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What Lies Within...

Student Forum Page 5

Senior Insert Page 7-10

Past Proms Page 15

Panther Press

The voice of Montezuma-Cortez High School

May 2011

206 W. Second Street, Cortez, CO 81321

Budget cuts hit M-CHS Gina Martin Staff Reporter

Public schools throughout Colorado are being affected by the educational budget cuts the governor has put on us. Public schools could take an even bigger budget hit next year. Montezuma County schools are being cut approximately $2 million dollars. “I am disappointed that we have to endure such sharp reductions in our building budget for two consecutive years. As funding for public education dries up it puts intense pressure on schools to maintain many of the services and programs that make schools a great place to learn. As the principal I must weigh what needs to remain and what must be done without as we plan for the next school year’s needs. We have been able to shield our students from most of the impact of these reductions over the past several years but we can no longer do so. It now begins to impact what kinds of opportunities we can provide for our students,” said Gordon Shepherd, M-CHS Principle. Ever since Governor John Hickenlooper unveiled his budget proposal for the state he's been expected to announce more cuts as one-time federal stimulus money dries up. Though Colorado education groups say kinder-

garten through 12th-grade schools could be cut by between $300 and $400 million, this is worse than the $260 million school cuts schools this year. Hickenlooper's proposal will be for the budget year that begins in July 2011. These new budget cuts will affect the whole school in more than one way. From classes and teachers being cut, pay freezes for all teachers for the 4th year, to less activities. This will affect some students more than others because the number of students per class will likely increase. “You will see a reduction in the number of electives and activities first as we are forced to downsize our staff. Class sizes will increase as well for the same reason.” Shepherd adds. With more students entering the classrooms it may have a negative impact on the way they learn by allowing less one-on-one time. Some recent research shows that many students do poorly on assignments or in participation because there are too many kids in class taking their attention off their work (virtualsalt.com).

See BUDGET CUTS on page 14.

Caffeine harms Changes to our bodies M-CHS schedule Halie Craft, Staff Reporter

A countless number of teenagers drink various caffeined drinks on a daily basis; however, teenagers don’t comprehend how much caffeine can damage the body. Caffeine is described as a drug that increases the body’s energy level. These can be helpful for waking up in the morning and getting though the day. But just like everything else in life, what goes up must come down. Energy drinks will speed up the metabolism for a short period of time, and then the body crashes to a slower state then before the drink was consumed. Drinking too much caffeine is a remarkable way to crash the body. There are constant side effects that happen, according to eHowHealth.com. Caffeine can cause negative effects on the body like:

• • • • • • •

Christina Stevens Staff Reporter

April 25th- May 9th M-CHS students and staff have been using a new daily schedule for MAP, or Measures of Academic Progress testing. Here is the schedule: Block: Time: Block A 7:30-9:02 am Career Pathways 9:06-10:16 am Block B 10:20-11:52 am Lunch 11:52-12:26 pm Block C 12:26-1:58 pm Block D 2:02-3:35 pm

Classes were 5 minutes shorter and lunch only about 35 minutes which is 10 minutes less than we usually have. The food lines were longer than usual because many students and staff members who generally left for lunch High blood pressure Brain – Delirium, Insomnia, Head found they didn’t have enough time to do so. “In my opinion, I think the MAPs schedule is ache, Anxiety, Irritability. dumb. I think lunch should have been 70 minEyes – Seeing flashes. utes and C.P should have been 35 minutes,” Ears – Ringing. said Pam Ayala, an M-CHS freshman. “It’s ridiculous, represents everything that’s Skin – Raising the level of sensitiv wrong with education, its about learning, not ity to pain and touch. testing,” said Bennie Palko-Herrera, an M-CHS Heart – Rapid heartbeat, Irregular theatre teacher, “but spending a week, taking rhythm. from lunch, none makes sense to me.”

Respiratory – Rapid breathing.

See CAFFEINE on page 3.

See MAPs on page 14.

Volume 11: Issue 8

Girls tennis players make state Caleb Branson Staff Reporter / Photographer

This year, two M-CHS tennis players went to state. Andi Pickins and Jessica Gonzales placed in the top 8 of the state in number 1 doubles. “We played good, we lost to the team that won state in the first round,” Jessica Gonzales stated about her play. State competition took place in Pueblo, Colorado on the weekend of May 13th. Pickens and Gonzales were the only players to make state in tennis for M-CHS. Gonzales and Pickens took 2nd in their regional tournament. Only the top two doubles teams can make it to state. Each year, both Steamboat Springs and Aspen dominate the Regional Tournaments. This year the M-CHS team took a couple of players to state and that was the goal.

Osama killed by Navy Seals Halie Craft Staff Reporter

Osama Bin Laden was shot and killed by a team of United States Navy Seals on May 1, 2011. Bin Laden was the founder of the Al- Qaeda terrorist group. AlQaeda was responsible for the tragic September 11 attacks that took the lives of thousands of Americans. Since 2001, Bin Laden was on America’s Ten Most Wanted List wanted dead or alive. Soon after Bin Laden’s death, president Obama made a speech to the United States and the world that Bin Laden had been confirmed dead. Many people question how Bin Laden died. According to CNN news, it was a fire-fight situation and Bin Laden was shot in the head. In addition, several other family members of Bin Laden were injured during the siege. No Navy Seals were harmed. There are no pictures of Osama as proof of his death, and according to NBC, Osama was buried at sea.


Press 02 Panther M 2011 ay

Lifestyles

Do you know Aly Wilson?

Panther Press wants to see if you know Aly as well as Jordan does! (Made by Christina Stevens Staff Reporter)

Questions: 1. Who is your favorite superhero(s)? 2. Who is your favorite singer? 3. Who is your favorite famous person? 4. What is your favorite candy bar? 5. Who is your celebrity crush?

Aly Wilson ‘14 1. Spider Man! 2. Trey Songz. 3. Don’t have one. 4. Snickers. 5. Trey Songz or T.I.

Jordan Miller ‘14 (Alys Friend) 1. Spider Man. 2. Trey Songz. 3. Noone. 4. Snickers. 5. Trey Songz.


Panther Press

May 2011

Caffeine From Page 1

Halie Craft, Staff Reporter Caffeine can also make the body dehydrated or raise its temperature. Caffeine affects children, teenagers and adults in the same way, but the age and health of a body can make a difference. Studies have shown that drinking caffeine can lead to a heart attack at an older age. In small portions, caffeine can be healthy for the body on acount of the antioxidants it contains and can help prevent cancer. After much research on both positive and negative effects of caffeine, it has much more negative side effects. Of course drinking small portions of caffeine once in a while will not do any harm. There are several caffeine drinks that are very harmful to the body. The graph shows how much caffeine is in some common drinks, according to Energyfield.com. This graph shows that energy drinks like RockStar and Monster contain the highest amount of caffeine. Caffeine can be a good thing if used properly but overdosing can cause negative effects. According Kevin Purdy on LifeHacker.com, “Caffeine affects differently on different people with different tolerances.” Whether caffeine is bad for the body or not, the amount of caffeine a teenager consumes should suit their needs.

