to honour alumni whose accomplishments and contributions are of a national or international significance, and/or have had a transformative impact on their field of endeavour. The inaugural recipient was Mike Pley. Pley is recognized for his

leadership contributions to the electrical engineering profession as President of COM DEV Space, a company that designs and manufactures space hardware subsystems. In addition, 48 presentations were made to engineering faculty, staff and students. Guest speakers during the evening’s festivities included Larry Di Ianni, Mayor, City of Hamilton; Peter George, President, McMaster University; Mo Elbestawi, Dean, Faculty of Engineering; Les Shemilt, former Dean, Faculty of Engineering; and Ken Norrie, Vice-President, Academic. Applause and Accolades was created to publicly acknowledge the success of the Faculty’s corporate partnerships and internal successes, and to promote awareness of these achievements to the wider Hamilton community and to engineering alumni. The special gala is a way to celebrate the successes and contributions of the engineering faculty, staff and students through awards, peer recognition, or appointments to positions such as research chairs.

Faculty graduates 10,000th student

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his year’s Kipling Ceremony, the annual event for graduating engineers, marked a milestone for the Faculty of Engineering – its 10,000th engineering graduate received the iron ring. Software Engineering student Andrew Flak, 23, was the honoured student. He received his ring during the Faculty’s 45th Kipling Ceremony from Waldo (Wally) Wheten, one of the Wardens of Camp 13. A total of 539 graduate engineers attended the ceremony and received their rings. Flak originally heard about the Kipling Ceremony and learned about the iron rings from his sister’s best friend who is a professional engineer. “It’s something I wanted even before I enrolled in engineering,” he said. Now that his five years of study are

Andrew Flak was presented with the 10,000 iron ring at Kipling by Wally Wheten, Camp Warden. M

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Dr. A. D. Spence second from left is pictured with Shamel Elnomany, Tamer Fahmy and Misara ElGammal at the Kipling Ceremony held on Friday, March 31st, 2006 at Liuna Station. The students commented that “It was an honour Sir to be presented with the Iron Ring by you”.

Dean Mo Elbestawi noted that the profession has seen many changes and advancements over the years including the use of computers for design work and the admission of women. The Kipling Ceremony, officially known as The Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer, is a Canadian tradition that dates from the 1920’s. It is named after the celebrated British author Rudyard Kipling who had often referred to engineers in his novels and poetry. He was approach by civil engineer professor Herbert Haultain of the University of Toronto to write a ceremony of induction for graduating engineers. The Ritual has been copyrighted in Canada,

finally over, it’s a great feeling to put on his own ring, he added. “I’m proud to be part of the Kipling tradition here at Mac. Through the Ceremony, you formally enter the profession in such a meaningful way. I look forward to one day presenting a ring to a graduate engineer in my turn.” Wheten, 92, who has been a professional engineer for over 65 years, was for many years Hamilton’s City Engineer and manager of the water works department. “I am very pleased and honoured to be asked to present the iron ring to the 10,000th McMaster engineering graduate.” In 1961 at McMaster’s first Kipling Ceremony, 23 students received their rings. U

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BEAMS sheds light on bioengineering

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larger than expected number of students attended the annual Bioengineering at McMaster Society (BEAMS) industry information session held in CIBC Hall in late March. “The Promise of Bioengineering”, hosted by BEAMS VP External Mohammed Khalaf, welcomed guest speakers Hubert de Bruin, an associate professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at McMaster, and Mark Mosley and Robert Harrison from the Toronto office of Montreal-based Baylis Medical Company. De Bruin started the session with a presentation on recent developments in medical instrumentation, the development of new techniques for analyzing physiological signals in clinical medical labora-

tories, as well as current information on the response of motor neurons to different modes of stimulation. Mosley, a McMaster kinesiology graduate, and Harrison gave a presentation using real-life examples on how a biomedical design is implemented and brought to the production phase. Both speakers emphasized the versatile career opportunities available to students interested in bioengineering. The evening gave students a chance to learn what bioengineers do, what bioengineering devices are being used in the industry, and what kinds of career opportunities currently exist. An informative questions-and-answer session over wine and cheese followed the presentations.

Researchers recognized by EIC

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wo Department of Civil Engineering researchers have been recognized by the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC). Ghani Razaqpur and Robert Korol were inducted as Fellows at the Institute’s Annual Awards Ceremony in Ottawa in March. Dr. Ghani Razaqpur is recognized as an international leader in the field of structural engineering and engineering materials, including reinforced concrete and advanced composites. He is today an authority on the innovative use of fiberreinforced composite materials in construction. Dr. Robert Korol is well known for his research in the area of steel structures and

Ghani Razaqpur

Robert Korol

in helping to develop sustainable cities at home and abroad. Most of his activities these days center on sustainability issues, as well as his role as a grandparent. Each year the EIC recognizes members for their career achievements and for the excellence of their technical papers.

Entrepreneurial success It was an ambitious idea: solve the world’s water contamination problems using a cleansing membrane filter. From modest beginnings in Hamilton, Ontario, the idea grew into a company. The company, Zenon Environmental Inc. (www.zenon.com), founded by Andrew Benedek in 1980, is now international and a global leader in membrane filtration technology. Benedek is a former lecturer at McMaster University. While at McMaster, he conducted research into methods of improving water quality. At the age of 36, he left his tenured position to start Zenon and is currently the firm’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Zenon’s success continues. In March, the General Electric Company made a $760 million bid for Oakville-based Zenon. If approved by shareholders, Zenon will become part of GE Water & Process Technologies.

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The event was an excellent get-together for bioengineers in all levels of study. For more information on other BEAMS events, please visit our website at www.beamsociety.ca.

10,000th graduate continued from page 5

and the ring design has been registered. Originally made of hammered iron, the rings are now made of stainless steel. Anyone who has been a professional engineer for a minimum of ten years can attend the ceremony and present a ring. Approximately 100 presenters were on hand to do the honours at Kipling 2006. They included grandfathers, brothers, mentors, and professors. Materials Engineering student Jillian Smith asked Beth Wozniak, her aunt and a McMaster graduate, to present her ring. “I thought it would be nicer to have a family member present me my ring rather than some random person,” she said. “Throughout my university career, [Beth] has been a mentor to me, encouraging and supporting me.” Wozniak, who graduated in Engineering Physics in 1987, is president of Sensing & Control at Honeywell. She was very pleased to be asked to be a part of the ceremony. “I know [Jillian] has worked hard over the last 5 years and I am so proud of what she has achieved.” The rings are administered by Carm Vespi, manager, Alumni Relations, and her staff. Each year, they arrange to have the students’ fingers sized prior to Kipling, and they also handle requests for replacement rings (for rings lost or worn out). As of this year, the Office of the Dean of Engineering will pay for the rings. Vespi has been involved with the preparations for 30 Kipling Ceremonies. “It is the most important day of the year for graduating engineers,” she remarked. “My staff and I enjoy helping to make this as memorable a day for them as possible. We are always so proud of our students!” Following the Ceremony, graduates and their guests celebrated at a dinner/dance at the Liuna Station Banquet & Convention Centre in downtown Hamilton. N

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Clean water talk

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n March 24, Ontario Minister of the Environment Laurel Broten visited McMaster to speak on the provincial government’s extensive agenda of environmental initiatives. Minister Broten emphasized to students in attendance the importance of science and engineering in advancing public policy that is concerned with initiatives for a cleaner and sustainable environment. She also reviewed current government programs, noting especially the proposed new clean water legislation to protect drinking water that has been developed in response to the recommendations arising from the Walkerton inquiry.

The Minister, a Great Lakes waterfront resident, displayed an obvious enthusiasm for her portfolio, and said that since giving birth to twin boys, the issues involved with protecting the environment are very real for her. Broten, a McMaster graduate, has a B.Sc. in Biology (’89) and a BA in Psychology (’90). The presentation was sponsored by McMaster’s Dofasco Centre for Engineering and Public Policy. The recently established Centre provides study at the graduate level to enhance students’ abilities to negotiate the interface between engineering and public policy.

