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Local Members Worldwide Service

Issue #29

2017

THE GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MAGAZINE

Where you matter most.

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” – Winston Churchill

At Service Credit Union, we are proud to provide affordable banking designed for the people and businesses of New Hampshire. Over 35 NH branch locations including 337 Amherst Street in Nashua.

federally insured by ncua

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PHOTO BY SID CAESAR / CEASERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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8 0 0 .936 .7 73 0 • S E RV I C EC U.O RG / G N CC

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Visit us today at any branch, online or by phone 24/7.

The Merrimack is committed to improving lives by supporting causes and organizations that benefit our community.

Your Passport to Everything Greater Nashua Has to Offer

SPONSORED BY

OPTILINE ENTERPRISES

800.541.0006

themerrimack.com


Millyard Technology Park

Downtown Nashua Visitors Map

Broad Street Parkway

30

WALNUT STREET

14

11

Daniel Webster Highway & Pheasant Lane Mall

97 Main St. • 595-1444

Cabinet Outlet • 1

259 Main St. • 880-8880

Collins Flowers • 41

9 Main St. • 882-2723

Darrell’s Music Hall • 31 75 Main St. • 886-1748

Fortin-Gage Flower & Gift • 12

86 West Pearl St. • 882-3371

Gental Dental • 19

151 Main St. • 886-0000

129 West Pearl St. • 882-9491

NH Health & Wellness Center • 33 60 Main St. • 402-9134

PRG • 4

227 Main St. • 882-5604

The Print Factory • 23

15 Factory St. • 880-4519

Scontsas Fine Jewelry & Décor • 16 169 Main St. • 882-3281

Splash by Masi • 39

A

Courtyard Garden – Mural

2 Clocktower Place • 880-3961

B

Vivian’s Dream – Mural

C

Le Dame De Notre Renaissance – Sculpture

Cotton Mill Apartments • 30

D E

Mirage of the Horse – Sculpture Cameo Image of Main Street – Mural

30 Front St. • 881-4222

Great American Downtown • 40

F

The Nashua Manufacturing Co. – Mural

6 Main St. • 883-5700

G

Frida Rota – Sculpture

H

Margaret’s View of Nashua – Mural

Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce • 22

14 Court St. • 889-2330

Studio Mark Emile Photography • 32

Positive Street Art • 17

174 Main Street, Suite 9 (978) 558-0772

Symphony NH • 26

6 Church St. • 595-9156

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35

CANAL STREET

PARK STREET

34

ET ER STRE

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41

42 Historical Society

LDG.

HUNT B

36

27

LIBRARY

37

20

Downtown Sculptures & Murals

Peacock Players • 25

H

I

T

Dunkin Donuts • 35

The Face of PSA – Mural

25 26

33

P

Food & Dining

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28

CH A VE.

r Activ

STREE

21

Clocktower Place • 24

La Tortue, Ascending Egyptian Turtle, Moon Shadow – Sculptures

39 40

COURT STREET

G

Community

33 Main St. • 594-3107 69 Main St. • 886-0957

22

The Arts

I

31 32

PEARSON AVENUE

P

HILLSBOROUGH SUPERIOR COURT

What a Bagel 2

AlphaGraphics • 29

TEMPLE STREET

9

17

15

COT TA GE

Nashua Wallpaper/Ace Hardware • 13

F

38

CHUR

10

ity Cen ter

8

To Sen io

POST OFFICE

er

MAIN STREET

E. PEARL STREET

E. HOLLIS STREET

T

DEARBORN STREET

Relocated to Exit 8, 1617 Southwood Dr. • 882-6811

29

18 19

SPRING STREET

H

Alec’s Shoe Store • 11

16

Riv

DARTMOUTH - HITCHCOCK NASHUA

W

TREE

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SPRI

SOUTHERN NH MEDICAL CENTER

ELDRIDGE STREET

3

Shopping & Services

E

MAIN STREET

To South Main Street

PROSPECT STREET

7

P

P

ET RE

5

4

A

23

ST

CITY HALL

B

ua

FLETCH

GARDEN STREET

MAPLE STREET

1

12

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FRANKLIN STREET

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H Merrimack Outlets

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FACTORY STREET

P

P

HIGH STREET

ELM STREET

SCHOOL STREET

6

P

R TE WA

BN Bank of New England

13

To Route 3 North & South

K PAR

STREET KINSLEY

MUDBURY STREET

Edmund Keefe Auditorium

W. HOLLIS STREET

H

24

W. PEARL STREET

BEECH STREET

To Nashua Airport – Boire Field

CE SAN AIS REN

PLEASANT STREET

PARKING AREAS

CEDAR STREET

P

TO ST. JOSEPH HOSPITAL

To Route 3 North & South

142 Main St. • 881-8333

Peddler’s Daughter • 34

42 Main St. • 889-9500

48 Main St. • 821-7537

Fratello’s Italian Grille • 10

Portland Pie Company • 36

Nashua Senior Activity Center • 20 70 Temple St. • 889-6155

Bank of New England • BN

14 Railroad Square • 882-7437

Margarita’s Restaurant • 37

Stella Blu • 9

Citizens Bank • 3

MT’s Local Kitchen & Wine Bar • 8

Surf Restaurant • 7

Enterprise Bank• 28

212 Main St. • 595-9334

What a Bagel • 2

Granite State Credit Union • 6

70 East Pearl St. • 578-5777

1 Nashua Drive • 883-0996

207 Main Street • 595-9293 24 East Hollis St. • 809-4466

5 Abbott St. • 883-9783 2 Court St. • 589-4600

157 Main St. • 882-5000

194 Main St. • 889-2022

Nashua Historical Society • 42 Nashua Public Library • 27

Banking Bank of America • 18

St. Joseph Hospital • H

2300 Southwood Dr. • 577-4000

Southern NH Health System • 8 Prospect St. • 577-2000

238 Main St. • 594-7710 88 Main St. • 546-0880 19 Elm St. • 668-2221

Lake Sunapee Bank • 15

Hospitals Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua •

295 Main Street • 598-8800

H

H

172 Kinsley St. • 822-3000

188 Main St. • 882-2700

NBT Bank • 5

221 Main St. • 578-2652

TD Bank • 14 191 Main St. • 577-5032

Triangle Credit Union • 21, 38 30 Temple St., Suite 700 886-5900 33 Franklin St. • 886-5900


Millyard Technology Park

Downtown Nashua Visitors Map

Broad Street Parkway

30

WALNUT STREET

14

11

Daniel Webster Highway & Pheasant Lane Mall

97 Main St. • 595-1444

Cabinet Outlet • 1

259 Main St. • 880-8880

Collins Flowers • 41

9 Main St. • 882-2723

Darrell’s Music Hall • 31 75 Main St. • 886-1748

Fortin-Gage Flower & Gift • 12

86 West Pearl St. • 882-3371

Gental Dental • 19

151 Main St. • 886-0000

129 West Pearl St. • 882-9491

NH Health & Wellness Center • 33 60 Main St. • 402-9134

PRG • 4

227 Main St. • 882-5604

The Print Factory • 23

15 Factory St. • 880-4519

Scontsas Fine Jewelry & Décor • 16 169 Main St. • 882-3281

Splash by Masi • 39

A

Courtyard Garden – Mural

2 Clocktower Place • 880-3961

B

Vivian’s Dream – Mural

C

Le Dame De Notre Renaissance – Sculpture

Cotton Mill Apartments • 30

D E

Mirage of the Horse – Sculpture Cameo Image of Main Street – Mural

30 Front St. • 881-4222

Great American Downtown • 40

F

The Nashua Manufacturing Co. – Mural

6 Main St. • 883-5700

G

Frida Rota – Sculpture

H

Margaret’s View of Nashua – Mural

Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce • 22

14 Court St. • 889-2330

Studio Mark Emile Photography • 32

Positive Street Art • 17

174 Main Street, Suite 9 (978) 558-0772

Symphony NH • 26

6 Church St. • 595-9156

J

35

CANAL STREET

PARK STREET

34

ET ER STRE

P

41

42 Historical Society

LDG.

HUNT B

36

27

LIBRARY

37

20

Downtown Sculptures & Murals

Peacock Players • 25

H

I

T

Dunkin Donuts • 35

The Face of PSA – Mural

25 26

33

P

Food & Dining

J

28

CH A VE.

r Activ

STREE

21

Clocktower Place • 24

La Tortue, Ascending Egyptian Turtle, Moon Shadow – Sculptures

39 40

COURT STREET

G

Community

33 Main St. • 594-3107 69 Main St. • 886-0957

22

The Arts

I

31 32

PEARSON AVENUE

P

HILLSBOROUGH SUPERIOR COURT

What a Bagel 2

AlphaGraphics • 29

TEMPLE STREET

9

17

15

COT TA GE

Nashua Wallpaper/Ace Hardware • 13

F

38

CHUR

10

ity Cen ter

8

To Sen io

POST OFFICE

er

MAIN STREET

E. PEARL STREET

E. HOLLIS STREET

T

DEARBORN STREET

Relocated to Exit 8, 1617 Southwood Dr. • 882-6811

29

18 19

SPRING STREET

H

Alec’s Shoe Store • 11

16

Riv

DARTMOUTH - HITCHCOCK NASHUA

W

TREE

NG S

SPRI

SOUTHERN NH MEDICAL CENTER

ELDRIDGE STREET

3

Shopping & Services

E

MAIN STREET

To South Main Street

PROSPECT STREET

7

P

P

ET RE

5

4

A

23

ST

CITY HALL

B

ua

FLETCH

GARDEN STREET

MAPLE STREET

1

12

sh

FRANKLIN STREET

P

H Merrimack Outlets

D

Na

C

FACTORY STREET

P

P

HIGH STREET

ELM STREET

SCHOOL STREET

6

P

R TE WA

BN Bank of New England

13

To Route 3 North & South

K PAR

STREET KINSLEY

MUDBURY STREET

Edmund Keefe Auditorium

W. HOLLIS STREET

H

24

W. PEARL STREET

BEECH STREET

To Nashua Airport – Boire Field

CE SAN AIS REN

PLEASANT STREET

PARKING AREAS

CEDAR STREET

P

TO ST. JOSEPH HOSPITAL

To Route 3 North & South

142 Main St. • 881-8333

Peddler’s Daughter • 34

42 Main St. • 889-9500

48 Main St. • 821-7537

Fratello’s Italian Grille • 10

Portland Pie Company • 36

Nashua Senior Activity Center • 20 70 Temple St. • 889-6155

Bank of New England • BN

14 Railroad Square • 882-7437

Margarita’s Restaurant • 37

Stella Blu • 9

Citizens Bank • 3

MT’s Local Kitchen & Wine Bar • 8

Surf Restaurant • 7

Enterprise Bank• 28

212 Main St. • 595-9334

What a Bagel • 2

Granite State Credit Union • 6

70 East Pearl St. • 578-5777

1 Nashua Drive • 883-0996

207 Main Street • 595-9293 24 East Hollis St. • 809-4466

5 Abbott St. • 883-9783 2 Court St. • 589-4600

157 Main St. • 882-5000

194 Main St. • 889-2022

Nashua Historical Society • 42 Nashua Public Library • 27

Banking Bank of America • 18

St. Joseph Hospital • H

2300 Southwood Dr. • 577-4000

Southern NH Health System • 8 Prospect St. • 577-2000

238 Main St. • 594-7710 88 Main St. • 546-0880 19 Elm St. • 668-2221

Lake Sunapee Bank • 15

Hospitals Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua •

295 Main Street • 598-8800

H

H

172 Kinsley St. • 822-3000

188 Main St. • 882-2700

NBT Bank • 5

221 Main St. • 578-2652

TD Bank • 14 191 Main St. • 577-5032

Triangle Credit Union • 21, 38 30 Temple St., Suite 700 886-5900 33 Franklin St. • 886-5900


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Local Members Worldwide Service

Issue #29

2017

THE GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MAGAZINE

Where you matter most.

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” – Winston Churchill

At Service Credit Union, we are proud to provide affordable banking designed for the people and businesses of New Hampshire. Over 35 NH branch locations including 337 Amherst Street in Nashua.

federally insured by ncua

OF COM

PHOTO BY SID CAESAR / CEASERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

E ERC

M

ER

B

8 0 0 .936 .7 73 0 • S E RV I C EC U.O RG / G N CC

CHAM

7

201

TER NASH EA

UA

GR

Visit us today at any branch, online or by phone 24/7.

The Merrimack is committed to improving lives by supporting causes and organizations that benefit our community.

Your Passport to Everything Greater Nashua Has to Offer

SPONSORED BY

OPTILINE ENTERPRISES

800.541.0006

themerrimack.com


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A Publication by

142 Main Street, 5th Floor | Nashua, NH 03060 (603) 881-8333 | nashuachamber.com

The Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce Magazine

PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

and McLean Communications 150 Dow Street | Manchester, NH 03101 (603) 624-1442 | nhmagazine.com

2 Welcome – Kevin Morrissey

27 Nashua From Above

4 Celebrating Nashua’s Indian Community

32 A Year of Festivals

6 Nashua - The Center of It All

34 Inspiring a Passion for Urban Art

8 A Place to Create

35 Onward and Upward

on passion, history

Technology Program

“Nashua is home.”

City expands its connections

City’s airport offers unique perspective, opportunities Diverse gatherings bring visitors to the Gate City

A quick glance at some of the landmarks just a short drive away Positive Street Art uses the city as a canvas Greater Nashua’s arts, culture organizations thrive

Discover Nashua Community College’s Aviation

11 Nashua Comes to Life After Dark

36 Rent, Buy or Relocate Nashua’s neighborhoods have something for everyone

13 Keeping Quality In Line

40 Golden Years in the Gate City Active lifestyle, continuing care defines retirement in Greater Nashua

Downtown swings to live music, events

Optiline Enterprises delivers optimum performance 15 A Road Map to Life in Greater Nashua

An exit-by-exit look at everything the region has to offer 17 Innovation Rewarded

Local tech firms benefit from Flatley Challenge 19 100 Years of Golf

Nashua Country Club celebrates its centennial 22 Diverse Dining in the Downtown Chef Michael Buckley serves from farm (and ocean) to table

Downtown Nashua Visitor Map +

42 One Greater Nashua Group capitalizes on city’s diversity

44 Nashua is “Open for Business”

Business incubator ready to show the way 46 Stay a While

Greater Nashua’s hotels are welcoming, comfortable 48 Relocation Information

A quick reference guide of useful numbers

See fold out at left

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in the magazine; the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce is not responsible for errors or omissions. © Copyright 2017, Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce is prohibited.

n a shua cha mb er.c om

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“Nashua is Home” COURTESY PHOTO

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Despite spending much of his time traveling the globe, Kevin Morrissey’s ties to the city remain strong.

evin Morrissey learned to ride a bike on Bolic Street. Now he’s riding – and often at the wheel – of the biggest ocean liner in the world. Morrissey, a Nashua-native in every sense of the word, is the third officer on the legendary Queen Mary 2, and the only American officer in the Cunard Line’s entire fleet. While most nights his focus is on the task of helping to pilot the massive vessel across the North Atlantic, there are often times when his thoughts bring him back to the trails of Mine Falls Park or running to Hayward’s for ice cream. No matter where in the world the 35-year-old may be, his heart is never far from his hometown. “I think of Nashua all the time,” Morrissey says, while home in Nashua on break. “Coming home is always amazing because it’s just a really great city. Literally, my entire life has been here.” Morrissey was born in the former Nashua Memorial Hospital, baptized at the Immaculate Conception church, attended Bicentennial Elementary and Fairgrounds Middle School, and was a proud Purple Panther at Nashua High School where he was president of the class of 2000. Despite spending much of his time traveling the globe, his ties to the city remain strong. “I still keep in touch with old teachers – and the fact that I can still see my first grade teacher when I come home is great,” Morrissey says, citing former teacher Lynda Marandos as a close mentor. “I enjoy seeing teachers who helped me get to this point.” Morrissey spent much of his youth playing basketball in the Police Athletic League, running cross country and swimming competitively. But it’s on the gridiron – led by former coaches Bill Hardy and Al Harrington – that he began to develop character traits that helped him get to the bridge of the Queen Mary 2. “I tried to play football,” he says, laughing. “My brother, Eddy, was starting quarterback in ’89. But I learned about discipline on the football field.” Morrissey attended Massachusetts Maritime Academy and spent time with the U.S. Coast Guard before beginning his career aboard the Disney Wonder cruise ship. His move to the Queen Mary has brought with it a number of notable interactions. “The fact that I was hanging out with Ed Sheeran two months ago, and then giving Francis Ford Coppola and his wife a tour of the bridge is amazing,” he says. “He’s a wonderful man.” And yet it all still comes back to Nashua. It was in the gilded halls of the Queen Mary that he ran into a fellow Nashua resident this past year. “It was Debora Pignatelli,” Morrissey says of the former Governor’s Council member and longtime notable Nashua resident. “I played basketball for her husband. It was during my first contract with the Mary and she was traveling to England.” Morrissey will normally spend 12 weeks at sea – working long hours, seven days a week – and then will return to his childhood home for six weeks to see his parents, Dennis and Sue. “I think about how I want to get involved in the city more someday,” he says. “It’s where all the people who helped me develop and get to where I am live. Nashua is home.” N

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N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


A Publication by

Simplify your financial life. 142 Main Street, 5th Floor | Nashua, NH 03060 (603) 881-8333 | nashuachamber.com

We make it easy.