Consequences of alcohol Gina Martin Staff Reporter

Alcohol is a leading cause of death among youth, particularly teenagers. It contributes substantially to adolescent motor vehicle crashes, other traumatic injuries, suicide, date rape, and family and school problems. Every day, on average, 11,318 American youth between the ages of 12 to 20 years of age try alcohol for the first time (marininstitute.org). “I think many students drink because it is available to them easily and they do it more because they know they can’t have it,” said Taletha Judy, M-CHS Spanish teacher. After talking to many students, it seems everyone knew someone who has had a DUI. Most everyone knew someone under age who has had an MIP and/or DUI. Also, many people have been in a car with someone under the influence of alcohol. After asking the question, “Do you know anyone who has had a DUI? An M-CHS student answered, “Yes my uncle has had two.” These days law enforcement seem to be getting stricter and they are cracking down on drunk drivers everywhere, setting up check points along major roads and highways. You must be 21 to drink alcohol or work in a bar or package store. Legal age is 18 to serve alcohol in a restaurant as long as a supervisor over the age of 21 is present. Like most states, the maximum blood-alcohol content (BAC) level is .08 percent. For a driver with a higher BAC, she/he is considered ‘per se intoxicated’ and can be convicted on the BAC alone; no other evidence is required. “I see many people drinking and abusing drugs and alcohol more these days because they seem more available and many more underage teens are getting MIP’s and DUI’s, from abusing alcohol,” says sophomore, Mariah Hunter.

A driver refusing to allow BAC testing or a BAC result that is .17 percent above the legal limit of .08 percent will experience more severe minimum mandatory penalties. ‘Zero tolerance laws’ are intended to keep under-age drivers from drinking. A driver under the age of 21 with a BAC of.02 percent or above is subject to DUI penalties. (alcohollaws.org) The NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) says, “Although every year 1.5 million impaired drivers are arrested, only one arrest is made for every 772 occurrences of driving under the influence of alcohol.” (That’s 1.158 Billion occurrences of violent, mostly victimless crimes every year! And 1,158,000,000 potential arrests each year. We need one BIG jail. Also, note that drunk driving is now impaired driving.) The first DUI offense in Colorado incurs a license suspension by the DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) of 90 days. The second offense incurs one year’s suspension, and a third offense mandates one year’s loss of driving privileges. A vehicle cannot be confiscated in Colorado for DUI conviction, but an ignition interlock device is a possible penalty as is mandatory alcohol education and assessment or treatment for alcohol dependency. (alcohollaws.org) "Drunk driving is one of the most frequently committed violent crimes in the United States, killing 16,653 people last year, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration," says Nationwide Insurance Poll press release. Locally, 85 people per 10,000 are arrested for DUI in Montezuma County annually. 13 people per 10,000 are killed by DUI in Montezuma County, CO annually (drinkinganddriving.org).

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News

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04 Panther Press M 2011

Opinion

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The “Future” Voice of M-CHS

S

The M-CHS Panther Press year is almost over and next year we want to start out strong. We, the staff of the Panther Press, encourage students to enroll in the class. There are many different positions in the class including The Editor-in-Chief, a Managing Editor, two Business Managers, and a Photographer. For the last three months of this year, Mrs. McVicker, the class advisor resumed both editing positions, although she prefers for these positions to be assumed by students. We want to keep it a student-run paper as well. “As the advisor, I will set up an interview panel, consisting of members of our Advisory Committee, who will assist in choosing each candidate,” said Deb McVicker, Panther Press Advisor. If you do not wish to apply for one of these positions, you can be a staff reporter. There is a different grading rubric for each position, but it is balanced out fairly based on your ‘job’. “In 2011-2012, a system will be in place to ensure fairness and consistency for these student ‘jobs.’ An application will be available for students in the journalism class to apply for all the positions of the paper. Even though this class and the positions are offered to anyone, other prerequisites shall be developed such as ‘Proficient’ levels on CSAP’s and MAP’s testing scores in both reading and writing,” said McVicker. The journalism class also consists of guest speakers and class trips throughout the semester. Pizza is delivered to the class upon completion of each monthly issue. Stories are submitted every month to High School Journalism online (hsj. org) for nominations and awards along with publication into the National Edition – Teen Generated News from around the Nation, and from the Mesa State College Media Day. This year, awards from these organizations went to Josh Maes, Darcie Biard, Karlee Montgomery, Mikey Mills, Ashley Romine, Ashley Long, Caleb Branson, and Lorisa Miller. At the end of each school year, publications are submitted to the Reynolds Institute of Journalism and C.H.S.P.A. for various “Journalism Excellence Awards.” As a class, we feel it is such a great accomplishment to see our stories published in this award winning paper each month. There are many people who read the Panther Press all over the community, and we want to keep it that way. Even though the 2010-2011 Panther Press faced many “ups and downs”, we still pushed through and held strong. We are all very excited to see how next year turns out.

t a f f

E d i t o r i a l

To Smoke or Not To Smoke? Krissey Gonzales & Christina Stevens Staff Reporters

Smoking. Is it a common thing for students here other drug substances. at M-CHS? A survey was sent out and completed by M-CHS “I don’t think that I will end up using any harder drugs just students and the results came out like this: 66 percent of students have NOT smoked in their lives and 34 percent of because of smoking,” said anonymous. students have smoked once or more in their lifetime. 60 percent of smokers start younger than thirteen years old. 6,000 children under the age of eighteen “I feel that smoking under the age of 20 start smoking, 2,000 of those will keep smoking. is ignorant and can decrease your That adds up to 800,000 new teen smokers lifespan” said anonymous. every year according to teenhelp.com. Statistics state that teen In our opinion, we feel that as long smokers become addicted as they know their consequence then faster and on lower levels of nicotine than adults. According smoking is okay. Also, we think a very bad habit, a negative influence on to thinkquest.org approximately other teens, and a gateway to alcohol and other drugs. It 90 percent of smokers begin before the age of 21. It can lead to makeing bad decisions during high school and is estimated that 4.5 million adolescents are cigarette slowly wither away your future. smokers in the U.S.