30 nm lines fabricated by Oleksa Hulko, a Research Associate in the CEDT.

McMaster goes nano

New study program in Russia

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he Faculty of Engineering has partnered with universities in the United States and Russia to offer a unique learning experience to interested engineering students. The Engineering Study Abroad Program (ESAP), a partnership between McMaster, Michigan State University and the State University of Architecture and Civil Engineering (in Volgograd) along with St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, offers students the opportunity to take engineering courses over the summer term (May to July) in Volgograd. First-year through to graduate courses are being offered and will be taught in English by American, Canadian and Russian faculty members. The program is open to students from all engineering streams, and the courses will qualify for credit.

Researchers at McMaster have a new capability for patterning materials and making devices down to the 10 nm scale (1 nm = 1 billionth of a metre). Called electron beam lithography (EBL), this technique improves upon our existing optical lithography capabilities by at least a factor of 100. This is a big step in support of our nanotechnology initiative at McMaster. Because the wavelength of the electron is much smaller than for light, it can be focussed to a much smaller spot and used for both microscopy and pattern definition. EBL uses a high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) to expose patterns in a polymer film, which can then be transferred to the substrate. Electrical contacts, photonic devices, mechanical structures, and surface textures can be fabricated down to the 10 nm scale. “Electron beam lithography is the ultimate research tool for developing new devices”, says Rafael Kleiman, Director of the Centre for Emerging Device Technologies (CEDT). The CEDT is the central fabrication facility serving the engineering and science community at McMaster, with a current membership of 45 faculty members. Because no template is required for generating the patterns (as in optical lithography), new ideas can be tried and tested very rapidly. Furthermore, because EBL uses a high-resolution SEM, the patterns can be registered to existing structures with extraordinary accuracy.

Konstantin Kreyman, professor of computing and software, is the ESAP program coordinator at McMaster. “This program allows students to gain new engineering knowledge …and is an excellent opportunity to gain an appreciation of the engineering environment of different countries.” Engineering courses include highway design, steel construction, probability and statistics for engineers, and engineering computation and mathematics. Courses in mathematics, education, the humanities and the Russian language are also available. In addition to attending classes, students will have the opportunity to visit St. Petersburg and Moscow, and one additional city, either Prague in the Czech Republic or Kiev in the Ukraine.

Webinar promotes new program In mid-March, the School of Computational Engineering and Science hosted a live Webinar to introduce students to its new graduate program. The School, the only graduate school of its kind in Canada, will begin offering programs at the Master’s, PhD and post-doctoral levels in the Fall of 2006. Programs will focus on three major research areas: computational physical sciences, computational optimization, design and control, and computational biosciences. The School brings together over 50 researchers from the faculties of engineering, science and business at McMaster. The Webinar was presented by Tamas Terlaky, director of the School, and Allison B. Sekuler, special advisor to the dean, Research & External Relations, Faculty of Science.

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From article by Rafael Kleiman, Director, Centre for Emerging Device Technologies.

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Alumni profiles Adrian Clements – “Life… ya gotta love it!” Adrian Clements (Chem.Eng. ’89) is one happy guy! By his own admission, life has been good. Since graduating from McMaster, he has been living in Michigan and working for Dow Automotive, a division of The Dow Chemical Company. For the past five-and-a-half years, he has been a Plant Service Representative with responsibility for the management of the Dow Automotive sealers, coatings and adhesives used in the manufacture of the Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigator at the Ford Michigan Truck Plant in Wayne, Michigan. He also manages the accounts at the Ford Wixom Assembly Plant in Wixom, Michigan (where the Lincoln Town Car and Ford GT are assembled) and Saleen Special Vehicles in Troy, Michigan (where initial assembly of the Ford GT takes place). Additional responsibilities within the unit include overseeing the “Cost Per Unit” (CPU) operations at four other Ford plants (the Atlanta Assembly Plant, the Norfolk Assembly Plant, the Twin Cities Assembly Plant, and the Wayne Stamping and Assembly Plant), and forecasting product usages for Dow Automotive materials at many of Ford’s US facilities. “I absolutely LOVE my job!” While he’s been fortunate to have stability in his working life, change recently entered his personal life. In November 2004, he met Cheryl and they were married in New York City on November 11, 2005. “Cheryl is amazing in every respect.” The newlyweds live in Canton, Michigan, with his son and daughter. Sebastian Ford is nine years old and, according to proud Papa, routinely scores 100% on all of his Grade 3 tests. Sebastian plays soccer on a local travel team, where he excels at defense, and recently attained his brown belt in Taekwon-Do. Daughter Victoria Anne is now seven-and-a-half, and is

doing very well in Grade 2. She enjoys gymnastics and, in June, will be moving from Pre-Team (which requires six hours of practice per week) to Team (which will require ten hours of practice per week). One suspects life is going to get a bit more hectic in the Clements’ household. It will come as no surprise to learn that his passion for old cars has not abated over the years. His Mac colleagues may remember him buying a 1967 Ford Galaxie 500 2-door convertible two weeks before the end of school, as a graduation present to himself. “I still have that car!” Since then, his collection has grown to include a 1967 Ford Galaxie 500 2-door hardtop, a 1967 Ford Country Squire 4-door 5+4 passenger station wagon, and a 1967 Ford Custom 2-door sedan. The latest addition is a 1967 Meteor Montcalm S-33 Sports Package 2-door convertible. “Cheryl bought it as a wedding present.” Chem. Eng. colleagues can contact Adrian Clements at amclements @motorcitygalaxieclub.com.

Duncan Hannay – from engineering to e-commerce The president of on-line financial services company E*TRADE Canada is not as surprised as others might be on his transition from engineering to the financial sector. Duncan Hannay (Mech. Eng. ’85) notes that his company relies heavily on state-of-the-art technology to deliver the services needed by on-line investors. “(Parent company) E*TRADE FINANCIAL Corporation leverages technology to deliver a compelling combination of price, product and service to the value-driven investor,” he says. “My engineering background has proven to be a strong asset in managing our Canadian operations.” New York-based E*TRADE FINANCIAL launched etrade.com in the mid-1990s using technology developed by American physicist and inventor Bill Porter. From a trading website, the company has expanded to offer a range of banking and mortgage services. One of the largest online financial services providers the United States, E*TRADE FINANCIAL currently operates in 14 countries and has 4.3 million customer accounts. Hannay got interested in on-line investing while recovering from a prolonged illness “as a way to keep my mind sharp”. On learning that E*TRADE FINANCIAL wanted to expand into Canada, he offered his services to develop a business plan for the Canadian launch of its

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retail investment services. He then worked on strategy development for the company in the United States to include investing, banking and lending services. In October 2005, Hannay was named president of E*TRADE Canada, a subsidiary of E*TRADE FINANCIAL, and he manages the Canadian operations. “I haven’t looked back! It has allowed me to really explore my entrepreneurial roots by leading an integrated business.” Always strong in the maths and sciences fields, Hannay confesses that he entered engineering more because it was a trend among his peers than for any real desire to practise in the profession. “I’ve always favoured my entrepreneurial side. What I discovered, however, is that engineering and entrepreneurship can go hand in hand – in fact, they should!” The engineering courses, he says, taught him to embrace learning and more particularly, to understand technical concepts. “So whether it’s commercial HVAC systems, where I started my career, or technical trading strategies, I’m able to learn and apply technical concepts quickly. This has served me well.” Displaying the iron ring to the company’s technology developers hasn’t hurt, either, he jokes. “They think I actually know what they’re talking about!” Life for Hannay is not all about the numbers. He and Mac nursing grad Kathy (nee Robinson, B.Sc. ‘85) live in Oakville with their three children and Skipper, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The family spends summer at a Muskoka cottage, sailing, swimming and water-skiing. T