Chairman of the Board Beth Needham • The Hanover Group Incoming Board Chair Fouad Mahfuz• PRG Secretary Lori Piper • Enterprise Bank Treasurer Rob Prunier • Harvey Construction

Serving anyone who lives or works in New Hampshire.

Ambassador Committee Chair Betsy Levesque • Berkshire Hathaway Verani Realty

409 Amherst Street, Nashua | 1.866.996.9828 | BCCU.org

iUGO Steering Committee Chair Mike Aquino • Weisman, Tessier, Lambert & Halloran LGN Alumni Association Steering Committee Chair Jean Perry • The Front Door Agency Directors Barbara Alves • Marguerite’s Place Mike Apfelberg • United Way of Greater Nashua

THE PLACE TO MEET in Southern New Hampshire

Sue Beaubien • Bellwether Community Credit Union Thomas Bishop • BAE Systems Paul Hebert • SquareTail Elizabeth LaRocca • Eversource Energy Krishna Mangipudi • Dell Sarah Marchant • City of Nashua Jeff Reilly • Fidelity Investments Bill Schick • MESH Agency G. Frank Teas • The Nashua Bank Dr. Amir Toosi • Rivier University Dr. Stephanie Wolf-Rosenblum Southern NH Health System

 10,500 Square Feet of Flexible Meeting and Function Space

 Custom Meeting Packages Tailored to Your Requirements 

 2 Hour Guaranteed Response on Inquiries  Complete Catering Services  Weddings, Social Functions, Corporate Functions, Meetings

Chamber Staff Tracy Hatch President and CEO thatch@nashuachamber.com Lizzie Doherty Director of Marketing ldoherty@nashuachamber.com Laurey Isanski Office Administrator lisanski@nashuachamber.com Cecilia Ulibarri Director of Programs and Events culibarri@nashuachamber.com Ashley Young Director of Membership ayoung@nashuachamber.com

2 Somerset Parkway, Nashua, NH 03063 603Ͳ886Ͳ1200 www.cpnashua.com n a shua cha mb er.c om

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2015-2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Membership Committee Co-Chairs Peter Tamposi • The Tamposi Group Kim Reagan • RJ Finlay Co.

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Art Director John Goodwin Editor Bill Burke Advertising Sales Ronnie Schlender

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and McLean Communications 150 Dow Street | Manchester, NH 03101 (603) 624-1442 | nhmagazine.com

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Nashua Celebrates its Indian Community, Expands its Connections

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ashua has grown and flourished thanks in no small part to its celebrated and vibrant cultural diversity. And this year, city leaders moved to make the relationship with its Indian community even stronger. one was very supportive.” Organizers attribute the growth to an increased social media presence, which alerted greater Nashua’s extensive Indian community of the event. The largest number of Indian-Americans in the state live in Nashua, where about six percent of the population is Indian. “I was just amazed at how many new people from the Indian community showed up,” Mangipudi says. “They were asking, ‘How do we connect? Is there an organization?’ And I told them – ‘This is it. Our city, the Chamber of Commerce – it’s who we are as a city.’” The Indian Independence Day Celebration was followed by a Downtown Dinner and a Movie presentation of “Bride and Prejudice” – a Bollywood retelling of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.” Nashua has also established a Sister City agreement between the Gate City and Mysore, which is in the Karnataka state in India. The relationship will provide opportunities for city officials and residents to further explore other cultures while strengthening economic development between the two cities. Mysore is about 91 miles southwest of the state capital of Bangalore. The city is 50 square miles and has a population of roughly 887,000 people. Mysore, India

In August, Nashua’s Indian Independence Day Celebration was held at Greeley Park. Members of the region’s Indian population and scores of friends, supporters and enthusiasts gathered to mark India’s independence from the British Empire (traditionally observed on Aug. 15). The festival, co-sponsored by the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce, provided vivid experiences like Bollywood dance by Shikha Bajpai, a yoga demonstration by Jay Gupta and music by Jhanani Sarma. “This was the third year we’ve had it and we moved it from Rotary Common to Greeley Park,” organizer and New Hampshire State Rep. Latha Mangipudi says. “It’s a much bigger venue, and we did it not knowing how that was going to transition.” The results surprised even the event’s organizers. At its peak, more than 500 people were in attendance, according to Mangipudi. “It was much bigger than previous years,” she says. “It was very, very nice to see a lot of young families show up. The Mayor was there the whole time – every-

Mangipudi was born and lived the first part of her life in Mysore, and studied at the All India Institute of Speech and Hearing in the city. “These are the two cities I’ve spent most of my life in,” she says of Nashua and Mysore. “And interestingly, Mysore is the second largest city in the state, and Nashua is the second largest city in New Hampshire.” The idea grew out of a visit by an Indian artist during the annual Nashua International Sculpture Symposium. Mangipudi said she spoke to the Indian consul general in New York about the idea, and had great support from the city. Since the legislation identifying the Sister City arrangement was passed, representatives from both sides have met via Skype, and arranged exchange visits. “It’s a great benefit by sharing knowledge about economic growth, higher education, industries like nanotechnology, cyber-security and alternative energy. Nashua has a lot of those technologies, so how do we share that?” Mangipudi says. “It can only be a positive net gain – a win-win for both cities.” The initiatives are a natural extension to come out of a city that has embraced its many ethnic and cultural communities for generations, she says. “What I’m finding is that the most diverse city in the state of New Hampshire is Nashua,” Mangipudi says. N

STAMP YOUR PASSPORT!

+ A

trip through Greater Nashua brings visitors through a variety of environments, ranging from quiet, wooded parks and a revitalized urban downtown to busy commercial zones and placid wooded vistas. No matter what the reason is for visiting Greater Nashua, it pays to explore each of its unique areas. There’s only one way to do just that: Travel along the Everett Turnpike from exit 1 through exit 10 (and beyond) to uncover all the region has to offer. Here’s what you need to do: Spot six Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce passport stamps like the one shown, at right, (but much smaller)

4

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

hidden on ads throughout the magazine. Tell us where you found them and you could win gift certificates, coupons and some great swag from local businesses. Send your answers to: Stamp my passport/ Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce, 142 Main Street, 5th Floor, Nashua, NH 03060. Or, email your entries to admin@nashuachamber.com. Prizes will be given to the first 5 winners. Good luck, and get reading, traveling and experiencing all that Greater Nashua has to offer!

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WWW.OPTILINE.CO


Nashua: The Center of It All P

erhaps Nashua’s nickname of “The Gate City” comes from its proximity to such a wide variety of entertaining and recreational options. Here’s a quick glance at some of the features you’ll find a short drive away when

you make your home in Nashua. All distances are measured from the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce’s offices at 142 Main Street. Bretton Woods 91 miles – New Hampshire’s largest ski area boasts 434 acres of skiing and snowboarding, including 101 trails and glades, as well as four terrain parks.

Dixville Notch 183 miles – Where the first-in-the-nation presidential election votes are cast. Mount Washington 153 miles – Climb or drive 6,288 feet to the summit to experience breathtaking views and some of the most extreme weather in the world.

Franconia 96 miles – Franconia Notch State Park, the former home of the famous “Old Man of the Mountain,” offers trails to hike and bike in a spectacular mountain setting.

North Conway 115 miles – Year–round this northern town offers seasonal fun. Whether it’s leaf–peeping in the fall, skiing in the winter or camping and shopping, there is always something to do.

Squam Lake 82 miles – Explore the site of the Academy Award–winning film “On Golden Pond” and listen for the famous loons.

Weirs Beach 76 miles – Get your game on at FunSpot, which features classic and contemporary arcade games, bowling, bingo, indoor golf and more.

Concord 31 miles – Visit the center of New Hampshire’s government at the State House in the capital. Manchester–Boston Regional Airport 12 miles – Enjoy the perks of a big airport without the congestion.

Franconia

Mt. Washington White Mountain National Forest

Manchester 16 miles – Catch one of many national acts that make a stop on the stage of the SNHU Arena.

North Conway

Lake Winnipesaukee

Fenway Park, MA 34 miles – Root, root, root for the 2013 World Series Champion Boston Red Sox at their home field.

Tilton

Gillette Stadium, Mass. 47 miles – Cheer on the 2014 Super Bowl Champion New England Patriots at their home field.

Portsmouth 42 miles – Step back in time at Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, where history comes to life in the Puddle Dock neighborhood from the 1600s to the 1950s. Merrimack Premium Outlets 6 miles – Feed your inner shopaholic at Merimack’s collection of outlet stores.

Dover I-93

Foxwoods Casino, CT 115 miles – Check out “the wonder of it all” at the largest casino in the northeast.

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Dover 42 miles – Discover and delight in the interactive exhibits at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire.

Squam Lake

Peterborough 31 miles – The oldest artists’ colony in the United States, The MacDowell Colony, is nestled in the woods.

Mohegan Sun, CT 94 miles – Catch a show, play the slots, dine on gourmet food or shop in luxury boutiques, all in the same place.

Lake Winnipesaukee 71 miles – Boating, swimming, cruises and more await in the pristine waters of this 72–square– mile lake. Check out the restaurants and resorts found along the shore and on some of the 253 islands in the lake.

Bretton Woods

America’s Stonehenge, Salem 17 miles – A maze of man-made chambers, walls and ceremonial meeting places, America’s Stonehenge is most likely the oldest man-made construction in the United States. Canobie Lake Park, Salem 14 miles – Find your thrill on one of more than 85 rides at Canobie Lake Park, an amusement park that has been in operation for more than 100 years.

Silver Lake State Park, Hollis 8 miles – Silver Lake State Park spans 80 acres and its sandy 1000-foot beach curves along 34-acre Silver Lake. Popular activities in the park include swimming, picnicking, and boating.

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Hampton Beach 47 miles – Come for the sun, sand and sea! Hampton Beach Boardwalk named among Top 10 in the country by USA Today!


Bishop Guertin High School Nashua, NH 03060 (603) 889-4107 • www.bghs.org

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nspired by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart, we are a community that cares deeply about each other, where everyone is known, valued and treasured. We are students who care about learning, in a place where it is cool to be smart. We are teachers who foster a love of learning and help students develop the skills to succeed in college and in life. Our graduates leave BG prepared, confident and ready to transform the world for the better.

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Bishop Guertin

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PHOTOS BY SCOTT BAKER

Nashua: A Place to Create Greater Nashua’s Arts, Culture Organizations Thrive on Passion, History

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t’s a Wednesday afternoon and the typical sounds of the city fill the air along Main Street in downtown Nashua: the hum of traffic, people chatting as they rush past and the distant mourn of a siren. But then the tinkling melodies of

a piano begin to drift by – first tentative but then building to full volume. The busy scene slows a bit as people pause to take in the scene. It’s just one element in a city packed with arts and culture opportunities. There are organizations dedicated to promoting such diverse artistic pursuits as music, sculpture, street art, fine arts, photography, drama and cultural celebrations. It’s these groups that have created and continue to support a thriving cultural and arts community in the Gate City. “I think that we are going in the right direction and that there’s a lot better cohesiveness within the arts community,” says City Arts Nashua President Kathy Hersh. “The artist community is pulling together better. There’s more communication, there’s more camaraderie, and there’s a lot more support. “I think there’s been more focus on downtown lately and on art downtown,” 8

Hersh continues. “So whether it’s Great American Downtown doing the street pianos and Positive Street Art painting murals, City Arts Nashua restoring the Yankee Flyer diner mural and commissioning the West Pearl Street mural, ‘Vivian’s Dream,’ downtown is benefitting from all the artistic creativity.” The support for Nashua’s arts and culture has also been a draw to those coming from outside the region. Symphony NH’s new Executive Director Marc Thayer arrived in the Gate City from St. Louis in July, and found a city humming with cultural activity. “There’s a lot of energy and support for the arts here,” Thayer says. “I’m very pleased to see how much is going on already. I’m living downtown close to Main

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Street, and I’ve found it to be a vibrant downtown. There’s a lot going on with live music and arts festivals and arts organizations.” Celebrations like the Latino-American Festival, held in August, spotlight the varied and exciting cultural diversity that helps define the city. The gathering, held at the St. Aloysius Church on West Hollis Street, allowed visitors to enjoy the traditional food, music and dance of the region’s Latino community. BrasilFest, which brought guests to Greeley Park for a day of all things Brazilian, provided plenty of opportunity to sample Brazilian life in Nashua. Unique to this festival was an inflatable soccer field perfect for families, and a 3-on-3 soccer tournament.


Nashua’s First Escape Room Adventure

Part scavenger hunt Part puzzle solving Part team building

PHOTOS BY SCOTT BAKER

“The inflatable soccer field was a tremendous success,” organizer Bruno Soares says. “The kids loved playing on the field.” More than 20 teams took part in the festival tournament, he says, which drew hundreds of attendees. Many of these events have been stylized by the work of artist Manny Ramirez, Vice President of Creative Direction at Positive Street Art – a group dedicated to inspiring a passion for urban arts. Ramirez and Positive Street Art co-founder Cecilia Ulibarri have led local artists who often bring an added splash of color to the city. “We’ve figured out how to make something that’s not boring,” Ramirez says. “It’s not like a gallery where you go and stare at art – which is a beautiful thing to do on its own, as well. But we do our gallery shows inside of nightclub venues and we brought music in with it, hip-hop acts,

urban art – things you see in bigger cities, we brought to a city like Nashua.” In addition to adding some color to the region, Positive Street Art has also added a modern, vibrant wrinkle to some of the city’s annual celebrations. At the Downtown Arts Festival, held annually every September, the group hosted a Live Art Battle, where artists competed in a live painting competition, a DJ battle and a dance battle. “That was the most exciting thing to watch,” Ramirez says. “I don’t think people had ever seen anything like that in Nashua before. I’m a dancer and I was in awe watching that.” Visitors don’t have to look far for examples of the group’s work. n a shua cha mb er.com

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PHOTO COURTESY SCOTT BAKER

“Educating Children

For Over 100 Years”

Infant Jesus School

We provide an enriching education for grades Pre-K through Grade 6        

Highlights Include:

Reading and Math Enrichment Science Fair Spelling and Geo Bee STREAM Drama, Band, Chorus You Be the Chemist Basketball, Cross Country, Cheer, Ski Club Garden Club and much more….

