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MacEngineer

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VOLUME 29

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING

Brothers give back to Mac See page 5

NUMBER 3

MCMASTER UNIVERSITY

FALL 2004


A message from the Dean Recruiting top engineering students

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ollowing the double-cohort year, the competition for top engineering prospects from high schools has been particularly aggressive. Clearly with a decreased pool of applicants, the Faculty needs to focus on additional strategies to reach our enrolment targets while continuously improving the quality of the undergraduate recruits. During the past three years, we have significantly improved Year 1 curriculum, created new and innovative undergraduate programs such as chemical and bioengineering, electrical and biomedical engineering and environmental engineering, for example. In addition, we have created new scholarships for highly qualified high school students and initiated a new

inside this issue Applause & Accolades ............4 Alumni Profiles .......................6 Upcoming Events .................14 Engineering Co-op and Career Services..............23 Hey Alumni! Have you got something to say, or any other news? We would like to hear from you. Contact Carm Vespi: Tel: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca

The MacEngineer is published by the Engineering Faculty for its alumni. Distribution assistance is provided by the Alumni Office. PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40063416 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO CIRCULATION DEPTARTMENT, 1280 MAIN STREET WEST HAMILTON, ON L8S 4L7 e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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undergraduate research opportunity program. While these initiatives certainly have helped in making McMaster Engineering attractive, we need to continue to improve and strengthen our recruitment efforts. To this end, we are in the process of strengthening our recruitment and marketing functions. This summer, we have also been engaged in developing new initiatives to enhance our recruitment efforts. These initiatives include: 1. Developing plans for expansion of the enrolment in our flagship programs in engineering and management as well as engineering and society. These programs continue to be in high demand and it is important to create new educational opportunities for our prospective students to meet this demand. Currently the Level 2 enrolment for the engineering and management program is 136 students, and approximately 60 students for the engineering and society program. Our plan is to increase Level 2 enrolment to 200 and 100 students respectively. 2. The development of an advanced engineering program for high school students. This program will offer outstanding grade 10, 11 and 12 students pre-university courses, which will expose them to Engineering. This program will include courses in fundamental engineering sciences such as engineering physics, chemistry and mathematics as well as some selected subjects that may include design, robotics, and biomedical engineering. This program will also offer opportunities for improved educational experience in Year 1 including access to more advanced honour classes for students with exceptional performance in these courses. For example, a student who is interested in information technology could have the opportunity for more advanced programming experience in Year 1.

Mo Elbestawi, Dean of Engineering

3. Preparing our undergraduate students to work in a global economy by offering increased opportunities for participating in international internships and projects. We will be working on developing opportunities in some selected U.S. universities, as well as universities in the U.K., France, the Netherlands, and possibly Germany. 4. We continue to work on developing our concept for integrated learning. The integrated learning centre will be a part of the new engineering building, for which we are currently fundraising. It is aimed at promoting interdisciplinary, project-based learning for our undergraduate students. I believe that these combined initiatives will help us maintain and improve the Faculty’s reputation as one of the leading engineering faculties in the country.

Mo Elbestawi

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

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A message from the Associate Dean Developing meaningful projects

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ast year, we introduced a new common Engineering 1 curriculum that was designed, among other reasons, to better introduce students to the engineering profession prior to them selecting a program. It included a new course, ENGINEER 1P03 – Introduction to Professional Engineering, that dealt with legal and ethical aspects of the profession and included group design projects that immersed the students in the various engineering disciplines. First year design projects have always been a challenge to develop so that the right balance of relevance and difficulty is achieved. If this balance is not achieved, students quickly lose interest or become frustrated. Also, to maintain their motivation, it is important to be able to assure the students that their designs are not simple ‘academic exercises’, but that they will be used for some useful purpose. I am happy to report that we are now working with Engineers Without Borders (EWB) to identify projects that will address problems in Third World countries. EWB was formed in 2000 to promote human development through access to technology

Engineering to develop a set of projects that meets both of our needs. The very limited resources that are available to residents of many poor countries demand solutions that are technologically simple yet cater to the cultural environment, and that employ locally available raw materials. Whether it is the design of ceramic water filtration systems for Cambodia, cooking appliances for Indonesia, water catchments for India, water pumps for Zambia, fish dryers for East Timor, or engine modifications for the use of Jatropha seed oil as fuel in Ghana, these design projects will have a definite impact on the lives of those who are less fortunate than we are. Our students in turn will have meaningful projects that are appropriate to the level of their technical knowledge and will gain the satisfaction of having improved the lives of others! If you would like to contribute to this undertaking, please give us a call. We are always looking for the participation of our former students in the development of the next generation of engineers! Peter Smith (adeaneng@mcmaster.ca)

Dr. Peter Smith, Associate Dean of Engineering

and it is currently Canada’s fastest growing development organization. Modelled on Médecins Sans Frontières, it strives to join Canadian engineering students, professionals and companies in an effort to reduce poverty throughout the world. Over the past few months, Anna Robertson (Civil Engineering) has been working with EWB on behalf of the Faculty of

Faculty establishes new position With the creation of an Associate Dean of Engineering for Research and External Relations, the Faculty of Engineering hopes to pursue new opportunities and partnerships, both in the academic environment and with industry. Engineering Physics professor Peter Mascher was appointed to the position in May 2004. Mascher will act as a spokesperson and advocate for the Faculty outside of the University. Internally, he will be a liaison with the Office of the Vice-President Research and International Affairs, and will work with other Faculties to identify and initiate large, multi-faculty initiatives to enhance McMaster’s research capabilities and reputation. He will be especially concerned with

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initiatives in the areas of biomedical engineering, micro- and nano-systems, engineering design, energy systems, and environmental engineering and public policy. Mascher, who has a PhD in engineering physics from the Technical University Graz, Austria, joined McMaster University in 1989 in a position initially funded by the Ontario Centre for Materials Research. He was chair of the Department of Engineering Physics from 1995 to 2001. His research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of thin films for optoelectronic applications and the characterization of defects in semiconductors by positron annihilation spectroscopy. A much-published author of research

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papers, he is the former program director of the Ontario Photonics Consortium, an ORDCF-supported initiative, centered at McMaster and involving participation of research teams from The University of Western Ontario, the University of Waterloo and Queen’s University. The chair was established through a donation to the Department of Engineering Physics by William Sinclair, one of the co-founders of JDS-Fitel, now part of JDS-Uniphase. Mascher says that the creation of the new position “signals the Faculty’s commitment to maintaining and further enhancing its status as one of the most research-intensive engineering schools in the country.”

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Special recognition Gala highlights engineering successes “Success is not the result of spontaneous combustion. You must set yourself on fire.”

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n Wednesday May 12th, 200 people filled the Liuna Station banquet centre in downtown Hamilton to recognize and honour the collective achievements of the Faculty’s engineering researchers. The first ever Applause & Accolades Awards Gala attracted a stellar number of local dignitaries and community and corporate notables. Well-known television personality Connie Smith, anchor for News at Noon on CH-TV, was emcee and following her opening welcome, she introduced the Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Mo Elbestawi, the first of a number of speakers. In welcoming University officials and faculty members, alumni, community and corporate leaders and special guests, Elbestawi remarked that the Applause & Accolades evening “is an opportunity to acknowledge publicly the success of our corporate partnerships and our many internal successes within the Faculty”. Then Janet Walden, Vice-President, Research Partnerships Program Directorate for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), announced the four new McMaster NSERC Industrial Research Chairs. Totaling $5.6 million, this investment into research at McMaster is jointly funded by NSERC with matching funding from industry partners and the University. She introduced the industry partners and chair holders, making particular note of the “wonderful work being accomplished here at McMaster”. She commented on the fact that 2004 is the 20th anniversary of the Industrial Research Chairs Program and that McMaster has had an on-going involvement with the Program since its inception. In congratulating the four newest chair holders, Walden concluded: “I am sure we will be hearing good things from you very soon.” • The NSERC/UNENE Industrial Research Chair in Nuclear Safety Analysis, led by John Luxat

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John Mayberry, former chairman and CEO of Dofasco

• The NSERC/RIM/CITO/McMaster Industrial Research Chair in Pico-Cellular Wireless Internet Access Networks, led by Terry Todd • The NSERC/Dalsa/McMaster Industrial Research Chair in Digital Cinema, led by Xiaolin Wu • The NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems, led by Tony Petric Following a sumptuous meal beautifully prepared and served by the Liuna staff, Dean Elbestawi made presentations to the recipients of provincial, University and professional awards including four Premier’s Research Excellence Awards (PREA), one teaching award, three University Honour awards, two Canada Research Chairs, and 17 who had received professional association and society recognitions. He then made a special presentation to a “great friend of McMaster”, which proved to be a highlight of this year’s gala affair. Industry leader John Mayberry, former chairman and CEO of Dofasco, received the first Faculty of Engineering Leadership Award. The award recognizes Mayberry’s c

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efforts as a corporate partner that have had a profound impact on McMaster’s research and educational programs. He was a key volunteer with the Changing Tomorrow Today fundraising campaign and encouraged Dofasco’s contribution in the form of two endowed chairs in the Faculty of Engineering. He personally established a scholarship for a student studying in the field of chemical, mechanical or materials science engineering. In making the presentation, Elbestawi noted that Mayberry “is a dynamic and farsighted corporate and community leader and as such, we are pleased and delighted to honour John with the McMaster University Faculty of Engineering Leadership Award”. Attendees at the event, which it is hoped will become an annual one, included University President Peter George; Murray Martin, President and CEO of Hamilton Health Sciences; Ken Norrie, Provost; Mamdouh Shoukri, VP Reserach and International Affairs; Roger Trull, VP University Advancement; and Karen Belaire, VP Administration. Corporate guests included Ian O’Reilly, Ed Cocchiarella, Ebdel Sherik, Fred Goetz and Norm Lockington, all from Dofasco; David Litster from MIT; Doug Barber, retired founder of Gennum Corp.and Chair of the Dean’s Council; RIM’s Dave Jarowsky and colleagues; Joe Ng, Dave Scime and Bassam Halabieh of JNE Consulting; a table of MDSciex representatives; Brian Doody, President and CEO of DALSA; Richard Koroscil, President and CEO of TradePort International Corporation; Ed Minich, President of Otis; Tim Valters, President of Selkirk; Sandy Thomson, President of Gordon-Thomson; Gerald Hatch and colleagues from Hatch Associates; and MMO’s George Wright. Marjorie Walker attended, representing the Mayor’s office of the City of Hamilton. MP Beth Phinney, who represents the riding of Hamilton Mountain, also continued on page 22 N

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Honorary Engineering Degrees

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he Faculty of Engineering conferred two honorary Doctor of Science degrees at its Spring 2004 Convocation ceremonies. Astronaut Julie Payette, the first Canadian to board the International Space Station (ISS), and Kenneth O. Hill, a three-time McMaster graduate and former researcher at the Communications Research Centre (CRC) Canada were recognized for their leadership and achievements. Payette, who knew from an early age that she wanted to be an astronaut, was selected from thousands of applicants by the Canadian Space Agency in 1992. She

received basic training in Canada prior to becoming technical advisor for the Mobile Servicing System (MSS), an advanced robotic system and Canada’s contribution to the ISS. In 1999, she flew on Space Shuttle Discovery to the space station, serving as mission specialist with responsibility for the station’s systems and for operating the Canadarm robotic arm. Hill’s groundbreaking work in photosensitivity, Bragg gratings, the study of the non-linear effects in fibre and fused fibre compiling all helped to lay the foundation for broadband communications networks. He conducted research at CRC, an agency

Julie Payette

of Industry Canada, for more than three decades, leaving in 2000 to enter private enterprise as a consultant. He is currently senior scientific consultant with OZ Optics. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the Manning Principal Award, the Tyndall Award, the CRC’s President’s Award, the Canadian Association of Physicists and the National Optics Institute Medal for Outstanding Achievement in Applied Photonics, and the Rank Prize from the Royal Academy of Medicine.