“I have smoked for a while now, I don’t think it’s caused me any problems so far, but who knows,” said anonymous. Research shows that teens between the age of thirteen and seventeen who smoke daily are more likely to use

Editorial Mr. Harriman M-CHS Teacher

To The Class of 2011,

Congratulations! You have finally reached that elusive and much sought after time in your lives. It can be bittersweet, this first step outside of all those school years you’ve experienced. Along the way you have made life-long friends, experienced the joys of youth, and participated in the struggle to accomplish your achievements. Celebrate these moments for they are an incredible influence on the rest of your lives. Journey out from the halls of MCHS and live your lives to the fullest. Experience the world! Value what you have learned and build on that knowledge. Be proud of your roots, and never forget where you come from. Be the light in your community and wherever your journeys take you. Remember that you will always be an MCHS Panther and never forget the

good times you have had here. We will all miss seeing your faces, sharing your accomplishments, experiencing you laughter, and sharing your tears. It has been an incredible four years with all of you. Now it is time for you to leave here and make a positive influence on your world. Use the

tools you have acquired, and continue to fill that tool box. Become complete citizens and life long learners, and share that knowledge with others. This is your legacy as you leave MCHS. Don’t forget your history, and live your life boldly! Once again, congratulations to the Class of 2011! Mr. Harriman

Empire Electric’s 2012 Photo Contest Calendar deadline is July 1, 2011

Empire Electric

2011

Guidelines

• EEA members only • Photo must be taken in EEA service territory • Photo must be horizontal orientation • Maximum of 2 photos per membership • Submit one form per entry • Prints, CD’s, disks, or digital photo (e-mail) • Do not send originals as photos will not be returned • Resolution of 300 dpi or higher • Do not write on your photo

2012 EEA Photo Contest Entry Form Name:______________________EEA Account #:__________ Address:_______________________ E-Mail:______________ Phone:_________________________________ Describe your photo: ________________________________ Location of photo:___________________________________ Send your favorite photo and a completed entry form to: EEA Photo Calendar Contest, Attention: Bobbe P O Drawer K, Cortez, CO 81321 or e-mail to bobbe.jones@eea.coop Call 970-565-4444


Panther Press

May 2011

What are you most looking forward to over the summer?

“Going on vacation, taking a break from school, and visting friends and family” -Cody Wells, Senior

“Warped Tour” -Tanea Watkins, Senior

Summer 2011 By Josh Maes and Halie Craft Staff Reporters

Summer time is here, many of us teenagers wonder what now. Summer is the time to take a break from the stresses of school, relax in the sun, and enjoy being a teenager. Although it’s fun to be a couch potato every once in a while during the summer months, it’s very easy to let the time slip away. Why not do something productive? It doesn’t have to be anything extraordinary, just something to get you off of the couch, outside, or with your friends. Maybe you could apply for a job. Perhaps you and your friends could plan a camping trip (don’t forget the marshmallows). Maybe you could even volunteer your time at a local soup kitchen or an animal shelter. This summer, just remember to be safe and have fun!

Sleepy students Sam Messenger and Halie Craft Staff Reporters Work, hanging in town, going to movies, staying up late, not getting home until one or two in the morning and then getting back up at six AM to go to school; the life of a teenager. Many students try to make up sleep during class. According to about.com “teenagers need at least 9.5 hours of sleep every night to repair cells, release hormones and strengthen the immune system,” however, many teenagers find it difficult to get the sleep they need. Teenagers who lack sleep can develop insomnia, the ability to not fall asleep. This, in turn, causes students to have trouble staying awake during school. A lot of teachers have students who try to nap during class. Mrs. Turose-Gaddy, a M-CHS teacher was asked, “Do you have a lot of students who sleep in class?” Her response was, “Yes, especially in the morning.” Not all teachers have the same problem with students sleeping in class. “Students sleep in class when they are sick,” says Greg Havran, another teacher at M-CHS. After asking both teachers what percent of students sleep in class, they both estimated about ten percent. “Teachers have to talk to their students for sleeping in

Panther Press 2010-2011 Staff & Information “Acting” Editor-In-Chief & Managing Editor Mrs. McVicker

Business Managers Krissey Gonzales Emily Crouch

Staff Reporters Caleb Branson Halie Craft Josh Maes Gina Martin Sam Messinger Christina Stevens

A huge thanks to Abby Lock and Tara Abrams for volunteering to help with this months’ student edits!

class,” Mrs. Gaddy said, “but usually I only have to tell them once.” “More students seem to sleep in the afternoon,” Mr. Havran said. Students can’t seem to keep their head up when teachers are at the board or if they’re watching a movie in class. “I don’t show movies and when I am going over the lesson they usually listen after I ask them,” Gaddy said. “Students sleep more when I am talking,” Havran said. When students sleep in class, do they do it for fun or is it because they are tired? “Most of the time I sleep in class,” Autumn More, a 9th grader at M-CHS, said. When another M-CHS student was asked “Do you sleep in class?” the response from Tara Terwilliger, a 10th grader, was “Yes I do. It’s fun.” Amanda Atkission’s response was, “Yes I do.” All students

have a time of day when they find it is the right time to sleep. Terwilliger and Atkinson, said, “The beginning of the day is when I sleep in class.” Everyone has classes they prefer to sleep in. “I sleep in all of them,” Autumn and Atkission said. It all comes down to students sleeping in class, instead of focusing on what is important. Solutions to help prevent teenagers from falling asleep during class is not drinking caffeine before bedtime and going to sleep earlier.

Want to advertise with the Panther Press? Call Krissey Gonzales or Emily Crouch at

(970) 565 - 3722 Ext. 148 preferably between 2:00 and 3:00 p.m. Monday Through Thursday Contact us at: Montezuma-Cortez High School Attn: Panther Press (Deb McVicker) 206 W. 7th St., Cortez, CO 81321

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“Cheer practice” -Zoe Nutt, Freshman

“Tennis & not going to school” -Todd Underwood, Freshman

Opinion

a n t h e r

P r e s s

The M-CHS Panther Press is an open forum which operates RE-1 district policy. The RE-1 school district, board,

under

and staff are not responsible for the information and opinions expressed in the

The Panther Press invites your letters, comments, and questions. Letters will be edited on the basis of content and conciseness.

Panther Press. pantherpress @cortez.k12.co.us dmcvicker@cortez.k12.co.us 970-565-3722x148


Press 06Panther M 2011

Sports/Clubs

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FFA Career Development Event

Final scores Caleb Branson Photographer

Girl’s Varsity Soccer Opponent

Score

W/L

Durango 5/5/11

3-1

L

Grand Junction 4/23/11

4-0

W

Ridgeway 4/19/11

2-0

W

Durango 4/12/11

0-4

L

Fruita 3/19/11

0-2

L

Montrose 3/18/11

0-1

L

Josh Maes Staff Reporter On May 2nd and 3rd members of the M-CHS FFA (Future Farmers of America) club competed in the state Career Development Event. The M-CHS FFA club took five teams to state this year in competitions of floriculture, agriculture sales, horse evaluation, meats evaluation, and livestock evaluation. Each of these events help students develop critical thinking abilities, excellent communication skills, and the means to compete in a competitive job market. Only 45 percent of those competing win bronze, silver, or gold awards. Of this 45 percent, 15 percent of the award winners placed in the bronze division, 15 percent in the silver division, and 15 percent in the gold division. Contestants are awarded both individually and as a team. Several M-CHS students were awarded in their categories. Below are the award winners.