“Just walk downtown,” Ramirez says. “You can find it all there.” The group is responsible for five murals located right around Main Street, and eight such works along the Rail Trail. There are also others inside three of the city’s Mexican restaurants. According to Paul Shea, Executive Director of Great American Downtown, it’s just another example of how the city – and its residents – support the wide-ranging and creative organizations

that breathe life into the region. “Nashua’s art scene has been growing for years upon years. It’s really gotten to the point where there are some fantastic things going on,” Shea says. “We have no less than a dozen great arts events throughout the year – big ones – never mind the smaller, more intimate events that occur on a regular basis. The number of murals and sculptures that have come up in the past few years alone has been astounding.” N

Our fully certified faculty strives to know and understand the needs of each student, building an atmosphere of mutual respect

Please call to schedule a private tour, or visit our website at www.ijschool.org

3 Crown Street, Nashua NH (603) 889-2649

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Get to Know: Nashua Street Pianos Nashua’s colorful Street Pianos are on display and available for use from May until October. The pianos are donated by members of the Greater Nashua community, and are tuned every two weeks. Nashua’s Sweeney Metal Fabricators created a custom frame with a canvas that allows the pianos to be covered during inclement weather. The pianos were painted by members of Positive Street Art. Online: downtownnashua.org Experience it: From May to October along Main Street, downtown Nashua

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PHOTO BY SCOTT BAKER

Strong Faith Strong Foundation Strong Future


Nashua Comes to Life After Dark

PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

Downtown Swings to Live Music, Events

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he end of the day may usher in quiet streets, empty sidewalks and darkened storefronts in many cities – just not in Nashua.

The Gate City has developed a dynamic and lively nightlife – with options ranging from great restaurants and places to get a drink with friends to a wide range of plays put on by local community theater groups. In recent years, the city has become a live music destination – and that trend toward setting a soundtrack to Nashua’s nightlife is quite intentional. Ben Ruddock, Creative Director at the Riverwalk Café and Music Bar, had a very definite vision of what he thought a live venue should offer when his family’s business expanded. “Everything here is by design,” Ruddock says of the Riverwalk’s attention to sound and its efforts to build a community. “We

think carefully about every act we bring in, and about the amplification of their music. We do a lot of music that’s traditionally hard to amplify – particularly bluegrass. But we’ve had a warm response from the bluegrass crowd because they’re not used to playing in spaces that pay that much careful dedication to sound.” With Nashua’s live music scene growing as other cities’ are actually contracting, it makes the downtown area an important stop on many artists’ schedules. “We’re becoming a pretty major destination between North Hampton, Massachusetts and Burlington, Vermont – between Boston and Portland,” Ruddock,

a mandolin player who has played many rooms throughout the region, says. “There are not a lot of good, small rooms that have a culture in Boston anymore. People appreciate the personality we put into music, the way we’re curating a scene. People are skipping Boston and coming straight to us.” A stroll through the downtown after dark will also bring visitors past any number of hotspots, ranging from the tapas and famous martinis at Stella Blu on East Pearl Street – another destination that offers live music – to the intriguing and utterly unique Codex speakeasy on Elm Street. This hidden (in plain sight) watering hole is inspired by Prohibition-era speakeasies, and packs all the character, charm and details of a 1920s saloon. Entry is secured by following a side street, and then facing a wall of dusty books that opens into the dimly-lit room, transporting guests back to the days of Manhattans and Sidecars. The offerings throughout the city are as diverse as they are varied: Agave Azul offers Mexican food during the day, with a nightclub feel as the sun goes down. The Peddler’s Daughter completes its authentic Irish atmosphere with live music on the weekends, ranging from rock to traditional Irish folk. “Having so much live music has extended the nightlife after 9 p.m.,” says Peddler’s Daughter Owner Michael Conneely. “After the dining is done, a lot of people from other restaurants gravitate on to Peddler’s to enjoy the live music we have.” The Irish-themed restaurant books live cover bands and has recently begun to reschedule Irish session music. Martha’s Exchange produces delicious handcrafted brews at its on-site brewery and features its very own Sweet Shoppe – a Main Street staple; Fody’s Tavern, located in the city’s oldest brick building in the heart of Railroad Square (built in 1833,) holds the philosophy that a night out is more than just dinner, providing live entertainment nightly. “There’s a really diverse set of offerings, so if someone has a particular taste, chances are they will find what they’re n a shua cha mb er.c om

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some really high quality music. But you’ve also got great music coming out of places like Fody’s Tavern, Dolly Shakers, which has a blues night, an open jam blues night, and music throughout the week. And you’ve got live music several nights a week at the Thirsty Turtle – everything from heavy metal to country. “There is something for everyone.” N

Online Info Agave Azul facebook.com/AgaveAzulNashua Boston Billiard Club bostonbilliardclub.com PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

Codex codexbar.com Fody’s Tavern fodystavern.com Martha’s Exchange marthas-exchange.com

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town – it’s amazing how you can walk to so many things here, and that’s not the case in a lot of cities. There are a lot of wonderful live music venues downtown.” According to leaders in the arts community, the city and its residents support the city’s thriving arts and cultural environment – especially after dark. “I’d say the biggest emerging trend in downtown nightlife is the explosion in live music,” Shea says. “The Riverwalk Café, of course, has been doing ticketed shows for a couple years now – regional acts and

The Peddler’s Daughter thepeddlersdaughter.com Riverwalk Café and Music Bar riverwalknashua.com Shade Bar and Grill shadebarandgrillnh.com Speaker’s Corner speakerscornerbistro.com Stella Blu stellablu-nh.com Thirsty Turtle Tavern and Grill thirstyturtlenh.com

Get to Know: Symphony NH

Founded in 1923 as an all-volunteer group, Symphony NH (and its accompanying chorus) has grown into a professional, top-notch organization. On a night when the full orchestra is performing, there can be as many as 60 people on stage. Its home in the Edmund Keefe Memorial Center for the Arts, a facility constructed in the 1930s that seats nearly 1,400 people, has the feel of a classic theater: cushioned seats, chandeliers and a wide balcony looking out over it all. Experience it: At the Edmund Keefe Memorial Center for the Arts, 117 Elm St. Online: SymphonyNH.org Phone: 603-595-9516

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

COURTESY PHOTO

looking for in downtown Nashua,” Great American Downtown Executive Director Paul Shea says. It’s the variety of those offerings that’s helping to bring people into the city, according to business owners. “The downtown has changed quite dramatically,” Conneely says, praising Shea’s work with the Great American Downtown in particular. “And I’ve seen it progress for the better. We’ve got a nice cross section of different restaurants here and it’s these nuances that are driving business.” Just outside the downtown, visitors will find Shade Bar and Grill just off the lobby at the Radisson Hotel Nashua – a perfect place to catch the game or to rub elbows with the chef at the weeknight Happy Hour Buffet Happenings. Executive Chef Todd Lytle holds court at the Speaker’s Corner at the Crowne Plaza Hotel, using seasonally-inspired ingredients in mouth-watering dishes available on the bistro’s outdoor deck during the warmer months. At the Boston Billiard Club on Northeastern Boulevard, guests can revel in the sophisticated, yet relaxed atmosphere. Pool lessons, foosball tournaments, live music on Friday nights and the reopening of the club’s casino – play poker, roulette, blackjack, Let it Ride and Mississippi Stud – ensures Boston Billiard Club remains a city favorite. “I’m impressed with the fact that Main Street is alive after 5 p.m.,” says Marc Thayer, Executive Director of Symphony NH. “To see people out, enjoying the


Keeping Quality In Line

COURTESY PHOTO

Optiline Enterprises Equals Optimum Performance

Cousins and business partners, Tommy Bolduc (left) and Mick Bolduc.

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n New Hampshire and Massachusetts, when you want quality, reliability and efficiency on a job site, Optiline is the drywall contractor of choice.

After working with his father’s company for 10 years and learning the value of treating each customer as if they were his only client, Tommy Bolduc wanted to turn his father’s expectation for speed and accuracy from each employee into a business of high volume metal framing and drywalling apartment complexes. Named for getting optimum performance while keeping quality in line, Optiline Enterprises was born. During the same time, Mick Bolduc was taking on some of the most complex metal framing projects New England could

develop. He’d been raised with the same strong work ethic and family values as he started his own business, Geo Construction, specializing in retail metal framing. But following the economic collapse in 2008, both entrepreneurs realized their businesses were missing something. Having safely navigated the crisis, Mick approached Tommy in 2012 to merge the companies under Optiline with 18 employees. The partners had a vision: developing and offering their clients the best variety of drywall packages. Because of their

shared experience in the industry and customer contacts, the company was able to take a faster route to starting up, landing three jobs at one time in May of that year. Knowing they would need to rapidly grow revenues, Tommy began immersing himself in construction estimating software to reduce the company’s overhead and maximize their potential. At the same time, Mick took over the field operations to keep their crew rolling along. However, that didn’t mean they didn’t face significant challenges. As a startup, the company could only get a loan for $10,000. Convinced of their path and their success, along with the support of their families, Mick and Tommy went all in with everything they had. The company saw its revenues double within the first six months and continued to gain momentum, seeing a 2000% increase in revenue since its startup. This significant growth, which could have overwhelmed many entrepreneurs, was well managed by the experienced partners. Part of this success was due to the company’s unique HR management. By pushing each employee into the tasks they did best, their original crew performed like a crew of 40. Today’s 118 full-time employees are under the same standard, performing like a crew of over 200. Roger Bolduc, Tommy’s father, recently joined the team after retiring from his own business to add his experience to the company’s contined growth. “What has made us a better team is the culture and family values that are passed on and respected by each of our employees,” Tommy Bolduc attributes to the company’s success. With strong ties to the community, they’ve given back through fundraisers and donations to local organizations. With this unique approach, it’s no wonder the company has won several awards. In their first year of operation, the company won the coveted DeWalt Power Drive Challenge. In 2015, Chief of Operations and Safety Director Leo Marchesseault’s astounding record earned Optiline the Top Diamond Safety Award in Massachusetts’s ABC Association. N n a shua cha mb er.c om

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From Rural to Urban and Back Again

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he beauty of Greater Nashua is that it has something for everyone. From its first exit along the Everett Turnpike, all the way up through Merrimack and beyond, visitors and residents can find a diverse

offering of culture, entertainment, dining and shopping options. Sometimes all it takes is a roadmap to navigate it all. There’s the shopping district along Spit Brook Road and Daniel Webster Highway; there’s a progressive, urban downtown where dozens of dining options tempt and neighborhoods are located close to major employers; there’s Amherst Street, which runs through the heart of the city, providing easy access to scores of shops – from restaurants to bowling alleys to grocers – ultimately leading to wide-open, natural spaces. It’s possible to travel from one extreme to another in minutes. It just necessitates a little navigational knowledge of the city. Here’s a look at what you’ll find at each exit along the way.

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A Road Map to Life in Greater Nashua

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EXIT

Nashua

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Located close to the Massachusetts state border and just off Route 3, visitors here will find themselves in the midst of the region’s technology sector, and just steps from the Pheasant Lane Mall and dozens of shopping and dining options along Spit Brook Road and Daniel Webster Highway. The stately Radisson Hotel Nashua stands just across a picturesque pond from the Nashua Technology Park, and watches over this tree-lined exit, which is home to shops like the Pressed Café and Pure Barre, and tech giants Oracle and BAE Systems.

Conduct Business

PHOTO COURTESY THE JOHN FLATLEY COMPANY

The Nashua Technology Park consists of more than 750,000 square feet of interconnected, energy-efficient office and research and development buildings within the Gateway Hills campus. The park and location have become a key component in the growth of numerous leading high-tech companies including Dell, Skillsoft, Amphenol TCS, Benchmark Electronics, VGo Communications, Plexxi, DataGravity, Infinio and more. (See “Innovation Rewarded” sidebar.)

Moe’s Southwest Grill is a welcoming fast-casual spot that serves up made-toorder southwestern fare using fresh, all-natural ingredients. Think burritos, quesadillas, nachos and tacos – with free salsa and chips in every order. The only thing you won’t find at Moe’s is a microwave. 256 Daniel Webster Highway, moes.com, (603) 888-0664.

Shop

The Pheasant Lane Mall is located just off of Route 3 at exit 1. This mall is one of the largest in the entire state, and is home to more than 135 stores and restaurants. 310 Daniel Webster Highway, pheasantlanemall.com, (603) 888-0005.

Bahama Breeze Island Grille provides food and drinks on island time. From a menu that reflects the laid-back escape of a trip to the islands, sample from Caribbean street food appetizers or dig in to some fantastic entrees like the ahi tuna stack, grilled chicken and tropical fruit, avocado and crabmeat salad or the mouth-watering wood grilled steak churrasco. Come for the food, stay for the live reggae music. 413 Middlesex Road, Tyngsborough, Mass., bahamabreeze.com, (978) 649-6660. Lui Lui is the place to be if a pasta feast is on the agenda. The entire family can enjoy a selection from the wood-fired pizza menu, baked fresh in Lui’s own brick oven. Lui Lui’s offers express lunches as well as a full take-out menu. 259 Daniel Webster Highway, luilui.com, (603) 888-2588.

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N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PHOTO BY JOHN GOODWIN

Burtons Grill’s menu covers all the bases – from crisp salads, hearty sandwiches and juicy burgers to aged beef served with seasoned butters and sauces. This top-notch restaurant showcases New England seafood and uses other local ingredients whenever possible. 310 Daniel Webster Highway, Pheasant Lane Mall, Nashua, burtonsgrill.com, (603) 888-4880. Tara Commons is home to a variety of retail shops such as the Craft Beer Cellar (craftbeercellar.com/Nashua), Elizabeth Grady (elizabethgrady.com) and Orange Leaf (facebook.com/ orangeleafnashuasouth) – while providing convenient access to Southern New Hampshire Health System (fpsouthnashua.org.) 102 Spit Brook Road, jflatco.com/tara-commons.

PHOTO COURTESY THE JOHN FLATLEY CO.

Dine


INNOVATION REWARDED

PHOTO BY JOHN GAUVIN, STUDIO ONE

Local Tech Firms Benefit From Fifth Annual Flatley Challenge

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The World Academy, founded in 1980, is a private, independent, accredited school for children ranging in age from six weeks through eighth grade. Designed to “educate, nurture and enhance the development of the whole child from birth through grade 8,” this unique, 55,000 square-foot campus is located on six wooded acres in Nashua. The school serves approximately 500 families with a staff of 80 teachers – all of whom regularly re-examine the school’s progressive offerings. 138 Spit Brook Road, worldacademynh.com, (603) 888-1982.

Explore

Roby Park, a sprawling 60-acre park off of Spit Brook Road, includes two softball fields, a sledding hill, zipline, a handicapped-accessible fenced playground, hiking and recreation trails, a children’s splash pond and an outdoor ice rink during the winter. SkyVenture is the perfect (and only) place to experience the thrill of skydiving without having to leap from a perfectly good airplane. The indoor vertical wind tunnel is not only used by the world’s best skydivers for training, but it was also designed for the general public to experience the sport of body flight. While you’re there, try Surf’s Up – the largest indoor surfing facility in North America. A 32-foot SurfStream creates an endless wave, allowing surfers to learn or perfect their technique. Guests can also climb the rock wall or try the Fishpipe, the world’s first rotating barrel ride. 3 Poisson Ave., skyventurenh.com, (603) 897-0002.