Engineering Dean and three alumni inducted into CAE

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ongratulations are extended to Dean of engineering Mohamed Elbestawi and alumni members Paul Watkinson, Peihua Gu and Thomas Harris who have been inducted as Fellows into the Canadian Academy of Engineering. A total of 30 Canadian engineers were inducted during the Academy’s Annual General Meeting in Toronto on June 4th. The citation for Elbestawi recognizes his contributions to manufacturing engineering research and commends him for being a champion for university/industry partnerships. He was the driving force in the establishment of the newly created $19-million McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute (MMRI) and was appointed as its first director in 2000. Elbestawi holds the NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Precision Machining and was the first Braley-Orlick Chair in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering. Paul Watkinson (’62, chemical) is currently a professor at the University of British Columbia. He is a highly respected expert in reactors for high-temperature reactions such as pyrolysis, gasification, and metallurgical operations. Working in laboratory and pilot reactors, he and his colleagues have established several processes in rotary kilns, spouted bed reactors and fluidized beds, which have contributed to numerous M

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Ken Hill

industrial applications. Watkinson is also world-renowned for his leading research on heat exchanger fouling. A professor at the University of Calgary, Peihua Gu (’90, mechanical) is an internationally recognized expert in manufacturing and design, with several research and education awards. He was twice awarded an NSERC Industrial Research Chair. He has published two books and numerous papers with many citations. His service to the profession includes establishing the Canadian Design Engineering Network, and serving on the editorial boards of several International Journals. He has been department head since 1999, and was associate dean from 1997 to1999. Thomas Harris (’77, ’80, chemical) of Queen’s University is widely cited for his seminal work in variance-based performance monitoring and assessment of control systems; he has not only made significant research contributions, but has also advanced the industrial practice of control. Drawing from cutting-edge approaches in econometrics to address structural analysis in time-series models, as well as multivariate systems analysis, his methodology is utilized internationally by several companies in a diverse range of industrial control applications. As dean of applied science, Harris has also championed the

Royal Society Inductee In July, John Brash, Department of Chemical Engineering, was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada, one of Canada’s most prestigious academic organizations. Brash is an internationally recognized pioneer in the science and technology of biomaterials. For over four decades, his research has contributed to the development of advanced medical devices such as artificial arterial grafts, blood pumps and heart valves. He has also served on many policy and granting committees, been involved as collaborator in research projects and been an innovative educator. Now officially a Fellow of the Society, Brash was inducted along with William Harris, a professor in McMaster’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. Currently sixty McMaster professors are Fellows of the Society.

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Alumni profiles Nick Javor – engineering the perfect donut

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ick Javor graduated in 1980 with a B.Eng.Mgt. from the Engineering & Management program. That date places him and his five fellow students in the inaugural class! Javor, who also obtained his MBA from McMaster in 1981, says he decided to take engineering because his maths and sciences had always been strong subjects in high school. “I’m from Hamilton and Mac seemed like a good fit. But also there was the reputation, and the fact that this was the only university in Canada offering the combined (engineering and business) program.” The Vice President for Corporate Affairs at Tim Hortons, Javor says he has no regrets. “The degree brought me a sense of preparedness and confidence. Engineering is very demanding; if you can survive engineering, you can survive anything!” Of all his professors, he especially remembers Don Woods (“Woodsy”). “He brought the people side to engineering. He taught that problem solving and communication are key. And he taught how to communicate in a way that engages people, motivates them and adds value to the whole experience. He really built your confidence in this area and stressed that engineers can and should communicate well.” Tim Hortons, founded in Hamilton, is Canada’s largest chain of coffee and baked goods stores. The company currently has over 2,600 franchised outlets and by yearend 2004, it expects to have sales of over $3.3 billion. Javor, 47, joined the company in the fall of 1994 as Vice-President, New Business Development. He is one of the reasons why you can buy a Tim Hortons coffee and donut while paying for your gas at an Esso On The Run convenience store! During his time in this division, he helped to establish 300 non-traditional locations in hospitals, universities and airports as well as inside retail settings. Javor’s current responsibilities include corporate communications, public relations, corporate social responsibility, and government and environmental affairs. He is the

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Nick Javor

official spokesperson for the company. In January 2004, he was named Vice President of the Tim Hortons Children’s Foundation (THCF). The THCF operates 6 camps in Canada and the United States that provide a 10-day camp experience to over 9,000 children each summer. As many Tim

Horton coffee lovers know, Camp Day is the annual in-store fundraiser; over $6.0 million was raised in 2004. ($4.6 million was raised in 2003). After obtaining his B.Eng.Mgt., Javor decided to stay the extra year and complete his MBA. “I had always had an affinity for the business side of things.” The degree combined with the engineering courses were invaluable for his successes at Imperial Oil (1981-1987) and Mr. Lube Canada Ltd (President, 1988-1994). A Certified Franchise Executive, he served as Chairman Of The Board of the Canadian Franchise Association from 1992-1994. This position provided him with numerous opportunities for making presentations and public speaking. He was awarded the Executive of the Year by the CFA Board in 1994. Nick has volunteered with Big Brothers of Canada and served as Chariman of his local school council. Javor is married to Lisa, also a McMaster grad (B.Comm. ’81). They have two children, Laura 14 and Ryan 11.

Jerry Uvira – english grad + coffee franchise = success

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echanical engineering grad Jerry Uvira (’79) is flying high these days, but his euphoria has little to do with his pilot’s licence. Uvira has left the corporate world with its intense stresses and frequent travel, and now runs three Tim Hortons stores in the United States. “I had achieved my goal of being in a senior management position in a large multinational corporation. But, after a few years it lost it’s appeal!” Uvira, 48, has enjoyed a successful but busy career since graduation. He started at Hamilton-based Stelco in manufacturing, then moved to Westinghouse to sell power generator equipment around the world. At Alcan, he ran an international sales division, transferring from Toronto to Atlanta, Georgia in 1995 to be Director of c

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Marketing for North America. In 1999, he became Corporate VP for North America at Pirelli, the company known for both tire and cable manufacturing. By 2003, it was time for a change. Uvira says the Tim Hortons brand is well established in several markets but is still quite new in the U.S. as a whole. There still is a lot of opportunity for good franchisees to grow with the company. He currently operates three Tim Hortons restaurants in the Columbus, Ohio area, the latest being a Tim Hortons under the same roof as a Wendy’s – a combo store. “It’s been liberating, from a personal standpoint,” he admits. “Sure, it’s a lot of work. But it’s a lot of fun, too. I love it!” Although over the years he has never continued on page 17 N

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Grateful grads give generous gift

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wo brothers, both graduates of the civil engineering program, have made a significant contribution to McMaster University. Vladimir (’80) and Chedo Sobot (’84, Civil & Management) donated $100,000 to the University’s Centre for Effective Design of Structures. The gift, announced in April 2004, will be used to prepare structural engineers for the challenges of building in the 21st century. In making the donation, Vladimir noted that he and his brother “were grateful to be part of this great institution and finally being able to give something back.” He also paid tribute to his parents who immigrated to Canada from Bosnia, providing the opportunity for a bright future for their sons. In accepting the gift, University president Peter George said it is critical for civil engineering students to have access to modern technologies and the most current research. In 1988, the brothers founded Sobotec Ltd., a Hamilton-based company that produces high-tech and visually appealing aluminum panel wall systems for commercial buildings. The company has grown from a 5,000 sq. ft. plant employing five

From left to right: Vladimir Sobot, Mo Elbestawi, Peter George, Chedo Sobot and Bob Drysdale.

people to a 72,000 sq. ft. building and 180 employees. Sobotec uses a material called Alucobond which is made of two aluminum cover sheets with a core of plastic between. It is corrosion resistant, light weight, and gives a high-tech look. “We can take an old building and completely retrofit and renovate it and it looks brand new – very clean and very bright,” Vladimir explains.

The Centre for Effective Design of Structures was established in 2002. The Sobotec donation will assist the Centre in its efforts to link research and education. Graduating engineers will be able to understand durability of materials, develop advanced analytical skills, identify clientspecific needs, and address sustainability concerns including reduced maintenance and extended service life of structures.

Mac engineers heed call of the wild

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lenges. The basic skill set is ummer vacations spent very valuable.” in the Muskoka area of Loon Call (www.looncall.ca) Ontario can result in has three divisions: barge more than a tan. If you are the transportation (pickups and entrepreneurial type, it can get deliveries over land and water; you thinking about turning weekly garbage & recycling those hazy, lazy, sunny days collection services); painting into a business venture. and staining of cottages, boatDavid Nagel (’02, Biology houses and decks; and prop& Psychology), a fourth-genererty maintenance (spring & ation Muskoka cottager, got the fall cleanups, lawn/garden idea for a barge and maintecare). Each is headed by a nance service that would assist manager and services are seasonal residents with such offered seven days a week, chores as garbage disposal, May through October, to and deliver furniture and cottagers on Lakes Joseph, project supplies such as From left to right: David Nagel, Darryl Dietrich and Craig Thornton Rosseau and Muskoka. This lumber. He contacted Craig was launched with 2 boats and a truck. summer, Loon Call will employ 16, not Thornton (’02, Computer Eng.), a longIt’s not such a leap from engineering to including company mascot Mel-Dawg (see time area cottager, who thought the idea a service company, according to Thornton. website for bio!). had great promise. In 2003, with co“In engineering, you learn how to solve The biggest start-up challenge was the founder and director Darryl Dietrich problems and to not back down from chalcontinued on page 12 (’01, Mech.), Loon Call Dockside Services M

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Greg Schneider – keeping it in the family

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lumnus Greg Schneider ’76 has a rare – maybe even a unique – family situation. Both his sons, Chris ‘04 and Dan ’04, along with their grandfather, chose to take engineering at university. Not only that, but Chris and Dan also graduated from McMaster! Admitting that the boys may have secretly preferred to go away from home for their university experience, Greg says having the three of them in the family as Mac grads is really special. “At least I let them choose their own disciplines!” There is much good-natured joshing between the three as they reminisce about student days. Greg took mechanical engineering (“That’s the easy one,” Dan interjects.) combined with management. “It was a forward-thinking program and the reason why I chose McMaster,” says Schneider senior. Dan, 22, admits there may have been a bit of subtle pressure to attend McMaster but seems pleased to be part of the family tradition now. “I was born at Mac (MUMC) and both my parents are Mac grads, so it was a natural choice.” Mom, Carol, graduated in 1980 with a BA in psychology and received her B.Sc. in Nursing in 1985. (Carol has since obtained a B.Ed. from Brock. Dan’s grandfather graduated from McGill.) He elected to take engineering physics (“The most difficult one,” laughs Chris). “I enjoyed learning the math and sciences in engineering physics, and the course taught me skills such as management and problem-solving.” Chris, 24, chose computer engineering, with a minor in business. He originally enrolled in the software engineering and management program but switched when the economy suffered a downturn in that field. Although he did well in the program, he missed group project work. “The software program was a lot of fun. We got to do group projects which meant you got to know everyone.” Both Chris and Dan have been working at Precision Rolls Inc. of Grimsby (formerly Metal Spray-on), a company Greg bought after leaving his position as President of Hodgson Steel in 1990. The company designs and builds high-

