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MacEngineer

The

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

VOLUME 30

NUMBER 2

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

SPRING 2005

Engineering & Management celebrates 30th Anniversary See page 10


A message from the Dean Continuing engineering education

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t McMaster we are dedicated to the belief that lifelong learning contributes to personal fulfillment, career enhancement and positive social change. It is our plan to provide leadership for continuing education in engineering by expanding opportunities for adult growth and development, best practices and standards for the engineering profession. We have moved forward to identify future continuing engineering education (CEE) needs by assigning the task to Professor Emeritus, former provost and dean of engineering, Art Heidebrecht. During interviews with Department Chairs and other leaders in the Faculty of Engineering and with several faculty in the Faculty of Business, including my counter part Dean, Paul Bates, it was clear that the Faculty of Engineering should

inside this issue Engineering News...................4 Alumni Profiles .......................6 Upcoming Events .................19 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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have a significant and identifiable thrust in continuing engineering education (CEE). The recommendations which follow are intended to aid in developing and implementing that thrust. Several recommendations were made: The first recommendation identified a need to undertake a plan to develop and implement CEE programs which are professional in character. These would be generic, multi-disciplinary rather than advanced specialized technical – essentially broad based skills for the practicing engineers. Secondly, that CEE programs developed by the Faculty of Engineering would be credentialed in accordance with the diploma and certificate system already approved by the McMaster Undergraduate Council. Thirdly, that the Faculty of Engineering partner with the McMaster Centre for Continuing Education for the management and operation of its CEE programs. Fourthly, to formulate plans for the creation of the first CEE program as a Diploma in Engineering Management, in cooperation with the Faculty of Business, and that consideration be given to developing a set of diploma programs associated with each of the School for Engineering Practice Centres in Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Public Policy and Design. Clearly, the continuing engineering education initiative supports the Faculty’s strategic objective of growth while improving the quality and our position as one of Canada’s top Engineering Schools. I welcome your comments. On the recruitment front, I am pleased to share with you news regarding two new initiatives we have started. This summer we launch, the Learning Enrichment Advancement Program, L.E.A.P. – a four-week intensive program that takes you from engineering fundamentals to hands-on projects. This program combines university level challenges with opportunities to explore,

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Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

meet new people and have fun for Grade 11 or 12 students. Secondly, Faculty of Engineering has recently created a variable number of entrance awards to inspire women to enter the engineering field. The scholarship, featuring a mentoring program, is available to incoming female students starting in the fall of 2005. Please check our website for more information.

Mo Elbestawi

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A message from the Associate Dean Software Engineering and Game Design program to commence this fall

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s I write this, second-term courses are coming to an end and students are getting ready for their final examinations. The University will soon develop a relaxed atmosphere, with most professors turning their attention to fulltime research. For the Office of the Associate Dean, this is the start of a very busy season during which we collect grades, review the status of all students, verify eligibility for graduation, admit and counsel new students and get ready for the new academic year in September. Starting in the fall, students will have a new choice of program that is generating a lot of excitement. Software Engineering and Game Design involves a partnership between the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities and is the first of its kind in Canada. It will be offered as a four-year B.Eng. degree, with top students having the option of continuing for a fifth year and earning an M.Eng. degree. As is the case with the recent Electrical and Biomedical Engineering program, the Management and Society options will not be available. I must admit that I was somewhat amused by the initial reaction to the announcement of this program by some people who likely had visions of dozens of university students playing video games. Those of us with teenage sons can understand the concern of these well-meaning skeptics but, with a closer look, the potential of this program quickly emerges. Electronic games are currently and will continue to be major drivers in the development of computer hardware and software. The latest in graphical processors, 4D modelling techniques for virtual reality, real-time systems and control, animation tools, user interfaces and sensory feedback have all been heavily influenced by the demands of game designers. In turn, the technology from the gaming industry is finding and driving countless other fields including digital image proM

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such as computationally efficient mathematical models to accurately simulate physical environments, are emerging. From a commercial point of view, computer games have become one of the bright lights in the software industry. The recent release of Halo 2 by Microsoft, with over 7 million units sold worldwide in less than six months, illustrates the commercial potential of computer games. Developers are also porting the technology to countless other new products, such as surgical simulators for the training of medical doctors, remote control (with sensory feedback) of remote mining operations, and simulation of life-threatening or catastrophic crises. All these will help extend the commercial reach of gaming software technology. This program adds to the portfolio of choices that we offer. We will continue to explore opportunities for new programs and endeavour to respond to the needs of industry and our students.

Dr. Peter Smith Associate Dean of Engineering

cessing, audio and visual modelling, flight simulation, military training, design prototyping, architectural visualization and animation. Entirely new fields outside engineering, such as interactive arts and digital music, are being made possible by the technology. New areas of research,

Peter Smith Associate Dean (Academic)

Program a first for McMaster As of September 2005, the Faculty of Engineering will offer the first undergraduate university degree program in software engineering to focus on game design. Courses for the four-year program will be provided by the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Humanities through the Multimedia program. Engineering courses include: computer architecture and graphics processors, 4D modeling for virtual reality, real-time systems and control, real-time animation, and computer game interface design. Multimedia courses include the digital image, audio and visual digital media, animation and interactive digital culture. U

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“Students interested in game design will develop the skills and knowledge to create the ultimate game experience,” said Jacques Carette, assistant professor of Computing and Software. “They will learn about animation, simulation and high-fidelity rendering, with special emphasis on the human aspects involved in designing such software.” According to Geoffrey Rockwell, associate professor in Computing and Multimedia in the Faculty of Humanities, employers look for graduates who are both technically proficient and have the creative ability to tell stories, design continued on page19

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Engineering news GM Canada and McMaster University partner to create Engineering Design and Corrosion Research centres

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cMaster University and General Motors of Canada have partnered to establish two new automotive engineering centres – the GM of Canada Centre for Engineering Design and the GM of Canada Centre for Corrosion Engineering Research. “GM Canada sees McMaster as a key educational partner as we work together to enhance automotive innovation and commercializable R&D in Canada,” said Al Green, Vice President Personnel and Operations for General Motors of Canada. “By linking universities, researchers, students and auto suppliers in a new Canadian Automotive Innovation Network, GM plans to strengthen innovation and competitiveness in Canada.” The establishment of the two Centres is part of General Motors of Canada’s broader $2.5 billion reinvestment in the company’s Canadian operations. It repre-

sents the largest and most comprehensive automotive investment in Canadian history. Following agreements with the Ontario and Federal Governments, GM’s “Beacon Project” investments will strengthen automotive engineering, R&D and manufacturing capabilities in Canada. “GM and McMaster have a long history of partnering on automotive engineering research,” said Peter George, President of McMaster University. “Today’s announcement acknowledges McMaster’s leadership in the field of automotive R&D and is a significant step toward our vision of becoming the leading automotive engineering school in Canada.” GM’s commitment to McMaster is valued at more than $60 million and includes computer-based design tools to help train a new generation of Canadian engineering students. The GM of Canada Centre for Engineering Design will be

From left to right: Dean Mo Elbestawi, Mayor Larry D’Ianni, Dr. Peter George, Mr. Al Green, Mr. Tony Valeri and Mrs. Marie Bountrogianni.

located in the new McMaster School of Engineering Practice and is scheduled to open in 2007. The GM of Canada Centre for Corrosion Engineering Research will be located at the new McMaster Innovation Park and is scheduled to be opened in 2006. “Engineering design is at the core of innovation in the automotive and manufacturing continued on page 9

