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November 2010

Panther The Voice of Montezuma-Cortez

Volume 11: Issue 2

High School

P r ess

Ashley Long/Panther Press

Journalism Students Place At State The M-CHS journalism students placed in several categories at the Colorado state journalism competition

Page 4

Clubs Preview Each of the clubs at MCHS is gearing up for a new year.

Pages 8&9

Teachers Part II

Golf

The new year brings ten new MCHS staff members

M-CHS golf team gets second in state.

Pages 10 & 11

Pages 12 & 13


Press 02Panther 2010

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Panther Press

Red Ribbon Week, laws prevent teen drinking and driving Swazy Baker helps with Red Ribbon Week by positing signs outside Senior Court on October 22nd. Red Ribbon Week was from October 25th to October28th.

NEWS

03

What Lies Within... November 2010 4. Journalism students places at state

5. Internet Addiction

Ashley Long/Panther Press

erance” policies showed a 20 percent STAFF REPORTER reduction of alcohol related accidents. The law works by punishing teen drivRecent events such as Stevi Larue’s ers if they have any trace of alcohol in car accident accident have launched his or her system. For instance, a speedcommunity wide concern for teen driving ticket would include a higher penalers. ty, even if it isn’t considered drunk “We are taking one day at a time,” driving. Alisa Oliver, the senior’s mother, said. Many experts say that parental U.S. teenagers are at the highest risk involvement is the of becoming anothonly way to limit the er death statistic. amount of teen fatalAccording to a ities and injuries study 2009 study related to motor conducted by the vehicles and alcohol, Centers for Disease according to the A website for Stevi Larue has been created on CaringBridge.org. Control, motor CDC. (http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/stevilarue) vehicle crashes are An obvious way Any updates on her recovery can be seen there. CaringBridge has informathe leading cause of to limit the risk of tion on where all Donations can be made and there is a forum where care U.S. teenager fatalibeing involved in an notes can be written on the site as well. ties. accident is to never Every day in step into a car with a 2009, eight teens drunken driver. were killed as a Another easy way result of motor to reduce the risk of vehicle accident being injured in a injuries. One reason vehicle is to wear a is that seatbelt use seatbelt at all times. is lowest in teen Red ribbon week drivers and passenis the largest antigers. As a whole, 20 drinking and antipercent of high drug campaign in school students the country. It has rarely or never taken hold at Mwear seatbelts, the CHS and Brandee CDC reports. Orris, an M-CHS Just by using senior, jumped at seatbelts properly, drivers and passenthe opportunity to get involved. driving in 1995, President Clinton gers can reduce the chances of perishing “I got involved because half of my signed a legislation to adopt and enforce in a motor vehicle accident by nearly biological family has been killed by a "zero tolerance" policy against teenage half. drunk drivers.” Orris said. drinking and driving. Drinking and driving is always a All states have adopted the “zero tolreckless decision, but according to Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, drinking and driving as a teen is even more dangerous. Since teens are inexperienced with both alcohol, and driving, they are more likely to crash. In 2003, 27 percent of fatally injured 16 to 20 year old drivers were intoxicated. In effort to end teenage drinking and

ABBY LOCK

Website provides updates

8-9.

Clubs

12-13. New Teachers Part II

16. Awareness Calendar

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Panther Press – 2010 - 2011 Staff & Information MANAGING EDITOR Karlee Montgomery NEWS EDITOR Darcie Biard BUSINESS MANAGER Lorisa Miller

STAFF REPORTERS Rudy Gonzales Mike Bracamonte Cheyenne Heal Krissey Gonzales Abby Lock Ashley Long Ashley Romine

WANT TO ADVERTISE WITH THE PANTHER PRESS? CALL LORISA MILLER AT (970) 565 - 3722 EXT. 148 PREFERABLY BETWEEN 2:00 AND 3:00 MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY CONTACT US AT: MONTEZUMACORTEZ HIGH SCHOOL ATTN: PANTHER PRESS (NATE THOMPSON) 206 W. 7TH ST., CORTEZ, CO 81321

THE M-CHS PANTHER PRESS IS AN OPEN FORUM WHICH OPERATES UNDER RE-1 DISTRICT POLICY. THE RE-1 SCHOOL DISTRICT, BOARD, AND STAFF ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE INFORMATION AND OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN THE PANTHER PRESS. THE PANTHER PRESS INVITES YOUR LETTERS, COMMENTS, AND QUESTIONS. LETTERS WILL BE EDITED ON THE BASIS OF CONTENT AND CONCISENESS.

pantherpress @CORTEZ.K12.CO.US nthompson @CORTEZ.K12.CO.US 970-565-3722X148


Press 04Panther N 2010

NEWS

OVEMBER

Ralstin enjoys political power CHEYENNE HEAL STAFF REPORTER

Ashley Long/Panther Press

Keegan Ralstin is thhe Freshman class presi dent. He hopes to make the school better for students.