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The Schneider family, from left to right: Chris, Greg and Daniel.

quality custom-manufactured rolls for a variety of industries including steel, glass and paper. Originally, it made repairs to rolls, primarily for the local steel industry, but Greg expanded the focus to include design and manufacture. His first set of new rolls was sold to Hamilton-based Dofasco – the company that hired him after graduation and where he worked until 1985. Under the name Precision Surface Technologies, the firm continues to do repair work. Since almost anything that is flat requires rolls for its manufacture, the company has grown steadily and now employs 15, and reports annual sales of $4 million. North American clients include Alcan, Owens Corning, GAF and General Mills, as well as local steel companies. Dan has been working during the summers on ISO certification requirements, while Chris analyzes industrial roll drawings, obtains pricing on components, manages the manufacturing and acts as the all-round computer guy. Both are upfront about their future plans, which do not necessarily include Precision Rolls, something Schneider senior seems to be taking in stride. Dan, who is attending the University of Miami, has decided to go into law. “I have c

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learned from my Dad how rewarding it can be to pursue one’s own career and dreams,” he says. “So I have chosen to chase after mine.” Besides, he adds, it would be hard to move back to Ontario after those warm winters in Florida! Chris would like eventually to work in digital hardware or firmware design – his first love is really computers. Greg notes that the firm’s succession plan is not yet in danger because he still has three more kids! Although daughter Trisha is studying to be a doctor, there remains Andrew (“the athlete”) and Mark (“the mechanical one”). Engineering has proven to be a good choice for the father and eldest sons. Greg notes that “engineering has given Dan the study skills he’ll need for law and has provided Chris, who has done almost every job at Precision Rolls, the skill set he can use throughout his career.” He adds that it provided him with the business skills that have helped him grow the business and be successful. Perhaps Dan sums it up best. “My Dad is the hardest working man I know. Through all his hard work and determination, he has shown us what we can accomplish and how successful you can be if you truly love your profession.” N

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Shafique Shamji – president of Time iCR

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n Ottawa-based company, Time Integrated Communications Research (Time iCR) is a service bureau offering advanced integrated voice response (IVR), Speech Recognition, and call processing solutions to business customers and the Federal Government. In October 2003, Computer Engineering grad Shafique Shamji (’89) became the new President of Time iCR. He is responsible for the strategic direction and management of operations and will serve on the company’s board of directors. Since graduating from McMaster Engineering, Shamji has spent over 15 years working in the areas of telecommunications and information technology. Most recently, he was vice-president of network services for Fidelity National Information Solutions (FNIS) in Santa Ana, Calif., where he was responsible for numerous departments within the organization, including network architecture, engineering and services, field operations for desktop and server installations, computer telephony solutions, telecom operations, data center operations, and project management. He has also worked in executive management positions for

IVR/Speech Recognition solutions for customers in a host of different industries and in a number of different languages. As a service bureau, Time iCR not only designs and develops the application but also houses the equipment to host the solution and manages the daily maintenance and updates. Time iCR was founded over 30 years ago. In September 2002, Call-Net Enterprises Inc. (which also owns Sprint Canada) acquired a majority interest in the company and purchased the remaining shares of the company earlier this year, thus, making Time iCR a fully-owned subsidiary of Call-Net Enterprises. As part of his mandate at Time iCR, Shamji will develop and implement a strategic business plan, identify key areas and opportunities for growth, and develop key strategic relationships and alliances. He has already started working with the Sr. Management team at Call-Net on a plan to bundle the best products from both companies in order to bring turnkey solutions for their collective customers. Born in Uganda, he emigrated to Canada in 1972. Currently, Shamji resides in Ottawa with his wife and two children.

Shafique Shamji

TeleHub Network Services in Chicago and Advanced Network Solutions at AT&T Canada (now Allstream in Toronto), and spent a number of years at Nortel in both engineering and marketing. IVR/Speech Recognition technology has the ability to bring the power of automation and increased customer service to any size call center. Time iCR (www.timeicr.com) designs, implements, administers and maintains an extensive variety of state-of-the-art network

Adam Forte – building high performance cars

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o, Alumni – Adam Forte has got THE BEST job! Currently, Forte (Mech. ’98) works for the Body Engineering Department at DaimlerChrysler’s Performance Vehicle Group, known as Team SRT, and is based at the company’s world headquarters in Michigan. Team SRT (Street and Racing Technology) was created to bring high performance cars to the public in record time and do it at a cost that left competitors in the dust. In 2000, the SRT group was working on a redesign of the Dodge Viper. At the time, Forte was working in the Body Engineering group at the Brampton Assembly plant – having gone direct to DaimlerChrysler following graduation from Mac. His manufacturing experience proved to be a foot in the door at SRT. The group was expanding to accommodate the ever-growing list of new parts for the new car. “Working here in Michigan for the SRT team is a very rewarding job. My days are M

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Adam Forte and the Viper SRT10.

spent in our Viper Garage, at our test tracks and tooling/build shops, verifying new design concepts for new products. “ U

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He explains that the small number of people involved on Team SRT bring to the continued on page 17 T

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Engineering news McDermid’s strengths assist steel industry

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ew technology and groundbreaking research at McMaster will help Canada’s steel industry and could result in more environmentallyfriendly cars. Associate professor Joe McDermid of the Department of Mechanical Engineering is an expert in steel galvanizing, a zinc coating process that gives steel corrosive-resistant properties and improved surface quality. His current research is involved with finding ways to make this process work with the new generation of high-strength dual phase and transformation induced plasticity alloy steels being developed for application in automotive design. The problem is that, to date, these new steels are resistant to the galvanizing process. The auto industry faces increasing demands from environmental protection agencies to build more fuel-efficient vehicles. One option is to build lighter-weight vehicles using high strength-to-weightratio steels. However, the high alloy content of these products results in a surface structure that resists the zinc coating process. To study the problem, McMaster’s Steel Research Centre has acquired two galvanizing simulators, one donated by Noranda Inc., and a state-of-the-art Rhesa machine purchased with the assistance of a $1.8 million Canada Foundation for Innovation grant. This simulator is one of only three in use in academic institutions world-wide and the only such device in North

America. They will be used to explore the science behind the metallic coating process and its effect on material properties and manufacturing. McDermid, who is a member of the Steel Research Centre, holds the Stelco/NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Steel Product Application. Hamilton-

based Stelco is providing a significant portion of the steel for processing in the simulator and will benefit from the research along with the other companies participating in the Centre: Dofasco, Ipsco, Bluescope Steel, Iron Ore Company of Canada, Hatch, Air Liquide, Reference Metals and Noranda Inc.

New school a Canadian first

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t its regular meeting in May, Senate approved a proposal for a McMaster School for Engineering Practice (MSEP). The School would be the first of its kind in Canada. MSEP will provide a focus for highprofile research and interdisciplinary education initiatives in three areas of engineering practice: engineering and public policy, engineering entrepreneurship and innovation, and engineering design. To achieve this, two associated centers are proposed: a Centre for Engineering and Public Policy, and the Centre for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. (A proposed Centre for Engineering Design will be brought forward at a later date.) The school and associated centres will work with other McMaster faculties and partner institutions internationally to advance multidisciplinary research and education in engineering practice. MSEP will also facilitate differentiated educational programs for future engineers who will have the necessary mix of skills to

recognize and develop new technologies, and to take those new technologies to market in a safe, efficient, and environmentally sound manner. The initiative will help propel McMaster into the pre-eminent position in education for engineering practices. The benefits include attracting top-quality faculty and bright students, strengthening interdisciplinary research and education partnerships between the Faculty of Engineering and other faculties such as the Faculties of Business and Social Sciences, and building strategic research partnerships with industry and government.

The MacEngineer welcomes your comments... Send your news and views to the editor at vespi@mcmaster.ca

Mac’s engineering innovations make news hemical engineering professors Heather Sheardown and John Brash were quoted in a feature article on Canadian university engineering schools in the May 29, 2004 issue of the National Post. In addition to comments about McMaster’s engineering programs, Sheardown and Brash were photographed along with students in the University’s

bio-engineering laboratory. The feature, jointly sponsored between the newspaper and the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers (CCPE), focused on recent developments in the field of engineering and the innovations being initiated by Canada’s schools of engineering to prepare students for future challenges. The article covered issues such as the emergence of new fields

(tissue engineering, nanotechnology) and the adaptation of existing programs to include courses on non-technical or “soft skills” (interpersonal communications, leadership). The article noted that many Faculties of Engineering, McMaster included, maintain close contact with industry partners, engage students in team projects, and provide opportunities for internships.

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Engineering Practice & BioEngineering building campaign

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artnerships with industry and alumni contributions are being sought for the necessary funding for the creation of the Engineering Practice and BioEngineering building to house the two new McMaster Schools. The three centres in the School for Engineering Practice will be aligned with key companies, as will the laboratories in the BioEngineering school. Discussions are currently underway with major funding announcements expected this fall. The McMaster School for Engineering Practice will comprise three new research and academic centres: Engineering Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Engineering and Public Policy, and Engineering Design. The three centres aim to provide a muchneeded interdisciplinary education that is informed by engineering problem-solving expertise. The principal activity will be to

Each center will emphasize interdisciplinary education and research in its area of specialization. Together, they will offer a dynamic, integrated learning experience for undergraduate and graduate students of all engineering disciplines. The new space will be deliberately welcoming to encourage students and faculty from the various programs to linger and learn about the allied work in their building. The design concept for the proposed School for Engineering Practice and BioEngineering building effects collaboration between diverse disciplines, and facilitates sharing of knowledge and understanding between experimental, theoretical and computational researchers. In its simplest form, the Engineering Practice and BioEngineering building can be viewed as a place where the various innovation functions ‘wrap’ around a central core of collegial interaction. The McMaster School of BioEngineering will provide a unique collaborative environment as well, that takes full advantage of our existing expertise in medical sciences and engineering and links current and emerging areas of molecular, medical and bioengineering research. At this time, several labs have been identified in the area of Integrated Systems, Medical Robotics, Medical Devices, Bio Photonics, Bio Materials, Bio Mechanics and Medical Imaging.

offer professional education at the Master’s degree level, the programs of which will complement the undergraduate engineering programs in Engineering Management, Engineering and Society, and the existing curriculum.