Former factory to become research site

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cMaster’s plan to purchase the defunct Camco site in West Hamilton is creating an exciting opportunity to collaborate with government and industry. The University, which is paying $13 million for the 14.8 hectare site, wants to develop a research park on the property. It’s an idea that could boost the University’s reputation and result in important economic payoffs for the City of Hamilton. The McMaster University Research Park will include private, university and government laboratories and workshops that are expected to bring new technologies and products to market. Scheduled to open in 2007, it will focus on the University’s reputation in engineering and the life sciences to develop new medical products, drugs

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Deployable Event Structure

and treatments. When completed, a process that could take up to 15 years, the park is expected to support as many as 1,500 jobs c

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with a payroll of over $100 million. A research park typically fosters new products, industries and businesses that benefit the surrounding community. A 2003 study conducted for the Association of University Research Parks in the United States noted that such parks have the potential to create hundreds of jobs, many in the high-paying technology sectors. The success of these research parks depends on two factors: the university must focus on current research strengths to draw related businesses to the park, and it must develop strong links with the private sector. Located on the corner of Longwood Road and Aberdeen Avenue, McMaster’s research park is a partnership with the City of Hamilton, which has pledged $5 million to build a biotechnology centre. N

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Program introduced via webcast

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he University community had an opportunity to be introduced to the new graduate program in biomedical engineering via live webcast. On Tuesday March 8, 2005 interested graduate students and faculty members could visit www.nextstep.mcmaster.ca to learn more about the program which draws resources equally from both the Faculty of Engineering

and the Faculty of Health sciences. Typically biomedical engineering is based in either a medical or engineering faculty, says John Brash, professor of chemical engineering. “The goal of the McMaster program is to develop biomedical engineers who are true interdisciplinarians, fluent in the languages of both medicine and engineering.”

The Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering is offered through the new McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering. It is expected that graduates of the program will be sought after by biomedical and biotechnology industries, as well as hospitals, governments and academic institutions.

TPL offers courses

Lecture supports new school

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March 2005 lecture by a respected biotechnology researcher helped to focus attention on the University’s new School of Biomedical Engineering. Robert Langer, a professor of chemical and biomedical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, visited McMaster to give the annual J. W. Hodgins Memorial Lecture on March 1st.

Robert Langer gave annual lecture on March 1.

His talk, “Biomaterials and How They Will Change Our Lives”, offered insights into current research that is producing microchips and synthetic tissues which, in the future, will help save lives or cure diseases. These kinds of research efforts will be part of the work done at the new School, scheduled to open in the fall of 2005. Biomaterials will be one of four areas of research conducted at the School. The others are: biomedical technology (the development of medical instruments), bioprocessing (producing drugs and vaccines on a large scale), and biomedical imaging. An $8-million fundraising campaign is underway to build a facility to house the School, which will be located at the corner of Main Street and Cootes Drive, in the west campus.

From June 6 to 8, 2005, the Thermal Processing Laboratory (TPL) at the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute is offering a short course on “Thermal Systems – Design, Sizing and Equipment Selection”. The course is designed to introduce participants to essential background information as well as the fundamentals of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. Participants will also be introduced to a set of systematic design, sizing and equipment selection procedures. The course will cover equipment typically used in thermal systems such as: gas transporting equipment (atmospheric and vacuum), liquid and slurry transporting equipment, solid transporting equipment (mechanical and fluidic), heat exchanging equipment (conventional heat exchangers, radiant and immersion tubes, fluidized bed exchangers, cooling towers, and thermal wheels), and storage and processing tanks for spray and quench applications. The course, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, will be of interest to mechanical, design and project engineers and technologists, plant and facility engineers, consultants, and maintenance and operation personnel. The registration fee of $1,284 (incl. GST) covers instruction, course materials and refreshment breaks. For more information and to obtain a copy of the registration form, visit www.mech.mcmaster.ca/~hamedm/cour ses.htm

Learning success

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o one can really teach a person to be successful. However, McMaster professor Rafik Loutfy believes it is possible to provide students with guides and tools that could potentially result in success. Loutfy is a professor in the University’s Xerox Centre for Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation. The mandate of the Centre is to assist engineers in bringing new technologies to market. Xerox of Canada donated $1 million to McMaster to create the Centre that will offer a Master of Engineering degree in entrepreneurship and innovation. The program, scheduled to start in the fall of 2005, will admit 20 students per session. M

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The difficulty with turning a bright idea into a marketable product is that quite often, inventors do not have the business knowledge and the necessary contacts. The program offers students sessions with mentors, practical hands-on experience with government funding programs and venture capitalist opportunities, and assistance with perfecting the invention and developing a business plan. Not all the program’s students will be current B.Eng graduates. It is expected that some will come from business or industry and be sponsored by their employers. This provides companies with an opportunity to explore, develop or perfect an invention with much less risk, Loutfy says. U

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Alumni profiles Kirk Bailey – engineering a natural choice

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ailey, who has both his B.Eng (’87) and M.Eng (’90) in chemical engineering, is currently Vice President at Suncor Energy, responsible for the company’s Sarnia refinery. The refinery’s goal, he explains, is to safely and reliably convert synthetic crude from Suncor’s Oil Sands into transportation fuels and petrochemicals. “My role is to lead a strong team of 275 employees to operate the facility safely and with minimum impact to the surrounding environment.” Engineering seemed a natural choice for the high school graduate who excelled in chemistry, math and physics. Also, Bailey’s dad worked as a process operator in a large chemical plant. “Based on his work stories, I thought it would be interesting to have a career in the process industries,” he says. He is particularly appreciative of the strong focus on problem-solving that was evident throughout the chemical engineering curriculum, noting that this has been a great help during his career. “Many of the chemical engineering courses used real-world examples to demonstrate that

Kirk Bailey

engineers must know how to deal with uncertainty and lack of information when solving problems.” He thinks back to his MacEng days with fondness, and remembers Dr. Woods’ classes in particular. “I always enjoyed Don Woods’ courses. Don could take a technical topic like surface phenomena and bring it to life with anecdotes from his

experiences. Who would have known that bubbles and foams could be so interesting?” Other memories include his friendship with Prof. Andy Hrymak and fellow grad students in the Chem Eng ‘penthouse’ while working on his Master’s degree. And last, but not least, weekend evenings spent at the Downstairs John and Hess Village! McMaster had an even bigger impact on Bailey’s future – it was here that he met his wife, Sheila, a mechanical engineer. The two have been married since 1991 and have 3 children. The family enjoys annual ski trips to locations in Canada and the U.S., and kayaking during the summer months in the Haliburton area. Bailey, who has been with Suncor since 1988, is very excited about the expansion currently in progress at the Sarnia refinery. Hundreds of millions of dollars are being invested in the facility to lower feedstock costs and allow the production of ultra-low sulphur diesel fuel. “It’s a unique and rewarding opportunity to be here at the refinery during a period of growth and renewal.”

Roy Bryan – stoking the family flame

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oy Bryan (’80) is positive about this: the Engineering and Management program had an important impact on his career. “As a person’s career progresses, management duties tend to become more predominate,” he says. “This seems to be the case with even the most technically inclined of engineers.” A civil engineer, Bryan is currently head of Bryans Fuel (www.bryansfuel.on.ca), a third-generation family business based in Orangeville, Ontario. The company provides home heating fuel, commercial and farm fuels, residential, farm and commercial propane and residential and light commercial HVAC installation and service. Its 55 full-time employees offer these products and services to customers within a 30-40 mile radius of the midOntario city.