Event Meat Judging

Award Bronze

Horse Evaluation

Gold

Horse Evaluation

Silver

Floriculture Floriculture

Silver Bronze

Student/Team receiving award Ryan Daves Staton Jeter Liz Hoch Shandra Fitchett Team Sammi Fish Lacey Jones Liz Hoch Shandra Fitchett Laura Heaton Team Chantz Koskie Savannah Simmons Laura Heaton

Career Pathways Revamp 2011-12

Baseball

Ed Rice Career & Technical Education Director

Opponent

Score

W/L

Grand Junction 4/30/11

3-11

L

Grand Junction Central 4/29/11

9-10

L

Fruita 4/23/11

10-3

L

Grand Junction Central 4/9/11

27-17

L

Fruita 4/1/11

8-11

W

Dolores 3/24/11

14-8

W

San Juan 3/18/11

7-14

W

Girl’s Tennis

M-CHS is presenting a proposal to revamp the Career Pathways class time next year. Each teacher would have a Career Pathway group on Tuesday and Wednesdays structured by grade, as it is now, with content lessons provided emphasizing ICAPS (Individual Career & Academic Plan), College In Colorado, Workforce Readiness, and Presenters. The objectives to this proposal are 1) Reduce the amount of student travel during CP on Mondays and Thursdays, 2) Incorporate RTI, ELL and Enrichments into the CP tutorial time, and 3) Increase the CP time to 45 minutes daily. Each teacher would have a separate group of students on Mondays and Thursdays for Academic Support time based on incorporating RTI, ELL and Enrichments. During this time, students would be screened based on CSAP and MAPS and placed into targeted intervention groups with a specific teacher for that specific targeted standards basic skill deficiency. At the 9th grade level the emphasis will be in Math and English because this is where the biggest slide towards dropping out occurs. As support is added (especially through monitored programs like Success Maker, Study Island, etc.) other targeted needs areas will be added. Students who do not present an RTI/ELL/Behavioral need would be allowed to go into enrichment mini classes or to a monitored study hall. Academic Support on Mondays and Thursday would be fluid (within 9 week blocks at a minimum) based on student mastery of specific skill sets and will be monitored with data. Teachers could create mini enrichment classes individually or in teams that could run for 9 weeks or 18 weeks. These classes could range from fine arts, sports teams enhancement, college preparation, mentoring and at the Senior level with basic requirements met, a monitored release time. Teachers who teach an enrichment or have an intervention group for Academic Support will have a 9 week block of release prep time at some point during the year to compensate for the extra work. Teachers can elect to supervise a study hall without the release time. All the students would be assigned a specific place to be each day during CP (T/W) and AS (M/TH).

Opponent

Score

W/L

Attendance would be taken every day under two class designations in Power School.

Grand Junction 4/22/11

0-7

L

Both CP and AS would change to a graded class- not Pass/Fail.

Durango 3/22/11

6-1

W

Comments, ideas, feedback:

senglehart@cortez.k12.co.us erice@cortez.k12.co.us mvanevery@cortez.k12.co.us asalk@cortez.k12.co.us rharriman@cortez.k12.co.us


Panther Press

May 2011

Senior Pullout

MCHS Students Future Destinations

07

Caleb Branson Photographer

Kayla Acott

Maya Lindgren

Brian Grubbs Isabella Vanderheiden

Jordan Saunders

Students Attending college in Colorado

Students attending Students Attending college in New Mexico college in Arizona

Accepted but not confirmed

Cory Adams Sierra Atkins Gina Bartolino Jesse Carey Max Demby Jessica Dorenkamp Kyle Foster Nichole Franco Vanessa Gallegos Patrick Geisinger Ryan Haley Amber Laner Michelle Leonard Rowtinya Marshall Deirdre McAlister Jennifer McDonald Clarissa McNamara Sarah Miller Karlee Montgomery Franky Quinonez Kealy Rich Jordan Rodgers Taylor Rucker Dustin Ruckman Veronica Shaner Savannah Simmons Kodie Sirois Eric Sprague Victoria Stevens Jordan Valdez Brittani Watkins Cody Wells Josh Whyte Andrew James Wynes

Kaelee Allmon Ashia Baloo Cheyene Begay Kayla Cotter Keadrick Kingery Phillip Staton Marford Jack Powers

Chris Black Patrick Cottam-Rhine Justin Doyel Jessica Gonzales Jordan Hanold Dakota Kibel Brittany Kimmel Terry Knight Quinton Lanier Maeselle Lapaz Tyler Largo Lorisa Miller Jasmine Ramsey Graham Robinson Katelyn Robinson Maggie Sheeran Cheyenna Sherlock Wilbert Slowman Cody Sprague James Sprague Jack Treinen Alia Trice Christopher Vanik

Planning, or enlisted in the military Alex Atkisson Roy Baldwin Wynonna Begaye Christan Burnham Letryraial Cly Michael David Shandine John Quinton Lanier Darren Sage Peter Schmalz Austin Short Isaac Sitton Collin Stewart

Mariah Baker Julianna Blackburn Amber Eavenson Kiley Lightenbuger Maley Muzzy Amber Nolan Emily Peterson Mikeeta Villanueva Bradey Yates


Press 08Panther M 2011

Senior S

Seniors 2011

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We asked the M-CHS class of 2011 what was th their biggest high school regre Michelle Leonard

Christian Johnson

Sara Gray

Maurice Battle

Kelsie Killingbeck

Zachary Smouse

Kaylisha Cotonuts

Madaline Hatch

Max Demby

Joshua Whyte

Letyraial Cly

Christopher Vanik

Dalton Daves

Mikeeta Villanueva

Aisha Baloo

Quinton Lanier

Shae Green

Best- “Being with my friends.” Worst- “Not trying harder.”

Jordan Valdez Best- “Getting fifth at Tennis Re Worst- “Not being able to go th game.”

Kodie Sirois

Tiffany Shorty

Wilbert Slowman

Cristy Reyes

Rowtinya Marshall

Sierra Atkins

Benjamin Dukeminier

Bradey Yates

Jasmine Ramsey

Best- “High school soccer.” Worst- “Not taking my grades more seriously.”

Best- “The laughs.” Worst- “The failure.”

Best- “Coming back to school to graduate, and also playing football Best- “My favorite memory of high school was being in the front with my friends.” around all my amazing friends.” Worst- “My biggest high school regret is dropping out last year.” Worst- “I have no regrets about high school.”

Best- “Falling down the bleachers on the first day of school junior year.” Worst- “Not doing enough school activities.”

Best- “My favorite memory was placing second in state for the marching band season.” Worst-“Biggest regret is not working hard my freshman year.”

Best- “All of the FFA trips we went on.” Worst- “I don’t have any regrets.”

Best- “Playing football.” Worst- “I don’t have any regrets.”

Best- “My favorite memory was the day when my friends Cristy, Routunya and I dressed up for Powder Puff.” Worst- “My biggest regret is not being open with things since my freshman year and being more involved in activities and clubs.”

Best- “Freshman year, my best friend and I were walking to class after lunch and a really tall guy was walking behind us and stepped on the back of my friends dress shoe and broke it. So we went to Mr. Howey’s class and asked of he had any string, and he said he didn’t have any he only had paper clips. So she had to use the paper clips t fix her shoe . I wanted to help but I was laughing so hard I was crying my eyes out! Mr. Howey gave us a face that said “really your fixing your shoe with paper clips?” ahhh good times good times .” Worst- “Not being open to new things and people since freshman year.”