Stay

The Radisson Hotel Nashua is a stately hotel and a longtime favorite for visitors and city residents alike. Its castle-like exterior renders it instantly recognizable, and its tree-lined grounds create a placid feel. The 336 rooms are close to scores of dining and shopping options, yet the on-site restaurant, Shade Bar and Grill, will cater to those who want to settle in and relax. 11 Tara Blvd., radisson.com/ nashuanh, (603) 888-9970. Homewood Suites by Hilton is a contemporary, all-suites hotel providing guests with a well-appointed, comfortable home-base right in the heart of the city’s high-tech center and just steps from the retail and dining options on Daniel Webster Highway. Start each day off with a hot breakfast and unwind with a complimentary evening social hour every Monday through Thursday. Swim in the indoor pool, workout in the on-site gym, or hike or bike along the fitness trails around the Gateway Hills property. 15 Tara Blvd., homewoodsuites3.hilton.com, (603) 546-7470.

ashua has long supported innovative firms who choose to put down roots in the Gate City. This past year was no different. For the fifth time, John J. Flatley, CEO of the John Flatley Co. and owner of the Nashua Technology Park and Nashua Office Park at Gateway Hills, has filled the role of benefactor for two local firms. Flatley this past year conducted the company’s fifth annual Flatley Challenge: an annual search that provides winners with free rent for one year for up to 5,000 square feet of office space at the Nashua Technology Park and Nashua Office Park at Gateway Hills, and up to $10,000 in fit-up, connectivity and related costs. “I saw a need for startups in New Hampshire to be given a chance to succeed,” Flatley said. “One way to do this, from my perspective, was to provide promising companies free incubation space and a small monetary incentive. As part of the Nashua community, I wanted to do what I could as a property owner to help promote and grow employment in New Hampshire.” This year’s winners were XCube, a Nashua-based streaming technology and big data management company, and SimQuest Systems, a new subsidiary of Boston-based SimQuest that builds surgical simulator platforms. “Winning the Flatley Challenge has been such a wonderful experience for XCube,” said Jennifer Lynch, XCube’s Director of Operations. “It has enabled us to focus our efforts on developing our company in ways we never imagined. The office space has allowed us to have all the features we ever dreamed of as well as the room to grow as we continue to hire new employees.” SimQuest was named winner of the Medical Devices category – first instituted in this past year’s Challenge. “The space that the Flatley Challenge has given us has really helped to provide a solid footing for the business,” Tim Kelliher, Director of Engineering at SimQuest said. “Beyond just being an office, one of the things that really surprised me was the help Flatley staff provided and the resources made available to us while we were settling into our new space.” Flatley was interested in emerging healthcare technologies – specifically in the medical device and digital health categories, according to the company’s founder. “With the expansion of the Flatley Challenge and our desire to become the next New England hub for the medical device industry, we look to attract more companies like SimQuest Systems to join our growing Nashua community,” Flatley said. The deadline for applications each year is in late October. A short list of the highest scoring applicants are invited for a personal interview before a review panel in early December with the winning applicants chosen by the end of the year. There is no application fee, and candidates can apply at gateway-hills.com/flatley-challenge. Online: XCube: x3-c.com SimQuest Systems: simquest.com

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Nashua

Exit 2

Nashua

This southbound-only exit provides a great way to access Daniel Webster Highway and head into south Nashua, or

Exit 3

a way to get back on the Everett Turnpike to head north.

Traveling along this quiet exit will bring visitors to Daniel Webster Highway en route to nearby Hudson. If getting there in style is the point, then consider taking Exit 2 to find Lovering Volvo (180 Daniel Webster Highway) and the nearby Tulley BMW (147 Daniel Webster Highway).

Explore

Granite State Indoor Gun Range is a modern, environmentally-friendly indoor range with 15 state-of-the-art shooting lanes. Certified range safety officers oversee the brightly-lit, well ventilated space. New shooters can learn the basics, experienced shooters can hone their skills and everyone can take advantage of the pro shop and gunsmithing services. 2 Hampshire Drive, Hudson, granitestaterange.com, (603) 718-8813.

Learn

Rivier University is a private, Catholic liberal arts university founded in 1933. The school enrolls more than 2,500 students and offers more than 60 programs where students can earn Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. The school has 44 buildings on 68 acres. 420 South Main St., rivier.edu, (603) 888-1311.

Explore

Walk in with a thirst and an interest in homebrew, and walk out with your very own handcrafted beer, wine, champagne or old fashioned soda. The folks at IncrediBREW will walk you right through the entire process. Keep an eye on the schedule for seasonal specials, tastings and pairing nights. 112 Daniel Webster Highway, incredibrew.com, (603) 891-2477.

Nashua

Walking trails and forest space make Benson Park a wonderful place to wander. Open, grassy fields present a perfect picnic area in this 166-acre, former home to Benson’s Wild Animal Farm, and a playground for the little ones creates a beautiful getaway for the entire family. 21 Kimball Hill Road, Hudson, hudsonnh.gov/boards/bensons.

Exit 4

city’s downtown and to get to some of the best hospitals in the region. Residential streets wind through quiet neighborhoods, eventually leading deeper into the heart of the city and toward the city’s busy downtown.

Learn

Bishop Guertin High School is a private school founded by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart in 1963. Nearly 800 students attend this school, which boasts an average class size of 19 students. 194 Lund Road, bghs.org, (603) 889-4107.

Learn

Presentation of Mary Academy has a rich and long history of providing students with values-centered Catholic education. Core values of spiritual growth and development, personal and educational excellence, concern for human dignity, compassion and service, global vision and responsibility and collaboration are hallmarks of Presentation of Mary Academy. 182 Lowell Road, Hudson, pmaschool.org, (603) 889-6054. 18

Upgraded in the 1980s, exit 4 is a great way to access the

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Explore

Boston Billiard Club & Casino is a sophisticated yet relaxed place to enjoy a good game of pool. With more than 30 tables available there is never a wait for one of the Brunswick Gold Crown tables. A well-stocked bar and a full menu offer a wide range of delicious meals. 55 Northeastern Blvd., bostonbilliardclub.com, (603) 943-5630.


100 YEARS OF GOLF

Serving the Greater Nashua Community for over 100 years.

Nashua Country Club Nashua Country Club Celebrates its Centennial

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he Nashua Country Club this year celebrated the 100th anniversary of its founding by dedicating a granite marker at the club’s new Centennial Plaza, placing a time capsule on the grounds and kicking off a year of observances and construction projects. To see the recently rebuilt championship golf course, heated Olympic pool, clay tennis courts and the only dedicated curling rink in the state, it’s hard to envision the humble beginnings of the Nashua Country Club. Yet it was from comparatively simple beginnings that the club first began. “The Club still has the same purpose and mission as it did 100 years ago,” General Manager David Scaer says. “The founders would definitely recognize the club and recognize the purpose, though it has been modernized.” The Nashua Development Corporation purchased the 160-acre Nashua City Farm for $10,000, built an 18-hole golf course and turned it over to the Nashua Country Club in 1916. At the time, the club counted 240 people as its membership – a number that soon grew. The club added curling to its offerings in the winter of 1928, with members casting stones across a frozen pond on what is now the ninth hole. (The icy pursuit was moved indoors to a newly-constructed rink in 1941.) To celebrate the centennial year, the Club has embarked on yet another building program. According to Scaer, the curling rink will be replaced by a larger sports center – adding a fourth curling lane to the ice surface. A new pro shop will also be built, extensive indoor remodeling will be completed and the Club will also add an indoor simulated golf center. “That will add even more to our winter activities,” Scaer says. “We are a 12-month club, and going through the history of Nashua Country Club, it always has been a 12 month club from the very beginning.” The Club closed for only one winter during the Great Depression. “That’s not typical of a lot of private country clubs,” Scaer says. The time capsule, buried under the granite marker, contains items such as menus, newsletters, a pair of golf shoes, a sleeve of golf balls, and a box of Devil Dogs – the favorite snack of retiring Head Professional Dick Dichard. Under it all, the group placed a 44-pound curling stone. “Hopefully, whoever opens the time capsule will have a good sense of humor when they open it,” Scaer says. “We had some fun with it, and it is going to be rather heavy.” Online: Nashua Country Club: nashuacountryclub.com

25 Fairway Street, Nashua NH ~ 603-888-0121 ~ www.nashuacountryclub.com

CHANGING THE WAY THE WORLD DEFINES & VIEWS DISABILITIES

We believe every person, regardless of ability, can live a life of their choosing. Easterseals.com/nh n a shua cha mb er.c om

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Single family homes line the roadways leading away from the Everett Turnpike, as office parks housing medical, dental and chiropractic offices provide convenience and services nearby. Audi Nashua (170 Main Dunstable Road) and Porsche of Nashua (170 Main Dunstable Road) call this exit home, and will provide a little extra zip on your travels through the Gate City.

Services

Southern New Hampshire Health Systems has more than 300 health care providers and a clinical affiliation with Massachusetts General Hospital and MassGeneral for Children, offering expert, comprehensive support for cancer care, pediatric specialties, trauma services, vascular surgery and stroke management. 8 Prospect St., snhhs.org, (603) 577-2000.

Shop

Just Lights will brighten up your life with its fantastic new showroom, located right in the city’s Millyard area, offering the widest selection of lighting styles and services. From Tiffany to wroughtiron landscape lighting to lampshades, crystal to contemporary, repairs to lighting design, Just Lights does it all. 10 Pine St., justlights.com, (603) 578-9482.

Experience

The YMCA of Greater Nashua offers a wide range of programs, including all levels of swimming, group exercise, racquetball, martial arts and child care, arts, enrichment and teen leadership, among many other programs. 24 Stadium Drive, Nashua and 6 Henry Clay Drive, Merrimack nmymca.org, (603) 598-1533.

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Masi Plumbing and Heating is a thirdgeneration, family-owned plumbing and HVAC company dedicated to ensuring year-round comfort, whether it’s a small repair or a complete system. Masi Plumbing and Heating specializes in high efficiency heating and cooling systems with a wide-range of offerings, from hybrid heat and radiant floor heating to central air conditioning and air purifyers. 36 Otterson Street, masiplumbinghvac.com, (603) 889-2331.

Explore

Edmund Keefe Memorial Center for the Arts, a facility constructed in the 1930’s, seats nearly 1,400 people, and has the feel of a classic theater: cushioned seats, chandeliers and a wide balcony looking out over it all. The Keefe Center for the Arts is Nashua’s largest indoor performance venue and is home to Symphony NH and Actorsingers. 117 Elm St., (603) 595-9156.

PHOTOS BY TONE GROCHALA

St. Joseph Hospital has won several prestigious awards, including achieving Magnet status – an award given by the American Nurses’ Credentialing Center. A Magnet hospital, like St. Joseph, is one where nurses “deliver excellent patient outcomes, have a high level of job satisfaction, and where there is a low staff nurse turnover rate.” 172 Kinsley St., stjosephhospital. com, (603) 882-3000.

Stellos Stadium/Motta Field – This companion to Holman Stadium provides a playing field for youth sporting events including Nashua High and Bishop Guertin football, soccer, lacrosse and field hockey. 7 Stadium Drive, (603) 589-3370. Escape the heat and humidity of the dog days of summer – or zip around the ice in a game of shinny during the hockey season – by skating at the Conway Arena. Figure skating, public skating and stick practice can keep your skills sharp, and keep you cool year-round. 5 Stadium Drive, conwayarena.com, (603) 595-2400.


Explore

Located in the heart of Nashua, Mine Falls Park is considered to be one of the jewels of the Gate City. The 325-acre park includes forest, wetlands and open fields and is bordered on the north by the Nashua River and on the south by the Mill Pond and canal system. Visitors take part in many activities, like walking, boating, fishing, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and biking – or, just have a picnic and enjoy all that nature has to offer. Park hours are from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. No camping or alcohol is allowed in the park and visitors are asked to please carry out all trash. (603) 589-3370.

WE DO

MUCH MORE The Nashua River Rail Trail is a beautiful and peaceful rural trail that runs from Countryside Drive and extends through the Massachusetts communities of Ayer, Groton, Pepperell and Dunstable. Water views, green fields, wildlife, various works of public art, several tunnels and bridges combine for a comfortable walk, run or bike ride. At Gate City Community Gardens you’ll find flowers, vegetables and vines winding through this community-led space just west of City Hall. Residents have been able to claim a plot and tend it, bringing new life and green space to the Gate City. facebook.com/gatecitycommunitygardens, (617) 870-4224.

than just glasses.

David J. Helfman O.D.|F.A.A.O. Elliot F. Lasky O.D. Kelly M. MacDonald O.D. Scott D. Huffer O.D.|F.A.A.O. Sarah E. Jagatic O.D.

505 West Hollis Street | Nashua

603.882.0311

abettervision.com

J.LAWRENCE

Learn

Maverick Technical Institute offers classroom and hands-on career training for students who wish to pursue a certificate as a Low Voltage Technician. Trained LVTs work on systems such as home theaters, computers, lighting, automation controls, commercial audio and video and rack assemblies, among others. 589 West Hollis Street, mti.school (603) 577-1730.

SPECIALISTS IN: • Steam and Hot Water Boiler Systems • Precision Temperature Control Systems • Chilled Water Process Systems • Energy Management Systems • Industrial Humidification • Maintenance Programs • Air Make-up Systems • Computer Rooms • Plumbing

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MicroSociety Academy Charter School of Southern New Hampshire provides its students standards-based instruction enhanced with “real world” concepts. Students create and participate in their own small society with guidance from teacher facilitators, utilizing their own currency, bank, marketplace with student-made goods, newspapers and legislature, among other details. Collaboration with community partners and mentors allows students to put their skills into practice outside the school. 591 W. Hollis St., macsnh.org, (603) 595-7877.

HALL

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Nashua High School South, one of the city’s public high schools, is known as the place “where Panthers roar and students soar.” Among its notable graduates is Paul Michael Levesque – perhaps better known as WWE wrestler, Triple H. The current location of the school was erected in 1975, and has an enrollment of more than 2,200 students. 36 Riverside Dr., Nashua.edu/south/home, (603) 589-4311.

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17 Progress Ave, Nashua NH 603-882-2021 www.jlawrencehall.com n a shua cha mb er.com

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FACES OF NASHUA

DIVERSE DINING IN THE DOWNTOWN

Chef Michael Buckley Serves From Farm (and Ocean) to Table

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Latha Mangipudi

N.H. State Representative and organizer of Nashua’s Indian Independence Day Celebration

“I love to walk all the trails in Nashua, and I especially love Mine Falls Park. I call it the Central Park of Nashua.” FACES OF NASHUA

Bruno Soares Organizer, Brasilfest

“I enjoy participating in community events because I enjoy seeing the community coming together. It’s great to see when the community has a sense of togetherness and everybody comes together to embrace and achieve the same goals.” 22

t’s been said that the short distance between 207 and 212 Main Street in downtown Nashua is paved with Michael Buckley’s shoe leather. That’s the route that chef-owner Buckley often travels when he runs between his two restaurants – Surf (207 Main St.) and MT’s Local Kitchen and Wine Bar (212 Main St.). On any given night, Buckley can be quarterbacking the busy kitchen at one spot, only to rush across the street to direct business there like an orchestra leader. It’s just a typical day for Buckley, who opened his first restaurant in the city in August of 1995. The busy chef/businessman operates Michael Timothy’s Dining Group – which also includes the Portsmouth location of Surf, and Buckley’s Great Steaks and Buckley’s Bakery in nearby Merrimack. And while he may have a lot of demands on his time, it’s still not unusual to see him in the city’s downtown. “Whenever we do a new project, I’m very personally invested in it,” Buckley says during a rare break. . Buckley first came to the city’s restaurant scene 20 years ago with Michael Timothy’s Urban Bistro, Wine and Jazz Bar, which was an immediate success thanks to its extraordinary menu and atmosphere. A makeover of the spot, which included a new name – MT’s Local Kitchen and Wine Bar – brought even more offerings to residents and visitors. It’s all a little less formal, but with all the great food and wine fans grew to love. Next came Buckley’s move to the sea – a move that further defined a diverse downtown dining scene. It was not, however, something he jumped into without a great deal of thought and planning. Change isn’t something this Granite State native, who got his start in the industry as a dishwasher 40 years ago in Brookline, N.H., takes lightly. “I was open for six years before we made our next move with Surf,” he says. “Then I was open for another four years before I made my next move to Buckley’s.” Surf, located just across the street from MT’s Local Kitchen and Wine Bar, opened in 2002. Buckley’s second hotspot in the downtown area is devoted to creatively-prepared and fresh seafood. The result: Surf has been named ‘Best Seafood Restaurant’ by New Hampshire Magazine numerous times. From its deceptively unassuming clam chowder (outrageous, thanks to fresh clams, bacon, heavy cream and butter) to unexpected offerings like the Lobster and Brie Nachos, to cognacflambéed Lobster Sarah – a two pounder served with Jasmine rice and grilled asparagus, the menu is an edible example of Buckley’s often surprising creativity. The artistic approach and renowned skills of its owner make Buckley’s restaurants a must-do in the downtown and surrounding areas. “In all our restaurants we make every dressing, every sauce, every ice cream, every everything, in-house, from scratch,” Buckley says of his renowned attention to detail. “At the end of the day you want to know you checked off all the boxes so you know you have what you really want.” Buckley’s two Nashua restaurants are a reflection of the diversity of dining options in the downtown area. In addition to seafood and bistro fare, visitors can try Italian food at Fratello’s Italian Grille (194 Main St.), Mexican at Margarita’s Mexican Restaurant (1 Nashua Dr.), and Irish offerings at The Peddler’s Daughter (48 Main St.), among others. Online: MT’s Local Kitchen and Wine Bar: mtslocal.com • Surf/Nashua: surfseafood.com Fratello’s Italian Grille: fratellos.com/2015/07/nashua Margarita’s Mexican Restaurant: margs.com/locations/new-hampshire/nashua The Peddler’s Daughter: thepeddlersdaughter.com

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High-tech firms fill the once-humming textile mill buildings along the Nashua River, but to get a feel for the culture of Nashua, head downtown. The new Broad Street Parkway will lead you right into the beautiful Millyard and downtown areas. Easy, plentiful parking and an eminently walkable cityscape invite long, lazy afternoons in the shops and relaxing evenings PHOTO COURTESY MILLYARD TECHN OLOGY PARK

in the restaurants and pubs.