“I feel powerful.” Keegan Ralstin, ‘14 said. Keegan Ralstin is M-CHS freshmen class president for the M-CHS. “I love him as a person.” freshmen vice president Anthonee Petrose, ‘14 said. “[Ralstin’s] the kind of kid who does good things.” Jonathan Bloedle, ‘14 said. “I think he’s cool.” Brandi Borgen, ‘14 said. He wants to represent the school by showing his talents. “I feel good to be new to the student government,” Ralstin said, “because I help represent the school.” Everyday on Tuesday or Thursday at lunch they will have there meetings to talk about up coming events. “I do look up to him because he is a good person,” Petrose said. “Of course I look up to Max Demby,” Ralstin said. Demby, ’11, is the senior class president and has been class president for all four years of high school. “He better do good things for our freshman class,”

Borgen said. “Of course I look up to him,” Borgen said, “I mean he is our president.” Ralstin and others hopes to become the president of the sophomore class next year. “I think he will be the president next year,” Petrose said. “He will make it to be the president next year,” Petrose said, “because he is an overachiever” “I think he will be the president next year because he is cool and easy to get along with,” Borgen said. We will always hope that he knows what is going on in there meetings. “I think he is pretty smart,” Blodle said. When he was just in elementary he was on the student counsel. “I got into student government when I was on the student counsel in elementary,” Ralstin said. Our president of the freshman class has been voted to be the freshmen president by is fellow class mates last year while he was in the M-CHS.

Journalism students place at state Language” by Madaline Hatch. - Honorable Mention – “Panther Press” editor The Montezuma-Cortez High School journalism Austin Cope for a Sports Feature about social netprogram recently received a number of awards at working pictures being used to discipline athletes. the Colorado state journalism contest. - Honorable Mention – “Panther Press” editor Awards are given by the Colorado High Lorisa Miller for her spring School Press Association at the beginning Sports Personality Feature of each new school year. The contest about track and baseball senincludes work that was done by high iors. school students during the 2009-2010 An honorable mention in school year. the CHSPA Newspaper The juried competition includes 15 cateSweepstakes is like tying for gories ranging from general excellence, fourth place, according to Nate design and photography to sports and feaThompson, the school’s news ture writing. The M-CHS journalism stumedia advisor. He said this is dents from the “Panther Press” and the third year in a row MCHS “Indigenous Magazine” placed in eight of journalism students have those categories. placed in more than half of the “I feel really proud to be a part of the contests at the state 4A news paper,” Karlee Montgomery, the “Panther sweepstakes, Colorado’s verPress” managing editor, said, speaking sion of a state championship about the newspaper’s third place award for journalism students. for in-depth coverage. “We had a different The awards were take on how to get news and it paid off.” announced Oct. 6 at the annuM-CHS awards from the 2009-2010 4A al Four Corners High School CHSPA Sweepstakes include: Press Day held at Fort Lewis - 2nd Place – “Panther Press” editor College and sponsored by the File Photo Austin Cope for a staff editorial he wrote Durango Herald. Karlee Montgomery, M-CHS senior and Managing Editor for the Panther Press with her state journalism award and a copy of the award win about the Cortez Journal’s poor coverage ning Panther Press issue “Human Target’s.” The journalism students placed in several categories in the Colorado State Journalism At that event, Managing of President Obama’s televised speech to Competition. Editor Kar Montgomery and students. Web Editor Darcie Biard - 2nd place – National News Package by the - Honorable Mention – “Indigenous Magazine” placed third at the Press Day writing contest. “Indigenous Magazine” staff members Bianca Rivas, for a news photograph taken of Canyon de Chelly by “I’m so proud of my students,” Thompson said. Madaline Hatch and Cheyenna Sherlock about their Cheyenna Sherlock. “These contests are every bit as competitive as a experience at Crazy Horse. - Honorable Mention – “Indigenous Magazine” sporting event and require just as much skill and - 3rd place – In-depth Coverage. The award was for a community commentary, “The Evanescent Ute hard work to win. given to the “Panther Press” staff for its “dartboard” STAFF REPORT

issue of the paper. - Honorable Mention – “Indigenous Magazine” for an alternative story form of reporting by Keano Davis and Brandon Avon about the digital age of TV antennas.