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An Eng & Mgt graduate benefits from both sections of the program, he says. Engineering offers a specialized way to view and solve problems and that’s something that a professional engineer never forgets. While the business knowledge can assist you in the most unexpected places. For example, consider selling – a key activity for his fuel delivery company. “Selling in even a moderately technical field is made easier by the instant respect given to a Professional Engineer.” A student will broaden their horizons by including the management courses as offered through the Faculty of Engineering’s well-respected program. It lays the groundwork for what he sees as the inevitable transition from pure engineering continued on page 7 c

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Roy Bryan at the Bulk Plant. N

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Adam Caromicoli – work is hard but rewarding

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dam Caromicoli (’86, M.A.’88 from MIT), has the following advice for engineering graduates thinking of becoming entrepreneurs. “It’s an experience that you need to try at some point in your career. The work is hard, sometimes grueling, but hugely rewarding.” The electrical engineering and management grad should know. In April 2005, he established his second start-up company. Indellient Inc. is a consulting firm that helps integrate a company’s corporate IT capabilities through the use of serviceoriented software solutions. “We start by helping customers understand the merits of a service-oriented approach to system integration within their enterprise,” he explains. The company can also provide project management and development services. Indellient is based in Mississauga, Ontario. Since graduation, Caromicoli’s career has focused increasingly more on management. “While I have always been excited about technology, I always believed that my future was to be more focused on business-oriented, entrepreneurial activities.” He credits the unique McMaster program with helping him realize this goal. “Engineering & Management provides the management skills needed for creating successful entrepreneurial ventures.” A fond Mac memory is Dr. Colin Campbell and his fourth-year filtering course. “He fooled his students into

Adam Caromicoli

1992, he took the entrepreneurial plunge and founded Sysinct Inc, which developed and implemented a variety of Internetbased applications built on the Lotus Notes and Domino software platforms. Five years later, Sysinct was purchased by IKON Office Solutions Inc. Caromicoli held a variety of positions while at IKON, all of them in management: president of the Technology Solutions Toronto division, vice-president of Technology Services for North American, and vice-president of the company’s eBusiness Services. The principles of problem solving, analysis and design development are pervasive across fields that have technicalrelated content, he says. “I learned a great deal about structured analysis and thought from the many excellent professors under whom I had the good fortune to study.” The program’s management courses – from accounting fundamentals to legal principles – are relevant in any business. In Caromicoli’s case, the combination has been tremendously beneficial. “Running a startup requires that you wear many hats!” Caromicoli and his wife Caroline currently live in Mississauga with their two children.

thinking that learning is easy!” Following a research position at Alphatech in Burlington, Massachusetts, Caromicoli worked in the software lab of IBM Canada, based in Toronto. But he was lured away in 1989 along with fellow Eng Mgt grad Steven Elop to work in software development for Soma, a small Ottawabased company. When Soma was bought by Lotus Consulting Services Group in

Roy Bryan profile continued from page 6

to more involvement in the business aspects of an engineering-based project or company. McMaster’s strength is that it presents both sides without sacrificing the pure engineering side, he adds. “It’s a tremendous opportunity.” Bryan’s memories of Mac include much more than merely the work and the pressure. “What great fun we had, particularly in the later years of the program!” He thinks frequently of Dr. Drysdale in particular, noting that despite a rather stuffy exterior, the professor often exhibited a tremendously dry sense of humor. In addition to running a busy small busiM

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ness, Bryan is actively involved with the community. Currently president of the Orangeville Lions Club, he has been chair of the Headwaters Health Care Foundation (1999-2002) and chair of the Canadian Oil Heat Association (1997). He coaches lacrosse and hockey, and plays an enthusiastic game of hockey as a member of an Old Timers team. Bryan, who has been married for 24 years, shares life with his wife Judy and their three children. It would certainly appear that Bryans Fuel is destined to continue as a family business for many years to come. U

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Kevin Johnston – Eng & Management

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always wanted to manage large construction projects and be involved in all engineering disciplines. I never envisioned working as a design engineer in one particular discipline,” Kevin Johnston (Civil ’83) says. Growing up in Calgary during a building boom in the 1970’s, Johnston worked most summers in construction and quickly gained an appreciation for the management end of a project. Combining engineering with management courses made good sense, he thought, and McMaster’s Engineering & Management program offered just the right combination. Johnston believes the program produces more well-rounded engineers. “Today, sound technical skills are largely a given. To be successful in the business of engineering and construction, you need to have a good technical basis, but you also need to be able to manage people, build and nurture relationships, have good business acumen, and be personable.” Johnston’s career took an interesting turn following graduation. He went to Vancouver in 1984 for the summer with the intention of entering a Master’s program in geo-technical engineering. However he got involved with the city’s Expo 86 site as a pile drawing inspector and worked his way up to assistant to the vice-president of construction – and his career was launched. He was hooked on the Expos. Since the 1986 Expo, he’s worked as a Project Manager on Expo 98 (Brisbane, Australia), Expo 92 (Seville, Spain) and Expo 93 (Taejon, Korea). After the Expos, came General Motors Place in Vancouver and the Santiago Chile International Airport expansion, where he was again the Project Manager. These experiences led to personal growth in other areas. He’s traveled extensively, is fluent in Spanish and was at one time conversant in Japanese. His travels identified different business opportunities which, fed by an entrepreneurial spirit, led to his current business venture. He is one of three founders of EMTech S.A (www.emtech.cl), a company that specializes in energy management and emissions technologies. Started in 2003, the company is based in Santiago, Chile. “I have been really, really fortunate and

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Kevin Johnston

have few regrets. I have met great people and been given great opportunities.” Johnston is also Senior Director, Design and Construction, for Vancouver Airport Services, a subsidiary of the Vancouver

Airport Authority. Vancouver Airport Services operates 20 airports in 8 countries. His responsibilities include the oversight and management of all international airport capital expansions for the B.C.-based company. Johnston says the Engineering & Management program is good for an engineer who does not want to concentrate solely on research or design work. In addition to the Mac’s strong technical side (“Mac is a great school for research and design and has some of the best structural profs”), the management courses provided exposure to financial statements, basic financing principles, economics, marketing strategies – key items for management positions or for starting a business. Johnston and his wife Sylvia have two children and look forward to a third. An avid car enthusiast, he also enjoys riding his hand-assembled Bimota YB11 motorcycle and practising Judo.

Alan Lam – good memories despite long days

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have good memories of Mac, even though I lived off campus,” civil engineering grad Alan Lam says. “I was at the University from 7:30 a.m to 11:59 p.m. for four years!” Despite the long days (or perhaps, because of them), McMaster engineering provided a good foundation, he adds, in both academics and in how to deal with people. Lam has parlayed those features into a highly successful career, searching out and pursuing opportunities for business. After graduating in 1981, he practised in the profession but always knew he’d prefer to operate his own business. In 1994, he founded Greenland International Consulting which focused on water resources and environmental issues, a natural follow up to his Master’s degree thesis on water resource engineering (University of Ottawa, 1983). Then, wanting to become more diversified, Lam established Ecotech Consulting Engineers in 2000. Ecotech does not develop products per

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Alan Lam

se, but engages in studies and research methodologies, and explores opportunities for solutions to a variety of environmental issues. The company consults on municipal engineering-related projects for municipalities as well as for developers of large-scale continued on page 9 N

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Gary MacFarlane – a man of passion