Explore

Le Parc de Notre Renaissance Française is an historic and beautiful spot by the Nashua River. The site of many gatherings and events, the park has been updated with a fantastic mural by Positive Street Art (positivestreetart.org) and features a sixfoot bronze statue paying homage to the women who worked in the textile mills nearby.

Conduct Business

The Millyard Technology Park is an entire business community under one roof – a charming, renovated textile mill, offering individual offices, business suites and large corporate space. More than 50 companies are part of this community, including technology companies, financial service firms, attorneys, travel agencies and light manufacturing. The Park features scenic views, exposed beams, refurbished bricks, high windows and polished hardwood floors. Outside, there are picnic tables, a gazebo, nature trails and a boat launch. The Millyard is accessible via the Broad Street Parkway, putting it less than a mile from the Everett Turnpike. 10 Technology Way, millyardtechnologypark.com, (603) 598-1275.

Dine

Martha’s Exchange Restaurant & Brewing Co. is a dining experience guaranteed to charm and delight. Guests can choose from menu items as diverse as a perfectlyprepared steak, a juicy burger, a pint of house-brewed beer and even some candy from the Sweet Shoppe. 185 Main St., marthas-exchange.com, (603) 883-8781.

Peddler’s Daughter stands out in a region where we take our Irish pubs seriously. Stop in for a pint or a mixed drink and stay for the full menu, which is packed with mouth-watering Irish/American fare. 48 Main St., thepeddlersdaughter.com, (603) 821-7535.

MT’s Local Kitchen & Wine Bar provides extraordinary food made from the freshest ingredients. The latest evolution of Michael Timothy’s bistro makes lunch, dinner, Sunday brunch or a small plate at the bar a memorable time. Savor exceptional quality food in a creative, casual restaurant with a relaxed atmosphere. 212 Main St., mtslocal.com, (603) 595-9334.

Stella Blu takes tapas and small plates from the ethnic neighborhoods of our great American cities. Tuck in to award-winning, modestly-priced plates from Little Italy, Asia Town, the Latin Quarter and Main Street, U.S.A. Arrive early and sample some of Stella Blu’s renowned martinis. 70 East Pearl St., stellablu-nh.com, (603) 578-5557.

Fratello’s Italian Grille brings great Italian fare back to the downtown. Casual Italian-American dining, featuring wood-fired brick oven pizza, steaks and seafood are highlights of this hotspot, which also includes a warm, welcoming bar area. 194 Main St., fratellos.com, (603) 889-2022.

Surf has set the standard in New Hampshire for fresh, exquisitely prepared seafood. Surf has built a reputation for truly imaginative cooking using only the very freshest fish and shellfish. 207 Main St., surfseafood.com, (603) 595-9293.

Margaritas of Nashua is the most exciting Mexican restaurant north of Guadalajara, providing the feeling, energy and taste of Mexico right here in Nashua. Savor the food and traditional music, enjoy the authentic hand-crafted furnishings from Mexico and have the time of your life. 1 Nashua Drive, margs.com, (603) 883-0996.

Giovanni’s Restaurant redefines neighborhood dining with outrageous pizza and roast beef. This family-run business, open for more than 20 years, uses only the finest and freshest ingredients in its renowned sandwiches and salads. 14 Broad Street, Nashua, giovannis.biz, (603) 882-5757.

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FACES OF NASHUA

Shop

Collins Flowers provides the best in floral services, gourmet baskets and gift delivery, offering a large variety of the freshest flowers. Celebrate holidays and special occasions with a surprise gift delivery from this city favorite. 9 Main St., Collinsflowers.com, (603) 882-2723. Darrell’s Music Hall – Entering the world of pianos through the doors of Darrell’s Music Hall can only be described as invigorating, motivating and inspiring. The experience is truly one of a kind, from the first visit to the ongoing fun and supportive relationship that they’ve maintained with all of their visitors and piano enthusiasts since 1969. Darrell’s also offers sheet music, piano lessons, performing artist services, piano moving and repair. 75 Main St., darrellsmusichall.com, (603) 886-1748. Fortin-Gage Ltd. is a breath of fresh cut flowers from the moment you walk in the door. This award-winning shop offers gorgeous flower arrangements for all occasions as well as unique gifts and great delivery service. 86 West Pearl St., fortingage.com, (603) 882-3371. Scontsas Fine Jewelry & Home Décor is a gallery of beautiful things that conspire to bring romance, comfort and just the right amount of luxury for you and your home. Stop in to this longtime downtown favorite – a vital part of Nashua for more than 100 years – to have a look at the extensive line of designer jewelry, admire the vintage chandeliers or perhaps the glassware and beautiful table linens. 169-173 Main St., scontsas.com, (603) 882-3281. PRG is one of New England’s most respected rug dealers. If you desire the look, luxury and long-lasting value of a finely crafted Oriental rug, this is the source. High quality, hand-knotted rugs are imported from Iran, India, Pakistan, Turkey, Nepal, China and other countries, and they maintain the largest selection of Karastan rugs in the country. 227 Main St., persianrugsnh.com, (603) 882-5604. Fresh of Nashua is a multiple award-winning casual chic boutique offering comfortable clothing that fits and feels good while still being fashion forward. Fresh also carries shape wear, fashion jewelry and accessories and top-notch gifts. 178 Main Street, freshofnashua.com, (603) 821-9888.

Karen Goddard

Owner, M&C Clothing and Gifts

“My new favorite thing to do is the Zombie Bike Ride. It starts at the Old Courthouse and ends at 30 Temple Street. I had a great zombie costume – a shredded, flowing dress. I’m looking forward to it next year.” FACES OF NASHUA

Located to the west of Exit 6, The Nashua Mall was the state’s first indoor mall when it opened in 1969 as the Gate City Mall. Today, it provides a great spot for some dining, shopping and even a movie. It’s here you’ll find L.L. Bean, Kohl’s, Burlington Coat Factory, The Christmas Tree Shop and Home Depot. Then head across the parking lot for some dinner at Shorty’s Mexican Roadhouse.

Services

Learn

Nashua High School North was constructed in 2002 and saw its first class graduate in 2005 – one year after the city’s schools were split. With an enrollment of 2,200 students, the Titans of Nashua High School North have earned several state championships. The school has also been named a NH School of Excellence. 8 Titan Way, nashua.edu/north, (603) 589-6400.

The Nashua Senior Activity Center provides recreational, educational and wellness activities for the city’s senior residents. Offerings include everything from organized day trips to enrichment opportunities like coffee clubs, shows, a fitness room and even golf and bowling clubs. 70 Temple St., nashuaseniorcenter.org, (603) 889-6155. Nashua Public Library offers its visitors seemingly endless stacks of books, but also meeting rooms, a computer lab, access to tablets, a children’s room, a theater and a play area for youngsters. 2 Court St., nashualibrary.org, (603) 589-4600.

Paul Shea

Executive Director, Great American Downtown

“I really enjoy supporting my wife at the theater and going to community theater productions at the Court Street Theater and the Keefe Auditorium on Elm Street.” n a shua cha mb er.c om

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Amherst Street, the busy thoroughfare that runs through the heart of this section of Nashua, is where you’ll find everything from restaurants and grocery stores to auto repair shops and bowling alleys. There are literally scores of shopping and dining opportunities, including Firehouse Subs, Artistic Tile LLC, Aldine Interior Solutions, Sunnyside Acura and U.S. Cellular, among many others. A fantastic addition is the Christopher Ward USA Showroom – by appointment only (christopherward.com) – an upscale watch seller based in the UK.

Key to Escape, LLC, is Nashua’s first escape room experience. Take part in a 60 minute adventure where players use only items hidden around the room to solve riddles, piece together puzzles and work as a team to escape within the time limit. 3 Bud Way, Unit 21, keytoescape.com, (603) 809-4018.

Shop

Find organic and natural offerings at Whole Foods Nashua. Known for its fantastic selection of foods without artificial preservatives, colors, flavors or sweeteners, Whole Foods provides healthy options in an exciting atmosphere. 255 Amherst St., wholefoodsmarket.com, (603) 318-7550.

Dine

110 Grill is a casual, yet innovative spot that melds the contemporary with the creative (think Tater-Tot Poutine to bourbon marinated steak tips and everything in between). This comfortable, top-notch spot can provide the perfect setting for everything from an intimate dinner to a gathering spot for an afternoon out while watching the game. 27 Trafalgar Sq., 110grill.com, (603) 943-7443. Head to Somerset Plaza to sample those renowned chicken sandwiches of Chick-fil-A – paired, of course, with the equally delectable waffle fries. The newest location represents an expansion of the restaurant into New England, 16 years after the first Granite State Chick-fil-A opened at the Pheasant Lane Mall. 377 Amherst St., chick-fil-a.com/Locations/Browse/NH, (603) 595-2202. Bertucci’s may be a chain restaurant, but this Nashua location is a longtime favorite gathering spot for residents and visitors alike. It could be the great food – from brick oven pizza and calzones to pastas and desserts – or it could be the great service. 406 Amherst St., bertuccis.com/locations/ nashua, (603) 595-7244.

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Explore

Djinn Spirits is a craft distillery whipping up small-batch, gourmet flavors of white whiskey, honey liqueur and gin. Better yet, owners Andy and Cindy Harthcock offer hand-crafted hip flasks and jugs – perfect for storing these hand-crafted spirits – and will even teach guests about their skills in classes. 2 Townsend West, Suite 9, djinnspirits.com, (603) 262-1812. Holman Stadium – One of the oldest and brightest stars of the city’s park system, Holman hosted what is considered the first integrated U.S. baseball team in the modern era, when Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe played for the thenNashua Dodgers in 1946. The Nashua Silver Knights call this family- friendly stadium home, and it’s here that you’ll experience some of the best events of the year, such as the Fourth of July fireworks celebration. 67 Amherst St., nashuasilverknights.com, (603) 589-3370. Nashua Historical Society’s Speare Museum contains a wealth of information regarding Nashua’s origins, its evolution into a mill town in the 1800s, and its continued growth as a city and as a leading manufacturing and technological center. Exhibits change frequently, bringing alive other eras with authentic costuming, furnishings and accessories. The Federal Revival-style Abbot-Spalding House was home to a succession of prominent Nashua citizens, including Daniel Abbot, who’s considered to be the founding father of Nashua. For more information about Speare Museum and the Abbot-Spalding House visit nashuahistoricalsociety.org, (603) 883-0015.

Learn

Recently acquired by Southern New Hampshire University, Daniel Webster College is a four-year school established in 1965. More than 600 students are enrolled at its University Drive campus, where they can pursue Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees. The college features schools of aviation sciences, business and management and engineering, and computer sciences. (20 University Dr., dwc.edu, (603) 577-6000.) Southern New Hampshire University is a private, nonprofit, accredited institution with more than 3,000 on-campus students and 60,000 online students. One of the fastest growing universities in the country, it also includes the innovative College for America – a competency-based, low-cost way to earn a college degree. SNHU partners with employers to make the unique program available to working adults. snhu.edu, (603) 881-8393.

PHOTO COURTESY DWC.EDU

Experience


NASHUA FROM ABOVE That community is made up of corporate pilots, recreational enthusiasts, student pilots, aviation experts who even build their own aircraft, and people who love the exhilarating experience of taking flight. “They’re a close-knit group,” Nashua Airport board member Bob Scheifele says over a full breakfast at the Midfield Café. A five member board – nominated by the Mayor and approved by the Board of Aldermen – oversees the airport and its operations. City’s Airport Offers Unique Perspective, Opportunities “We’re doing better than a lot of the other hile there may be dining options worth Bourque says over breakfast at the runway-side airports in New England,” Bourque says. “And I driving to, there are few worth flying to. diner. “People don’t understand the energy that think that’s because of a lot of the flight training Yet the Midfield Café has served up meals for comes out of this place.” activity we have here.” people who have done just that. Between corporate jet operations, flight Five flight schools call the Nashua Airport It’s just one of the unique details that draw instruction, community events and on-site home, and more than 100 corporate operations people to Boire Field at Nashua Airport – one businesses, the Nashua Airport has developed a take place there monthly. But it’s not an exclusive of the city’s more unique attractions. The airport long-lived reputation for excellence, and grown club open only to high-level jet-setters. – a 400 acre site adjacent to Daniel Webster Col- a thriving community of pilots and aviation “From a business perspective, there’s an lege – has a history with the city dating back to enthusiasts. unbelievable amount of activity that this airport the 1930s. Since then, the site has become busier “We have one of the liveliest pilot populations supports,” Scheifele says. “This is a tax generator than any other airport in the state in terms of of any airport in New England, really,” Bourque for the city and obviously for the state of New flight operations, hosting 270 based aircraft at its says. “They’re engineers, they’re teachers, they’re Hampshire.” 93 Perimeter Road location. fabricators – any profession you can imagine. But in the end, it’s a fascinating resource – one “It’s one of those little secrets that a lot of peo- These are the pilots that make up the communi- that is open for tours – that welcomes visitors. ple don’t know about,” Airport Manager Stephen ty, and they’re a great bunch of people.” Online: nashuaairport.com

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8 A true second hub of activity for Nashua, visitors here are greeted by the Villages at Kessler Farm – a condominium housing development overlooking the busy goings-on nearby. Residents can take advantage of the expert healthcare at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, entertain at the Crowne Plaza Hotel or visit any one of a number of dining options.

Shop

Alec’s Shoes, a downtown Nashua fixture since 1938, moved and expanded in the Fall of 2016. Still family-owned and operated, Alec’s has a knowledgeable staff of shoe experts and a broad selection of the industry’s most respected brand names. Step inside and see that customer service and long-term satisfaction is this shop’s primary mission. 1617 Southwood Dr., alecs-shoes.com, (603) 882-6811.