CDE continues state assessment system revision PRESS RELEASE

The Colorado Department of Education and the Colorado Department of Higher Education will jointly host a public feedback tour regarding the draft recommendations for Colorado’s new assessment system. The tour will allow the public to provide feedback to the departments before final recommendations move to the Colorado State Board of Education and the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. All meetings will be held from 5 to 7

p.m. Educators, students, parents, business and community members, and interested citizens are invited to the meeting. The schedule follows: Monday, Nov. 1, Adams State College, 208 Edgemont Blvd., Porter Hall – Room 130, Alamosa Thursday, Nov. 4, Mesa State College Center, 1455 North 12th Street, Grand Junction Monday, Nov. 8, University of Northern Colorado, Kepner Building – Room 2030, 800 17th Street, Greeley Tuesday, Nov. 9, Pueblo

Community College, 900 W. Orman Ave., Occiato Theater, Pueblo The objective of the tour is to solicit feedback from the field about the new assessment system design. Feedback from the public will ensure the new design reflects what Coloradans want and value in the next generation of assessments. The reactions from across the state will be used to shape recommendations of the new assessment design that will be presented to the Colorado State Board of Education and Colorado Commission on Higher Education.

No RSVP is necessary and questions may be directed to Emmy Glancy at glancy_e@cde.state.co.us or 303-8666118. In addition to the public meetings, an online survey for Coloradans to provide feedback on the assessment design proposal will be available from Oct. 25 – Nov. 9 at www.cde.state.co.us/ASMTRev/publictour.htm. For more information, v i s i t www.cde.state.co.us/asmtrev/home. htm.


Panther Press

NEWS

Internet addiction M-CHS students appear to use internet in moderation sit them in a million(:

t to a

ake them coun

corner and m

KRISSY GONZALES AND ABBY LOCK STAFF REPORTERS

Video Gaming. Social networking. Endless hours spent in a virtual world. It almost seems as if society couldn’t have existed without the internet. According to the Stanford University School of Medicine Study, 1 out of 8 Americans suffer from Internet Addiction. Some M-CHS students; however seem to have healthier internet habits than expected. Recently, a small survey was conducted through the Panther Press website, and results were rather surprising. Nearly 71 percent of survey participants testified to spending less than two hours online every day. The other 29 percent answered that they spent an average of 3-5 hours online each day. According to the survey data, students are using most of their online time to complete homework and other school related assignments. Even though, survey participants didn’t show

the symptoms of an internet addict, nearly 88 percent recognize that internet addiction is an existing condition. Internet addiction is defined as any onlinerelated, compulsive behavior which interferes with normal living and causes severe stress on family, friends, loved ones, and one's work environment. According to netaddiction.com, there are four subtypes of internet addiction. The first is cyber sexual addiction, which include people who are addicted to pornographic material. Cyber-affair/relational addiction is the second type, which consists of people who are addicted to chat rooms and/or social networking. Net compulsions are the third type of addiction. Net compulsions include addictive gamblers and compulsive shoppers. The final type of internet addiction is called information overload. Individuals suffering from information overload, spend excessive time online collecting and searching for information.

According to studies at the Center for Internet Addiction Recovery, children who suffer from internet addiction are more likely to suffer from depression, experience academic and social problems at school, and are at greater risk to develop physical illnesses, obesity, and carpel tunnel syndrome. The first United States residential center specializing in addict recovery opened in 2009.

Quick Facts! 5% of M-CHS survey participants use their internet time to play videogames

44% of M-CHS survey participants use their internet time to complete homework.

70.8% of M-CHS survey par- 88% ticipants spend less than two hours online in a 24 hour period

of M-CHS survey participants believe it is possible to become addicted to the internet.