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verything about me is passiondriven. No passion? Then it’s time to move on!” Gary MacFarlane’s CV confirms this. After graduating from the Engineering & Management Program (Civil) in 1975, he spent ten years with Stelco in various positions (Sales Engineering, Marketing and Technical Sales). Then, for five years he worked at Magna International. He left Magna in 1987 to join Ortech International and launch its Manufacturing Process Technology group. A year later, he took the practice private in a new venture, Manufacturing Process Technologies. Since then, he has been an owner and served as president of Apex Metals, which he grew 250% over 4 years, and then Olympic Gear & Manufacturing. Today, he is founding partner and president of Dynac Inc, a Kitchener-based developer of budgeting, forecasting and reporting software applications. “I am basically a “hard wired” entrepreneur. I probably could not hold a `job’ job for long any more!” MacFarlane speaks glowingly, even passionately, about the Engineering & Management program. “It has had more impact on me and my career than any other event in my life,” he admits. “I was born an engineer but clearly Eng.& Mgt. kick-started my transformation into an entrepreneur, and

grounding that has stood the test of time. With Dynac Inc. (www.dynactools.ca), MacFarlane combines over 30 years experience in both business and engineering. The company, established in November 2001, has developed a suite of software programs known as DynacTools, which assist management in the collection and analysis of financial data for the purpose of streamlining budgeting, and forecasting processes. In effect, he has brought the principles of engineering to accounting. According to MacFarlane, DynacTools takes accounting from a lack-luster, twodimensional world to a truly multidimensional model that can help business people review the past, understand the present and view the future. Successful businesses require a strong financial foundation and vice versa. “It’s a parallel to Eng & Mgt. – or is that Mgt & Eng.?” he quips. When not busy planning his next entrepreneurial move, MacFarlane enjoys family activities; he and wife Linda have two children. In his free time, he plays golf and wind surfs.

Gary MacFarlane

harnessed my imagination and intuition.” He would definitely encourage prospective students to consider it. The program offers the ultimate in career flexibility, he notes. “You can be the engineer with business acumen or the businessman with engineering acumen.” He has never regretted spending that extra year. The increased knowledge “truly had a synergistic effect, where 4 + 1 really equals 6!” Unlike many of his Management & Engineering peers, MacFarlane never felt the need to obtain an MBA. He believes the program provided him with a solid

McMaster and GM continued from page 4

sectors,” said Mo Elbestawi, Dean, Faculty of Engineering, McMaster University. “It allows engineers to apply knowledge of materials, processes, information systems, and robotics to develop new products and processes. Through the GM Canada partnership, we will significantly expand our role in developing future generations of vehicles and engineers.”McMaster University, named Canada’s Research University of the Year by Research InfoSource, has world-renowned faculty and state-of-the-art research facilities. McMaster’s culture of innovation fosters a commitment to discovery and learning in teaching, research and scholarship. Based in Hamilton, the University has a student population of more than 20,000 and more than 112,000 alumni in 128 countries. For more information ontact: Joe Barbera, McMaster University, 905-525-9140 ext 26714, barbera@mcmaster.ca or Gene Nakonechny, McMaster University, 905-5259140 ext. 26781, genen@mcmaster.ca

Alan Lam profile continued from page 7

developments and roadwork projects. One of the company’s current projects involves a large tributary of China’s Yangtze River system. Over the years, Lam has visited that country, exploring various ways a Canadian engineering company could assist with China’s rapid development, and nurturing contacts. Lam, who is president of Ecotech, explains that while China has developed an expertise in civil engineering, its history of severe pollution problems is impacting on the success of new project developments. Water there is contaminated by two main sources: manufacturing waste and human waste. In January 2005, Ecotech signed a deal with the city of Wuhan to help clean up a small polluted lake in the area, using wetland M

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science and the introduction of microorganisms. Lam expects the work to be completed within ten months. “It’s a huge opportunity,” he notes. The Hubei province where Wuhan is located is known as the land of 1,000 lakes, most of them severely polluted. His York Regionbased company is poised to enjoy a spectacular boost in business! Back home in Canada, in addition to his consulting work, the busy entrepreneur is also an active land developer and has been involved in residential building projects. When not flying to China, developing new business initiatives or helping out in Community works, Lam helps his wife raise their three children and occasionally enjoys a good game of golf. U

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Special events Thirty Years and Counting!

ested in participating in the next forum or in coming to McMaster to present a seminar, please contact Fran Allen, Engineering Physics Department, McMaster University, L8S 4L7, Tel (905) 525-9140, Ext. 24548, E-mail, allenf@mcmaster.ca.

The year 2005 marks the 30th anniversary of the Faculty’s highly-regarded Engineering & Management program. To celebrate, faculty, staff and alumni came together on March 11th for refreshments, speeches and dinner at the University Club. Over 85 people attended and from the many positive comments, the evening was a great success! Ken Coley, acting director of the program, noted that one highlight was the 40-second “interviews” by Dr. Don Woods of all alumni present. A previous director of the program from 1986 to 1991, Woods invited each alumnus to give a short introduction and a statement of what he or she is doing now. It became obvious that a great many of those who spoke have been very successful indeed. In addition to Dr. Woods, five other past directors were in attendance. They were joined by alumni and their guests, current engineering & management students, and faculty and staff members. (For photos, check the Alumni picture gallery at http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/eventgallery/e&m30th2005/index.htm “This went over very well,” Coley said. “It was a good boost to all of us to see how well our program has done.”

Engineering Degree Morphs into Business Career Joe Sferrazza (’80) was the keynote speaker at the very successful AIC Wine & Cheese evening on Wednesday, March 2nd. His address to a captivated audience of 100 including 3rd, 4th, and 5th year engineering students was entitled “How An Engineering Degree Was Leveraged Into The Business World”. The electrical engineering grad, who continued on to complete an MBA in 1982, is currently the Chief Information Officer for AIC, Canada’s largest privately held mutual Joe Sferrazza fund organization. Sferrazza gave a personal and informative talk about his undergraduate and graduate experiences, and the role that his degree has played in the business world. To be successful in either engineering or business, one needs a sound framework for making decisions combined with a value system that is constantly applied to the decision-making process. He noted that character traits that typically lead to success include commitment and focus, enthusiasm and passion, preparedness and flexibility, confidence and determination, loyalty and honesty. He also provided three simple steps for success: Choose a role model; Ask your role model “how”; Don’t be arrogant copying it.

Homecoming Weekend 2005

Engineering Physics Alumni Undergraduate Forum and Social

Calling all Redsuits from 1987 to 2005! You are all invited to “come back to Mac” for this year’s Homecoming Weekend events, October 1, 2005. Bring your Redsuit – whether it fits or not! Visit our website for more information. http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/ engalumni/homecoming.htm

The Thirteenth Annual Forum of Engineering Physics Alumni and Undergraduates was held on Friday, March 11, 2005. Members of this year’s panel were Ken Fairservice (B.Eng.Mgt. ’04) from Ontario Power Generation, Mike Mazarakis (’98) from IBM Global Services, Lisa (Taubensee) Woodward (’01) from Gennum Corporation, and Jon Markle (’04) who is currently an M.Sc. graduate student. Paul Jessop, Department Chair, acted as Moderator. Members of the panel outlined their careers since leaving McMaster and described how the Engineering Physics program had prepared them for the workforce. The event was followed by a social in the ABB Lounge where undergraduates had an opportunity to talk informally with faculty and alumni. The forum is a valuable learning experience for our undergraduates. For those alumni who missed the event but would be inter-

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Give Back to Mac by becoming a Mentor for an evening. Engineering alumni from all departments are invited to attend and participate in Mentor Night on Thursday, September 28th. Last year, we had 50 mentors and over 100 engineering students. The meet and chat event not only offers engineering alumni a chance to revisit the University and reconnect with classmates, but it provides valuable opportunities for current students to ask questions about employment prospects, emerging fields of work and other issues relating to their futures as engineering professionals. Mentor Night will be held in CIBC Hall at 7 p.m. To participate as a mentor, please email Carm Vespi at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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Venture program continues to grow

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he ever-popular summer Venture Science and Engineering Camps are gearing up for another stimulating session in 2005. This will be the fifteenth anniversary of the successful collaboration between the Faculty of Engineering and McMaster University. The camps offer engineering and science faculty and undergraduate students an opportunity to engage and interact with the next generation of brilliant young minds. The goal is to provide resource-rich programs that will spark a life-long interest in learning and discovery.