Learn

The Academy for Science and Design, which opened in 2007, is a public charter school for grades 6-12 that focuses on STEM subjects: science, technology, engi­neering and math. Students in their junior and senior years can major in a subject – like aeronautics and aviation; chem­istry and biomedicine; or space, astronomy and astronautics – just as a college student would. 486 Amherst St., asdnh.org, (603) 595-4705.

Nashua Community College – This two-year, public institution was established in 1970, and is part of the Community College System of New Hampshire. Its facilities include 19 general purpose classrooms and 20 program-specific classroom laboratories. Programs range from automotive and aviation technology to computer science, nursing, paralegal studies and teacher education. Students can also take part in an innovative new Advanced Manufacturing program. 505 Amherst St., nashuacc.edu., (603) 578-8900.

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Stay

Exit 8 offers a number of hotel options for those visiting Nashua for business or pleasure. The Crowne Plaza Nashua is an institution in the city. The hotel has been offering comfortable, stately accommodations to visitors for years. The Courtyard by Marriot is offering visitors many new amenities after undergoing an extensive renovation that added new, state-of-the art technology and upgrades to all of the rooms and the open, inviting lobby. The Residence Inn by Marriott is perfect for visitors who will be staying for a few days or a few months. For the complete story on where to stay while in the Nashua area, turn to page 46.

Services

The Nashua Exit 8 Transportation Center, just off exit 8, offers a great connection to Boston via motorcoach. All terminals offer free coffee and wifi, and you can expect hourly service to and from Logan International Airport and South Station in Boston. Reservations are not necessary or accepted. 8 North Southwood Drive, bostonexpressbus.com/index.phpnew-hampshire/ nashua-exit-8, (800) 639-8080. Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health Care System, located just off exit 8, is part of the hospital originally founded in 1893. Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua is a 150,000-square-foot ambulatory care center which offers services ranging from treatment for adult congenital heart disease, allergies and diabetes, to skin cancer, AIDS, women’s health, sleep disorders and more. Dartmouth-Hitchcock also offers walk-in services for nonemergency needs. The staff there cares for more than 60,000 people each year for primary care visits, specialty care or diagnostics, among other needs. This state-of-the-art building was designed and constructed in 2012. 2300 Southwood Dr., dartmouth-hitchcock.org, (603) 577-4000.


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Welcome to Nashua! Celebrating over four decades in higher education, Nashua Community College provides focused on the diverse needs of students and the Greater Nashua Region.

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Nashua & Beyond

Head north and explore what Greater Nashua has to offer, whether that’s doing some premium outlet shopping, getting creative with the arts or just enjoying the great outdoors, we’ve got you covered.

Explore

PHOTO BY WENDY WOOD

Nashua residents have long appreciated the varied opportunities offered at Greeley Park, located in the north end of the city. The park, which straddles Concord Street, has a full range of playing fields, including the 24-station Warren Hall Memorial horseshoe pits, tennis courts and softball fields. The park also offers jogging, walking and hiking trails, a playground and wading pools. There’s also acres of green grass for picnicking and barbecue pits. In snowy weather you can cross-country ski or snowshoe. The Greeley Park Rotary Band Shell is the center of many free activities like concerts, a film series and children’s shows. SummerFun hosts the Fairy Tale Festival every summer at Greeley Park. Dress in your fairy finest and watch the puppet shows, participate in the wing-making workshops, get your face painted and listen to the story-tellers. 100 Concord St., Nashua, (603) 589-3360.

Shop

The Merrimack Premium Outlets have become a favorite shopping destination in Greater Nashua, and are located at the intersections of Industrial Drive, Spartan Way and Premium Outlets Boulevard in Merrimack. Bargain hunters can seek impressive savings at more than 100 top name-brand outlet stores, including Ann Taylor, Bloomingdale’s Outlet Store, Banana Republic, Calvin Klein, Coach, Cole Haan, DKNY, Elie Tahari, J.Crew, Lucky Brand, Michael Kors, Nike, Polo Ralph Lauren, Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th, Talbots, Tommy Hilfiger and more. Check out the entire directory of shopping options at premiumoutlets.com/merrimack.

PHOTO BY JOHN GOODWIN

M&C Clothing and Gifts is Southern New Hampshire’s hippest shop and best source for retail, closeouts and consignment clothing for men, women, teens and children. What started years ago as a mother and child consignment clothing shop has grown into a destination where shoppers can still find children’s clothing, toys, furniture and baby accessories, but also teen and adult clothing and local, fair-trade and sustainable products. 135 Route 101-A, Amherst, mothersays.com, (603) 886-6727. 30

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The Derryfield School is an independent, private, day-school first established in 1964. The school, for students grades 6-12, focuses on educating the “whole child,” inspiring them to find not only what they love to do, but what the world calls them to do. The school offers a rich variety of academic, athletic, artistic, service and social opportunities. 2108 River Road, Manchester, derryfield.org, (603) 669-4524.

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Ponemah Bog Preserve – This 75-acre open bog and botanical preserve offers a living museum to visitors who want to experience a pristine bog environment. The boardwalk and trails are open every day until dusk. Check out the plant and animal listings at nhaudubon.org and click on Ponemah under the Sanctuaries List. Rhodora Drive, Amherst, (603) 224-9909.

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A Year of Festivals Diverse Gatherings Bring Visitors to the Gate City

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hether it’s the food, the music or even if it’s just an excuse to get outside and soak up some of the diverse cultures offered at one of the many events held throughout the year, Greater Nashua’s residents have a wide

range of can’t-miss festivals that reflect the diversity that makes up the city. Here’s a look at a year of must-do festivals and events that make the most of the wonderful, contrasting cultures that make up Nashua.

Greek Food Festival Where: St. Philip Greek Orthodox Church, 500 West Hollis St. The delicious smell of homemade food wafts across the grounds of St. Philip Greek Orthodox Church as scores of hungry attendees flock to this annual two day favorite for a taste of mouth-watering fare. Visitors can expect fine Greek food ranging from gyros, roasted chicken and marinated lamb to dolmathes, spanakopita and mouth-watering Greek pastries. Live Greek music and dancing completes the festive atmosphere. Parking is free, and shuttles are available from nearby Stellos Stadium. stphilipnh.org/events/festival, (603) 889-4000.

June

Taste of Downtown Nashua Where: In and around Main Street Every year in early June, the streets of downtown Nashua are converted into a massive, welcoming feast during the Taste of Downtown Nashua. Now in its 23nd year, this ticketed event, arranged by Greater American Downtown, draws hundreds of discerning foodies who sample delectable culinary offerings from the city’s best restaurants. A number of Greater Nashua’s talented chefs set up sample stations inside neighboring businesses, providing delectable options during this event. Street musicians add a festive touch to the proceedings, which include prizes, giveaways, raffles and a scavenger hunt. downtownnashua.org, (603) 883-5700.

PHOTO BY ALLEGRA K BOVERMAN

May

Rock ‘n Ribfest Where: Anheuser-Bush, 221 Daniel Webster Highway, Merrimack The best barbecue in New Hampshire mixed with a side of rock and blues make this annual fest, an early summer favorite. Scores of food vendors whip up enough tasty fare to satisfy even the hungriest attendee, and an impressive roster of live music keeps it all moving. Past performers have included Granite State guitar wizard Gary Hoey and longtime local favorites The Fools. Presented by Rotary Club of Nashua West. ribfestnh.com French Cultural Festival Where: Parc de Notre Renaissance Francaise, Water Street The Richelieu Club of Nashua hosts this celebration of all things French culture – which includes a wide-range of international influences. In addition to France’s contributions to world culture, experience Canadian, Haitian and Vietnamese food, activities, live music and more. facebook.com/events/442799162561954

July

Traditional food, lively music and a wide-ranging roster of activities reflecting many Latin American countries make this mid-summer festival a must-do. Cultural offerings from Mexico, Colombia, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic – among others – create an unforgettable ethnic soiree that’s perfect for families. (603) 882-4362.

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Downtown Dinner & Movie Where: East Pearl Street and West Pearl Street A Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce signature event, and the only one of its kind, the Dinner and a Movie series turns the downtown business district into an outdoor restaurant and cinema. On different Wednesday evenings throughout the summer, guests can catch a film and enjoy fine dining and drinks right in Nashua’s beautiful downtown – and under a clear summer night sky. nashuamovies.com

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PHOTO BY EMILY EDWARDS

Latino-American Festival Where: St. Aloysius of Gonzaga Parish, 48 West Hollis St.


August

FACES OF NASHUA

Indian Independence Day Where: Greeley Park

The Farmers Dinner Where: Greater Nashua Promising “a story in every bite,” The Farmers Dinner brings together diners, area farmers and local chefs to celebrate and enjoy fresh, amazing food – straight from the source. These gatherings are a foodie’s nirvana, with meticulously-prepared menus highlighting the finest fare from Greater Nashua producers. Since 2012, The Farmers Dinner has hosted over 25 farm-to-table events across New England and fed more than 2,000 customers, raising more than $34,000 for local farms. The dinners sell out quickly, so veterans of this delicious experience advise purchasing tickets early. For more information and a schedule of dinners, visit thefarmersdinner.com.

PHOTO BY SID CAESAR / CEASERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

Celebrate India’s democracy, food, its place in Greater Nashua and its culture – including musical performances and Bollywood dancing. Free and open to the public, the celebration also includes formal remarks and recognition of the holiday by members of Nashua’s Indian community.

September

Eat Local Fall Food & Music Festival Where: Downtown Nashua This event celebrates local agriculture, culinary arts, musicians and makers in the last week of September! The week kicks off on Sunday with the free two day Downtown Fall Music Festival — be sure to bring a lawn chair—and the popular Main Street Farmers Dinner. The festival continues through the week with local chefs using local ingredients throughout Downtown Nashua. The week caps off with a Harvest Celebration at the Nashua Farmers Market! downtownnashua.org, (603) 883-5700

Patrick Geoffroy

Nashua Community College Aviation Technology Program Director

“I am a foodie and I love going to my favorite restaurants in the downtown Nashua area. My favorites are The City Room Café and MT’s Local, also Surf Seafood restaurant.” FACES OF NASHUA

James Vayo PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

Specialist, Office of Economic Development

November

Winter Holiday Stroll Where: Downtown Nashua One of the most anticipated events of the year draws residents and visitors to the city’s downtown area to celebrate the holiday season. Presented by Greater American Downtown, Main Street and the surrounding area is lit up and shops throw open their doors as live performers regale the crowds with seasonal favorites. Ice sculptures, food, activities, music, shopping and a quintessential New Hampshire downtown atmosphere make this event one of the most popular all year long. facebook.com/nashuaholidaystroll, (603) 883-5700.

“My favorite thing to do in Nashua is to ride my bicycle through Mine Falls Park to get my groceries on the weekend. I like to stop at the Farmer’s Market on the way to get local produce and maybe some sugary bits too.” n a shua cha mb er.c om

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Inspiring a Passion for Urban Art Positive Street Art Uses the City as a Canvas

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f downtown Nashua seems a more colorful place in recent years, thank the innovative artists at Positive Street Art. It’s this group that has replaced unremarkable, gray surfaces with vivid murals that explode with color and positive

messages, turning Nashua’s streets into a living art gallery. “The city welcomed us immediately,” Positive Street Art Co-Founder Manny Ramirez says, while taking a break from preparing his latest mural. “It was totally the opposite of what we thought it was going to be. There can be negative connotations that go along with street art and graffiti, and to our surprise, everyone loved the idea.” Positive Street Art is the brain child of Ramirez and Cecilia Ulibarri, who founded the group in 2012. Their mission: to inspire a passion for urban arts, and to build stronger communities through educational workshops, community events and artistic services. The group – now a 501c nonprofit – has grown to include a larger team and an advisory board, working with volunteers to create urban art through painting, drawing, graphic design, photography, fashion, dance and other outlets. “It’s grown overwhelmingly,” Ramirez says. “We’re constantly looking for more and more volunteers. People are always excited to join our advisory board and we’ve always got projects going on.” Ulibarri says the group has a number of opportunities for volunteers and participants who are welcome to bring a variety 34

of interest and skills to the organization. “We have art workshops for kids, dance workshops for kids, fundraising paint socials for adults and we have our community events,” she says. “We really need people who can step up and be advisory board members or even become a director at some point. We’re looking for volunteers who can dedicate the time and passion that we have.” Positive Street Art’s first mural can be seen on the corner of Canal and Main Streets. Known as “The Face of PSA,” it features the elements the group outlines in its mission statement. “Because it was going to identify who we are as a group, we wanted it to show what we are – urban, diverse and inspiring,” Ramirez says. Ulibarri explains that the face on the mural includes representations of her eyes, another board member’s nose and Ramirez’s mouth. “Putting those things together truly represented who we are and who we planned to be,” she says. There are now five such murals around Main Street alone, eight along the Rail Trail, and three in city restaurants. Most

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

recently, an otherwise blank wall at 170 Main St. served as the group’s canvas. Its owners reached out to Positive Street Art’s team to talk about how the space could be improved. The building, which will be celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, was once a theater. It was all the inspiration Ramirez and his team needed. The mural features an historical theater and scenes from films that may have played there over its long life – nods to “It’s a Wonderful Life,” the Three Stooges, “Notorious,” and “The Blob” included. “We wanted to put in a little something for everybody,” Ramirez says, “While also adding elements and characteristics of the building itself.” The organization is celebrating its fifth year by planning special events that recognize just how far they’ve come. “Watching this movement expand, watching it grow and seeing what it’s become today has been the most rewarding part,” Ulibarri says. “We never thought when we started that we’d be here five years later. It was just an idea, but it was embraced by the community – which is very rewarding in itself.” N Online: positivestreetart.org


ONWARD AND UPWARD

Nashua Community College’s Aviation Technology Program

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s the aircraft maintenance workforce ages and many technicians prepare to retire, the industry is ripe for well-trained, prepared workers. Nashua Community College has them. NCC’s Aviation Technology program, a Federal Aviation Administration-approved training facility, prepares students to apply for the FAA oral, written, and practical exams for the Airframe and Powerplant Technician License. And it’s doing so at a time when the industry needs qualified workers. “The people who are in working with the airlines are older and getting ready to retire,” Aviation Technology Program Coordinator Pat Geoffroy says. “We’re looking at well over 50,000 people over next year or so getting ready to retire. We have to get these students out there into the field so they can gain the experience they need to move into the industry.” The program is the only one in the region to graduate students with the certification they need to complete testing with the FAA. Graduates go on to assume maintenance positions with large airlines and smaller companies that maintain planes for private use, such as PlaneSense, Inc., which operates out of the Pease Tradeport. The 21-month curriculum includes one summer session and covers a wide variety of subjects. “Our students range in age from 18 to 35, with some just starting out and some changing careers” Geoffroy says. “What they all have in

common is a shared passion for ensuring that airplanes – from Cessnas to 747s – run as safely and as efficiently as possible.” In operation since 1991, the program makes the most of its ideal location. Under Geoffroy’s guidance, students sometimes take advantage of facilities at the nearby Nashua Airport. (See related story, page 27.) “One of my colleagues has an airplane at the Nashua airport,” Geoffroy says. “We go there every once in a while to give the students an understanding of what working on an airplane is all about. I take them over and we talk to mechanics and get an insight into what exactly is required from a mechanic.” Geoffroy also takes students to Manchester Airport for training, and in the spring they’ll assist in preparing a small plane for an annual inspection. There are currently 15 freshmen and seven seniors enrolled, Geoffroy says, putting the program at its limit. This hands-on training pro-

gram has outgrown its current space, and the Community College System will be looking for state support next year to expand its footprint on the Nashua campus. The program is space intensive, focusing on hands-on learning where students complete all aspects of airplane maintenance and repair on donated equipment. “We have two lecture halls and four labs,” Geoffroy says. “We have a hangar bay and a fairly good sized room with two airplanes and two runnable engines. We have another room with system boards and a sheet metal lab and an engine lab. The space itself is tight, very tight. If there’s any more than 15 students, it gets extremely difficult to move about.” The Community College System has included a $2.5 million request as part of its capital budget request for the coming two years to the Legislature to expand and enhance the facility so it can increase space for more students and additional aviation equipment that can be incorporated into the learning and training experience. “There’s a real need for maintenance because they’re developing pilotless airplanes as well, and they’re going to need aviation maintenance technicians to keep them flying,” Geoffroy says. “The industry is getting ready to blow up as far as new technologies, more efficient airplanes, and the future looks really bright as far as aircraft maintenance goes. These students are getting into it at the right time.” Online: nashuacc.edu

Get to Know: Nashua Community College

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Nashua Community College was originally established in 1970, and has grown to include four buildings, 31 general classrooms, 25 programspecific classrooms and laboratories, the Academic Success Center, the Advising Center, the Wellness Center, the Peterson Library, an auditorium-lecture hall, administrative and faculty offices, a cafeteria and a book store. Students are accepted through rolling admissions and the institution offers associate degrees, certificates, community and corporate education, employmentready programs, and online courses. Experience it: 505 Amherst St. Online: nashuacc.edu Phone: 603-578-8900

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PHOTO BY WENDY WOOD

Rent, Buy or Relocate Nashua’s Neighborhoods Have Something for Everyone

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hen it comes to real estate, the deciding factor for new home seekers often comes down to one deciding mantra: location, location, location. It’s an element Nashua’s got in spades.