Auto investment announcement

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cMaster University was the site of the provincial government’s spring announcement of a new $500-million investment in the auto industry. On April 14th, Premier Dalton McGuinty toured the research facilities at the John Hodgins Engineering Building before making the announcement in the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute. The Ontario Automotive Investment Strategy is designed to strengthen the industry’s competitiveness and train highly skilled workers for the next generation of innovation in the automotive industry, the largest manufacturing sector in Ontario. The funds will be used to partner with industry for advanced skills training,

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improved environmental and energy technologies, public infrastructure, and investments in research and innovation. The five-year initiative will provide support for leading-edge auto manufacturing projects having more than $300 million in investment, or those that create or retain more than 300 jobs. It is estimated that the $500 million has the potential to spur up to $5 billion in automotive investments. The Ontario auto industry accounted for 45 per cent of the province’s exports in 2003, and directly employed over 300,000 people. Many thousands more are employed in supplier industries such as steel, plastics and glass.

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For more information about the campaign contact Terry Milson, Faculty Advancement Officer at 905.525.9140 ext. 27391 or email: milsont@mcmaster.ca.

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Alumni profiles (continued) Craig Wilkie – finds his niche in recycling

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hen Craig Wilkie graduated in 1980 from the Chem Eng program, he never dreamed his career path would lead to a prominent position with a major Canadian recycling company. “The sciences always intrigued me and I saw engineering as a practical application of the sciences,” he says of his choice of university program. He adds that the engineering courses offered at McMaster give students exposure to technical knowledge and experience using problem-solving and analytical skills. “I’ve been able to translate these into any type of work I’ve done over the years.” Currently Wilkie is Vice President of Newalta Corporation, a waste management company that focuses on recycling and resource recovery. Founded in the 1980’s and based in Calgary, Alberta, Newalta has 40 facilities in Western Canada and 600 employees. Using the latest technology, the company recovers and recycles valuable products from a broad range of industrial wastes including sludges and wastewaters, and consolidate waste solvents, waste lubricating oils and spent antifreeze. It recycles antifreeze, solvents, diesel distillates and lubricating oils, and manufactures and markets a line of lubricant products, including base oils, motor oils, and hydraulic fluids to customers throughout western Canada and the USA Wilkie jokes that his company, which recovers 1.2 million barrels of crude oil annually, could be considered “a junior oil company except we don’t do any drilling or have any wells!” The crude oil is refined using Newalta’s centrifugation technology. The company employs 40 centrifuges of various types and sizes, and has extended this capability to on-site where it processes the material on the customers’ site either as a short-term project or a long-term contract. Wilkie, who has an MBA from Harvard (1989) established and built Newalta’s Industrial Services sector when he joined

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Craig Wilkie

the Company in 1993. Today, he is responsible for business development. “I run both the acquisitions and the technical side in this area. The Mac engineering experience has given me the skills and tools to bridge between these two sides.”

Loon Call

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fact that none of the three principals had any business background, Thornton says. But they developed a business plan, secured financing, and are now poised for a successful second season. In addition to quadrupling in size, Loon Call has bought out its biggest competitor and expects to realize $1/4 to $1/2 million in sales during summer 2004. In addition to supportive family and friends, Thornton says that customers have been great, too. “Many have become good friends.” He credits this to the company’s insistence on hiring hardworking qualified people who are polite, friendly and reliable. “Our customers can see that we are working to be the best. People have said they are very pleased with our services which are offered 24 hours-a-day.” Thornton, 26, says the partners go their c

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One of the division’s objectives is to develop and commercialize innovative technologies to recover and recycle products from wastes. The company investigates processes from around the world in order to expand the wastes that the company processes, to expand services and to diversify markets. Wilkie remembers his McMaster years fondly. His was a relatively small class, he says, which became a tight-knit group that worked well together and got along very well with the professors. He especially remembers three great profs: Drs. Cameron Crowe, Don Woods and John Vlachopoulos. The relatively small, tight-knit 1980 graduating class has kept in touch on and off over the years. “It’s a measure of the connectedness of the class that I can pick up the phone and start talking with any one of them.” Married with two boys aged 10 and 12, Wilkie spends his free time skiing or golfing.

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own ways during the winter months. Last year, Nagel traveled around Europe and Dietrich spent time in Vancouver. Thornton was busy working on his masters in Electrical & Computing Engineering at McMaster where supervisor Terry Todd has been truly supportive. “Dr. Todd has been key in helping me through grad school. I wanted a practical experience in the field of wireless communications and Dr. Todd has modified my program to achieve just that.” The ECE department has also been very supportive, he adds. Thornton hopes eventually to start a wireless communications company. For the next few summers, however, Loon Call suits him just fine. “It’s really nice to wake up to the lake and know that’s where you are going to spend most of your day. For now, my summer office is a barge on the Muskoka Lakes!” N

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Eric Sit – Mac Engineer assists in NASA project

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ric Sit, ’78 (Elec.), never dreamed he’d be working on a space project one day. After graduation, he attended the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis/St. Paul and received an MSc in Electrical Engineering. In 1980, he started working at an American pacemaker company Medtronic and, after passing two eight-hour engineering tests, received his Professional Engineer registrations in the States of Minnesota and Wisconsin. “The tests were much tougher than the Canadian PE at that time,” he recalls. However, he adds that being an EE employee for corporations means he has never once used his PE signature! Following his time at Medtronic, he spent 17 years at ADC Telecommunications before joining General Dynamics in Bloomington, Minnesota in 2003. He currently works in the Advanced Information Systems division as a technical manager in systems engineering. And it is with General Dynamics that he got the opportunity to work on “a very exciting project” involving NASA. Virginia-based General Dynamics is a leader in business aviation, mission-critical information systems and technologies, shipbuilding and marine systems, and land and amphibious combat systems, employing approximately 68,400 people worldwide. Established in 1952, it is now comprised of four main divisions: aerospace (business aircraft), combat systems (land and amphibious), information systems and technology, and marine systems (submarines and surface combatants). Recently, the company contracted to work on the mission control computers to be used in NASA’s X-37 demonstrator - an advanced technology flight demonstrator designed to test and validate technologies in the environment of space as well as test system performance of the vehicle during orbital flight, reentry and landing. Results from the X-37 will aid in the design and development of NASA’s Orbital Space Plane – which will provide crew rescue and crew transport to and from the International Space Station. Of his part in this project, Sit says: “I gained a huge appreciation on the strict discipline in the designing, testing and qualifying of the system under various M

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fulfilling to know that the product I helped to produce is going to be used in space exploration.” However, he has only positive comments of his time at Mac. “The EE training I received at Mac really paved the road for me. EE is my passion and I appreciate the foundation that Mac gave me. Dr. Sinha was my senior project advisor and I remember working on the feedback control robotic system, soldering the circuit in the lab, trying to get it to work. I still have the system in a box in my garage!” Sit feels extremely lucky, both in his choice of university and in his career path. He also believes that in addition to getting a job and putting one’s education to work to better humankind, real success comes when you are happy in your work. “Follow your heart and passion,” he advises. “You’ll be happier and stay in the job much longer if it’s something you like to do.” Married to Rose for 22 years, the

Eric Sit hiking at Philmont National Scout Ranch in New Mexico, June 2004.

stringent standards and operating and environmental requirements, that an engineer in other commercial electronic industries may not usually see. It is very

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Doug Gierula – out of the lab

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t 26, Doug Gierula (Chem.Eng.) just might be the youngest engineering grad holding the position of company president. Shortly after graduating from McMaster in 2003, Gierula became president (and owner) of Grimsbybased Klacko Marine. Even before he finished the engineering degree, Gierula was actively involved in the company. It all started with a summer job. At the end of his final high school year, he was working in the shop and caught the eye of owner, Martin Klacko. “He saw a lot of potential in me and sort of took me on as an apprentice,” Doug says. After completing a degree at Queen’s and returning to Hamilton to attend McMaster, the ambitious student began working parttime during the year, too Klacko Marine (www.klackomarine.ca), founded in 1964, designs and fabricates custom metal work for all type of watercraft. Products include spars, castings, rails, bow fittings, stanchions and braces. The company currently employs three people. Gierula is expanding the company’s line to include custom items for architectural, exhibition, medical and indusU

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trial applications. The next time you are at a Silver City movie theatre, look way up at those giant cokes, chip containers and straws – all items designed and produced by Klacko! However, 95 per cent of the production is still marine work, he says. Gierula, who is from Grimsby, realized after getting his BSc degree in biocontinued on page 17 T

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Don’t miss any of the Monday, August 23, 2004

Thursday, September 23, 2004

McMaster Materials Engineering Alumni Reception

2nd Annual Wine Tasting Event East Dell Estates 4041 Locust Lane, Beamsville Gathering at 6:00 p.m. Registration fee: $40.00 per person Space is limited. Please register by Sept. 13th

Convention Centre, Hamilton 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. This event is part of COM 2004

Sunday, August 29, 2004

Saturday, October 2, 2004

1st Annual Engineering Family Day

Engineering and Society Homecoming Weekend

Free hotdog and drink Bring the kids to see the McMaster Solar Car and SAE Formula Car Cameron Motor Sports, Mount Hope

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Buffet Dinner & Silent Auction at the University Club at 5:00 p.m. $30 per person (guests are welcome)

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ese upcoming events! Football Game starts at 2:00 p.m. Please register before Sept. 17th

Friday, November 19, 2004

McMaster Engineering Society Past Presidents’ Gala

Tuesday, October 7, 2004

Social Connection Night Alumni and Class of 2005 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., CIBC Hall

6:00 p.m. Faculty Club, Formal Attire

Thursday, October 21, 2004

Tuesday, November 30, 2004

Oakville Alumni Event

Scotch Tasting Event

Guest speaker: Nick Javor, Chem.Eng. & Mgt. ’80 Topic: Diversity in Engineering

5:30 p.m. Scottish Rite of Hamilton, Round Room 4 Queen St. South $40 per person (includes traditional Christmas Dinner and three Scotch Tasting samples) Please register by Tues., Nov. 16th

For more information contact Carm Vespi, e-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca or visit the website: www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

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Mac engineers play to success

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ike Paddags, ’03, Mech. & Society, is pretty darn excited. This Crooked Mile, the threepiece band he and fellow engineering students Geoff and Dan Olsen brought to life in 1999, has taken a big step toward immortalization with its first studio album pressed earlier this year. Now a seven-member synthesis of guitars, drums, trumpets and keyboard, This Crooked Mile finds its own space between the boundaries of rock and pop, folk and funk. “Proof That Things Are Changing” is the title of TCM’s premiere offering and it can be yours, hot off the presses, at www.thiscrookedmile.ca or from any member of da band if you ask very, very nicely. “The band’s name comes from a lyric in a Dave Matthews Band song,” explains Geoff (’01, Mech. & Management), the group’s designated mouthpiece. “When TCM started, we were an acoustic cover band playing a lot of Dave Matthews tunes.” In a highly un-rockstar-like twist, the band first broke on the scene playing dinner music at a McMaster residence formal. The thrill of performing live and the enthusiastic response they received from the crowd convinced those original three to sink their teeth in, and over the next few years TCM perfected its acoustic set on stages from Hamilton to Waterloo and Toronto. It was during the 2001