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Trevor Jones – robots are coming to a shop near you! That would make Trevor Jones very happy indeed. The Mechanical Engineering & Management grad (’81) would like to see robotics technologies branch out from their well-established manufacturing applications to more general industry ones. This is one of his main goals as president of the Robotic Industries Association (RIA). “In my term as President, I want to see the membership grow by promoting new markets for robotic automation.” Jones was named president of the organization in December 2005. Over the past 20 years, robotics has been keenly adopted in the automotive sector which realized early on the benefits of automation on productivity and the bottom line. But Jones believes robotics technologies should be making in-roads to other areas such as the medical

industry. “All of the traditional strengths of robotic automation – repeatability, reliability – these things can play very strong roles in the medical field.” The challenge, he adds, is making these technologies affordable for a broader range of users. There is also a need for people who can be integrators, who can help new users adopt and institute these technologies. Founded in 1974, the RIA is a trade association with 250 members representing suppliers, users, integrators, academics and consultants in the field of robotic automation. It provides a variety of services to members including workshops and conferences, publications and videotapes, and information on industry trends. It also operates a website at www.roboticsonline.com. Jones thinks his organization can be a catalyst in helping expand robotics technologies into the non-industrial sectors. “It’s important continued on page 10

Sam Kodsi – motivated by motion Ever since he was a young boy, Sam Kodsi has been fascinated with anything on wheels. No surprise, then, that he chose mechanical engineering for his specialty at McMaster. “I have a deep passion for everything in motion, especially vehicles.” That passion not only gave him direction at university, it established his business focus since graduating in 1997. His company, Kodsi Engineering Incorporated (KEI), specializes in forensic engineering: accident reconstruction, which entails technical investigation of motor vehicle collisions and personal injury events. The lead engineer in over 1000 collision investigations/reconstructions, Kodsi helps clients identify the cause and contributing factors of collisions and other events. The Mississauga-based company (www.kodsiengineering.com) lives its motto: Purpose Driven Forensic Investigations – Straightforward Answers. Of course, there is more to Kodsi Engineering than investigating accidents, and the company’s principal engineer has plans to advance the firm into an industry leader, not only in the areas of quality and service but also in research and development. To that end, Kodsi has a certificate in Accident Reconstruction from the IPTM at the University of North Florida. He has taken specialized courses and

participated in a number of conferences and seminars and crash tests on accident reconstruction, vehicle dynamics, and occupant biomechanics and personal injury matters. In addition to being a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Society of Automotive Engineers, he is a member of the Canadian Society of Forensic Science (CSFS), the International Association of Accident Reconstruction Specialists (IAARS), the Canadian Association of Technical Accident Investigators and Reconstructions (CATAIR), and the Canadian Association of Road Safety Professionals (CARSP). He has also authored several articles and lectured on subjects relating to vehicle collisions and automobile failures, and made presentations to insurance and legal professionals. He has qualified as an expert witness in criminal and civil court, and in arbitrations on motor vehicle accident reconstruction and other personal injury matters. Kodsi chose Mac Engineering because of its reputation for maintaining high standards in education, its commitment to research and its hand-on approach to learning. He believes the benefits gained from his McMaster experience were well worth the years of study there. “I not only apply the methods of how to acquire and research information, but I also apply valuable technical knowledge gained in subjects such as physics, dynamics and kinematics,” he says. “The experience I continued on page 18

Karim Lakhani – Open source software opens doors to success “I was intrigued by how open source software communities were developing software via a process that was not taught in either engineering or management schools.” Karim Lakhani (El.Eng. & Mgmt. ’93) is explaining his fascination with open source software issues and why he pursued further studies after graduating from McMaster. A thesis on the Apache Web Server community provided him with the Masters degree in from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Not sure that he wanted to make a career out of this research topic, Lakhani accepted employment at the Boston Consulting Group as a strategy consultant in the area of internet-enabled strategies. However, a continuing interest in the issue of open source communities M

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prompted him to enter the PhD program at the MIT Sloan School of Management in 2001. His area of study was the dynamics of distributed innovation systems in general, and open source software in particular. In December 2005, Lakhani received his PhD. Lakhani was attracted to McMaster by the Faculty’s common first year, and he was intrigued by the idea of a combined engineering and business program and the opportunities it might provide. After graduation, he joined General Electric as part of its Technical Leadership Program, working in the Medical Systems Division on the interface of technology, business and healthcare in sales, marketing and new product development. McMaster, he says, provided a critical foundation for his future professional and academic career. “The Engineering and Management program allowed me to confidently approach and develop answers to continued on back cover E

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Philips Engineering – 60 years of engineering success A well-known Burlington-based engineering consulting firm is celebrating a milestone during 2006. Philips Engineering Ltd. (www.philipseng.com) is 60 this year! The company founded by civil engineers H. Philips and E.F. Roberts has been a strong consulting presence in Southern Ontario and beyond. The firm Philips and Roberts had early offices in Hamilton and Brantford, but in 1960, it moved to Brant Street in Burlington. In 1966, the company built its own office building at 3215 North Service Road, changed its name to Philips Planning & Engineering Ltd., and has been working from that location ever since. The name changed again in 2000 to Philips Engineering Ltd., to reflect the core business of the firm, specifically, civil engineering. Philips Engineering specializes in five market segments: water resources, golf courses, structures (bridges & buildings), municipal land development, and highways & roads. Clients include municipalities, provincial governments, conservation authorities and the private sector. During the past 60 years, Philips’ engineers have completed over 10,000 projects. Recent and current projects include Hamilton’s Red Hill Creek Expressway, the reconstruction of the Peace Bridge Plaza area in Fort Erie, the Highway 6 extension servicing Hamilton’s airport from Highway 403, Milton’s Glencairn Golf Club, and Niagara’s Water Quality Protection Study. One of the most interesting facts about Philips is the number of McMaster civil engineering graduates it has on staff. Four of the company’s five principal officers – Gary Tansley (’66), Ken DePodesta (’73), Ron Scheckenberger (’81), Hank Huitema (’86) – and four of the firm’s five Associates - Paul Smeltzer (’79), Brian Bishop (’89), David Sinke (’90), Angelo Cutaia (’86) – are Mac grads. Rounding out the Mac connection are designers Aaron Farrell (’96), Aaron Brouwers (’03) and Tim Winterton (’04). The company currently has 65 employees, a number that Gary Tansley says has remained fairly stable over the firm’s long history. “Many of our employees grew up in the area or moved here to attend university,” he says. “Many think of Philips as a “Mac” company; they got their first job here and stayed.” The company has garnered a number of awards over the years including the 2004 Environmental Project of the Year for Canada from the Transportation Association of Canada (for the Red Hill Expressway), and the 2005 Professional Engineers of Ontario – Hamilton Chapter and Hamilton Engineering Institute 2005 award

Left to Right: Back Row – Angelo Cutaia (1986), Aaron Brouwers (2003), Hank Huitema (1986), Ken DePodesta (1973), Ron Scheckenberger (1981), Brian Bishop (1989), Gary Tansley (1966). Front Row – Tim Winterton (2004), Aaron Farrell (1996). Absent – Paul Smeltzer (1979), David Sinke (1990).

(for the Mountain Brow Water Management Project in Hamilton). It has also received three awards from the Ontario Public Works Association since 2002. While the consulting industry is evolving and many firms are being bought up by larger international companies, Tansley believes there is still a market for the smaller mid-sized engineering consulting firm. Especially, he says, if that company employs the strategies that have stood the test of time for Philips Engineering: develop excellent people and business relationships, focus on the core business, and demonstrate a strong commitment to service. Congratulations to Philips Engineering on its 60th anniversary!

Trevor Jones continued from page 9

for the RIA to be a facilitator, bringing people and ideas together. We’re advocating education and programs to attract smaller players into our association and provide incentives for people to collaborate with each other.” Jones was attracted to McMaster as a result of its reputation as an excellent engineering school. He chose the Engineering & Management program because he felt the mix of business and engineering would be important to his career. He was right. Shortly after graduating, he along with academic colleagues founded CRS Robotics, a developer of small “table-top” advanced robotics. From 1983 to 2001, he was in charge of its product development department. The Burlington-based company grew steadily and by 1995 was listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange. “When we started CRS Robotics in 1983, we were a design consulting company with aspirations to design, market and sell a small robot. We started selling products in 1985, and continue to this day.” In 2002 CRS was acquired by Thermo Electron Corporation of Boston, Massachusetts (www.thermo.com), the world leader in analytical instruments. Currently Jones is director of OEM Business Development for Thermo Electron, Laboratory Automation and Integration of Burlington, Ontario (Thermo CRS Ltd). In this capacity, he manages the sales of automation components to system integrators and OEM clients in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors. Jones is married and lives in Ancaster. When not thinking of things robotic, he enjoys hockey and horses.