And it’s no secret. Named to the “Best Place to Live in America” list by Money Magazine for the third time this past year, the Gate City has a lot to offer – not the least of which is its proximity to cultural and educational necessities and its ideal geographic location. But there’s a lot more to Nashua than access. Recent physical improvements, such as renovations to the Walnut Street oval downtown, a beautification project that 36

saw residents plant more than 30 trees in the Ward 4 neighborhood and the new Broad Street Parkway, are a perfect example of why the area is positioned as a real estate hot spot. There’s a diverse range of options for home buyers to consider. They can choose between a garden style apartment near the convenience of Amherst Street, a renovated condo downtown, a ranch style home near Route 3, a stately

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

home in the city’s north end off of Concord Street, or move in to a development with high-end homes like Ballerina Court or Rosewood. Young families are also coming to the region. The great location – no secret to anyone who lives or works in Greater Nashua – combined with countless cultural offerings and strong schools make for an attractive area to call home. N


The Neighborhoods of Nashua

FACES OF NASHUA

Average price of a single family home in Nashua: $239,966 Greater Nashua has a wide variety of environments, from urban to suburban to rural. Here are a few of the neighborhoods that make up Nashua, and what you can expect when settling down.

Ali Flewelling

PHOTO BY BOB BETTENCOURT

Director of Public Relations, Nashua Community College

Downtown: Condominiums and apartments tucked into brick-lined streets. Navigate: Exit 6 and the Broad Street Parkway You might like this neighborhood if you enjoy walking to dinner, settling into a coffee shop or browsing the boutiques along Main Street. Convenient to dozens of dining options, plenty of shopping opportunities and easy access to the beauty of Mine Falls Park and the Millyard.

“A few of my favorite spots are the Riverwalk Cafe & Music Bar, The Peddler’s Daughter, and Surf. I also like to catch movies at Chunky’s Cinema Pub. There’s so much to do.” FACES OF NASHUA

Crown Hill is another centrally-located neighborhood. It’s also home to the Canal Street location of BAE – the city’s largest private employer. Navigate: Exit 4 You might like this neighborhood if you want access to apartment living with affordable options. Convenient to playing a few rounds of golf at the Nashua Country Club, and easy access to the city’s lively downtown.

French Hill is named for the FrenchCanadian mill workers who settled in this area of Nashua over 100 years ago. Navigate: Exit 7 You might like this neighborhood if you value access to more affordable housing options. Convenient to top-notch baseball at Holman Stadium and Greeley Park (where you’ll also find great annual gatherings like the 4th of July fireworks).

Bob Scheifele Coburn Woods: 220 homes on 63 acres of wooded land. The area was designated as a wildlife habitat by the National Wildlife Federation in 1974. Navigate: Exit 7 You might like this neighborhood if you want live in a more rural section of the city. Convenient to the many shops and businesses on Amherst Street and Daniel Webster College.

Continued on next page

Board of Directors, Nashua Airport-Boire Field

“I like to walk – the parks are the greatest. I’m in them every day, seven days a week unless it’s raining. My favorite is Mine Falls Park. And I know every piece of that park – every square inch.” n a shua cha mb er.c om

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The Neighborhoods of Nashua Birch Hill: This neighborhood is quiet with many single family homes, yet sits just minutes from the highways and the new Broad Street Parkway. Navigate: Exit 6 You might like this neighborhood if you want to be located near the new Broad Street Parkway, which provides easy access to the downtown area with its many shops, restaurants and cafes. Convenient to Downtown, Birch Hill Elementary School, Daniel Webster College.

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back to the 1800s can be found in this part of the city, including Classic Colonial Revivals and ornate Queen Anne style homes. Navigate: Exit 7 You might like this neighborhood if you enjoy a part of the city that is rich in history and period architecture. If this is something that appeals to you, the North End is ideal for you. Convenient to near-by downtown and its shopping and dining options, and the St. Christopher School and Nashua Christian Academy.

South End: Newer developments are

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North End: Single family homes dating

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Five bus routes available.

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

located near the shopping centers along with Nashua’s tech companies. Navigate: Exit 5 You might like this neighborhood if you commute to work along Route 3 or to Massachusetts. Easy access to the highway makes this neighborhood ideal for the commuting life. Convenient to two of the city’s great hospitals, Conway Arena, Stellos Stadium, Mine Falls Park and Nashua High School South.


Bicentennial: This neighborhood of condominium associations and single family

Ballerina Court at Gagnon Farms: Luxury homes dot this newer neighborhood located in the southern part of the city, not far from Spit Brook Road or Route 111A. Navigate: Exit 4 You might like this neighborhood if you’re interested in new construction that blends the traditional with the elegant in a highly-sought after part of town. Convenient to to Sky Meadow Country Club, Rivier University, the Nashua Country Club and great dining and shopping. In many ways, this neighborhood provides easy access to all that makes Nashua a great place to live.

homes runs from exit 4 off of Route 3 down to the Massachusetts border. Expect to see everything from modest ranch-style homes to extravagant new construction. Navigate: Exit 4 You might like this neighborhood if you’re attracted to the highly-rated school nearby. The elementary school consistently outscores other schools in the city on standardized tests, and comes highly-rated by parents who send their children there. Convenient to Sky Meadow Country Club, Pheasant Lane Mall, Bishop Guertin High School and the newly-refurbished and upgraded Rivier University.

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Kessler Farms is located in the northwest part of Nashua just off the commercial byway along Amherst Street. This ethnically diverse neighborhood is split between home-owners and those who rent at one of several apartment and condominium complexes. Navigate: Exit 8 You might like this neighborhood if you like the convenience of living close to supermarkets and a commercial center, and yet enjoy nearby green space and ponds. Access to the highway also makes this locale an ideal place for commuters. Convenient to Nashua Airport, Southern New Hampshire University, Daniel Webster College, Nashua Community College, and Nashua High School North.

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YMCA OF GREATER NASHUA: Merrimack Branch 603.881.7778 Nashua Branch 603.882.2011 www.nmymca.org

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154 Broad St., Suite 1514, Nashua, NH 03063 603-577-8787 • Fax: 603-577-5518 rhendricks@baystatefinancial.com n a shua cha mb er.com

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FACES OF NASHUA

GOLDEN YEARS IN THE GATE CITY

Active Lifestyle, Continuing Care Defines Retirement in Greater Nashua

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Marc Thayer

Executive Director, Symphony NH

“I really enjoy all the beautiful old architecture here in the city. I enjoy learning the history of all the old buildings. It’s fun to be in an historic old building and learn how it started – that’s fascinating to me.” FACES OF NASHUA

Manny Ramirez

Vice President of Creative Direction, Positive Street Art

“I like spending time downtown. I enjoy going to the bars and clubs in the downtown, having drinks with friends there and watching live music.” 40

ith a number of top-notch hospitals and wellness clinics, a vibrant downtown packed with diverse dining options, a variety of world-class cultural offerings and countless volunteer opportunities, Greater Nashua is an ideal retirement location. SmartAsset, a personal finance site, named Nashua as one of the top places to retire last year, citing factors like tax rates, senior recreation centers and proximity to doctor’s offices and hospitals. “It’s a wonderful location, and we’re finding more and more of this with folks moving into the area,” says Margo Bell, Executive Director of the Nashua Senior Activity Center. Experts cite the lack of a state sales tax as an immediate benefit, but also say there are many great reasons to retire to the Granite State – and specifically the Greater Nashua area. There’s easy access to Boston if someone wants to go shopping on Newbury Street or to the theater or one of the museums, and yet the region is also convenient to the mountains if someone is more adventurous and wants to go skiing or snowshoeing. There are 89 golf courses within 30 miles of the city, and 49 ski resorts within a two hour drive. For those who want to stay closer to home, Nashua has plenty to offer. The Nashua Senior Activity Center, at 70 Temple St., provides retirees with recreational, educational and wellness activities. Residents 50 and older can take part in everything from cooking competitions and craft fairs to organized day trips and workouts in the fitness room. A number of clubs (golf, bowling, bridge and walking, among others) also provide plenty of opportunities to keep busy. Bell says people moving to, or back to, greater Nashua to be closer to their children or to downsize are finding there are quite a few 55-plus communities in the region, and a wide variety of activities to take part in. The Nashua Senior Center has nearly 2,000 members, with more than 55 programs or services offered every week. Groups often take day-trips to Boston, multi-day trips to destinations like New York City – and occasionally even further afield. One group just returned from a trip to the Azores. “Our programs are recreational, cultural, educational, health-related – we have in-house programs and off-site programs,” Bell says. “There’s also the stereotype of retirees being old, but that’s not the way it is. If you come to one of

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

our aerobics classes, there might be 40 people in it, and there might be someone who is 52, but there also might be somebody who is 92. People are staying active longer, another great thing about being here in Nashua is that there are a lot of opportunities available.” Nashua Senior Center Nashuaseniorcenter.org 70 Temple St., (603) 889-6155

Online: Benchmark Senior Living at Nashua Crossings benchmarkseniorliving.com, (603) 204-2161 Bridges by Epoch bridgesbyepoch.com/communities/nashua-nh (603) 594-0581 The Courville at Nashua courvillecommunities.com, (603) 889-5450 Fairview Healthcare in Hudson fairviewhealthcare.com, (603) 882-5261 Gatewood Manor hinec.org/gm.html, (603) 880-6029 Hunt Communities silverstoneliving.org, (603) 882-6511 The Huntington at Nashua silverstoneliving.org, (603) 882-6511 Langdon Place of Nashua genesishcc.com/LangdonPlaceNashua (603) 888-7878


Stephen Lubelczyk, Regional President, 603.263.1420 Al Romero, Regional Commercial Banking Manager, 603.263.1443 Member FDIC

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One Greater Nashua Capitalizes on City’s Diversity A

community is stronger when all of its residents enjoy good health and well-being, regardless of age, income or race. A new coalition – One Greater Nashua – is working to ensure this is the case.

One Greater Nashua’s mission is to improve health outcomes through enhanced social inclusion and integration efforts. The discussion began during the United Way Day of Caring a few years ago, where United Way asked community leaders to engage in a conversation about their views on the city, strengths, challenges and opportunities. Several times, leaders referred to “the two Nashuas.” “Essentially, they recognized that the demographic make-up of Nashua was changing,” Liz Fitzgerald, Director of Community Impact at United Way of Greater Nashua, says of that initial meeting. “New leaders were emerging but not necessarily connecting with established leaders. There was concern that there was potential that the community could bifurcate along race and ethnicity and socio-economic lines. There was agreement that it would be in the best interest of the community to take some action that would bring the community together.” United Way and the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce agreed to create an action plan. Shortly after, the Endowment for Health launched an “Immigrant Integration Initiative,” looking for four 42

communities in the state to plan a three year project focused on immigrant integration. “We saw this as an opportunity to bring the broad community together and address the two Nashuas concept,” Fitzgerald says. Achieving health outcomes – and health equity – is more than just access to healthcare. According to the group, social factors account for 40 percent of a person’s health. If people feel more connected to their community and have better opportunity to participate and thrive, it’s expected that over time they will have better health outcomes and the entire community will be stronger for it. What the group has found is that health outcomes vary dramatically by demographic group, with people of color having the least favorable results. “Our coalition seeks to reverse those trends,” Fitzgerald says. The coalition was awarded a $10,000 planning grant from the Endowment for Health. With United Way of Greater Nashua overseeing the process and NH Listens, a civic engagement initiative of the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire, facilitating, the group developed a plan

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

to improve health equity for the entire community through increased leadership capacity, economic vitality and community engagement. The three-pronged approach involves: Youth leadership and family engagement – empowering youth with leadership skills and opportunities and encouraging better understanding of different cultures; Key gateways and cultural navigators – helping to orient newcomers to the community and connecting them to learning opportunities as they discover ways to share their unique skills, talent and ideas; and A diverse business and civic network – encouraging diverse civic leadership and community engagement. Leveraging those strengths and enhancing opportunities that showcase Greater Nashua’s growing diversity will attract young people and professionals to the region. “Essentially, Millennials are attracted to communities that are culturally rich, and our initiative encourages diverse civic leadership and community engagement,” Fitzgerald says. “It’s important to attract younger, well-educated workers for our community to remain economically competitive. Our coalition


recognizes our growing diversity as a regional advantage. Through the coalition, these young leaders are gaining access to opportunities to share their talents and through this engagement they will see Nashua as a community they value and that will increase the likelihood that they will choose to put their roots here.” The plan has already experienced some success. The Endowment for Health recently awarded One Greater Nashua a three-year, $60,000 grant to implement the plan, and the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation has committed to match that amount. United Way of Greater Nashua is providing staff time and $10,000 for each of the three years. Additionally, coalition members are committing in-kind time and expertise valued at $42,000 annually. “The response has been very positive,” Fitzgerald says.

“We’re just getting started and essentially we are building our coalition through grassroots, neighbor-to-neighbor, and word of mouth community engagement.” The coalition roster currently has about 120 members and there are more than 40 community members who are actively engaged in helping to implement the activities. In the first full year of the coalition, volunteers contributed more than 5,676 hours of volunteer service. “We know there are still many people we need to reach that have much to offer our community, and we are looking forward to finding more and more opportunities to bring community members together,” Fitzgerald says.