McMaster University Battle of the Bands that the trio expanded to seven members, taking in new recruits from the McMaster Engineering Musical’s band where Geoff, Mike and Dan had held membership for most of their engineering degrees. TCM made the most of their few weeks of prep time and landed feet-first in the finals. It was during this event that the band developed its signature sound – a solid foundation of tried and true rock format overlayed with rich vocal harmonies, textured with vivid layers of trumpet and keyboard. In 2003 TCM returned to the MSU Showoff, and this time their momentum carried them all the way to victory and on to the South Western Ontario Finals in London. Here they found themselves a standout act among the plethora of alternative and pop/punk bands, and TCM held their own with an excellent second place finish. These days the band has depth aplenty; in addition to Mike on drums, Geoff on vocals/electric guitar, and Danny (’03, Civil & Management) on acoustic guitar/ vocals, TCM employs the skills of bass guitarist Allan Raun (’04, Mech. & Management), Geoff Boyd (’04, Chem.) and Dave Olsen (’06, Chem. & Management) on trumpet, and keyboard/vocals by Bryan Hall, the group’s “engineer by proxy” (secretly a Philosophy grad from York University, but we won’t tell if you don’t). The sound has evolved over the past four

years, too. These days you’ll hear the influences of Coldplay, Rufus Wainright, The Beatles, and Radiohead in TCM’s distinctive melodies. Geoff Olsen claims that the life of the band is uncomplicated by brotherly rivalries – at least not in the actual biological sense. “Over the past four-and-a-halfyears the rest of the guys in the band have pretty much become like brothers, so any problems associated with working with family members extend to the rest of the band.” He says that as various members of the band graduate, it actually becomes easier to find time to rehearse and record. “It was hard to be in a band while at school because, between classes and homework, there didn’t seem to be much time left over for music. That’s engineering for you!” This Crooked Mile is revved up to spend the next year promoting both the album specifically, and their music generally, across Canada and in the spring they hope to hop the pond (figuratively) and introduce themselves to the fine, music-loving audience of England. They also love hearing from devotees, both new and old, so get a-typing with emails to info@this crookedmile.ca if you have questions or comments. And don’t forget to bring those freshly pressed undies to their next gig. Even clean-cut rock stars love a little panty tossing.

This Crooked Mile from left to right: Bryan Hall, Dan Olsen, Mike Paddags, Geoff Olsen, Geoff Boyd, David Olsen and Allan Raun

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Jerry Uvira

will find the traditional and familiar format and product mix, but Uvira says he does much more business on the bakery and soup/sandwich side than with coffee sales. Speaking with him, it’s clear that he is obviously happy with the career change and excited about his new business venture. “My only regret – not doing it 10 years ago!” Uvira, who lives in Columbus, is dad to two teenagers, John and Jennifer, who shuttle between California and Columbus. He still flies and “plays bad golf”!

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actually done any engineering, he has always used the engineering degree indirectly. He credits the B.Eng. degree with giving him the analytical skills that benefited him throughout his career. The degree, he says, allowed him to get the jobs that helped him acquire comprehensive business knowledge and expertise – skills that he now uses in managing the Tim Hortons stores. Mechanical engineering was a good choice, he adds. Because the program allows you to become a generalist, it is one of the most diverse engineering degrees available. Besides, at 19, he already had his commercial pilot’s licence and was working on his instructors rating and saw the mechanical courses as being the closest to aeronautical engineering as he could get in Hamilton! Mac Engineering was four years of hard work “and a lot of intensive drinking,” he jokes. He says the class of ’79 kept in touch for many years after graduating, before slowly drifting apart. However, many made the effort to attend the 25-year Reunion this past June.

Doug Gierula continued from page 13

chemistry that “working in a lab was not for me!” Also, he wanted to establish some credentials for business reasons. He chose McMaster because Hamilton is near Grimsby, allowing him to continue his parttime job at Klacko. But he has no regrets. “We were a small class and became quite close-knit. It was great. There was a different learning system than Queen’s, with a lot of emphasis on presentations and problem-solving. It gave us good realworld experiences.” The size of the class meant that they became good friends and did everything together, both socially as well as academically. “We were able to be close to the profs, too. We got to know them and could have conversations with them in the halls.” His Mac experience left a good impression. As part of Kipling 2003 celebrations, M

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Adam Forte

Jerry Uvira

Uvira, who always wanted to run his own business, says the Tim Hortons organization has been “first class”. He mentions that Columbus is known in the restaurant business as a tough market. In fact, many restaurant companies will test their concepts here. In spite of the competitive nature of the market, Tim Hortons is doing very well. Interestingly, people in the southern United States don’t drink as much coffee as Canadians, preferring a nice cold pop with their donuts. Any Canadian Mech Eng grad who visits one of his stores

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group individual core expertise from their own disciplines. The result is a group able to break the kind of traditional political barriers that exist in other large automotive companies, and get the public what they really want – “kick ass performance at a fair price”. Traditional design/release engineers work on 3- to 4-year projects. The SRT group is very different, designing and releasing in one year! This, he adds, “drives dynamic decision making and no-nonsense approaches to problem solving.” For that first job in 2002, Forte worked as a body engineer on the Viper SRT10 (500 hp V10) with responsibility for design, testing, production tooling and final part release for the rear clip. From 2002-2003, he had responsibility for the development, design, production tooling and final part release for new front and rear fascias, a rear deck lid spoiler and reinforcement bumpers for the Dodge SRT4 (230hp 14 Turbo). And the next year, he had the same responsibilities for new exterior body component assembly for the RAM SRT10 (500 hp V10) – which had not been released as of time of printing. Most recently, he is the Lead Synthesis Engineer responsible for creating and maintaining all vehicle level performance and endurance testing for the newest and as yet un-named SRT vehicle. “In a nutshell, a synthesis engineer owns every aspect of the vehicle from a customer perspective and is the voice behind product enhancements, performance, feel and overall customer appeal of a vehicle.”

Gierula built and presented to the department the large chemical engineering sign now located on the third floor of JHB. Having credentials is important in an industry where most of the players are much older. The boat building industry in Canada virtually collapsed during the 1980’s, so there are very few young people working in the field. All are middle aged or older. “It helps a lot when these (older) guys see I have an engineering degree and practical experience,” he adds. Gierula, who is single, actually began the process of taking over the company in 2000, during a slow transition that benefited both the business and the plans of the original owner. One of the challenges that concerns him is the lack of skilled workers in this field. “We pretty well have to take high school graduates and train them here ourselves.” Despite the responsibilities, he does get some free time, and enjoys outdoor activities like sailing, windsurfing, kayaking and downhill skiing. U

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Alumni news

2004 golf tourney a success

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wenty-nine teams were registered for this year’s annual Mac Engineering Golf Tournament, held

at the Tyandaga Golf Course in Burlington on May 27th. The day was gorgeous, and the 116 duffers enjoyed Mac anecdotes and

Gary Moore, Ron Scheckenberger, Peter Crockett and Paul Cripps, all Civil ’81

Personal Invitation! by Pat (King) Stevens, Chem Eng ’80 Please consider this a personal invitation to attend any upcoming McMaster Engineering Alumni event. Carm Vespi and her team, along with the Engineering Alumni Advisory Committee, have been working feverishly to pull together a series of events which are spread out across the next calendar year and have been designed to appeal to a variety of interests. Pat Stevens These events include: Engineering Family Day – August 29th at Cameron Motorsport Wine Tasting at East Dell Estates – September 23rd Diversity in Engineering with Guest Speaker Nick Javor (Chem Eng & Mgmt ’80) on October 21st (Location TBD) Engineering MES Past Presidents Gala – November 19th Faculty Club Scotch Tasting – November 30th at the Scottish Rite in Hamilton Toronto Alumni Dinner Event – February 24, 2005 (Location TBD) 3rd Annual Golf Tournament – May 26, 2005 Alumni Weekend for ’65, ’80, ’85 – June 4, 2005 Attending any one of these events will provide you and your partner with an enjoyable outing and enable you to hook up with old friends. You will note on the alumni website, that Carm and her crew provide a listing of those who are planning on attending each event, so you know in advance if any of your former classmates will be attending. If there is an activity or location that would have greater appeal to you than those listed above, please feel free to contact Carm or me so that we can include your ideas in future plans! Please accept this invitation to attend any of the events we have to offer.

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sharing golf tips as they made their way around the challenging course. Team 13 (Anton Osfolk, Mechanical & Mgt. ’01, Ryan Mendell, Eng. Physics ’02, Ian Karas, Chemical & Mgt. ’02, and Derek Macpherson, Materials & Mgt.’04) were the winners of Lowest Score. Other winners included Andy Kurelek, Mechanical ’81 (Putting Competition), Jeff Brace (Men’s Longest Drive), Cathy Taylor, Civil & Mgt. ’82 (Women’s Longest Drive), and Walter Veckie, Unified Engineering (Closest-to-the-Pin). The record number of teams participating (31) included an all-Dofasco team and a CivEng emeritus professors team. The 21 raffle prizes donated by our fine sponsors and supporters were very much appreciated. (see website for full list!) http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni/ Thanks to everyone for supporting this annual event. See you next year on Thursday, May 26, 2005 at Crosswinds Golf and Country Club, Burlington. www.crosswindsgolf.com . Book Early!

David Rosato (Computer & Mgt. ’07), Matthew Rosato (Computer ’03), Jason Little (Electrical ’03) and Pete Patskoviak (Eng. Physics ’03)

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Faculty of Engineering Advisory Board 2004 Membership Five new members have joined the Dean’s Advisory Board due to vacancies arising from the retirement of Vince Smith (Dow Chemical Canada) and Norman Toms (Sierra Wireless), and an out-of-country move by Claudine Simson (Motorola). We welcome Don Black, Bob Magee, Amit Monga, Tim Valters and Ed Whitehead.

Formed in 2002, the Board meets twice a year to share their experience and wisdom with the Dean. For example, the group has provided important advice on issues relating to the creation of the Schools of Engineering Practice and BioEngineering. If you wish more information about the Board, please e-mail Terry Milson at milsont@mcmaster.ca Dr. John Reid JDS Uniphase (retired)

Dr. David J. Litster Professor, Department of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Dr. Doug H. Barber (Chair) Gennum Corporation (retired)

Mr. Dietmar Reiner Chief Information Officer Ontario Power Generation

Mr. Don Black Deputy Minister Ministry of Economic Development and Trade

Mr. Norm Lockington Vice President, Technology Dofasco Inc.

Mr. Walter Booth Chairman & CEO Timberland Equipment Limited

Mr. Bob Magee President & CEO The Woodbridge Group

Ms. Maryann Combs General Director of Engineering & Product Planning General Motors of Canada

Dr. Amit Monga Vice-President, Technology Investing MDS Capital Corp.