Left to Right: Hank Huitema (1986) – Principal; Ken DePodesta (1973) – Principal; Ron Scheckenberger (1981) – Principal; Gary Tansley (1966) – Principal

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New Faculty Members Chemical Engineering We are pleased to welcome David K. Potter who joined the Department in January. He will retain his position at the School of Engineering Practice. Dr. Potter obtained his B.Sc. and Ph.D. in chemistry David K. Potter (polymer science) from the University of Waterloo in 1989. He is chair of the Innovation Council, Conference Board of Canada, a group of senior technology and new business development executives who explore and/or share best practices in innovation and commercialization. Since 1994, he has worked at Toronto-based ShawCor Ltd. as Technology Group Manager –

and analytical modeling of the phenomena involved in fuel dryout and rewetting. Prior to his appointment, Dr. Novog was the Manager of the Reactor Trip Assessment Section at Nuclear Safety Solutions located in Toronto, and was involved in a wide range of modeling and experimental work geared at ensuring reactor special safety system performance.

Advanced Technologies. He leads corporate R&D group responsible for identifying and assessing emerging technologies that have the potential to offer competitive advantage to one or more ShawCor Ltd. companies.

Engineering Physics The Department welcomes Dave Novog whose appointment was effective February 1, 2006. Dr. Novog’s research interests include modeling of nuclear power plant cooling under hypothetical accident sceDave Novog narios, statistical analysis of plant safety margins, equipment and measurement degradation under aged and irradiated conditions,

CFI research funding continued from page 4

and existing structures,” Tait says. The four professors are in the early stages of their careers and all agree that having new equipment in their labs will greatly accelerate their research. “One of the biggest advantages to these CFI initiatives is that the funding allows us to acquire in three to four years much of what our mentors acquired over a 25 year period,” explains Gianni Parise. “We can expand our labs in a much shorter time frame, accelerating our research results.” Allison Sekuler, associate vice-president of research notes that the CFI funding totals more than $420,000. “The projects are particularly exciting because they take place at the interface of traditional research areas, and, as such, can expand our knowledge in completely new directions.” Sekuler, a Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience, adds that “the creativity and vision behind these research projects show why McMaster is one of Canada’s premiere research Universities.” The announcement marked the inauguration of the CFI’s new Leaders Opportunity Fund (LOF). The new program, created to reflect Canada’s fast-evolving research environment, was designed to give Canadian universities the added flexibility they need to both attract and retain the very best of today’s and tomorrow’s researchers at a time of intense international competition for leading faculty.

Research & External Relations Update continued from page 3

at both universities and includes solar energy, fuel cells, nuclear energy, and systems modeling as the main research topics. • The “Centre for Automotive Materials and Corrosion Research” (D.W.Wilkinson, MSE) includes researchers from MSE and ME at McMaster as well as the University of Waterloo. Based upon recent major investments by General Motors of Canada Ltd., the Centre would blend focused industrially-oriented research with fundamental studies to establish a systematic approach towards innovative improvements in automotive design, high performance manufacturing and vehicle value. All of the above proposals are exceptionally strong and we wish the proponents success in what promises to be a very tight competition. Results should be known by November 2006. I would also like to mention the renewed emphasis by the Faculty on increased internationalization of its educational and research programs. Several student exchange programs are under development with countries as diverse as Russia, Brazil, Austria, France, India, China, and Mexico. More on this in a future edition of the MacEngineer. M

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On the research side, in February I participated in an Ontario delegation to Catalunya (Spain). The technical mission was timely as it permitted the first formal meetings between the Ontario and Catalunyan universities to explore targeted research collaboration in specific science and technology fields. The major successes of the project were the in-depth information exchange and the establishment of personal connections between the universities and research institutes/centres. On March 8, 2006, a Letter of Agreement was signed in Toronto between the Province of Ontario, Ministry of Research and Innovation and the Government of Catalunya, Ministry of Universities, Research and the Information Society. The two parties have agreed to establish general principles for R&D collaboration in the defined fields of photonics, nanotechnology, materials and advanced manufacturing, biotechnology, information and communication technologies, emerging technologies and agriculture. Most of these are integral components of the Faculty’s research priorities. This agreement may provide the means to facilitate university-based partnerships and expand linkages with business partners and government agencies in Ontario and Catalunya. U

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Get your MacEngineer by e-mail! Contact Carm Vespi vespi@mcmaster.ca T

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Engineering students news Meet MES President Kristin Pouw

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ourth-year Chemical and Bioengineering student Kristin Pouw hopes to make a difference during her term. “I want to develop better communication between the MES and the students, the university and external groups,” she says. For example, students need to be better informed about the many services the Society provides, and about the provincial and national conferences and competitions which they can attend. Better cross-information flow between the MES and the University will ensure smooth running of events and open opportunities for collaboration. During her one-year term, she hopes the MES will be able to expand its range services, especially in the area of providing more academic-based events. Interview skills seminars, she notes, are one such

Kristin Pouw

initiative, and previous sessions have been very successful. And the Society will continue to encourage social events such as

movie nights, where the focus in not on drinking. “I have a great team and I think students will see lots of new and exciting things from us.” The MES has two current alumni relations representatives: Halley McLaren and Sana Shamsher. They liaise with Carm Vespi and the Alumni Office to ensure good communication. The MES and Alumni Office jointly work on such events as Homecoming, Applause & Accolades, and Frosh week. Alumni can also support the MES and its programs, Pouw says. Donations can be made to clubs and to the Society’s study abroad bursaries. Alumni are also welcome to attend MES events and talk to the students. “It’s awesome (when Alumni do that) and very valuable.”

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mechanical engineering team comprised of Matthew Woodruff, Matt Doherty, Geoff Hoover, and Kristen Whitney has won the fourth-year engineering design competition sponsored by The Liberty Motor Company of Oakville, Ontario. The team’s winning design was a concept that proposed a redesign of the rear-axle assembly of a Honda Odyssey van to accommodate a wheelchair ramp conversion. Team members will share the $3,500 prize. The Liberty Motor Company provides low-floor, rear-entry wheelchair accessible vans and van modifications for people with disabilities and for wheelchair taxi, paratransit, and non-emergency applications in Canada and the United States. President Simon Jones said the company plans to incorporate the winning design into its line of products and services. Twenty-six McMaster teams submitted proposals for this year’s competition. Three teams were selected as finalists and

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Members of the design teams together with Simon Jones and Gerry Bourne (far right) from The Liberty Motor Company Inc.

worked directly with The Liberty Motor Company to further develop their concepts. Competitions like this provide an opportunity for students to apply their studies in a real-world application, gain experience c

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and make a meaningful contribution, said Samir Ziada, chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering. “We never cease to be amazed by the ingenuity of our students.” N

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Software engineering students shine at CS Games

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eam Blue Screen of Death, a group of McMaster software engineering students, won top ranking at a recent CS Games competition in Montreal, Quebec. McMaster's team finished in second place overall, and placed first in the Team Software Engineering and Gaming competitions. Hosted by l'École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS) of Montréal in March, the 2006 Games were well attended, with a record participation of over 300 students and 33 teams from across North America. The Games consist of 13 separate competitions (Artificial Intelligence, The Challenge, Team Software Engineering, Assembly, Xtreme Programming, Web Design, Debugging, Algorithm, Gaming, Scavenger Hunt, Scripthink Big, Sports, and Participation), in addition to a final group game. Team Blue Screen of Death member Brian Hogg describes the contests as grueling. "The Gaming session involved an

honour with all of them." In addition to McMaster, Canada was represented by teams from Queen's, McGill, Concordia, Carleton, Guelph, Brock, Dalhousie and St. Mary's Universities, Polytechnique and l'École de technologie supérieure. The team from the University of Rochester placed first overall.