Best- “I’ll let you know when it happens.” Worst- “Lowering my standards for the school.”

Best- “My favorite high school memory is meeting new friends.” Worst- “My biggest regret is not going to prom.”

Best- “Prom was the best memory, but I think home coming was my favorite with all the fun events,” Worst- “Taking American Government and AP English IV until the last semester, I should have taken it last summer,”

Best- “Getting second place at state for marching band.” Worst- n/a

Best- “Hanging out with my friends, doing what we do best: Play basketball and pick on our teachers such as Ms. Ray! Lol :) Worst- “Missing school, getting behind in class, failing a class,”

Best- “Freshman year, it was lunch time and we had red fruit jello. One of my friends was eating it and a piece had come out of her mouth. Then me and my other friend started laughing and we had let go some pieces of jello as well. So there was jello all over the table. It was sooooo funny!!!” Worst- “Not taking Chamber Choir my first semester of freshman year. I missed out on some awesome and fun experiences. “

Best- “Too many to choose from.” Worst- “None.”

Best- “Playing in the All-State B Worst- “Not playing soccer my

Best- ‘Last year when I walked bly on Feb. 16th I felt really pum Worst- “I don’t have any regret

Best- “My favorite high school sports with friends,” Worst- “I regret not trying hard freshmen”

Bset- “The summer programs I NASA JSC was a really cool exp will remember forever.” Worst- “Regrets? I have none! to dwell on the past!”

Best- “Laughing with Chassity i ment.” Worst- “Being lazy and procras

Best- “I have many favorite hig and the grate ones are the one friends,” Worst- “My greatest high schoo up in the class that I should no

Best- “My favorite high school those from my years in marchin memories compare to those I h ous trips we took over my four Worst- “My biggest high schoo having planned my years to my having to leave band behind up

Best- “My senior year dancing game.” Worst- “Procrastinating way to


Sign-Off

Panther Press

Seniors 2011

09

Emily Crouch & Gina Martin Business Manager & Staff Reporter

heir favorite high school memory and what was et. These were their responses:

Band this year.” freshman year.”

d during an assemumped,” ts”

Jennifer McDonald

Michael David

Clarissa Mae McNamara

Patrick Cottam- Rhine

Kayla Acott

Garret Tucker

Hannah Vandevoorde

Jessica Gonzalez

Collin Stewart

Shane Nelson

Katelyn Robinson

Chassity Schenally

Aaron Johnson

Ryan Haley

Maley Muzzy

Kaelee Allmon

Angelita Tophaha

Stevi Larue

Brandon Brady

Terry Knight

Wrangler Hinton

Cody Wells

Brittani Watkins

Best- “My favorite high school memory is the variety of classes I took, photography is great and Physics is awesome!” Worst- “My biggest high school regret is not starting the Character Council essay contest sooner its fun, plus you can make lots of money!”

CLASS OF 2011

Jesse Carey

Heidi Wright

Anthony Gonzales

Best- “Hanging out with my friends during lunch” Worst- “Waiting too long to do things”

Best- “Freshmen year, abusing Ben Dukeminer with a waffle bat,” Worst- “I would rather not say,”

memory is playing Best- “Getting all state athlete varsity softball sophomore year.” der in class as a Worst- “Not playing softball my senior year,”

I was a part of. perience, and one i Life goes too fast

in Navajo Govern-

stinating all year.”

egionals.” he last Durango

Best- “My best memory was when me and Austin got kicked out of the parking lot for parking on the hill behind the aux gym.” Worst- “I regret not living it to the fullest.”

Best- “Playing basketball with friends.” Worse- “Failing a class.”

Best- “Senior homecoming, powderpuff.” Worst- “Sleeping in class.”

gh school memories Best- “My favorite high school memory is es that I spent with playing baseball and beating Montrose,” Worst- ‘My biggest high school regret is ol regret is giving not putting all I could into school,” ot have.”

memories are ng band. No other have from the varir years in band.” ol regrets are not y advantage, and pon my graduation.

for the Durango

oo much.”

Best- “My favorite high school memory was hanging out with my awesome buddies with the confidence and all powerful wisdom every senior seems to have.” Worst- “My biggest regret is getting injured and not being able to compete in my final year of high school track.”

Best- “Visiting Washington D.C. with the band.” Worst- “General lack of effort.”

Best- “Last year water balloon fight” Worst- “Not playing football my junior year,”

Best- “The time my teacher thought I was suicidal and I got called to the “Counseling” office” Worst- “Leaving Anne Keller”

Best- “My favorite high school memory was the four years of volleyball,” Worst- “Didn’t try my best,”

Best- “the first day of school when my friend Kay fell down the stairs! Ha ha” Worst- “Losing friends.”

Best- “My sports games” Worst- “I don’t have any”

Best- “Getting saved’ Worst- “Didn’t try as hard as I should have”

Best- “playing guitar for jazz band.” Worst- “I have none.”

Best- “Fetal pig Dissection in biology” Worst- “Procrastination”

Best- “2010 New Years Eve.” Worst- “Missing so much school.”

Best- “Senior ditch day as a junior going to the lake and ditching with all the seniors,” Worst- “Didn’t play football all for years of high school,”

Best- “Deffinately all the good times I had with my friends.” Worst- “None.”

Best-“Friends.” Worst- “Slacking.”

Best- “Being with my friends,” Worst- “Not being more out going,”

Best- “Volleyball trips” Worst- “Quitting Volleyball,”

Best- “My favorite memory was probably playing football.” Worst- “Not doing my work.”

Best- “Hanging with friends,” Worst- “Screwing around so much,”

David Burch / courtesy photo


Press 10Panther M 2011

Senior Pullout

ay

Emily Peterson Best- “The ten days in France and Spain.” Worst- “Slacking my freshman and sophomore years, it killed my GPA.”

Alivia Whiteskunk Best- “Senior year, best game of my high school years. Points  Basketball Varsity.” Worst- “High school wasn’t about regrets…. But the most memorable experiences.”

Carlos Beltran Best- “My favorite high school memory was watching my classmate Zack Smouse walk in the gym.” Worst- “I have no high school regrets.”

Danelle Lopez Best- “The dance team.” Worst- “I don’t have any.”

Jack Powers Best- “The Durango soccer game senior year.” Worst- “Not running cross country.”

Graham Robinson Best- “It’ll be when I graduate.” Worst- “Not jumping through more hoops.”

Keadrick Kingery Best- “This year’s home coming game.” Worst- “Having a girlfriend during my senior year football season.”

Patrick Jacket Best- “Playing my first varsity football game.” Worst-“Not doing my work.”

Jamila George Best- “Home coming week! =D” Worst- “Not taking high school serious freshman and sophomore year!”

Tanae Watkins Best- “Marching band.” Worst- “I don’t have any regrets.” Dakota Kibel “Squatting pounds and making the 1000 pound club.” “Procrastinating too much on school work.”

Taylor Rucker Best- “Marching band.” Worst- “Not taking more difficult classes.” Ysaline Spacy “I have so many good memories! I loved taking art classes and choir.” “I don’t think I have any regrets.”