Mr. Tim Valters Vice President & General Manager Selkirk Canada Corporation Mr. Ed Whitehead Director of Engineering Motorola Canada Dr. Joe Wright President & CEO Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada

Mr. Joe Ng President JNE Consulting Limited

Mr. Bob Crow University & Government Relations Research in Motion Limited

Mr. Michael Pley President COM DEV Space

Mr. Mike Fielding Chief Executive Officer StrataFlex

Twelfth Annual Engineering Physics forum

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he Twelfth Annual Forum of Engineering Physics Alumni and Undergraduates was held on Friday, April 2, 2004 – and was a rousing success. An advance notice of the event was sent by e-mail and responses were received from around the world; over 125 people attended. Members of this year’s alumni panel outlined their careers since leaving McMaster and described how the Engineering Physics program had prepared them for the workforce. Panel members included: Victor Barreto (’97) from ITC Systems Inc., Gord Cormick (’74) of Fibre Laminations Ltd., Mandy Jandu (B.Eng. Mgt.’02) from Ontario Power Generation, Brian Mitchell

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from Sobotec Ltd. (B.Eng.Mgt. ’03), Karen Owen (B.Eng. Society ‘02) from Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Horatiu Pop (’98) from MD Robotics and Stephen Szabo (B.Eng. Mgt. ’91) from Stantec Consulting. Paul Jessop, Chair of the Department, acted as Moderator. The forum was followed by a social at Wentworth House where undergraduates

had an opportunity to talk informally with faculty and alumni. Alumni who missed the event but who are interested in participating in the forum or other seminars, please contact Fran Allen, Engineering Physics Department, McMaster University, L8S 4L7, Tel (905) 525-9l40, Ext. 24548, E-mail, allenf@mcmaster.ca.

Canadian Academy of Engineering inductions continued from page 5

advancement of engineering education and training for the 21st century. The Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) is an independent, self-governing and non-profit organization established in 1987 to serve the nation in matters of engi-

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neering concern. The Fellows of the Academy are professional engineers from all disciplines and are elected on the basis of their distinguished service and contribution to society, to the country and to the profession.

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Fun for all – Alumni Weekend 2004

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he 2004 Engineering Alumni Weekend, held on Saturday June 5th, featured alumni classes of ’64, ’79, and ’84. The Meet and Mingle event held in the Engineering Lobby prior to dinner, provided everyone with an opportunity to tour a number of the Faculty’s new or newly renovated departments: the McMaster Research Institute (MMRI), Information Technology Building (ITB), Engineering Student Services and the University’s Student Centre. Following a welcome by Dean Mo Elbestawi, over 75 alumni, faculty and staff and their guests tucked into a scrumptious dinner buffet. Alumni tell us they appreciate an occasion to reunite with classmates, touch base with former profs and generally become re-connected with Mac. Why not plan to join us next year and re-connect with Mac!

Jackson Wiegman (Super Plumber) holding Ben Sproule MES President ’79.

Class of ’84: Front row: Chris Wolfe (Chemical), Ian Kennedy (Mechanical), Antero Gomes (Electrical & Mgt.), Carol Wilson (Mechanical & Mgt.), Chuck Taylor (Mechanical). Back row: Dr. Les Shemilt (Chemical), Dr. Don Woods (Chemical), Erwin Bluemke (Civil), David Hiemnstra (Electrical & Mgt.), Sam Luinstra (Mechanical), Craig Pappin (Mechanical & Mgt.), Harry Laiconis (Mechanical), Tom Grice (Mechanical & Mgt.), John Walma (Mechanical)

Mechanical ’79: Art Cooper, Dave Petherick, Peter Young, Mark Ryc, Dr. Ross Judd, Tom Magyarody, John Shimmell, Jerry Uvira, Paul Schurter

Class of ’64: Gene Riley, David Parkes, Tom Ricker and Don Jones. Missing: Mimmo Lostrocco and John Buchan

Class of ’79: Front row: Rick Moreau (Civil), Ben Sproule (Civil), Gwen Rousseau (Chemical), Janet Major (Chemical), Warren Bridle (Chemical), Neil Crawford (Chem. Eng.). Second row: John Monkman (Civil), Dave Petherick (Mechanical), Peter Young (Mechanical), Dr. Ross Judd (Mechanical), Dr. Les Shemilt (Chemical), Tom Magyarody (Mechanical & Mgt.), John Shimmell (Mechanical), Jerry Uvira (Mechanical), Paul Schurter (Mechanical & Mgt.), Dr. Terry Hoffman (Chemical). Back row: Al Pluim (Electrical), Juha Kantovaara (Eng. Physics), Mark Ryc (Mechanical), Art Cooper (Mechanical & Mgt.).

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Tom Ricker and Don Jones

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Interfaces – George C. Weatherly Symposium

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bout 60 friends, colleagues and former students of the late Professor George Weatherly gathered at McMaster University May 5-7, 2004 for the first annual Weatherly Symposium. This symposium was instituted as a memorial to his life and a trust fund was established for this purpose. In future, the venue will alternate between the University of Toronto and McMaster University to reflect the fact that George Weatherly worked at both institutions during his distinguished career. It was George’s wish that something be done to enable students of Materials Science to come together to collaborate and present their work. The study of Material Science encompasses almost all of the natural sciences from math, physics, chemistry, biology, to most of the engineering disciplines and therefore, crossdiscipline collaboration is important to solving materials problems. George Weatherly clearly understood this requirement. From 1996 to 2001, he was Director of the Brockhouse Institute for Materials Research, established to bring together researchers from all the disciplines touched by materials science and to provide a

University of Toronto. He will be cherished by his friends, colleagues and students for the richness of his life, his quiet humour, his humanity and care for others and, above all, for his unfailing honesty. His contributions were many and are written clearly in the lives of those with whom he taught and worked.

collection of state-of-the-art facilities for this research. Papers presented at the Interfaces symposium offered a wide range of topics: mathematical models, the physics and chemistry of interfaces and grain boundaries, the biological interfaces of membranes and bones, and the application of electron microscopy to the study of hard and soft materials. Six current PhD students, two from the University of Toronto and four from McMaster, presented papers on their work. Andi Limanga and Kevin Spencer (Mat. Sci. & Eng., McMaster) were presented with awards of $300 each for the best presentations. Eleven students presented posters on work being done in the area of materials science and Ye Zhu (Mat. Sci. & Eng., McMaster) received the prize for the best poster. In total, 29 papers and 14 posters were presented. The outstanding impressions of the first symposium are captured eloquently in the memorial written by David Wilkinson: George was a devoted scientist in the field of electron microscopy and an educator with a distinguished career at McMaster University and the

Eric Sit profile continued from page 7

couple have three children. Nathan, an Eagle Scout, is studying biological chemistry at UC Berkeley; Leeann is going to the U. of Minnesota to study anthropology and sociology; and Tyler, who is passionate about drama and choir/band, will be a sophomore in Eden Prairie High School. In his spare time, Sit is active in scouting and is currently training to be a Commissioner. “We have to leave the trail in better shape than when we found it. Fame and money are only by-products. If you do a good job, things will happen.”

Alumni Gallery Inductees 2004 Three engineering alumni have been inducted into the Alumni Gallery of Distinction. A graduate in electrical engineering (B.Eng. ’89 and M.Eng.’92), Steve Mann is the inventor of WearComp, a wearable computer, and WearCam, an eyetap camera and reality mediator. In 1991, his inventions and ideas were snapped up by MIT and he can be credited with planting the seeds that developed into the MIT Wearable Computing Project. He has also constructed a device that will record every moment he sees, and connect with the Internet 24 hours a day. At the age of 22, Eva Marsh was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Not one to be defeated by this news, the electrical graduate (’81) began to investigate this typicaly debilitating disease, determined that it would not slow her down. In the succeeding 37 years, Eva has raised a family, graduated from university and worked in industry. Public speaker, researcher and author of two books, the single mother works actively to help others living with MS. An internationally known and respected researcher in the field of microstructure development in engineering materials, Gary Purdy graduated from material science and engineering in 1962.

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Steve Mann

Eva Marsh

Gary Purdy

Currently he is a professor in McMaster’s Materials Science & Engineering department. During his career, he has made major contributions in the areas of multicomponent effects in diffusion and phase transformatives, structures and properties of solidsolid interfaces, and phase transformations involving interfacial diffusion. Current research projects include: equilibrium and dynamic properties of interfaces as they relate to the development of microstructure; liquid film migration in solids, liquid phase bonding, coherent equilibrium, reaction and diffusion in thin films and heterostructures, phase transformations in steels, cast irons, light alloys, machinability of materials.

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New Faculty Members Civil Engineering Michael Tait joined the Department as an assistant professor in July 2004. Dr. Tait received his Ph.D. from the University of Western Ontario. His research interests include Michael Tait experimental testing and numerical modelling of passive vibration control devices, the retrofit/rehabilitation of structures, and full-scale monitoring of structures. Dr. Tait has been involved in several commercial research projects at the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory in London, Ontario.

Computing & Software The Department welcomes Tom Maibaum who joined us in June from King’s College London, where he was Professor of the Foundations of Software Engineering in the Department of Computer Tom Maibaum Science. Maibaum received his B.Sc. in Pure Mathematics from the University of Toronto and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of London, and has held appointments at various other institutions including the Imperial College of Science and Technology and University of Waterloo. He has an extensive and impressive list of publications, professional contributions and administrative experience, and we are very pleased that he has

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attended and brought congratulations to the NSERC chair holders. The many speeches and announcements couldn’t dampen the evening’s festive mood! The overwhelming success of this celebratory gala combined with the realization that world-class research continues at McMaster, means we can look forward to another Applause & Accolades Awards event in the near future.

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decided to join our department. Software Engineering students will benefit from his experience. He will be teaching two of our core Software Design courses.

Electrical & Computer Welcome to Aleksandar Jeremic who joined us in July 2004 as an Assistant Professor. Dr. Jeremic received his BSEE from the University of Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Aleksandar Jeremic electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research focuses on different areas of biomedical modeling and signal processing. In addition, his research interests include medical image analysis, visualization of biomedical systems using spatio-temporal models, and biochemical sensing.

University of Windsor. He has extensive experience in all aspects of nuclear safety analysis gained from many years with Ontario Hydro, Ontario Power Generation and, more recently, Nuclear Safety Solutions. His research interests include best estimate and uncertainty analysis methods for reactor accident analysis, nuclear safety thermalhydraulics, and thermal-mechanical behavior of reactor components under accident conditions. The IRC in Nuclear Safety Analysis is an industrial partnership with the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) – a consortium of Canadian nuclear organizations including Ontario Power Generation (OPG), Bruce Power, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), the CANDU Owners Group (COG) and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC).

Mechanical Engineering

Engineering Physics John C. Luxat, NSERC/ UNENE Industrial Research Chair (IRC) in Nuclear Safety Analysis, joined the Department in May 2004. Dr. Luxat received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University John C. Luxat of Cape Town, South Africa, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the

Sumanth Shankar joined the Department on July 1, 2004 as the BraleyOrlick Chair in Advanced Manufacturing. Dr. Shankar was previously employed as a Research Scientist in the Advanced Casting Sumanth Shankar Research Center, Metals Processing Institute at Worcester Polytechnical Institute in Worcester, MA.