intense four-hour competition that required excellent teamwork and skill to come out on top." The competitions were held from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. during the 3-day event, and could last up to three hours each. Each competition posed challenges that required knowledge of specific skills and the ability to problem-solve, as Team member Kevin Klinger explains. "Algorithms consisted of writing 'pseudo' code for a variety of problems as well as solving general numerical problems. In AI (Artificial Intelligence), we had to write the code for a player of the game “stratego”. Team member FanFan Huang says the group’s success is proof that Mac software engineers are well-rounded and able to deal with a variety of situations and challenges. "I think I speak for the whole team when I say that we would like to thank all our professors and fellow students for this achievement, and would like to share this

Ontario Engineering Competition McMaster was well-represented at the Ontario Engineering Competition held in February at the University of Toronto. The Faculty of Engineering was represented in all seven categories: • Junior Team Design: Deborah Lee, Andrew Neely, Stephanie Shaw, Kyle Watson • Senior Team Design: Joe Algudady, Stuart Grodinsky, Cory Minkhorst, Milan Zagorac • Engineering Communications: Adam White, Kyle Byckalo • Entrepreneurial Design: Mohammed Khalaf • Consulting Engineering: Deirdre Schroder, Paula Claudino, Dave Tyndall, Tom Cassidy • Debate: John Vraets, Derek Shields (represented at OEC by Jackson Wiegman and Scott Mitchell) Wiegman and Mitchell placed third in Debate, and the Junior Design Team of Lee, Neely, Shaw and Watson placed first in their category. During the event, Lee and Shaw placed a bid in front of the Ontario Engineering Competition Advisory Committee to host the OEC at McMaster in 2008 – and their presentation was successful! Lee and Evan Stevens will be the co-chairs of OEC 2008. They are already busy making plans, and seeking support and sponsors. If you or your company would like to help sponsor this event, or provide judges for the competitions, please contact Deborah Lee at deborah.c.lee@gmail.com.

Engineering Awards Night The Ontario Professional Engineers (OPE) gold medal, presented to the student with the highest four-year cumulative average, has been awarded to two McMaster students this year. Gaurav Bahl, an electrical engineering student, and computer engineering student Andrew Maw tied for the medal with averages of 11.8. This is the first time since the inception of the award in 1961 that two students from the same university have tied for graduating with the highest cumulative average. The award, which is from the OPE Foundation for Education, was presented at the Faculty of Engineering’s annual Awards Assembly in February. The evening also featured the announcement of two new annual scholarship awards. The Canadian Institute of Steel Construction established a $2000 award to be presented to the student who attains high standing in Civil Engineering 3S03 and shows an interest in steel structure research. The first recipient is David Jonkman. The Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering (CSChE) established an award of $500 to be presented to the

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Mr. Stephen Jack (right) of the Ontario Professional Engineers Foundation for Education presents the award to Andrew Maw.

student entering Level II of a program in the Department of Chemical Engineering who has attained the highest academic standing in Level I. Chemical engineering and bioengineering student Andrew Evans is this year’s recipient. During the evening, a total of 175 undergraduate engineering students earned entrance, in-course and academic awards.

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Robots make an impression

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tudents from the Department of Computing and Software impressed IBM representatives with their skills and innovation during the 6th annual software engineering design project competition in April. The annual event is part of the senior software engineering capstone design project. This year’s challenge was to develop search and rescue robots. In real life situations, such robots are used when a disaster occurs and the conditions are too dangerous for human rescuers due to factors such as radiation, fire, or the instability of the structure. Ten teams of 5 to 6 students developed their projects from scratch, working through the full software development cycle including the implementation and testing stages. For construction materials, they used Lego Mindstorms, a kit that combines traditional Lego bricks with a computer control unit, motors, sensors, wheels and gears. IBM representatives Nadine Nichols, talent manager at IBM SWG Canada Lab, Stephen Perelgut, project manager for University Relations, IBM Toronto Laboratory, and Benedict Xavier, a recruitment partner at IBM Canada, judged the

From our readers:

competition and presented awards to the top three teams. Team 5 “Tortoise” won first place. Team members Daniel Cooper, Sebastien Delmon (on exchange from Institut Supérieur d’Electronique de Paris: ISEP), Arslan Idrees, David Poulton, and Cheung-Wai (Jake) Wong each received $125. Second place prize was awarded to Team 7 “The Underdogs”. Julia Druve, Ryan Jackson, Manreet Rahil, Chinmaya Shanbhag, and Zhao Li received $50 each. The best presentation award went to Team 10 “Xbot” members Karan Aurora, Avri Balofsky, Ryan Browne, Kevin Diamond and Husein Shamshudin. “The robots were impressive,” Perelgut remarked. “The software interfaces showed careful thought and design, and the presentations were very professional.” Nadine Nichols said IBM is pleased to sponsor the capstone design project and connect with students from McMaster. “I was also very impressed with the quality of the students, their energy, presentation skills and technical abilities.” The names of the winning teams have been placed on plaques which are on display in the main office of the Computing and Software Department.

While sending in a change of address, John Pocher, (Civil Eng. ’94) director of Research and Development (Austin) for DelStar Technologies, Inc. said that he “always looks forward to hearing the latest news from home”. Mark Davison (Mech.Eng. ’80) writes: “I received my Winter 2006 copy of the MacEngineer and saw the excerpt you submitted for me. Thanks. My sons enjoyed seeing us in print. You do a great job with the publication. I read every one!” Mech. Eng. grad Leah Coulthart-Howe (’96) wrote to say she’d like to receive the MacEngineer by e-mail, and added: “I enjoy hearing about the changes and the people.” When sending in an update for “Grapevine”, Mike Cullip (Civ.Eng.& Mgt., M.Eng. ’94/’96) added: “Hey, Carm. I see you are still doing the MacEngineer. Saw your picture on the Website – you haven’t changed at all. Still with the big smile.” From Adrian Clements (Chem.Eng. ’89): “Greetings from the west side of Detroit, Michigan! I trust that the gang at Mac is doing well. It always brings a smile to my face to read names like Crowe, Hrymak, Marlin, Pelton, Vlachopoulos, Woods, etc. in the MacEngineer. Sometimes it seems like only yesterday that I was under their tutelage, even though it was more than 17 years ago!”

NCR Eng. & Mgmt. award announced Congratulations to Team II from the Engineering & Management 5B03 course on receiving the NCR Corporation’s $3500 award for Industrial Projects 2005. The winning team was announced in mid-April by Susan Carreon,

Director of Engineering, Financial Self Service Division. This year, a total of eight teams submitted reports to NCR for consideration. Team II members are: Paula Claudino, Alexey Kodintsev and Andrew Gadsden from Mechanical Engineering and Management, and David Tyndall, Jeffery Patterson and Leo Lee from Electrical Engineering and Management. Their report was prepared for the Niagara Parks Commission and was entitled “Cost Reduction Strategies Using Alternative Energy Sources in Greenhouses”. Engineering & Management 5B03 instructor David Conochie extended thanks to NCR for sponsoring the award and to Carreon for reviewing the reports, and he recognized the support of the Director of Engineering and Management, Dr John Medcof. Conochie also noted that the students were very grateful to the clients of the project: Debbie Whitehouse, Senior Director of Parks for the Niagara Parks Commission, and Cheryl Tyndall, Curator at the Niagara Parks Commission Butterfly Conservatory. “I would like to thank the team, and indeed all the 5B03 teams, who worked to make 5B03-2005 a success. It has been a pleasure to work with you.”

From left to right: Andrew Gadsen, Leo Lee Elec, David Tyndall, Alexey Kodintsev, Paula Claudino and Jeffrey Patterson.

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Chem Eng Alumni – your club needs you!