Adam Burris Best- “The band, choir, and soccer trips.” Worst- “Not getting more scholarships.” Christina Warren “Coming in high school and learning new things and meeting new people.” “Meeting some people and slacking off.”

The 2010-2011 school year is almost over, and we are going to miss our seniors very much. They worked very hard to get where they are now and we want to congratulate them on all of their hard work. Graduation will be held May 26 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Panther Stadium.

Class Colors: Hot pink and Lime green. Class Motto: “Life’s not the breaths you take but the moments that take your breath away.” -George Strait

Class Song: “Never Gonna Give You Up.” by Rick Astley Class Flower: Lily.


Teacher’s week

Panther Press

News

Ties for #4

11

Emily Crouch Business Manager

The week of May 2- May 6 was teacher appreciation week, and to honor this we asked 70 M-CHS seniors who’s their most influential teacher at M-CHS. Out of all the teachers, there were 27 mentioned as the “Most influential” teacher. Mrs. Harriman came in 1st place with 19% of the seniors’ votes, Mr. Harriman came in 2nd with 10% of the votes, Mrs. Kline came in 3rd with 9%, and Mrs. Broesma, Mrs. Love, Mr. Chandler, Mr. Rithaller, and Mrs. Casey all tied for 4th, each getting 4% of the votes. Some of the other teachers mentioned include: Mrs. Ramos, Mrs. Mason, Mr. McComb, Mr. Gerlach, Mr. Koops, Mrs. Wisenbaker, Mrs. Ray, Mrs. Mott, Mr. Gordon, Mrs. Engleheart, Mrs. Gaddy, Mr. Russel, Mrs. Palko, Mrs. Louis, Mr. Walton, Mrs. Linda Brewer, Mrs. Belden, Mrs. Lytle, and Mrs. Keller.

What influenced you to become a teacher...

#1 I have a passion for ART! The discipline

of art is an amazing adventure to share with my students. -Deborah Harriman

#2 I love kids and it’s very challenging.

it’s something new everyday. I really think it is a noble profession. The money was too good to pass up too ;) -Raymond Harriman

#3 My husband was a math teacher here for 21 years. I thought he was such a great teacher and I wanted to imitate him. -Jeanne Kline

I have actually been teaching since I was in high school. My dad was a preacher and my mom was a teacher, so it just came natural to have the gift of loving to talk. -Sarah Broersma

My mom was the best teacher I know and such an awesome role model. It’s something I always knew i would do. -Betty Love

It was an alternative path to get to medical school. -Eric Chandler

Just the joy of seeing a student finally obtain their potiential. -Rodney Ritthaler

I was not interested in a regular 9 to 5 job and ultimately grew into a love and passion for teaching. -Tom Casey


Press 12Panther M 2011

News

ay

Last week of 2010-2011 school year Mon, May 23

Wed, May 25

All Day 8AM Senior Grades Deadline for Teachers 8:30 AM – 9:00 AM M-CHS Administration/Counselors Meeting in CCR 9:12 AM – 9:44 AM Peer Mentoring in room 607 during Career Pathways 11:45 AM – 12:15 PM Native American Club Meeting in room 616 3:35 PM – 4:35 PM After School Tutoring Available to all students in room 116 and Math Tutoring, open to any student, in room 304 with Mr. Tryon 3:35 PM – 4:35 PM English Tutoring, open to any student, in room 309 with Ms. Martucci 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Academic, Athletic & Activity Award Night in the Auditorium 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Basketball Open Gym in the M-CHS Main Gym

All Day CP Teachers distribute checkout forms to the Juniors, Sophomores and Freshman All Day FINALS Period 1 & 3 / 1st Semester Checkout 11th at 9:12AM / 10th at 11:00AM / 9th at 3:00PM 11:30 AM – 12:15 PM Power Lunch!!! 3:35 PM – 4:35 PM After School Tutoring Available to all students in room 116 and Math Tutoring, open to any student, in room 304 with Mr. Tryon 3:50 PM – 4:50 PM Leadership Team Meeting in Library 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM Baccalaureate in the M-CHS Auditorium (Band Performance) 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Basketball Open Gym in the M-CHS Main Gym

Tue, May 24 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Principal’s Meetings at the District Office 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM Senior Picnic at PDV 3:35 PM – 4:35 PM After School Tutoring Available to all students in room 116 and Math Tutoring, open to any student, in room 304 with Mr. Tryon 3:35 PM – 4:35 PM English Tutoring, open to any student, in room 309 with Ms. Martucci 7:00 PM – 9:30 PM School Board Meeting at Downey

Thu, May 26 All Day FINALS Period 2 & 4 / 2nd Semester Checkout 11th at 8:30AM / 10th at 9:12AM / 9th at 1:20PM 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM Grad Practice at Panther Field - Rime Out 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM Graduation at Panther Field

Fri, May 27 - Last Day of School All Day Final Student Checkout - Last Day of School – Special Bell Schedule/ Half Day – Busses run at 12PM / End of 4th quarter - end of 2nd Semester Robinson Out 12:15 PM – 12:30 PM M-CHS Staff Meeting in Library 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM All District Staff Celebration Hamburger Cookout on the Calkins Building Lawn Co-Sponsored by RE-1 and CEA 1:30-4:00PM Staff Checkout w/ Ramsey

Calendar proposals for 2011-2012 votes are in board approval scheduled for May 24th Samantha Messinger Staff Reporter

The Montezuma-Cortez School District RE-1 posted both of these school year calendars online for staff to review and cast their vote. The results will be determined at a May 24th board meeting. Both schedules were developed from a

previous survey asking M-CHS staff for their input. One of these two schedules will be adopted.

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Panther Press

Band and Choir Large Group Competition

Sports/Clubs

13

Josh Maes & Caleb Branson Staff Reportrers

On Tuesday, April 26th three groups from M-CHS performed in the CHSAA Large Group Music Festival:  the Advanced Symphonic Winds, the Concert Choir and the Chamber Choir. Each band performed in the gym and the choir on stage in the auditorium.  There were no announcements or bells and students were released in time for warm ups. The band and choirs were scored on a scale of 1-5, 1 being a superior and 5 being unprepared. The Advanced Symphonic Winds warms up at 8 a.m. and performed at 8:30 in the Gym. The Chamber Choir warms up at 9:15 and performed at 9:40 in the auditorium. The Concert Choir warms up at 11:00 and performed at 11:25 in the auditorium. Concert Band has done exceptionally well this season, with getting superior ratings in the NWNMMEA festival, and the CHSAA large group festival. The symphonic winds ensemble has had one of the best years in recent memory. After such an amazing year on stage Mr. Ritthaler states, “Well, I’m very pleased with our performances this year.” Although the band had some trouble in Grand Junction, with a score of one 1 and two 2’s, the band came back and had their best performance. “So far Kirtland was musically the best performance,” Ritthaler said, “We were only one of three bands to get a superior rating at the NWNMMEA.” With such a good year, the band hopes to keep the tradition going. “I just strive for the best music production next year. I have no opinion of the upcoming freshmen yet, but with my end of the year evaluation I do at the middle school and band camp, I will have a better idea of our needs,” Ritthaler states. The Concert Choir performed two pieces and Chamber Choir performed three for the festival. “Chamber Choir did ‘Shenandoah,’ a Renaissance piece called “Fyre Fyre,” and ‘I’m Gonna Rise.’ Concert Choir sang ‘Windy’ and ‘Save the Last Dance,’” Choir Director Marla Sitton said. Both choirs, directed by Marla Sitton, have practiced over the past few months to prepare for the competition. The choir students felt they practiced many hours. “So much, like a lot, possibly all the time…. maybe,” Junior James Liska said. The choir got an overall score of 2 at the festival. Sitton was happy with both of the choirs’ performances. “I thought both choirs worked very hard. I was pleased with their performances,” Sitton said. Huge thanks goes to Marla Sitton and Rodney Ritthaler for organizing this event.