Can you help us find? Brian Damato, Chemical ’82 Kenneth Agler, Mechanical & Mgt. ’91 Paul Alexander, M.Eng. Chemical ’70 Frederic Allan, Eng. Physics ’67 Kenneth Ametewee, Computer ’97 Eric-Alexander Achig, Electrical ’03 Lisa Anderson, Chemical ’84 David Arnott, Civil ’81 John Arvanitis, Materials ’98 David Atkins, Civil ’79 Jodie Atkins, Civil ’96 George Augustyn, Mechanical ’80 Jesse Awai, M.Eng. Civil ’83 Hussein Azmi, M.Eng. Civil ’75 c

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Mohsen Azari, Electrical ’95 Michael Ball, Electrical ’84 Jeffrey Balmer, Eng. Physics ’83 Marc Bender, Software ’02 David Betel, Eng. Physics ’68 Roy Bilic, Civil ’89 Mike Binder, Chemical ’94 David Black, Mechanical ’94 Ken Black, Manufacturing ’02 Ricky Blacker, Mechnaical ’94 Anne Duncan, Eng. Physics ’87 Brian Eady, Electrical Eng. & Mgt. ’80 William DiDiodato, Mechanical ’99

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Engineering Co-op & Career Services New Program:

On-Campus Recruiting:

Advice:

Engineering Co-op & Career Services is the new name of Engineering Career Services. As of September 2004, we will have an official co-op program. Students graduating from the co-op option must accumulate a minimum of 12 months experience prior to term 2 of their final year. The Co-op requirement may be completed through: • Three four-month summer experience terms • One four-month summer experience term and two back-to-back four-month experience terms (8-month September to April placement) • Three four-month back-to-back experience terms (May to May, September to September). January starts are not available because we aren’t a trimester school. In building the Engineering Co-op program, we’ve tried to offer the maximum flexibility to both employers and students. As always we would appreciate an opportunity to discuss the Engineering Co-op program with you. Please contact Anne Markey markeya@mcmaster.ca to arrange an appointment.

Career’s Day kicks off on-campus recruitment on Monday, September 20 this year. If you haven’t yet registered – call me. We’re also booking space for corporate information sessions targeted to members of the graduating class. The following companies have reserved dates. Evertz Microsystems, IBM Canada, Ontario Power Generationm Imperial Oil, Enbridge Consumer’s Gas, GE Canada, Dofasco Canada, Apotex Canada, Accenture Canada, Research In Motion, Nortel Networks, Nuclear Safety Solutions I hope that, as alumni, you’ll be on campus as part of the recruiting team. If you are, stop by and visit us in JHE A214. I’ll be at most sessions; please say hello. To arrange an information session, or to post positions for members of the graduating class, please contact me.

I’m asking for your suggestions on the top 3 things engineering students can do to ensure their employability upon graduation. You are the experts. Please take a moment to share your information. I can’t make students take your advice, but we can make them aware of what you believe is important. Please send your top 3 suggestions to engcar@mcmaster.ca and use the subject line: Top 3. We’ll collate the information and make it available to students on our web site. And finally – plant/industry tours. In the last academic year we bussed students to General Motors of Canada St. Catharines (thanks Peter), Imperial Oil Nanticoke (thanks Chris), Modatek Systems in Milton and Gerdau Ameristeel Corporate (Cambridge Division). Although the tours are

Guest Speakers: Our fall lineup of special events for students is under development. We’re recruiting alumni to participate in the following events: Networking Breakfasts: 8-9:30 a.m. Friday Oct 1 – Civil Engineering Thursday Oct 21 – Electrical & Computer Engineering, Eng Phys Monday Nov 15 – Software Engineering & Comp Sci. Monday Jan 10/05 – Materials & Chemical Engineering Monday Feb 7/05 – Mechanical Engineering

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Alumni Employment Opportunities The Engineering Co-op & Career Services office has used this column to report changes to our program and to inform alumni of our services – it is now our turn to provide a ‘career service’ for you. Numerous engineering opportunities come to our attention that require several years of experience in addition to an engineering degree. These positions are posted at http://careers.mcmaster.ca and require alumni to register on line at http://careers.mcmaster.ca/alumni.htm in order to access the job descriptions. Registration is free. If you are an employer with an opportunity for an experienced graduate, this service will also be of benefit to you. Posting is free of charge and weekly informative reminders are forwarded to all registrants on eRecruiting highlighting recent postings. Please visit http://careers.mcmaster.ca for more information and to register.

Change of address card: Name:_______________________________________________________________________________ Grad Yr. & Dept.: _____________________________________________________________________ New Address: _________________________________________________________________________

Other Events:

____________________________________________________________________________________

Monday Oct 18, 5-7 p.m. Resume Writing – Employer Panel • What impresses you in resumes or other application forms? Thursday Nov 4, 5-7 p.m. Interview Tips – Employer Panel • Share your perspective on what you look for when hiring new recruits If you’d like to participate in an event that isn’t mentioned above, please contact me and we’ll work with you to develop a session.

Phone: __________________________________ Fax: ________________________________________

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Postal Code: __________________ E-mail:_________________________________________________ Comments: (present occupation, recent accomplishments ie: awards, recognitions). ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ Any comments provided will be included in the next issue.

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Engineering Students news Accolades for the Venture Program

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he Venture and Engineering and Science Program, organized and administered by the Faculty of Engineering’s Alumni Office, has won a prestigious award. The Program’s Electronic Roadster 2000mm won the 2004 Best Project Award from Actua at the Association’s bi-annual gathering, held in June in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The McMaster project competed against entries from 26 Canadian engineering and science camps. Designed to be used in Venture’s Computer and Technology summer camp, the Electronic Roadster 2000mm is a metal track with a small current running through it. Children design cars that contain two motors that they wire themselves and run on the track. The activity teaches them

about electricity, conductivity and engineering design. The Venture and Engineering Science Program (www.venture.mcmaster.ca) is a non-profit program run by McMaster

undergraduate engineering and science students. Its mandate is to introduce children to engineering, science and technology in a fun, interactive and innovative manner.

McMaster wrestler garners awards

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hemical Engineering student Lulu Bursztyn was selected as one of eight Academic All-Canadians by Ontario University Athletics. She was honored at the 11th annual Academic AllCanadian Celebration on June 10th at the Chateau Mont Ste-Anne in Quebec. Each

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Ms. Carm Vespi Managing Editor The MacEngineer Faculty of Engineering John Hodgins Building, Room A 201D McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 Tel: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 E-mail: vespi@mcmaster.ca

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year, one female and one male are selected from each of the four regional associations that comprise the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS). Bursztyn has earned two OUA wrestling medals during her four years at McMaster. She is also the recipient of the Chancellor’s God Medal (November 2003). One of the University’s top prizes, it is awarded to the student that ranks highest in scholarship, leadership and influence. Earlier in the month, Bursztyn was the recipient of the Dr. Mary Keyes award for the Top Female Marauder Scholar. The Marauder Scholar Awards are presented annually to student-athletes who have achieved a minimal sessional average of 9.5 (80 per cent) over 24 units while competing for a varsity or club team during the school year. In addition to numerous academic and sports awards, Bursztyn has been active with the McMaster Engineering Society, a member of the Chemical Engineering Club and the Redsuits Orientation Committee, as well as being a tutor. N

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It’s summer and the camps are fun

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cMaster University offers a variety of summer camp experiences for kids ranging in age from 6 to 16. The oldest is the Sports Fitness School (SFS) which celebrates 27 years of providing a multi-sports program that emphasizes fitness and recreational swimming. This year, in addition to traditional stand-by’s like squash, wrestling and dance, lacrosse has been added to the menu. The Mini-U (www.mcmaster.ca/camps/ miniu) targets ages 9 to 14, and offers this group a study program combined with recreational activities and swimming. Kids chose from three modules of four topics, all designed to explore both the sciences and non-sciences. The two-week program culminates in a sleep-over in one of the campus’ residences. The Faculty of Engineering’s Venture Engineering and Science camp (www. venture.mcmaster.ca) offers two streams: one that focuses on engineering and science, and one on computers. Venture Engineering and Science is divided into junior (Grades 4 & 5), intermediate (Grade 6) and senior (Grade 7 & 8) groups. Computer Camp has the same three groups but they cater to different ages: junior

(Grades 4 & 5), intermediate (Grade 6 & 7), senior (Grade 8 to 10). Instruction is provided by McMaster undergrads who quickly discover that there’s more to teaching than they ever imagined! Experience and knowledge of the camps are key factors in hiring both directors and coor-

dinators, many of whom have participated in previous camps as instructors. While the focus is on exposing kids to hands-on educational activities in a university setting, the overriding goal for both campers and instructors is to have lots of fun!

The Solar Car soars at last!

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was working as expected. They had no major difficulties during the 3-day event. The 317-kilogram, $600,000 vehicle was one of 20 cars entered in the competition, which attracted some of the top engineering schools in Canada and the United States. McMaster’s entry has always been a multi-disciplinary initiative involving students from health sciences, humanities and business, as well as engineering. The Formula Sun Grand Prix is a shorter race than the American Solar Car (ASC) Challenge, a 10-day race from Chicago to Los Angeles. The efforts at the Grand Prix “was a great learning experience and offered the team great race experience,” says Tammy Hwang, project manager. “We know what to expect for the big race (ASC) in 2005.”

he Phoenix, the latest version of the McMaster solar car, won top Canadian school at a three-day road course in Topeka, Kansas in May 2004. The challenge of the 2004 Formula Sun Grand Prix was to be the car that completed the most laps of a closed circuit over a 72hour period. The race was held at the 2.5mile track at Heartland Park in Topeka from May 19 to 21. Four members of the McMaster Solar Car Team took turns driving the car in order to take full advantage of the sunlight hours. They completed over 400 miles, as well as clocking a fastest lap time of four minutes and five seconds. Overall, the Phoenix ranked a very respectable fifth. The drivers reported that the car performed very well and the newly implemented steering system

Wishing for fun and profit

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magine a giant game of Mousetrap built out of Tinker Toys. Three engineering students did just that! The mechanical engineering students built a sophisticated game designed to make young patients at the McMaster Children’s Hospital smile – and raise money for the hospital at the same time. The McMaster graduates earned an “A” for this final year project, dubbed Mech-A-Wish, that put their mechanical engineering skills to the test. The brightly coloured kinetic display features 20 different mechanisms performing a different action with a raveling ball. The device is activated by the donation of a loonie or toonie coin. Dean of Engineering Mo Elbestawi remarked that “it is important in the education of our students in mechanical engineering to have applied design projects to work on. This project shows a high degree of innovation with a wonderful opportunity to be utilized by the Children’s Hospital.” Students on the team included: Brian Wilson, Ruger Johnsen and Morgan Curran-Blaney. They were supervised by Professor Tim Nye.

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The Mech-A-Wish is on permanent display in 3B/3C Lounge of the McMaster Childrens Hospital at the McMaster University Medical Centre.

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Departmental newsbriefs In June, the Software Quality Research Laboratory (SQRL) was host to a three-day conference on Application of Concurrency to System Design (ACSD’04). This international conference was preceded by the First International Workshop on Model-Based Methodologies for Pervasive and Embedded Software (MOMPES). Both the conference and the workshop were a huge success. The conference alone attracted participants from Germany, Finland, France, Iran, Japan, The Netherlands, Portugal, the United Kingdom, and the United States, as well as from across Canada.