Give back to Mac! Calling all Engineering Alumni.We want you to know that there are many ways you can give back to your Alma Mater. Financial support is important and very much appreciated. However, your support is needed in other ways to assist with the learning opportunities that the Faculty provides to its undergraduate and graduate students. (For more detailed information on giving back, check www.eng.mcmaster. ca/contributing/index.html. Possibly one of the most important methods to give back is through mentoring. The Faculty sponsors a number of mentoring opportunities during the year in which you can speak to engineering students about the industry, career opportunities, and how your degree has influenced your life. The large number of students who attend these sessions and the thoughtful questions they ask are indicative of how much they appreciate the chance to explore the highlights and challenges of working as professional engineers. Other mentoring initiatives include co-op work placements. Placements benefit both the employer and the student: the company can assess the skills of a potential future employee; the student can apply in-class theory and techniques in real-world situations. Another way to show support is to attend our many events. While some of these are indeed fundraisers, all of them will re-connect you to the Faculty and your department of specialty. They give you the chance to visit with professors, colleagues and students. Alumni who have attended such events have remarked on the excellent networking and friendship-building opportunities that these events provide. If you would like to join the growing number of engineering Alumni who elect to support financially the Faculty’s programs, initiatives and scholarships, please consider the following: • The Engineering Building Fund – The Faculty is embarking on a 50,000 square foot expansion with a new three-storey building dedicated to realizing the Faculty’s vision of putting McMaster at the forefront of interna-

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tional advancements in the areas of BioEngineering and Engineering Practice. • MACLAB Endowment Fund – The Terry Milson MES created MACLAB in 1997. The endowment fund assists with upgrading and maintaining lab equipment for undergraduate laboratories. We have exceeded the $1M mark and hope to build to $5M in the next 10 years. • Undergrad Research Opportunities Program (UROP) – The Program provides undergraduate students in Level 1 or 2 research-based summer employment and experience working with faculty and research staff. • The Solar Car Project – These students volunteer their time and expertise to put McMaster on the (road)map! Donations of goods, supplies, services and money are gratefully received. A unique and fun way to re-connect to your University! • Faculty, Endowment and Scholarship Funds, Class donations, Legacy funds – Let us help you decide on the most appropriate choice for you. • McMaster Racing Club (MRC) – This student run organization designs, constructs and competes a Formula One style vehicle on behalf of McMaster University and the Mechanical Engineering Faculty. The 2006 competition in Romeo, Michigan is just around the corner and the MRC is well on its way to completing its Top 10 goal. The McMaster Racing Club is looking for new sponsors for the 2007 season. For more information, please visit our Business Division website at: http://sae.mcmaster.ca/business Did you know that charitable bequests are the most popular method of making a planned gift to McMaster? How fitting for a University that was founded through a $900,000 bequest from Senator William McMaster in 1887! Typical bequest designations include the establishment of an endowment for a research chair, scholarship, award or bursary. All donors who confirm a bequest, or other future gift arrangements, are invited to join The William McMaster and Susan Moulton McMaster Society. To explore how you can Give Back To Mac in a manner that best reflects your wishes, please contact Terry Milson, Faculty Advancement Officer, at 905- 525-9140 ext. 27391, or e-mail Terry at milsont@mcmaster.ca.

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The McMaster Chemical Engineering Club is looking for donations to assist with funding some of its many events planned for the coming year. In addition to the variety of academic and fun events, we would like to have the resources to send Mac delegates to the CSCHE Conference which is being held this year in Sherbrooke, Quebec. The Conference is a wonderful opportunity for chemical engineering students to meet their colleagues from other universities and participate in learning workshops. Our other activities include sponsoring industrial tours, speakers’ nights, and getting together with the University of Buffalo’s Chemical Engineering Department – all of which provide learning and networking opportunities for our members. Donations to help offset travel costs for these would greatly help the Club and allow us to organize even more of these types of events. We have also planned numerous sporting activities such as soccer tournaments and ski trips, and social gatherings to which our faculty members are invited. The Chem Eng Club also volunteers at the local children’s hospital. Although Club membership is open only to undergraduate chemical engineering students, many of our events are open to students from other departments.Thanks to the hard work of the Club executive, our events are always well organized and well attended! Anyone interested in making a donation should contact Kristin at skreckke@ mcmaster.ca.

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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New Technology Program Launched

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cMaster and Mohawk College announced in early May the launch of a joint venture in technology education – an advanced Bachelor of Technology Degree Program. It will combine an engineering technology education with management studies - a skill set which is in demand by innovation-based organizations. The program will provide an accelerated path for working technologists, internationally trained professionals and high-school graduates to earn both a college diploma and university degree in technology. “Employers have told us that they need a new type of technology employee, one who has technical capabilities but who is also trained to take on management and supervisory responsibilities,” said Mo Elbestawi, dean of McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering. Students earn the Bachelor of Technology degree in one of two ways. Two-year degree-completion programs are

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available to college graduates with a threeyear technology diploma, as well as to internationally trained professionals who require Canadian credentials and experience. Four-year integrated programs are being developed for students entering directly from high school. Both options feature co-op placements to provide handson experience. The two-year programs will begin in September 2006 and be offered in civil engineering infrastructure technology, computing and information technology, and manufacturing technology. Graduates receive a Bachelor of Technology degree from McMaster. Programs will be offered in the evenings and on Saturdays, and can be taken on a full-time or part-time basis. Projected enrollment for the first year is 120 students. Enrollment is expected to grow to about 400 students in five years. The four-year programs are scheduled to begin in September 2007, and will be offered in process automation technology

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Art Heidebrecht

(based on an existing program at Mohawk), automotive and vehicle technology, and biotechnology. Students successfully completing a program will receive both a Diploma in Technology from Mohawk College and a Bachelor of Technology degree from McMaster. Enrollment of 140 students is projected for the first year, growing in five years to an estimated 960 students. Art Heidebrecht, a professor emeritus in the Department of Engineering, has been appointed Executive Director of the joint venture. Dr. Heidebrecht previously held the positions of Provost and Vice-President Academic, Dean of Engineering, and Acting Director, Centre for Continuing Education. The initiative builds on the successful Bachelor of Technology program in Manufacturing Technology which has been offered jointly by both institutions since 1997. (It will be folded into the new degree program.) While the Bachelor of Technology degree programs will initially use existing facilities at McMaster and Mohawk, there are plans to establish permanent classrooms and laboratory facilities at the new McMaster Innovation Park (MIP). This will help facilitate student access to industrial and laboratory facilities operating at MIP for both intern-type project work and co-op work placements. Further information about the Bachelor of Technology Program can be found at: www.btech.mcmastermohawk.ca N

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Departmental newsbriefs Chemical Engineering Lucy Ye won the first place Bolker prize and Chuanwei Miao won second place for the best presentations at the graduate student session at the PAPTAC Meeting in Montreal on February 9. Lucy Ye also won the Karnis award for the best poster. Finally, Yaling Xu won the Journal of Pulp Paper Science Award for the best paper (Yaling Xu and Robert Pelton, “A New Look at How Fines Influence The Strength of Filled Papers”, JPPS, 31(3) 147-152, 2005). The Canadian Pulp and Paper Technical Association (PAPTAC) hosts the world’s largest annual pulp and paper meeting in Montreal every winter. The graduate student poster and paper presentation sessions are an important part of this meeting. Lucy and Chuanwei are Ph.D. students working for Prof. Robert Pelton and Yaling Xu, a former student of Pelton’s, works for the Nalco Chemical Company in China. ProSensus Inc., established by John MacGregor, a Chemical Engineering professor at McMaster University, has set up office in the McMaster Innovation Park. ProSensus was formed as a spin-off company from the McMaster Advanced Control Consortium, a university/industrial consortium involved in research on analysis, monitoring, control and optimization of industrial processes. ProSensus works on projects using digital images and plant operating data for property prediction, process monitoring and product development. Their clients are in the food, chemical, pulp and paper, agricultural, steel, and water industries. The company has worked with local businesses as well as Fortune 500 companies in the US and Europe. ProSensus now employs two research engineers, both chemical engineering post-graduates from McMaster, and anticipates hiring another two to three engineers in the coming year. The McMaster Innovation Park is an ideal location, close to the main university campus and ProSensus receives business, legal, and marketing support from the university’s Office of Research Contracts M

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specifically recognized for his teaching of Software Engineering 3F03. The Department congratulates Alan on receiving this award.

and Intellectual Property. Contact: John MacGregor at (905) 5259140 x 24951, or email: john.macgregor@ prosensus.ca. Web site: http://www.prosen sus.ca.