The Booster Club celebrates athletics Samantha Messinger Staff Reporter

The M-CHS booster club held a spring sports event on April 28th, sponsored by the Booster Club and the spring sports coaches. The spring sports athletes and several parents, along with Gordon Shepherd, the M-CHS principal, and Stacey Houser, the school district superintendent, attended the event as well. The guests had a load of fun, and kept their stomachs full with hot dogs, chips, and soda, provided by the booster club, and cookies which were donated by the volleyball team and several parents. Also, a big thanks goes to Elsie Walck, who provided the event with fresh fry bread. “The big kick-off went really well. It was nice to watch the new booster club mirror be donated,” Debra Ramsey said. The M-CHS booster club, the Hinton family and the Deane Hinton Memorial fund assisted with the cost for a large mirror. The mirror, which has the M-CHS logo, “Athletes,” across the front and a picture of Mrs. Hinton on it, will be hung in the commons by the kitchen doors. The next big event will most likely be the 3rd annual homecoming bonfire.

People enjoying food during the M-CHS Booster Club event.

The Mirror has been given to the school.


Press 14Panther M 2011

News

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Politics & Teens Gina Martin, Staff Reporter

Young adults are becoming more interested and involved in politics. In the 2004 presidential election, the turnout for voters ages 18 to 24 was 11 percent higher than in the 2000 election. Even people below the voting age are becoming more interested. (pbs.org) The youth of today are the voters of tomorrow, as well as the local officials, congressmen, senators, and president. When adult leaders make decisions that are going to affect teens, the teens should be asked for their input. While teens care about who is running our country, they don’t always feel that their opinion is wanted or useful. They want to be informed and involved in the decision-making process. Teens are creative and oftentimes come up with ideas that no one has even considered before, yet political parties have hardly tapped the enormous pool of resources that youth represent. Sometimes it may seem like all teenagers care about are clothes and music, but that may not be so. Many teenagers are deeply interested in the world around them as they prepare to enter the real world. They are interested in current events for teens. Even though teenagers cannot vote, many are very interested in politics. Many schools have clubs for ‘Young Republicans’ and ‘Young Democrats’. Teenagers can help with campaigns by passing out literature, making phone calls, and putting up signs. Teens typically want to read about politics, because it affects their future. (EzineArticles.com) Teenagers can get involved in politics in many ways. There are political clubs and organizations that are made specifically for teens. Information about these clubs can be found by contacting the local library or talking to a school guidance counselor. Another way is sharing opinions and points of view with others. Teens love Facebook and other social networks which are great places to express one’s views. Visit the website ypa.org to get involved. The site is operated by a group called Young Politicians of America. A teen can become a member for free. There are also online newspapers and meetings. If there are no meetings nearby, start a group. It is a great way to interact and communicate with other teens who are involved in politics. It is a great way to speak out!

Budget cuts From Page 1 Gina Martin, Staff Reporter

When asking M-CHS principal, Gordon Shepherd, “Do you think budget cuts will affect the way our students learn and what they want in the future?” His reply was, “If student learning is affected by larger classes and fewer options then I would say, yes, this will have an impact. We will continue to work with giving our teachers the support needed for them to be effective in their classrooms. Students may be inclined to look for their educational needs beyond the walls of our building more so than before. Online courses and PCC classes may be more in demand than they would be otherwise.” In Montezuma County, the greatest cuts will occur at the high school. When asked, “Why do you think our school is being cut so much money?” Mr. Shepherd responded, “Our share of the reduction seems larger in part because we have the largest student and staff population of the schools in our district. The amount of school support we receive is based, in part, upon the number of students enrolled in our district. When this sum is reduced then it is apparent why our school district is facing the

situation we are now in. Furthermore, these reductions are impacting every public school in our state – meaning that schools all over Colorado are forced to make very difficult decisions about how they can continue to provide a high quality education for their students. Our story is being played out all over the state.” Stacy Houser, District Superintendent, adds, "The budget cuts make it very difficult for students to be afforded the same or better level of educational opportunities that they’ve experienced in the past. Students in Cortez, and every community in Colorado, will be impacted by next year’s budget cuts. One issue that has not been adequately addressed is how Amendment 23 of the Colorado Constitution was bypassed by the governor and legislature." Many surrounding states suffer the same grief. Albuquerque Public Schools will endure a 22 million dollar budget cut. (newmexicoindependent.com) 8.1 million from the Arizona Department of Education. (azcentral. com) Utah prevailed to keep public education nearly unharmed. (deseretnews.com) It will be interesting to see how this pans out next year. With support from administration, students and staff shall keep their heads up and function to the best of their ability!

MAPs

From Page 1 Christina Stevens, Staff Reporter

The Reading MAPs test consists of 42 questions, ranging from a few sentences to questions that are about a page long. M-CHS students take the test during the 72 minutes C.P. class. This did not leave enough time for many students to finish. "I don’t think 72 minutes is enough time for 42 questions," said Kelli Reder, an M-CHS fashion and food sciences teacher. From a student’s point of view, when asked if they had enough time, their response was: "No, I felt rushed and pressured to get the test done on time," said Jordan Miller, an M-CHS freshman. M-CHS students aren’t very fond of the daily schedule during MAPs testing and want it to end. This is the first year students took the MAPs test during C.P. In past years, the MAPs tests were taken during normal class time. Math MAPS tests were taken during Math class and reading MAPs test was taken during English class. The block schedule creates a problem since students don’t always take Math or English in the same semester. MAPS test is required three times a year: the fall, winter and once again in the spring. M-CHS gave this new schedule a try, but it didn't make people happy. "It’s lame, I wish I had more time for lunch, and I wish this didn’t have to go on Thursdays," said Leander Rockwell, an M-CHS freshman. For those who don’t know what MAPS testing is, it is a test that measures your academic progress, as said in the name "MAP". Most students were told that their score results would determine if they need to be put into remedial classes because they are not performing on grade level. Mrs. Angi Sauk, our RTI coordinator, gives the rational for MAPs testing from an administrative perspective: “MAPs testing, along with CSAP assess students on their knowledge of the standards that the state requires all schools to teach. MAPs is given 3 times a year and allows teachers to see what growth is being made by students. If enough growth isn’t being made in certain standards, teachers can alter how much time they are spending on specific standards to help their students. Or, a referral to RTI (Response to Intervention) may be made if students are not making progress. Since CSAP is given once a year and the results aren’t reported immediately we need another assessment to give us more immediate feedback that teachers can use in their classroom. Tests serve various purposes. Some are formative and others are summative. Teachers use the information from the different types of tests in different ways”.