Venture is comprised of two exciting programs: Engineering and Science (Grades 4 to 8) and Computers & Technology (Grades 4 to 10). The one-week sessions offer hands-on educational projects, from dissection and website design to chemistry and computer game creation, as well as fun

recreational and social activities. In 2004, Venture won the Best Project Award from ACTUA, a Canada-wide group of university-based science camps. For more information, go to www.venture. mcmaster.ca or call 905-525-9140, ext. 24906.

New summer program leaps into action

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new engineering enrichment camp is ready for its inaugural term this summer. Geared to appeal to top Grade 11 and 12 students who excel in science or engineering, the Learning Enrichment Advancement Program (L.E.A.P.) will run from July 3 to 29, 2005. Students who enjoy building things and learning how things work will be able to pursue their interests while at the same time developing skills and expanding their knowledge. The four-week camp, which can accommodate both day ($834.60) and live-in students ($2,312.68), combines lectures, design projects and laboratory experiments. Students will choose from three build/design projects: robot, car or aircraft. Depending on their chosen project, participants could be working with Computer Aided Design (CAD) and rapid-prototyping machines, or with microprocessorequipped robots as well as ultrasonic and laser sensors. Each member of the team that builds the best robot, designs the best car and designs the best aircraft will receive a $3,000 McMaster entrance scholarship. For more information about L.E.A.P., go to www.leap.mcmaster.ca or call 905-5259140, ext. 24906. M

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Paul Mizzi – capitalizing on business opportunities

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he employees at CIMTEK (www. cimtek.com) speak affectionately of “Mizzi Vision”, the unerring ability of the company’s co-founder to assess and capitalize on business opportunities. Paul Mizzi (electrical ’80) founded the Burlington-based CIMTEK with James F. Egan in 1986. The company offers products and services that reduce the risk of launching new products to market by ensuring that they perform. CIMTEK’s innovative electronic functional test solutions are used by manufacturers in industries such as automotive, consumer electronic, aviation and other emerging markets. New product testing in these sectors is critical to ensure that they meet expectations and the problems and product failure are detected early. Today, CIMTEK,

which is privately owned, employs over 100 people and has offices in key locations around the world including the United States, Mexico, Britain and China. This year, it ranked 100 on the Branham300, a listing of the top Canadian IT companies. The vice-president of business development says his success is directly attributable to the strong engineering and academic background obtained at McMaster. “It provided me with a solid base from which to build a career.” Mizzi admits that he’s always been a techie – “I had a computer lab at home” – and was more interested in the computer side of electrical engineering. After graduating, he started working in a small Hamilton high-tech company as project engineer with responsibility for product

Paul Mizzi

management and technical documentation as well as technical sales support. From there, he went to Hewlett Packard as a continued on page 15

Peter Timler – building “neat” things

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eter Timler always wanted to build – not just ordinary things – but, “Neat things, like long-span bridges and tall buildings!” Focused on this goal, he took civil engineering at McMaster, graduating in 1981, and then completed his Master’s at the University of Alberta (1984), specializing in steel construction. A Hamilton native, Timler recalls his time at the University with fondness. “I very much enjoyed my experiences there. It always felt like home.” During his professional career, he developed a diverse consulting and construction background from work on numerous projects, primarily in steel structures (bridges and buildings), and is recognized as a structural steel specialist. Currently he is Western Regional Executive Director of the Canadian Institute of Steel Construction (CISC), based in Vancouver. Founded in 1930, CISC is the national industry organization representing the structural steel, open web steel joist and steel plate work fabricating industries. Member companies produce fabricated structural steel for buildings, bridges, tanks, plate work and other similar steel structures. Timler is responsible for the area from Thunder Bay in Ontario to British Columbia, and travels frequently from his home outside Vancouver. There are several

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Peter Timler

segments to CISC’s mandate, he notes: to seek out and disseminate new methods of steel construction (composite or hybrid); to promote new technology that will improve productivity especially for designers; and to assist project teams with safe and cost effective methods of steel framing. “It’s a big challenge, but it’s a great industry.” In 2004, CISC jointly received the Charles Pankow Award for Innovation from the American Society for Civil Engineering (ASCE). It recognized CISC’s collaborative work in implementing the c

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Steel Plate/Composite Column/Shear Wall system in the Seattle Federal Courthouse project. (Collaborators included structural engineers Magnusson Klemencic Associates (MKA), NBBJ Architects, the General Services Administration, and the University of California at Berkeley.) Timler accepted the award on behalf of CISC. “The R & D on the steel plate shear wall (SPSW) concept has been studied and tested in Canada for over 22 years,” Timler says. Having been an original researcher in this field himself and having provided concept development direction to MKA during design development for several SPSW projects, he is especially proud that CISC was recognized for its innovative engineering and promotion of excellent structural steel research – initiatives that are strongly rooted in Canada. Somehow he finds the time to be actively involved in a number of professional organizations including the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia, the Consulting Engineers of British Columbia, the Canadian Association of Earthquake Engineers, the Steel Structures Education Foundation, and both the Canadian and American Institutes of Steel Construction. Timler is married to Mary, who is also a Mac grad (BA ’84), and they have two children. N

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Chris Vacca – just do it!

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ngineering physics grad Chris Vacca (’98) has many great memories about his time spent at Mac – and some even involve academics! Mostly though, it’s the fun stuff: being a Redsuit and helping “guide” first year engineering students; attending Fireball; figuring out what to do for Kipling; attending the Engineering Physics Social; putting a band together for Civilpalooza; and entering the Ontario Engineering Competition in which his team took home a prize – along with some unauthorized mementos from the pub at Queen’s! In a more serious vein, Chris says the engineering program provides graduates with a solid technical background, as well as the problem solving and time management skills needed in a professional engineering career. When asked about influential profs or mentors, he especially recalls Dr. Peter Mascher, professor and chair of the Department. “He was always

extremely enthusiastic about Eng Phys and this showed during his lectures. Dr. Mascher was someone you could talk to when you needed some advice.” Because Engineering Physics is a diverse and forward-looking discipline, it has lead him to some very exciting career opportunities. Since graduating, he has worked in the automotive and the high-tech industries with short stints at Daimler Chrysler Canada and JDS Uniphase. Currently he is Safety Manager for the Global Apparel Product division of Nike, a recognized leader in footwear and athletic apparel manufacturing. Its world headquarters are in Beaverton, Oregon, and Chris has taken up residence in near-by Portland. Established in the 1970s, Nike today is a large global corporation with operations on six continents and over 23,000 employees. That figure rises to 1 million when suppliers, shippers, retailers and service

Chris Vacca

providers are included. At Nike, Chris is responsible for ensuring the safety of all Nike apparel product that comes to market. “I work closely with the company’s design, development, manufaccontinued on page 15

Steve van der Woerd – uses Mac skills daily

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hose who entered the Engineering and Management program in its early years did so for a number of reasons, but almost all now recognize the many benefits of combining business courses with an engineering degree. And, like Steve van der Woerd (Civil ’81), they are quick to encourage first-year engineering students to consider the five-year option. “The Engineering and Management program is ideally suited for those who want to excel and be leaders in their field,” he says. “The knowledge gained will broaden the tools needed to achieve success.” Van der Woerd (Civil ’81) is no stranger to success. After graduating from Mac, he completed an MBA (York ’84) while working in the profession for the Canadian firm Marshall Macklin Monaghan, which is based in Thornhill, Ontario. Then, in 1989, combining his engineering and business expertise, he took the entrepreneurial leap and founded van der Woerd & Associates (www.vdwengineering.com). The Burlington-based engineering consulting firm began by specializing in municipal and land development engineering. While engineering remains the main thrust of the company, today this M

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neering and surveying, offers a wide range of services including design for traffic, storm water management and streetscape projects, as well as rezoning applications, construction layout and site inspections. It currently employs 12 and handles clients from across southern Ontario. As president, he is responsible for the overall management of the company. When required, he assists on projects that need his expertise such as feasibility studies, road and water main design, pump station hydraulics design, traffic analysis and design, and intersections and road configuration. Van der Woerd says he was drawn to the unique McMaster program for very practical reasons. “I felt the program would better equip me for work in industry.” He thought the commerce courses could broaden his education and provide for a greater variety of options in the working world. Turns out, he was right! On a personal note, he and Annette are celebrating their 25th wedding anniversary this year with a special trip. The couple are the proud parents of three children, and the family enjoy holiday time spent at the family cottage in Barry’s Bay in Algonquin Park.