Engineering Physics

Civil Engineering

Congratulations to John Luxat who has been elected for a two year term to the Advisory Board of the International Association for Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology (IASMiRT). His responsibilities will include assisting with the organization of the SMiRT-19 International Conference scheduled to be held in Toronto in August 2007. Luxat is currently serving as President of the Canadian Nuclear Society and has recently presented invited lectures on the "Energy Challenges and Nuclear Opportunity" to groups in Ottawa and Chalk River. Bill Garland and John Luxat participated in a UK/Canada Nuclear Skills Workshop held in March in Toronto. The workshop, organized by the British High Commission in conjunction with the Canadian High Commission, involved academic and industry participants from the UK and Canada. It provided an information exchange forum and promoted collaborative interactions in such areas as research and training. Peter Mascher hosted

And the Winner is… the Civil Engineering graduate students and staff of the Applied Dynamic Lab (ADL)! They collected five of the seven boxes of food donated to the Hamilton Food Bank prior to the 2005 Christmas holidays. The ADL students and staff had challenged the faculty, staff and civil engineering graduate students of JHE to a food drive competition to help everyone get into the Christmas spirit.

Computing & Software David Parnas, director of the Software Quality Research Lab, retired as of February 2006. The Department thanks David for his invaluable contributions, his commitment and dedication, and especially for his tireless work in establishing the Software Engineering program here at McMaster. The McMaster Student Union (MSU) Teaching Award for Engineering was presented to Alan Wassyng. He was

continued on page 19

Moving? Got news to share? Fill out and fax to 905-546-5492 or e-mail info to Carm Vespi at vespi@mcmaster.ca Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________ New Address: _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________ Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine Chemical Engineering Grabham, Norm ’74: Currently a parttime engineering instructor teaching engineers/plant managers from Saudi Arabia and surrounding area at Haward Technologies, a Canadian-operated training school in Abu Dhabi the United Arab Emirates. The power engineering and water treatment courses include Boiler Water Chemistry, Oily Water Chemistry, and Boiler Systems. There is a great exchange of technical information and ideas on the similarities and differences of how plants operate here versus in Canada. So far, it has been a great assignment.

Civil Engineering Cheng, Phil ’93: My wife, JoAnn, our puppies, Cooper and Beethoven, and I have moved from Florida and are now living in Richmond, Virginia. We moved because I have been transferred to the Richmond office of Kimley-Horn & Associates, Inc. (www.kimleyhorn.com), an engineering and land planning company. JoAnn is pursuing a career in advertising, following her graduation from the University of South Florida with her BA. Hamilton Beach, Susan ’93: It has been a busy couple of years. I was married in May 2004 to Paul Beach, and in December 2005, gave birth to Jenna (9 lb 1 oz). I also have two beautiful step-daughters, Laura (11) and Jessica (9). After maternity leave, I will be taking on the new title and responsibilities as Development and Environmental Engineer for the City of Sault Ste. Marie. I would love to hear from any fellow CivEng ‚93 grads at suehamilton@shaw.ca.

Electrical Engineering Marsh, Eva ’81: The German translation of my book, Black Patent Shoes Dancing With MS8 is now available. For more information about Tanzen mit MS8, please visit www.evamarsh.net. In January, I traveled to Kuwait to share the research that explains my experience of recovery from multiple sclerosis, and I look forward to returning there again in 2007. [Ed. Note: Eva was inducted into the McMaster Alumni Gallery of Distinction in 2004.]

Engineering Physics Shepherd, Tod ’92: I am the Network Services Supervisor for SunCom Wireless (www.suncom.com), a wireless provider offering voice and data services in the Southeast United States and the Caribbean. The company, which is based in Berwyn, Pennsylvania, is similar to Rogers Wireless, Telus, and Bell Mobility. I live in Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Tomasino, Juan ’00: My wife Tanya and I welcomed our son, Alexander, to the world on Nov. 11, 2005. He weighed 7 lb 3 oz.

Starr, Brian ’91: Moved to Calgray after graduating and lived there for six years. Then I worked abroad in Brunei, Holland and Denmark over the next seven years for Shell and Maersk. Returned to Calgary to take a position at EnCana Corporation, initially as team leader for North Sea offshore developments and, more recently, moved to corporate strategic planning. Still managing to put those years of learning to good use!

Mechanical Engineering

Civil Eng. & Mgt.

Coulthart-Howe, Leah ’96: I am busy at home this year with our second little girl. Mom and Engineer - it’s like having a double career! I love doing both but it is certainly wonderful to have a year to stay at home.

Cullip, Mike ’94 (M.Eng. ’96): My wife and I and the two children, Mackenzie (6) and Aiden (3) moved to Dubai, United Arab Emirates in January. I have accepted the position as Manager of Transportation Planning for the Middle East Operations of Cansult Limited (www.cansult.com), a Canadian firm of consulting engineers and project managers.

Weaver, Andrew ’02: Started a new job in February. I work at a company called Lovat, in the mechanical engineering design department. They are located on Carlingview, right near the airport, and so I’ve moved back to Toronto.

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Chemical Eng. & Mgt. Marshall (nee Schinkel), Rebecca ’97: The Fireball Club ’97/’98 Alumni Group) was created by a group of female engineering graduates who have remained close friends after graduation. Members include Tanya Cochrane (nee Davis), Iris McDonald (nee Gregoriou), Michelle Maybee, Janet Loebach, Betsy Agar-Eva, Meredythe Brown, Lisa Maurice (nee Greb), Pam McPhee (nee Bhandarkar), and Rebecca Marshall (nee Schinkel). Here is a shot of the newest additions to the Fireball Club: on the left is Rhiannon, daughter of Betsy; in the basket is Hannah, daughter of Rebecca; Rhiannon’s older brother Isaac is in the

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Civil Eng. & Society Loebach, Janet ’97: I have recently moved to London, Ontario and continue to do my consulting work.

Wong, Wendy ’98: Mike Chan (Mech Eng ’01) and I are thrilled to announce the birth of our daughter Estelle, born on Dec. 14, 2005. She weighed in at 6 lb 3 oz.

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middle, taking care of the girls. The photo was taken by Fireball Aunt Janet at the Fireball New Year’s Celebration ’06. More future engineers to follow!

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Materials & Society Boyd, Jennifer ’05: I became engaged in Dec. 2005 to Jeremiah Stenekes (MechEng ’04), and we are excitedly planning our wedding which will be in February 2007.

Sam Kodsi continued from page 9

gained in the laboratory courses, including testing and observing, and as a member of the Formula SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) race car team are priceless.” Engineering, he adds, “is the foundation of my career”. For relaxation, Kodsi enjoys working on home renovation projects, traveling to warm destinations during the winter months, swimming and cycling. He lives in Mississauga with his wife, Marianne, whose career has moved from biochemist to teacher. They have one son, Joshua. N

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Alumni Forum focuses on alumni successes The 14th Forum of Engineering Physics Alumni and Undergraduates was held on Friday, March 24. This annual event provides an opportunity for engineering physics students to hear from alumni about how the program has helped them in the workplace and in their careers. This year’s panel was comprised of Jeff Brace (B.Eng.Mgt ’05) from Scotia Capital, Andrew Dawes (B.Eng. ’97) from Quanser Inc., John Domm (B.Eng. ’90) from Automation Tooling Systems, Ivo Ferreira (B.Eng. ’05) from Bruce Power, and Debbie Lisak (B.Eng. Soc. ’97) from Fabrinet Canada Manufacturing Inc. Many additional alumni enjoyed the opportunity to visit with old friends, professors and staff including Steve Crowley, Brad Marshall, Jamie Smith, Avery Yuen, Darryl Wallace, Miroslav Maklenov, Su Mei

Cheung, Victor Barreto, Shaulaine Choo and Anthony Colenbrander. The Forum, moderated by department chair Paul Jessop, was followed by a social in the Wentworth Lounge where undergraduates had an opportunity to talk informally with faculty and alumni. The evening was a great success and enjoyed by all who attended. The annual Forum is a valuable learning experience for undergraduates, and the Department is eager for this contact with the alumni to continue growing. For members of our alumni who missed the event but would be interested in participating next year, or who would consider coming to McMaster to present a seminar, please contact Fran Allen, Engineering Physics Department, McMaster University, L8S 4L7, Tel(905) 525-9l40, ext. 24548, or e-mail allenf@mcmaster.ca.