Chemical Engineering John Vlachopoulos received the Distinguished Achievement Award of the Extrusion Division of the Society of Plastics Engineers (S.P.E.) during SPE’s Annual Technical Meeting (ANTEC) in Chicago, on May 18th, 2004. He received a plaque and an honorarium in recognition of his contributions to polymer extrusion technology and to the plastics industry. SPE is the world’s largest association of plastics professionals with membership 25,000. Professor Vlachopoulos is Director of the Centre for Advanced Polymer Processing and Design (CAPPA-D) at McMaster University and Acting Director of the McMaster Manufacturing Research Institute (MMRI). Congratulations to MASc. student Art Tinson. Art received the Best Student Paper Award for the Rotational Molding Division at the Society of Plastics Engineers ANTEC Conference in Chicago, IL, in May 2004. The paper, co-authored with E. Takacs and J. Vlachopoulos, was entitled: “The Effect of Surface Tension on the Sintering of Polyethylene Copolymers and Blends in Rotational Molding”. Congratulations also to Ph.D. student Bettina Klenkler who tied for first place in the poster contest at the 7th World Biomaterials Congress (Surface Characterization and Modification Session) held in Sydney, Australia, in May 2004. Judging was conducted by members of the Society for Biomaterials and Genzyme Corporation and winners were awarded a certificate and a cheque.

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Don Woods presented a three-day workshop on Feb. 25-27 on “Implementing PBL”, for faculty from Ulsan College, Korea. On June 14 he was the plenary speaker for the Faculty Development Kickoff Workshop for the School of Nursing at McMaster. Also in June, he presented a workshop and two papers at the American Society for Engineering Education Conference in Salt Lake City. The workshop was on “Motivating and Rewarding Faculty”. The papers were titled “Motivating students to Learn” and “The Development of Student’s Skill in Self Assessment” (co-authored with Heather Sheardown). The Department welcomes Jim Dickson and John MacGregor who are back from their research leaves and wishes all the best to Bob Pelton and Heather Sheardown as they begin their one-year research leaves.

Technical Council on Forensic Engineering (TCFE). The paper, which was published in the ASCE Journal of Constructed Facilities, describes the performance of three large new bridges during the 1995 earthquake in Kobe, Japan. These modern long-span bridges that utilize the latest design concepts, materials and details, were found to have seismically vulnerable elements. Because of their size, repairs were quite costly and time consuming, and the impact on commerce which relied on these bridges was devastating. The TCFE Awards Committee was impressed with the significance of the lessons that can be learned from this paper, as well as the clarity of John Wilson’s concise presentation of the damage and repair procedures.

Civil Engineering

Ms. Yasaman Ardeshirpour, a Ph.D. student in the Department, won the Best Student Paper award at the 2004 IEEE Canadian Conference on Electrical and Computer Engineering. Her paper was titled “2-D Cmos Based Image Sensor System For Fluorescent Detection” and was co-authored with Professors M. Jamal Deen and Shahram Shirani. The award was presented at the Conference in May 2004. As a result of this honour, she was asked to write an invited paper for the Canadian Journal of Electrical Engineering. Professor M. Jamal Deen was elected Chair of the Dielectric Science and Technology Division of the Electrochemical Society at its 205th meeting in San Antonio Texas in May. His two-year term covers 2004 to 2006. He was also elected a Member of the Board of Directors of the Society for the same two-year period. Mathieu Marin, a student co-supervised by Professor Deen, won the Best Student Paper award at the 2003 SPIE’s International Conference on Fluctuations and Noise – Circuits and Devices. Their paper was titled “Effects of Body Biasing on the Low Frequency Noise Behavior of NMOSFETS From a 130-nm CMOS Technology” and the research was a collaborative effort between McMaster University,

Peter Crockett, ’81, was appointed to the position of Commissioner, Planning and Public Works for the Region of Halton, effective June 2004. Most recently, Peter held the position of General Manager, Public Works for the City of Hamilton. Prior to working with the City of Hamilton, he held a series of increasingly responsible management positions with Peel Region. The Department welcomed Hong Eie Wong, ’82 back from Singapore for a short visit during the summer. He is currently Regional Corporate Service Manager for Intel Technology Asia Pte. Ltd. He stopped by to catch up and reminisce with faculty and staff from his undergraduate days. Graduate student Daman Panesar won 2nd prize at the 6th International Ph.D. Symposium in Civil Engineering. The symposium was held in Delft, The Netherlands, in June. She is completing her doctor of studies under the supervision of Professor Samir Chidiac. John C. Wilson’s paper, “Repair of new long-span bridges damaged by the 1995 Kobe earthquake”, was named 2003 Outstanding Journal Paper by the American Society of Civil Engineers c

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Universite de Montpellier (France) and France-based ST Microelectronics. The award, consisting of certificates for each coauthor and $500, was presented at the Conference’s 2004 meeting in Spain in May. Ph.D. student Abbas EbrahimiMoghadam has won the 2004 CITO Research Excellence Scholarship. His supervisor, Dr. Shahram Shirani, nominated Mr. Ebrahimi-Moghadam for his outstanding contribution to the CITO project “High Quality, Low Bit Rate Video Communication Using Foveation”. He was subsequently chosen by a panel of five representatives from both academia and industry. The CITO Research Excellence Scholarship is designed to recognize superior student researchers and acknowledge the important role they play in the success of CITO-supported research projects. Congratulations to graduate student Andrea Mucci and her supervisor Dr. Hubert deBruin. Mucci was awarded the prize for the Best Student Paper at the 17th Biennial International EURASIP Conference Biosignal 2004, held recently in Brno, Czech Republic. Her paper was entitled: “Characterization of a Chloride Channel in Interstitial Cells of Cajal: A Potential Contributor to the GI Slow Wave”.

Materials Science & Engineering Graduate student Shane Turcott won the prize for best presentation in the Materials Physics category at the Canadian Materials Science Conference in Ottawa in June. Pat Nicholson’s book Disastrous Approach to Materials Science (Mosaic Press) was reviewed favourably in the June 2004 issue of Journal of Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (JOM). The reviewer says: “A very quotable Professor Nicholson gives us pithy lessons on some materials science fundamentals and examples of how these fundamentals can be applied (or misapplied) with calamitous consequences.” The book explores such events as the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster and the sinking of the Titanic with references to a collapse or flaw or unexpected occurrence in the materials used in their construction.

Mechanical Engineering Congratulations to Phil Koshy who has been awarded the CSME I. W. Smith M

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Award. The I.W. Smith Award was established in 1977 to honour Professor I. W. Smith who taught mechanical engineering at the University of Toronto. It is awarded annually for outstanding achievement in creative mechanical engineering within 10 years of graduation. Stephen Veldhuis has been awarded a CFI Infrastructure Operating Fund to assist with his research. High resolution investigation tools and highly trained support staff are vital for conducting research into improving the productivity and quality of a wide range of manufacturing processes and this award will provide the necessary support to maintain the readiness of three systems focusing on advanced metrology, machine tool accuracy and force measurement. The systems include: a scanning white light microscope, linear scale interface cables and interpolation cards as well as a grid encoder and a force dynamometry system. These three systems work together to provide detailed information into the manufacturing process and will enable Dr. Veldhuis to study factors which influence processes at levels rarely studied before in Canada. Developing a fundamental understanding of processes at this level is essential to making process improvements and developing the new manufacturing capability required by Canada’s industry. Two undergraduate students were recognized at a luncheon in July for their outstanding academic performance in the 2003/2004 academic year. Julie Woods was awarded the Iroquois Trophy and David Anderson received the CSME Medal. Three graduate students have been recognized for contributions to excellence in their academic programs and to McMaster University. Hongda Wang was awarded First Prize out of 29 papers submitted in the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Society of Canada’s Student Paper Competition at this year’s conference held in Ottawa May 9-11th, 2004. His paper was titled “Effects of Side Wall Thermal Conditions on Natural Convection in Inclined Enclosures Heated from Below and Cooled from Above”. The prize included $350 and an engraved plaque. Bing Li received the Mary Keyes Award for Leadership and Service to McMaster University at the Graduate Student Recognition Day U

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Dinner held on May 18th, 2004. His current involvements include serving as the President of the McMaster Graduate Student Association GSA), Chair of the Phoenix Executive Committee, Chair of the GSA Trip Committee and President (and founder) of the McMaster Kungfu Tai chi Association. He has also served in several capacities including President and Senior Advisor in the Chinese Students and Scholars Association. At the same event on May 18th, Wael Ahmed was the recipient of the Dean’s Award for Communicating Graduate Student Research. Ahmed’s paper was titled “Two-Phase Flow Through Piping Systems”. He serves as one the department’s two graduate student representatives and has been instrumental in organizing cultural seminars and social events for faculty, graduate students and staff in the department.

Engineering Co-op & Career Services continued from page 23

targeted to students in year 1, we did invite upper levels – space permitting. Our plan is to offer tours to students again this year and we’re looking for industry hosts. Again, if you’re interested, please contact me. Thanks for taking the time to read this. I hope we’ll have a chance to work together this academic year. Should your organization wish to hire a student or former student please contact us – your support is crucial. Anne Markey, Manager Engineering Co-op & Career Services, markeya@mcmaster.ca

MacEngineer

The

The MacEngineer is printed and produced by

Managing Editor: Carm Vespi, Engineering Alumni Officer Editorial Committee: Dave S. Weaver, John Preston, Terry Milson, Carm Vespi Art Direction and Design: Wordsmith Design and Advertising Contributing Writers: Administrative Coordinators, Terry Milson, Trudi Down, The Daily News, Carm Vespi, Judy Mair

T

Y

The MacEngineer

27


40063416

3rd Annual McMaster

E ngineering Golf Tournament

Thursday, May 26, 2005 Crosswinds Golf & Country Club Milton, Ontario More details available soon. Check the website at: http://www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

You’re invited...

1965 Alumni Weekend 1980 1985 Saturday June 4, 2005

For more information contact: Ms. Carm Vespi Phone: (905) 525-9140, ext. 24906 Fax: (905) 546-5492 email: vespi@mcmaster.ca www.eng.mcmaster.ca/engalumni

Hey, Engineering Alumni… What’s new? What have you been up to since graduation? How are you meeting the challenges of your careers? Send us your success stories! We want to let other alumni, especially those from your class, know how well you’ve been doing. We want to hear from YOU!

You are Needed as an Alumni Mentor! Do you remember all the questions you had as you entered your final year here at Mac Engineering and prepared to join the working world as a professional engineer? • How do I find good job prospects? • How do I make the best impression at interviews? • What should I include in a portfolio? • Who in the companies should I contact? • How can I tell if a specific job offer is the one for me? You can make an important difference to our graduating engineers! They have many questions … you have the answers! We are seeking engineering alumni, men and women, to volunteer two hours during Social Connection Night. Return to Mac and talk to the fourth and fifth year students about your experiences, challenges, dreams and successes. Be a mentor for a couple of hours to these bright, eager engineers – and future alumni. You will have the opportunity to reconnect with McMaster, meet colleagues and former classmates, network and engage in lively discussion. But most importantly, you will be providing invaluable help and advice to our graduating classes. We guarantee you’ll be rewarded beyond measure!

Social Connection Night Thursday, October 12, 2004 Convocation Hall ~ 7:00 p.m. For more information call Carm Vespi 905-525-9140, ext. 24906 or email: vespi@mcmaster.ca

MacEngineer Fall 2004  

The MacEngineer - The magazine for McMaster University's Faculty of Engineering Alumni

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