Steve van der Woerd

activity is supplemented by legal surveying and design/build projects. “I use the skills learned in the Eng. & Mgt. program on a daily basis, and I consider the education to be invaluable in my work as an employer, consulting engineer and business manager.” The company, which has completed projects for both the public and private sectors in the areas of planning, engiU

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Engineering grad receives alumni award

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he McMaster Alumni Association will present its Association Branch Award for 2005 to Romeo Palombella (’73) at a special luncheon during Alumni Weekend 2005. Palombella, who received a B.Eng. in Civil Engineering was nominated by the McMaster Branch of the Association in recognition for his active and enthusiastic support of the Association, in particular of engineering alumni. He founded the Engineering Alumni Branch in 1988, and is a long-time member of the Engineering Alumni Advisory Committee, recently serving as its chairman. Palombella regularly attends

student events and mentoring nights to offer support, and is an active participant in the annual Engineering Frosh Week Bus Pull. A regular contributor to the MacEngineer, Palombella often engages his business and professional colleagues in support for the University and the Alumni Association. The award was established in 1995 to recognize “outstanding contribution and dedication to the McMaster Alumni Association through involvement in one of its branches”. Palombella will receive the award at the Volunteer Recognition Luncheon event on Sunday June 5.

Eliminate wet hands

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he world may soon have a more efficient and sanitary method for drying hands in a public washroom. As part of a mechanical engineering design competition, a team of McMaster engineering design students have developed a handsfree, roll-towel dispensing machine that provides individual double-thick folded towels. The thickness of the towel almost guarantees it will not be torn when wet hands take it from the dispenser. The competition, held at McMaster from January to April 2005, was organized by the Away From Home Division of Scott Paper Limited in Mississauga,

Romeo Palombella

Ontario and Mukesh Jain, associate professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Fourth-year students Paul Cutrona, Graham Dickinson, Stuart Evans, Brett Jermyn and Michael Whitby won a $7,500 prize for their invention. Scott Paper chose the Faculty of Engineering at McMaster University because of its highly regarded mechanical engineering department and its approach to innovation and design. The company will now integrate the mechanical design into its product development process, taking it through prototype, testing and pre-production project phases.

Brett Jermyn, Paul Cutrona, Michael Whitby, Stuart Evans and Graham Dickinson teamed up to build a better towel dispenser for Scott Paper.

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Attracting girls to engineering

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cMaster’s Women in Engineering (WIE) Committee, founded in 2003, has upped the ante in an attempt to entice more female high school students into engineering. At its annual Women in Engineering Exchange event in February 2005, the Committee announced the creation of a new entrance scholarship. The Inspiration Scholarship for Women in Engineering is open to female high school students entering McMaster’s engineering program with a grade average of 85 per cent or better. The Scholarship includes a $2,000 award and a mentoring opportunity with either an engineering alumna or a senior female engineering student. The new scholarship was announced in conjunction with the February 5th Exchange event, which attracted over 150 young women (Grades 9 to 11) from 45 Ontario high schools. During the daylong event, the students heard guest speakers, participated in tours of the engineering buildings and labs, engaged in panel discussions with engineering students and alumni, attended a Fireball Show and took part in an engineering design competition.

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New Faculty Members Mechanical Engineering Dr. Selvaganapathy graduated from the Central Electochemical Research Insititute, one of the leading Institutes in India. He obtained his M.S. & Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, Ponnambalam Selvaganapathy Ann Arbor. Prior to coming to McMaster, he was employed as a Postdoctoral Research Scientist at

Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California. Dr. Selvaganapathy’s areas of research interest include micro channel flow, micro systems, micro fabrication and applications of micro systems in biomedical engineering.

completing his doctoral studies in the UK, he was employed as an engineer at Hatach Associates in Toronto and served as a consultant to Motion Concept Vehicles in Mississauga as well as to Stephen Tullis British Aerospace. Dr. Tullis’s research interests include turbulent combustion, boundary layer flows, fluid flow in bioreactors and metallurgical flows.

Dr. Stephen Tullis received his B.Sc. and M.S. degrees from Queens University and his Ph.D. from Cambridge University. Dr. Tullis is a member of Professional Engineering Ontario (PEO). Prior to

Paul Mizzi profile

Chris Vacca profile

continued from page 10

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turing, legal and consumer affairs departments.” He also travels a fair amount during the year, mainly to Europe and Asia to visit local offices and manufacturing partners in those areas. Working at Nike’s world headquarters is a benefit in itself, he says. “The campus has state-of-the-art sports facilities including fitness centres, tennis courts, basketball courts, beach volleyball courts, two soccer pitches, two running tracks, a pool, a rock climbing gym, and much more.” There is the added perk that you just might run into a Nike sponsored athlete on the campus. “It makes for a very fun and unique place to work!” MacEngineer readers will want to note this: “If any Mac grads are ever in the Portland area, I would love to give you a tour,” he offers. Chris says Portland is a great city to live in because of its proximity to the ocean and the Cascade Mountains. When not hard at work, he enjoys mountain biking, hiking, rock climbing, snowboarding and kayaking.

research engineer, a move that gave him the opportunity to develop a through knowledge of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM). He brought this knowledge along with extensive technical and sales expertise to the formation of CIMTEK. Mizzi is responsible for the growth of strategic partnerships and for pioneering the early stages of the company’s global sales and distributor network. Clients currently include Delphi, Siemens, DuPont, and Microsoft.

Mizzi is very interested in the recent GM Canada announcement of its R & D investment in the University’s automotive engineering area. He is very supportive of such investments. “Canada needs to continue to grow talent, and retain talent, in order to be a recognized leader in the world economy,” he says. “Innovation will be key to making a difference in the future.” Paul lives in Burlington with his wife of 21 years, Arlene, and the couple have 4 children and 1 grandchild.

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca CIMTEK’s Canadian headquarters located in Burlington, Ontario. M

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Departmental newsbriefs Chemical Engineering

Computing & Software

Robert H. Pelton has been named a Fellow of TAPPI, the leading technical association for the worldwide pulp, paper and converting industry. TAPPI Fellowship is an honorary title bestowed upon less than one percent of TAPPI’s membership, and is given to individuals who have made extraordinary technical or service contributions to the industry and/or the Association. Dr. Pelton is recognized for advancing the science and technology of papermaking chemistry. He has published more than 170 refereed publications and more than forty book chapters and conference proceedings. He has also been awarded six patents. He is currently leading the startup of SENTINEL – The Canadian Network for the Development and Use of Bioactive Paper. The Department welcomes Andrea Vickers to the position of Graduate Secretary. Andrea recently worked in the Office of Research Services where she was the Administrative Assistant in Major Projects. She has also worked in various other positions in the Hamilton area. Congratulations to Glen and Lisa Crossley on the birth of their son. Rowan Alexander Crossley arrived on November 12, weighing in at 8 pounds, 4 ounces.