Departmental newsbriefs continued from page 17

a delegation of UK participants at McMaster immediately following the workshop. The Department would like to extend its congratulations to Joel Hilchey who won the Consulting Engineers of Ontario Scholarship Essay contest at McMaster, receiving a $1000 prize. His essay, "Alternative Energy Sources, Are They Practical?", has been forwarded to the provincial competition. The winner of the Ontario contest will receive $2000, while the runner up receives $1000. The prize will be awarded in June at the organization’s annual meeting in Kingston. On March 23, Dr. Wolfgang Ecke from the Institute for Physical High Technology in Jena, Germany presented a seminar to members of the Department entitled “Optical Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors – Technology, Sensor Systems and Applications”. The following day he was a keynote speaker at a workshop on Optical Fiber Sensors hosted by Dofasco Inc. and Photonics Research Ontario. Many of the professors from the Department with research interests in the area of Fiber Optics were in attendance.

Materials Science & Engineering Congratulations to the following who have won Graduate Student’s Association awards: J.D. Embury, Excellence in Graduate Supervisor; Kumar KrishnaM

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pisharody, the TA Excellence Award; Boris Martin, the Mary Keyes Award for Leadership and Service to McMaster; Michael Greenwood, the Theresa Quigley Award.

Abrasive Waterjet Machining using a Multiphysics Approach”. Congratulations are extended to Anthony Martin Hamilton who was presented with the 2006 S.E. Wolfe Award at the Professional Engineers of Ontario AGM in April. The thesis award is given to a professional engineer (licensed during the year following successful completion of at least one technical exam) who has submitted an engineering report judged to have been the best of all reports received during the year. Hamilton was licensed on November 10, 2005. His report entitled “Gas Turbine Cylinder Assembly Cycle Time Reduction Report” received a mark of 85%. The reward recognizes Professor S.E. Wolfe, P.Eng., a former member of the PEO Board of Examiners.

Mechanical Engineering Phil Koshy was elected as an Associate Member of the International Academy for Production Engineering (CIRP). Sumanth Shankar received the best paper award in the Aluminum Division of the Transactions of the Morphology of the Eutectic Phases in Hypoeutectic AluminumSilicon Alloys. Marilyn Lightstone will co-chair an up-coming conference of the CFD Society of Canada. It is anticipated that the conference will be held in June 2007. Atef Mohany was awarded a Dean’s Award for Excellence in Communicating Graduate Research by Dean F. Hall of the School of Graduate Studies. His seminar was titled “Flow Excited Acoustic Resonance of Bluff Bodies in CrossFlow”. Judging for the award is based on the presentation of a seminar on the student’s research for a public audience. Mohany is one of only three students who received the award this year. Mohamed Eltobgy was presented with an award for the Best Graduate Research Seminar for Fall 2005 by Dr. Samir Ziada, Chair of the Department. The title of his seminar was “Modeling of U

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MacEngineer

The

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair, Eugene Nakonechny

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Can you help us find these lost alumni? Harry Rumble, Electrical Azfar Saeed, Civil Mitsuru Aizawa, Chemical Donald Stephens, Gary Carpenter, Chemical Metallurgical Donald Jaffrey, Metallurgical David Weber, Mechanical Chuan-Sung Yeh, Mechanical Sunil Jha, Mechanical Alistair Young, Metallurgy Suresh Kacker, Mechanical William Kucharski, Electrical Thomas Place, Metallurgical 1971 John Plewes, Metallurgical Robert Ball, Chemical Maged Beshai, Electrical Thomas Reid, Mechanical

1966

Winston Blair, Chemical Umesh Bonde, Mechanical Ho Chan, Civil Dung Dang, Chemical Howard Heffler, Chemical Norman Husemeyer, Mechanical Albert Klein, Chemical Stephan Lane , Chemical Michael Lovett, Chemical Alejandro Lozada, Chemical

Karim Lakhani continued from page 9

the complex questions of technology, business and innovation.” In addition, he says it provided the grounding for his successes at General Electric and the Boston Consulting Group. Lakhani currently lectures at MIT in the Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group. He has just been appointed as an assistant professor at the Harvard Business School in the Technology and Operations Management group, and will begin his duties there in July 2006. “I am really thrilled,” he says, adding that he is “very glad all the schooling is over!” While at MIT, he has been active in ensuring that open source issues are publicly recognized and debated, and encouraging scholarship on distributed innovation systems. He is a co-founder of the MIT Open Source Research Project, the administrator of the MIT-based Open Source Research Community website, and co-editor of Perspectives on Free and Open Source Software (MIT Press, 2005). Lakhani is married to Shaheen (Uddin) Lakhani, also a McMaster grad (B.Sc.’92 & BA Economics ’93). She currently works as a pediatric health psychologist at the Boston Medical Center and lectures at the school of medicine at Boston University. They have a two-year-old daughter, Sitarah Noor.

Moosa Mahomed, Mechanical Vincent McGowan, Mechanical Frederick Neil, Mechanical Richard Rynard, Mechanical Gerhard Schneider , Eng. Physics Allan Scott, Electrical Trevor Sutherland, Chemical

Lucio Cinelli , Eng. Physics Surya Dumpala, Electrical Laila El Hifnawy, Civil Alaa El Zawahry, Civil Ezzat Hanafy, Civil Steven Ho, Chemical David Joyce, Eng. Physics Elizabeth Kesler, Electrical Keith Lam, Mechanical Sander Lam, Electrical David Lau, Computer 1976 Mark Lemon, Ceramic Stephen Cheong, Mechanical Kwok Leung, Civil Randell McFarlane, Chemical Ian Hope, Chemical David Johnston, Mechanical Lynne Morin, Eng. Physics Patrick Naraine, Electrical Yuen Kwok, Mechanical Sunny Omorodion, Chemical Pak Lee, Civil Andrew Pang, Civil Douglas Little, Chemical Zvika Shtifter, Civil William McCann, Civil Nicholas Quzas, Eng. Physics Kuen Siu, Civil Yan Tam, Civil John Small, Electrical Andrew Speziale, Chemical Wing Tong, Civil James Sullivan, Metallurgical Philip West, Electrical Stephen Willey, Eng. Physics 1986 Man Wong, Civil Terrence Atherton, Civil 1981 Chi Chong, Computer Micahel Chou, Mechanical David Arnott, Civil Alain Cyr, Chemical Ngai Chan, Civil Congtru Doan, Computer Ning Chan, Electrical

Hieu Duong, Electrical Sai-Kiu Eng, Electrical Seng Fung, Civil Philip Gensey, Manufacturing Kwok Hui, Electrical Scott Iseppon, Mecahnical Joel Kao, Computer Eddy Ko, Electrical Pak Ku, Computer Gregory Lai, Electrical Amanda Lau, Eng. Physics Wing-Biu Law, Mechanical Thomas Lee, Mechanical Terry Liu, Electrical Marian Matson, Civil David Mitchell, Civil Foad Mojgani, Electrical TFong Ng, Computer Cong Nguyen, Electrical Nuu Nguyen, Electrical Kiem Nguyen, Mechanical Francis Omani, Electrical Cong Pham, Electrical Kiet Quach, Electrical Dante Quiroz, Electrical Edward Robb, Computer Alfred Seto, Chemical Narinder Singh, Electrical Eric Tam, Electrical Alan Thomson, Chemical

MacEngineer Spring 2006  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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