How to get involved One Greater Nashua meets monthly at United Way of Greater Nashua on 20 Broad Street on the first Thursday of the month from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. All are welcome. There are three goal groups that have regularly scheduled meetings. People can join the OGN list serve by going to the website or by texting OGN to 22828. N

Here for you No matter where you are on the road of life we have the financial products and services you need for smooth traveling. Enjoy the ride. 800-281-5772 n a shua cha mb er.c om

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Nashua is “Open for Business” Business Incubator Ready to Show the Way

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ometimes all that’s needed for a business to take off is a little guidance and some inspiration. nashuaHUB is ready to provide both.

nashuaHUB – a new business incubator designed to provide young entrepreneurs with those key elements, and a lot more – was brought to life by Brendan Keegan, founder of velocityHUB, and Jay Jacobs, chief executive and president of Nashua-based RAPID Manufacturing. Joined by Executive Director Chris Williams and Directors Amanda Rogers and Matt Sordillo, the team at nashuaHUB has launched the first opportunity of its kind in the city. “When it began, my wife and I wanted to give something back to the community,” Keegan says. “We have the Keegan Family Courage and Faith Foundation, which focuses primarily on youth, and now, from a business standpoint, we have this.” nashuaHUB members pay $150 a month and get downtown parking (“Which in itself is pretty good,” Keegan says), 24/7 access to the co-working space, access 44

to a print station, conference room, discounts from more than 20 sponsors and membership to the Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce for one year. Discounts are available on related services and products such as printing jobs, tax returns, setting up a back office system and marketing efforts. The group’s stated goal is to help 250 businesses over the next 11½ years, creating 5,000 local jobs. “The goal is for someone to stay for a year and then graduate,” Keegan says. “But during that year they would reap a savings from the eco-system that we’ve built that would really pay for their membership. If you’re starting a business, you need a lawyer, accountants, you need to design a logo, you need to get business cards – and you won’t have to spend hours and hours figuring that out. We’re saying, for example, ‘Here’s a bank where you can open an account.’ You can go

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

anywhere you want, but here’s a group of people that are invested in you before you even decided to take this job. “You can’t get space at this price anywhere, and then there are 20-plus businesses there to support you.” The site itself is 2,000 square feet of space on Water Street where as many as 20 people can work. The modern, Silicon Valley-style space has a conference room, a kitchenette complete with its own beer tap, and workspace deliberately designed to encourage collaboration. “Attached to that is an executive collaboration center if someone wants to have client or investor meetings,” Keegan says of the space, which is also available to nonprofits when it’s not in use by nashuaHUB. The result: Keegan, Jacobs, Williams, Rogers and Sordillo are building a community of entrepreneurs. “It creates an entrepreneurial community that hasn’t really existed in Nashua,” Keegan says. “It embraces entrepreneurs


MakeIt Labs – New Hampshire’s first community workshop, also known as a makerspace or hackerspace, this nonprofit opened its doors in 2010 to provide creators with a place to craft, build, dream and learn with other like-minded people. MakeIt Labs’ 12,000-square-foot facility gives members of its community access to facilities like a wood shop, machine shop, an automotive garage bay, classrooms, rapid prototyping areas, a computer lab, lounge and kitchen, among other resources. Open houses are held every Thursday from 6-9 p.m., and free parking is available on-site. Experience it: 25 Crown St. Online: makeitlabs.com Phone: (978) 226-3266

nashuaHUB – A new business incubator designed to provide young entrepreneurs with access to a co-working office space, a print station, conference room, parking and discounts from more than 20 Nashua business partners. Experience it: 4 Water St. Online: nashuahub.com Phone: (603) 402-1700

The Flatley Challenge – An annual search that provides winners with free rent for one year for up to 5,000 square feet of office space at the Nashua Technology Park and Nashua Office Park at Gateway Hills, and up to $10,000 in fit-up, connectivity and related costs. Experience it: 200 Innovative Way Online: gateway-hills.com/flatley-challenge Phone: (603) 598-7500

WALK-IN

CARE 603.577.CARE | immediatecaresnh.org Amherst | Hudson | Merrimack | Nashua | Pelham | Pepperell | S. Nashua n a shua cha mb er.c om

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Online: RAPID Manufacturing: rapidmanufacturing.com velocityHUB: velocityHUB.com

Get to Know: Resources for Startups in Nashua

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and it says ‘start here.’ You don’t have to go to Portsmouth or Manchester. Our tagline is ‘Nashua is open for business.’” Keegan cites support from the city as being a key element in getting it started. The group went to the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen, who passed legislation to donate 15 parking spaces to nashuaHUB. “It may sound small, but you’ve got a guaranteed parking spot,” Keegan says. “And to not have to pay $50 for parking shows the city is behind it, as well.” At its start, nashuaHUB counts among its members two web app development companies, a merchandising company, a sports memorabilia company – and one person who is trying to “figure it all out.” “That might be the neatest one,” Keegan says. “He knows he wants to start a business, he knows he wants to be a business owner, so instead of sitting on his couch he says he’d rather be in an upbeat, positive environment. In some weird way, that inspires me more than any other.” N

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Stay a While

Greater Nashua’s Hotels are Welcoming, Comfortable Homewood Suites Gateway Hills/Hilton offers its guests studio and one-bedroom suites with fully-equipped kitchens. Located in the heart of the Gateway Hills complex, it’s convenient to the Spitbrook Road shopping district, the many dining options in downtown Nashua and the Mass. state border. Where: Exit 1 – 15 Tara Boulevard, 6.9 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: gatewayhillsnashua.homewoodsuites.com (603) 546-7470 Whatever level lodging visitors choose, they’re all convenient to Boston’s Logan International Airport and the Manchester/ Boston Regional Airport in nearby Manchester. Holiday Inn Express & Suites Where: Exit 11 – 4 Amherst Road, Merrimack, 6.4 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: hiexpress.com/merrimacknh, (603) 429-3600

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et comfortable during your stay in Greater Nashua – there are accommodations to fit any need.

From modest to ornate, the hotels in the region offer a diverse range of amenities: One is tucked into a stand of trees and is surrounded by paved nature paths perfect for walking or biking; another sits right next to the Everett Turnpike, making quick trips to the area’s airports a snap. Two of the city’s hotels give the outward appearance of stately castles, while inside they offer comfortable rooms making any stay a treat. If staying at a hotel that’s become a local institution is on the agenda, the Crowne Plaza should be at the top of your list. Luxuriate at the on-site salon or book a massage. Guests can dine at the Speakers Corner Bistro or grab a coffee at il caffe, just off the hotel’s welcoming lobby. Where: Exit 8 – 2 Somerset Parkway, 3.2 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: cpnashua.com, (603) 886-1200 46

The Courtyard Marriott offers 245 guest rooms and suites. An indoor pool and fitness center will keep guests feeling fit. Sit down for breakfast or dinner at the Courtyard Café, or gather in the livingroom style lobby to catch up with friends. Where: Exit 8 – 2200 Southwood Drive, 3.5 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: courtyardnashua.com, (603) 579-6037 If a longer stay is on the agenda, consider the Residence Inn by Marriott. This allsuite hotel serves as a home away from home for guests spending a little more time in Greater Nashua. Suites come with fully-equipped kitchens, and guests can spend some time in the fitness center or even on the putting green. Where: Exit 7W - 25 Trafalgar Square, 2.7 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: marriot.com/mhtnr (603) 882-8300

N magazine GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Holiday Inn of Nashua Where: Exit 4 – 9 Northeastern Blvd., 2.7 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: holidayinn.com/nashuanh, (603) 888-1551 Motel 6 Where: Exit 5W – 2 Progress Ave., 2.6 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: motel6.com, (603) 889-4151 Where: Exit 1 – 77 Spitbrook Road, 6.5 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: motel6.com/nashuanh, (603) 888-1893 Radisson Hotel Nashua Where: Exit 1 – 11 Tara Blvd., 5.5 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: radisson.com/nashuanh, (603) 888-9970 Hawthorn Suites by Wyndham Where: Exit 10 - 246 Daniel Webster Highway, Merrimack, 5.1 miles from downtown Nashua Contact: hawthorn.com/merrimack (603) 424-8100


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Offering youth development activities for kids, ages 5 to 18. We help them to achieve academic success, enjoy healthy lives, and develop good character and citizenship. Kids Club (ages 5 to 8) Clubhouse (ages 8 to 12) Stahl Teen Center (ages 13 – 18) All members have access to education and technology centers, swimming pool, gymnasium, outdoor play areas, games rooms, art and dance studios, mentors and more! Specialized programs include FIRST LEGO League, theater arts, swim team, college prep, and more.

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www.fairviewhealthcare.com Where Your Child’s Journey Begins Matters If you’re considering a private education for your child, we invite you to tour our beautiful campus and visit our classrooms to learn about the 21st century programs we offer for Infants through Grade 8. Tours are offered by appointment. Call Samantha Bonenfant, Director of Admissions at 603.888.1982.

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One Positive Place, Nashua, NH 03060 603-883-0523 • www.bgcn.com n a shua cha mb er.com

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A QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE

Relocation Information New Hampshire Area Code (603) Utility Services Electric Company Eversource Energy (800) 662-7764 ENH Power (800) 549-6160 Gulf Electricity (781) 223-8186 Gas Company Liberty Utilities Natural Gas (800) 833-4200

Local TV WYCN TV 13 (603) 533-4984 WBIN (603) 845-1044 WMUR (603) 669-9999

Useful Numbers Town of Nashua Nashua City Assessor’s Office (603) 589-3040 Board of Aldermen/ Legislative Assistant (603) 589-3030

Cable Comcast (800) 266-2278

Boston Express Bus Service (603) 521-6000

Internet Providers Comcast (800) 266-2278

City Clerk (603) 589-3010

FairPoint (866) 984-3001 Local Newspaper Telegraph Publishing (603) 882-2741 Lowell Sun (978) 970-4715 Waste Water Company Nashua Wastewater (603) 589-3195 Heating Oil Providers McLaughlin Oil (603) 882-5500 Water Company Pennichuck Water Works (800) 553-5191 Telephone Company FairPoint Residential: (866) 984-2001 Business: (866) 984-3001 Wireless Communication AT&T (603) 891-1686 U.S. Cellular (603) 880-6553 Verizon Wireless (603) 888-2000

Community Development Division (603) 589-3095 Health and Community Services Division (603) 589-4560 Mayor’s Office (603) 589-3260 Motor Vehicle Registration (603) 589-3200 Nashua City Hall Information (603) 589-3000 Property Tax Collections & Information (603) 589-3190 Public Library (603) 589-4600 Public Works Division/Parks and Recreation Department (603) 589-3370 Solid Waste Department (603) 589-3410 Street Department (603) 589-4750 Voter Registration (603) 589-3010

Banks/Credit Unions Bank of America (800) 432-1000

Non-Emergency American Medical Response (603) 594-2540

Bank of New England (603) 598-8800

ConvenientMD (603) 471-6069

Bellwether Community Credit Union (603) 645-8181 Citizens Bank (603) 594-7700 Digital Federal Credit Union (800) 328-8797 Eastern Bank (603) 546-0012 Granite State Credit Union (603) 668-2221 Lowell Five Cent Savings Bank (603) 888-5310 Merrimack County Savings Bank (603) 880-7000 The Nashua Bank, Division of the Lake Sunapee Bank (603) 882-2700

Nashua Fire Rescue (603) 594-3636 Nashua Police (603) 594-3500 Pridestar EMS (978) 441-0911 Nashua Public Schools School District (603) 966-1000 Nashua High School North (603) 589-6400 Nashua High School South (603) 589-4311 Private Schools Bishop Guertin High School (603) 889-4107 Derryfield (603) 669-4524

NBT Bank (603) 578-2652

Presentation of Mary Academy (603) 889-6054

People’s United Bank (603) 594-8555

The World Academy (603) 888-1982

Service Credit Union (603) 579-5423

Charter Schools Academy of Science and Design (603) 595-4705

St. Mary’s Bank (603) 889-6964 TD Bank (603) 577-5040 Triangle Credit Union (603) 889-2470 Hospitals/Clinics Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua (603) 577-4000

Gate City Charter School for the Arts (603) 943-5273 Town Offices Amherst (603) 673-6041 Brookline (603) 673-8855 Hollis (603) 465-2209

Southern New Hampshire Medical Center (603) 577-2000

Hudson (603) 886-6000

St. Joseph Hospital (603) 882-3000

Lyndeborough (603) 654-5955

Litchfield 603) 424-4046 Merrimack (603) 424-2331 Milford (603) 249-0650 Mont Vernon (603) 673-69126

PHOTO BY KAREN BACHELDER

Wilton (603) 654-9451

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Millyard Technology Park

Downtown Nashua Visitors Map

Broad Street Parkway

30

WALNUT STREET

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11

Daniel Webster Highway & Pheasant Lane Mall

97 Main St. • 595-1444

Cabinet Outlet • 1

259 Main St. • 880-8880

Collins Flowers • 41

9 Main St. • 882-2723

Darrell’s Music Hall • 31 75 Main St. • 886-1748

Fortin-Gage Flower & Gift • 12

86 West Pearl St. • 882-3371

Gental Dental • 19

151 Main St. • 886-0000

129 West Pearl St. • 882-9491

NH Health & Wellness Center • 33 60 Main St. • 402-9134

PRG • 4

227 Main St. • 882-5604

The Print Factory • 23

15 Factory St. • 880-4519

Scontsas Fine Jewelry & Décor • 16 169 Main St. • 882-3281

Splash by Masi • 39

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Courtyard Garden – Mural

2 Clocktower Place • 880-3961

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Vivian’s Dream – Mural

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Le Dame De Notre Renaissance – Sculpture

Cotton Mill Apartments • 30

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Mirage of the Horse – Sculpture Cameo Image of Main Street – Mural

30 Front St. • 881-4222

Great American Downtown • 40

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The Nashua Manufacturing Co. – Mural

6 Main St. • 883-5700

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Frida Rota – Sculpture

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Margaret’s View of Nashua – Mural

Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce • 22

14 Court St. • 889-2330

Studio Mark Emile Photography • 32

Positive Street Art • 17

174 Main Street, Suite 9 (978) 558-0772

Symphony NH • 26

6 Church St. • 595-9156

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Downtown Sculptures & Murals

Peacock Players • 25

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La Tortue, Ascending Egyptian Turtle, Moon Shadow – Sculptures

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PEARSON AVENUE

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What a Bagel 2

AlphaGraphics • 29

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W. HOLLIS STREET

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BEECH STREET

To Nashua Airport – Boire Field

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PLEASANT STREET

PARKING AREAS

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TO ST. JOSEPH HOSPITAL

To Route 3 North & South

142 Main St. • 881-8333

Peddler’s Daughter • 34

42 Main St. • 889-9500

48 Main St. • 821-7537

Fratello’s Italian Grille • 10

Portland Pie Company • 36

Nashua Senior Activity Center • 20 70 Temple St. • 889-6155

Bank of New England • BN

14 Railroad Square • 882-7437

Margarita’s Restaurant • 37

Stella Blu • 9

Citizens Bank • 3

MT’s Local Kitchen & Wine Bar • 8

Surf Restaurant • 7

Enterprise Bank• 28

212 Main St. • 595-9334

What a Bagel • 2

Granite State Credit Union • 6

70 East Pearl St. • 578-5777

1 Nashua Drive • 883-0996

207 Main Street • 595-9293 24 East Hollis St. • 809-4466

5 Abbott St. • 883-9783 2 Court St. • 589-4600

157 Main St. • 882-5000

194 Main St. • 889-2022

Nashua Historical Society • 42 Nashua Public Library • 27

Banking Bank of America • 18

St. Joseph Hospital • H

2300 Southwood Dr. • 577-4000

Southern NH Health System • 8 Prospect St. • 577-2000

238 Main St. • 594-7710 88 Main St. • 546-0880 19 Elm St. • 668-2221

Lake Sunapee Bank • 15

Hospitals Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua •

295 Main Street • 598-8800

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172 Kinsley St. • 822-3000

188 Main St. • 882-2700

NBT Bank • 5

221 Main St. • 578-2652

TD Bank • 14 191 Main St. • 577-5032

Triangle Credit Union • 21, 38 30 Temple St., Suite 700 886-5900 33 Franklin St. • 886-5900


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Local Members Worldwide Service

Issue #29

2017

THE GREATER NASHUA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MAGAZINE

Where you matter most.

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” – Winston Churchill

At Service Credit Union, we are proud to provide affordable banking designed for the people and businesses of New Hampshire. Over 35 NH branch locations including 337 Amherst Street in Nashua.

federally insured by ncua

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PHOTO BY SID CAESAR / CEASERPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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Visit us today at any branch, online or by phone 24/7.

The Merrimack is committed to improving lives by supporting causes and organizations that benefit our community.

Your Passport to Everything Greater Nashua Has to Offer

SPONSORED BY

OPTILINE ENTERPRISES

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themerrimack.com

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N Magazine 2017  

Your passport to everything Greater Nashua (New Hampshire) has to offer

N Magazine 2017  

Your passport to everything Greater Nashua (New Hampshire) has to offer