The Department congratulates graduate student Ed Sykes, who received the Best Ph.D. Student Award Certificate by IASTED at its 5th International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology CATE-2003 in Rhodes, Greece. He was also selected as the one of five finalists in the 3rd International Competition of Ph.D. Students on Research in Web-based Education Era by the 2004 International Conference on Web-based Education WBE-2004 in Innsbruck, Austria. Two Departmental research groups – the Algorithms Research Group and the Advanced Optimization Laboratory – are jointly hosting the First Franco-Canadian Workshop on Combinatorial Algorithms at McMaster from August 18 - 20, 2005. Although “Franco-Canadian” in its orientation, FCWCA accepts research contributions from anywhere in the world. At the August event, a total of seven distinguished researchers will give invited talks, including Stephen Cook of the University of Toronto, whose 1971 paper laid the foundation for the modern study of computational complexity. It is anticipated that FCWCA will be held every two years at alternating venues in Canada and France.

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Civil Engineering Structures and earthquake engineering specialist Ahmed Ghobarah visited Southeast Asia in February 2005 as part of an engineering and science group evaluating the effects of the December 2004 tsunami. The 9.0-magnitude earthquake and the tsunami that followed have completely destroyed large sections of the affected areas in Thailand and Indonesia. The group included earthquake, structural, coastal and geotechnical engineers. Information gathered by studying the disaster’s effect on engineered structures will assist engineers in the future design of structures which can survive these events.

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Associate professor Tim Davidson recently received substantial financial CFI support for his research into signal processing. Davidson is the Canadian Research Chair in Communications Systems. Tom Luo and Alex Gershman jointly received the IEEE 2005 Best Paper award for their paper on Signal Processing. Dr. Luo is the Canadian Research Chair in Information Processing.

Materials Science & Engineering

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Mechanical Engineering The Department is very pleased to announce the following awards. In March during the Graduate Student Recognition Day, Gary M. Bone received the President’s Award for Excellence in Graduate Supervision for outstanding supervisory and mentoring skills. Dr. Bone was selected from among candidates nominated by the Faculties of Engineering, Science and Health Sciences, and is only the second candidate from the Faculty of Engineering to win this award.

Dr. Gary Bone receives award from Dr. Peter George.

Gordon Irons, director of the Steel Research Centre, is the recipient of the c

2005 Canadian Materials Chemistry award from Canadian Materials Science. He will accept the award in June at the Canadian Materials Science Conference, which is being held at the University of British Columbia. On May 9th, Irons gave the Howe Memorial Lecture at AISTech 2005, the annual meeting of the Association for Iron & Steel Technology. His paper, entitled “Developments in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking”, won the Henry Marion Howe Award for Best Paper. AISTech 2005 was held in Charlotte, N.C., from May 9th to 12th . Two display technologies used in Adrian Kitai’s laboratory were accepted at the technology showcase World’s Best Technologies 2005, in Arlington, Texas in March. They are: a flexible polymerceramic composite for roll-up TV of the future, and an optical fibre-based display solution for new very large flat displays called “electronic posters”.

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in Communicating Graduate Research at the Graduate Student Recognition Day reception on March 15th. His topic was “Active Control in Thermal Management of Electronics”. Fourth-year students Akbar Ahmad, Daryl Scheerer and John Yarnell were awarded third place in the ASM Ontario Chapter Education Night Poster Competition hosted at the University of Toronto on Monday, March 7th. Their poster was titled “Characterization of LiquidCooled Heat Sinks” and was based on their senior project, carried out in the Thermal Processing Laboratory (TPL) under the supervision of Dr. Mohamed Hamed. Doctoral student Joseph Hall has been awarded a prestigious NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship. He is considering research opportunities at several universities in Canada and the United States. Joseph McDermid, associate professor, has been awarded $50,000 as part of the Auto 21 Project, and has also been awarded a $75,000 (US) American Iron and Steel Society grant for research on the galvanizing of advanced automotive steels.

Solar Car Update $20 Buys You Power! The McMaster Solar Car Team’s “adopt-a-cell” campaign offers the entire University community, including alumni, a chance to be part of the first North American Solar Challenge. For just $20, you can purchase one of the solar cells that cover the Phoenix, McMaster’s sleek solar car. The Team needs to raise $75,000 to send the car and Team members to Austin, Texas, in July for the special running of the world’s longest solar car race. Starting from Austin, the cars must travel across the United States and into Manitoba, finishing 4,000 kilometers later in Calgary, Alberta. Solar cell sponsorships may be purchased online at www.solarcar. mcmaster.ca. Corporate sponsorships are also needed and would be most welcome. E-mail inquiries can be sent to solarcar@mcmaster.ca.

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Associate professor Allan Spence is hosing the annual meeting of the Association of Coordinate Metrology Canada 2005, to be held at McMaster on June 9th and 10th. The meeting will include international speakers on Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing, Coordinate Measuring Machines and related technology. A dinner will be held at

the Royal Botanical Gardens. For information about the meeting, visit www.acmccanada.ca. In June Dr. Spence will travel to Bangkok, Thailand to present a technical paper at the International CAD Conference and Exhibition, and to participate in the editorial board meetings for a new journal, Computer-Aided Design and Applications. www.cadanda.com .

Remembering Fumi On December 31, 2004, Fumiko Miyasaka, the Faculty’s first undergraduate student advisor, died peacefully in her sleep at Macassa Lodge, Hamilton. She was 87. Fumi, who started at McMaster in 1973 in Admissions, worked full time for the Faculty of Engineering from 1977 until her retirement in 1984. She will be remembered as a generous, caring, and compassionate person who whole-heartedly embraced life. Born and educated in Vancouver, she had a successful career as a bookkeeper prior to the war. During the 1940’s, Fumi was sent to the Lemon Creek internment camp where she stayed until the end of the war. In 1945 she moved to Hamilton, finding work first as a seamstress and later as a bookkeeper. She married James Miyasaka in October 1949, and in September the following year, Jim and Fumi became the proud parents of Gale. In 1999, the couple celebrated their 50th anniversary with a Mediterranean cruise. An active woman who enjoyed tennis

Fumiko Miyasaka

and skiing, traveling and dancing, Fumi suffered a massive stroke in April, 2003 and went directly from hospital to a nursing home. Many in the McMaster community will have fond memories of Fumi, a talented, positive mentor and friend who brightened our lives with her presence.

Change of address card: Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________ New Address: _________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________ Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Alumni Grapevine MacChemEng

Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. Contact him at nathanhon@wfg-aegon.com.

Nguyen, An-Lac ’69: Living in Montreal with his wife, an accountant, and his two sons. Graduated from Princeton with an MA in biotechnology and from McGill with a degree in law, and now practicing patent law at Ogilvy Renault. Petryschuk, Walter ’65: Spent 25 years

with Polysar Corporation and 5 years with Suncor, and served as Director General of the National Research Council. Retired in 1998 to enjoy life with Mary, our four sons and their families. Future plans include travel, golfing, curling and writing my memoirs.

MacCompEng Schmid, Glen ’85: Currently living in

Ottawa and is Director, Mobile Solutions for Bridgeport Wireless, a U.S.-based company.

MacComp&Software Provost, Jim ’02: Meghan and I would

like to announce the birth of our first daughter, Madeleine, on January 21, 2005, weighing 7.5 pounds.

MacEngPhys

MacChemEng&Soc Ng, Jon ’04: Currently working as a Project

Coordinator at JAN Kelley Marketing in Burlington, Ontario – a advertising and communications agency. Our accounts include Dofasco, Sobeys, RIM, University of Toronto and McMaster. In February 2005, I made a presentation at the Women in Engineering and Computer Science Conference at Concordia University entitled, “An Inquiry into Undergraduate Women in Engineering”.