Proms of the past... Krissey Gonzales Business Manager/Staff Reporter

Mrs. TuroseGaddy Best: Being able to go to the prom with a group of my best friends and spending the weekend at Cedar Point Amusement park. Worst: Having to sit with my best friend because she was upset her boyfriend broke up with her at prom.

Ever wonder what your teachers looked like at prom...

Panther Press

Book or Phone?

Ms Copeland Best: After prom hanging out with my girlfriends. Worst: My date! He left with a different guy than I came with.

Mrs. Livingston Best: I was crowned Prom Queen and Prom King was Sam Jarrett; He was a high school friend and he is still a good friend. Worst: Prom was held in this gym, at it was so big as compared to the gym at CMS.

Mrs. Ramsey Best: I got to wear a metallic dress and it was really shiny. Worst: We had dinner in senior

Ms Carriger Best: Being asked to prom by the guy I’d had a crush on for, like, EVER! Worst: My freshman prom I was doubled over in the bathroom for half the nigt because my stomach hurt so bad. I found out a couple days later I had an ulcer. Mrs. PalkoHerrera Best:After prom 3-4 a.m. I drove us as far as I could to beat the sunrise at Lookout Mountain. Worst: My senior class was almost 900 students crammed all into a room the size of the aux. gym.

15

Reconsider your answer! Gina Martin Staff Reporter

At sometime in our life we have all asked the question: is technology taking over our lives? It is a proven fact that reading is good for your health. However, that doesn’t involve reading your text messages, it means reading an actual book. A nationwide survey was commissioned by the National Year of Reading to explore the importance of reading in everyday life. This confirmed that reading can have real benefits for your health, as well as for your social circumstances, with 86% of responders confident that reading improves their mood. (science20. com) “Well there are different purposes, I don’t think reading your phone really improves your reading. Reading graphic novels or anything besides your phone improves your reading and writing,” said Janet Lytle, M-CHS science teacher. When we hear that reading is 'good for us' we may assume that this is because it helps our education. Research says that reading for pleasure can raise your spirits, offer an escape from everyday stress, help you empathize with other people AND keeps the brain ticking. Reaching for a favorite magazine or book could very well be good for your health. Many students think of reading as a burden and a waste of time. However, if you find the right book, you might just experience an exciting journey. “Reading is important and I think any kind of reading helps, but reading electronics can play with your eyes more. Reading

isgood and you’re still using your brain while reading anything,” says Melanie Rime, M-CHS English teacher. Reading helps improve brain functions, mood, reading and writing skills, and it’s also a good time consumer if you’re bored and have nothing else to do. Reading could also be a good hobby. Reading makes your brain want to work and it improves your thinking ability and writing skills. It may seem boring, but it’s good for your body. “Reading is important because it is one of the subjects people struggle in most, and if they read it could help a lot and not just reading your phone. Text message language is much more primitive compared to the language used in books,” said Bradey Yates, M-CHS senior. Reading is an active mental process – Unlike TV, books make you use your brain. By reading, you think more and become smarter. It is a fundamental skill builder - Every topic on the planet has a matching book to go with it. Why? Because books help clarify difficult subjects. Books provide information that goes deeper than just classroom discussion. (persistenceunlimited.com) By reading more books, you become better informed and more of an expert on the topics you read about. This expertise translates into higher self esteem and expanded vocabulary. When you become well-read, people look to you for answers. The feelings you have about yourself can only get better.

If you find the right book, you might just experience an exciting journey.

Mrs. Walk Best: I was never allowed to go because my dad, but I was nominated for royalty so I could go. Worst: I didn’t know how to dance!!

Lifestyles


Press 16Panther M 2011

Special Feature

ay

Montezuma-Cortez High School would like to thank all guest speakers who came and discussed their occupations during Career Pathways Class

Career Pathways Presenters Shilo’s Peaks to Plains Hay Co. Skanska Chamber of Commerce Division of Wildlife Let it Grow Madison House Natural Resources Conservation Services 4 Corners Financial KRTZ Southwest Memorial Hospital Century 21 Real Estate Montezuma County Partners Steve Keetch Vista Mesa South West Workforce Keesee Motors Southwest Colorado Community College Mithell Toms United States Army Susan Likes-Accountant Training Advantage Central Implement Sky Art Southwest Bank Cortez Police Mike Green-Attorney Mancos Valley Bank Aspen Ridge Ins. Cortez Journal Seas’nings Catering Hairs to You Fraley Co. Slavens Frank Lucero

Great Lakes Aviation Tuffy Products Guy Drew Vineyard Montelores Dental Marty McKean-Veterinarian-retired Dave McCusky-Pilot-retired United States Marines Land Title Citizens State Bank of Cortez City of Cortez Montezuma Veterinarian Outdoor Connection Walgreens Pharmacy Atmos Energy Montezuma County Sherriff’s Office Remax Exponential Engineering Ertel Funeral Home Tom Vaughn-Retired BLM First National Bank City Market IFA Dr. Haspals-retired, Dentist United States Postal Service SW Statistical Cortez Recreation Department Colorado State Patrol United States Navy Mont. County Assessor Empire Electric Colorado State Parks Mike McAndrew RBS Construction SOS Staffing Geisinger Feeds

Vibrant Animal Hospital Mont. County Jail Cortez Auto Muscanell Millworks Steve Chappell-County Commissioner Premier Weed Pepperhead Restaurant Vectra Mortgage Al Struass Dolores State Bank Cortez Cultural Center White Eagle Inn Eric Rayburn Insurance Colorado State University Extension Diamond D Processing Judds Custom Cues Love Appraisals Mountain Chiropractic D.L. Services Fire Department Sam Jarvis Ins. Kokopelli Bike and Board Alpine Security Dave Nolton-Engineer Lincoln College Crow Canyon Jon Callender-College Professor United States Air Force Western New Mexico University Wendy Weygandt-Horse Trainer Wyoming Technical College Universal Technical Institute Westward College Audio Box

M-CHS would also like to thank the following businesses for hosting student interns Southwest Memorial Hospital Cortez Electric Height of Wellness San Juan BOCES Ute Mountain Fire & Rescue

Rhonda Allmon Dance Studio Tuffy Products Montezuma Veterinarian Montelores Dental Cortez Police Dept.

Colorado State Patrol Montezuma County Partners Cortez Fire Dept. Crow Canyon Archeological Professional Garage Door

A special thanks to

For their donations for Text Message for Lunch winners


May 2011 Panther Press  

Granduation issue

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