Colgan, Jeff ’99: After graduating, I did

a Masters in public policy and am now an international trade specialist. I currently live in Washington, DC, and am employed as an economic consultant with the Brattle Group. Have recently published a book called “The Promise and Peril of International Trade”, published by Broadview Press. Written for non-economists, it looks at the economic, social and environmental impacts of free trade on Canada. You can find a link at www.jeffcolgan.com .

MacCivEng

Rak, Miro ’92: I’m enjoying the sixth

Hon, Nathan ’98: Owner of a financial service brokerage providing services in

year of my job transition from “physical” engineering to “human engineering” as I

To:

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Ms. Carm Vespi Managing Editor The MacEngineer Faculty of Engineering John Hodgins Building, Room A 201D McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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work in a church as a pastor. I’m now fulltime and am entering a season of being senior pastor. I also remarried this past fall and am so in love with my new wife, Christy. Living in and enjoying the climate of Edmonton. Feel free to contact me at miro@strathconabaptist.ca.

MacMechEng Chow, Rania (Rebeiz) ’01: After eight years together, Bernard (Mech.’00) and I got married in May 2003 and we currently live in Mississauga, Ontario. I work as a project engineer for GE Consumer & Industrial, where I have been for four years. For the past five years, Bernard has worked as a development engineer for Pratt & Whitney Canada.

MacCivilEng&Mgt Cheung, Steven ’86: I have been appointed World Wide Partner at Mercer Human Resource Consulting. Currently, I work from Deerfield, Illinois, as the head of Global Retirement Systems and Software. Email ypscheung@yahoo.com

MacElEng&Mgt Del Riccio, Luigi ’90: I came to Italy in 1996 to do a MBA and ever since have been working in marketing and business development both in the manufacturing sector and in Internet/Telecommunications. Currently, I am starting my own consulting business to work with Canadian companies that want to develop commercial relationships in Italy and with Italian companies that want to develop commercial relationships in Canada. I work for a biotech company and am interested in talking to experts in Bioengineering regarding the field of orthopedics, to get a better understanding of the North American market. You can contact me at: ldelriccio@yahoo.ca.

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Applause & Accolades awards gala to honour Gennum founder Douglas Barber, recognize McMaster engineering achievements by Gene Nakonechny The community is invited to join McMaster University’s Faculty of Engineering in honouring Douglas Barber and faculty members at the second annual Applause and Accolades Awards Gala. Barber is a founder, director and former president and CEO of Gennum Corporation and a Distinguished Professor-inResidence in the engineering faculty. In addition to his business achievements and community contributions, he has played an important role in supporting the many initiatives of the Faculty of Engineering as it prepares students to contribute to today’s changing society. The celebration will take place Wednesday, May 18, 2005, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Liuna Station, 360 James Street North, Hamilton. Tickets are $100 per person or $800 for a table of eight. RSVP to 905-525-9140, ext. 27926. The Applause & Accolades Awards

Gala is organized by the Faculty of Engineering at McMaster University to recognize at outstanding citizen who has contributed to engineering, the university and the community. It also celebrates the many achievements of faculty members over the past year.

compelling worlds and animate interesting characters. “This program combines the creative and critical with the technical and scientific.” Graduates, who will earn a Bachelor of Engineering (B. Eng.) degree, will not only find employment in the computer gaming, user-interface design, animation, data visualization and high-fidelity simulation industries, but will also have the skills and knowledge required for many other software development jobs. More information about the program can be found at http://gamer.mcmaster.ca or by e-mailing gamer@mcmaster.ca.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2005 Scotch Tasting Event – Details TBA

Douglas Barber

innovative thinking going on at McMaster.” Programming for the first Radio Fireball podcast includes: • an interview with associate professor Nick Provatas discussing developing the next generation of colour copiers; • a conversation with third-year materials engineering student Ayesha Hashambhoy about university life; • an interview with the chef of the new, award-winning East Meets West Bistro; • a soundseeing tour of Hamilton’s trendy Westdale shopping village; • music from Hamilton’s emerging altrock band The Ride Theory. S

Saturday, June 4, 2005 Engineering Alumni Weekend Class ’65, ’80 and ’85

Saturday, October 1, 2005 Homecoming Weekend Calling all Redsuits 1987-2005

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June 3-5, 2005 Alumni Weekend – Details TBA

Wednesday, September 28, 2005 Social Connection Night – Details TBA

continued from back cover

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Thursday, May 26, 2005 Engineering Alumni Golf Tournament

Tuesday, September 13, 2005 Big Sisters/Little Sisters BBQ

Gaming degree program

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Wednesday, May 18, 2005 Applause & Accolades Awards Dinner

Thursday, June 9, 2005 2:30 p.m. Engineering Convocation, Hamilton Place

Podcasting

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Wednesday, January 25, 2006 Salsa Night – Faculty Club – Details TBA Friday, March 31, 2006 Kipling – Details TBA For information and registration forms, visit our web site: www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

MacEngineer

The

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, The Daily News, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair, Eugene Nakonechny

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The MacEngineer

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University recruitment by MP3 McMaster Engineering taps into podcasting phenomenon to recruit students

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ngineering recruits at McMaster University are receiving more than admission papers this spring. They’re getting invited to tune into one of the fastest growing developments on the Internet – podcasting. McMaster’s engineering faculty has launched a 20-minute podcast called Radio Fireball (after the Faculty’s fireball logo). The lifestyle-oriented podcast provides listeners with a taste of campus life. It features interviews with professors and students, profiles of campus facilities, audio tours of local hotspots and music by Hamilton bands. Four podcast programs will be posted monthly through the spring and summer beginning April 26, 2005. The podcast is posted at www.engpodcast.com. “We’re talking to the download generation,” said Peter Smith, associate dean, Faculty of Engineering. “Why not have the option to download information about education and careers the same way you can download music? It untethers content from the Web and lets students access us at their convenience.”

A podcast is like a personal blog (Web log) but in audio format. It is posted in MP3 format to the Internet for downloading or subscription, allowing the listener to access it at their convenience. The name comes from the fusion of the terms broadcasting and iPod, Apple’s popular portable audio device. Podcasts can range from personal musings to radio-quality programming. “McMaster Engineering is the first Canadian faculty I know of that’s using real podcasting to reach students,” said Wayne MacPhail of w8nc, a marketing and communications firm specializing in bringing emerging technologies to colleges and universities. The firm worked with the Faculty to produce Radio Fireball. “This is really leading-edge and lives up to the university’s commitment to innovation.” Podcasts are an outgrowth of the immense popularity of MP3 players and

3rd Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament

Thursday, May 26, 2005 Crosswinds Golf & Country Club Milton, Ontario Check the website at: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

downloadable programming, primarily among teenagers and youth. The concept of podcasting emerged in August 2004. Approximately 22 million people in North America have an MP3 player. That number is forecasted to reach 50 million by the end of 2005. Already, an estimated 4,800 podcasts have been posted to the Internet. According to a recent survey by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, about six million American adults have listened to a podcast. Pew forecasts that number to grow dramatically over the next 12 months. “Podcasting is a way for us to make a more personal connection with the student before they arrive on campus,” said Lucy Sheung, outreach and enrolment manager, Faculty of Engineering. “Instead of a cold, impersonal institution, they are able to hear professors and students talk about university life. The audio dimension provides a fuller sense of the people, excitement and

You’re invited...

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1965 Alumni Weekend 1980 1985 Saturday June 4, 2005

For more information contact: Ms. Carm Vespi Phone: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

MacEngineer Spring 2005  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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