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Press 06Panther N 2010

OPINION

OVEMBER

Staff Editorial All students can tell you that fighting is part of the high school experience, whether they like or not. Even parents remember the fights that happened while they were in school. This year, however, M-CHS has seemed to become over-run with fighting students. There have been fights breaking out in the halls, bathrooms, everywhere. For instance, on one occasion, there were three fights in the commons within ten minutes of each other. On another day, there was a fight in the girls’ bathroom between 200 hall and 300 hall – it went on for quite some time before it was broken up. By the end of the first quarter of the 2009-2010 school year, there were five students in trouble for fighting. This year that number has more than doubled. By the end of the first quarter of school this year, there have been 12 students in trouble for f i g h t i n g , according to Assistant Principal David Robinson. The statistics also show that typically more girls than boys are fighting. Last year only two of the five that got in trouble for fighting were boys. Then you look at this year and seven of the 12 people in trouble have been, you guessed it, girls. The Panther Press is concerned about what is causing all these fights and the fact that nothing – other than students fighting each other – is being done to address this issue. We understand that violence is often the “go-to” method for students when they get angry or when they feel the need to prove themselves, but honestly, it’s immature and it doesn’t prove how tough you are. All fighting does is end up getting you in trouble, and if you continue that attitude into adult-hood, it can get you into serious trouble. Fighting can land you with assault charges and, depending on how serious the fight is, you can get jail time for it. To all you students out there complaining about not seeing a fight: Think about it this way, you feeling remorse for not seeing a fight is the same as a “peeping-Tom” not feeling remorse for spying. Almost every fight involving teenagers has been captured on video on someone’s cell phone for them to be able to “get-off” on watching it or showing it to a friend later. We have a suggestion for anyone who hears about a fight brewing: Tell someone. It is safe to tell, and we don’t mean that in a cheesy middle school way. By telling someone about a fight, you can actually help keep people from getting hurt. Parents: Talk to your kids about the consequences of fighting, because they can be pretty severe. Let them know about the negative outcomes of fighting, let them know about the other ways to handle their problems. Administration, teachers, and all other higher authority figures: Help make students feel like it’s okay for them to come to you with problems like this. Help make them feel like they’re not going to be a “rat” for coming to you when they hear about fights. Fighting may seem like the reasonable solution to whatever problem you may be dealing with at the time, but trust us, it’ll just end up doing more harm than good. Keep that in mind the next time you hear about a fight contemplate getting in one.

The Issue:

Students Fighting

Our Take:

It’s Immature

THERE’S A REASON THE DRINKING AGE IS Teenagers all over the country drink. In every city and town you’ll find those kids who drink and party every weekend. Most kids see drinking as a way to have fun, right? Well as recent events have shown, it’s not. It’s a way you can hurt yourself, or worse someone else, and get yourself into some serious trouble. Car accidents are the number one cause of death for people age 15 to 20, and guess News what, around 28% of drivers that age who died were drinking when they got in the accident, according to the National Highway Traffic S a f e t y Administration. Drinking has a tendency to cause kids, and adults, to make stupid decisions that they’ll end up regretting, because, whether you’ll admit it or not, drinking really does affect your decision-making abilities. It’s been shown that when a person drinks the likeliness of them wearing a seat belt drops. There are a lot of kids who choose not

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to wear seat belts as it is, when you add alcohol to that – you’re going to get a dangerous combination. There’s a reason the drinking age is 21. The human body continues to develop until you turn 25. True, since the liver is still developing most damage done by drinking will be covered up by the new tissues, but the alcohol can affect its development. The other major organ Editor that can be affected by alcohol: Your brain. The “But I, being properties of poor, have the alcohol only my can have an dreams; I have extremely spread my damaging dreams under affect on your your feet; brain. It can Tread softly impede develbecause you opment and it tread on my can end up killing you. dreams.” So maybe you should think about that the next time you decide you want to go out and get drunk with your friends. As cheesy as it may sound, the “You drink, you drive, you loose,” campaign has a valid point.

Darcie Biard

Letters to the Editor

Turn up the heat

Dear Editor:

As a student of M-CHS I feel the temperature changes to different climates each year. It would be nice if the school was a bit more up-dated with heating systems during the fall/winter seasons along with air-conditioning during the summer. I am unable to concentrate on school work because for the lack of heat or burning up in a class with no windows. Class would be more enjoyable if I was warm. Wearing a jacket I feel is not good enough to keep me warm. Using space heaters in a classroom makes me feel like our school district is unable to provide for its students. Every time I walk into school I feel unsafe because of the report in the Cortez Journal. The auxiliary gym has mercury and asbestos contamination. Montezuma-Cortez High School is aged and out-dated. I hope that we do get the 70 million dollars plus renovation expenses to get a new school. I have not only felt this way here, many of the elementary schools are also aged. We as a city and as students need a solution to this problem and it needs to be fixed. Sincerely a student of M-CHS, Jasmine Lansing


Panther Press

SENIOR YEAR not all its cracked up to be. . . Starting high school all you hear about is how amazing senior year is and how easy it will be. The hard truth is; it’s more work than play. You’re busy with applicatoins, scholarships, résumés, and essays and still doing your high school work. If you’re not planning on going to college then I guess all you have to worry about is a job. The first thing on the list is deciding what you want to do as a career. Then follows finding the college you want to attend; if that college even offers what you want to major in; requirements to get into that college; how much it’ll cost; financial aid and scholarships; actually applying and so much more. Then comes the difficult part. Writing essays that won’t make you look stupid, or put you behind the other hundreds of students trying to get accepted. Along with your essays, is getting

letters of recommendation. That means depending on someone else’s view of you and hoping that their letter will have some impact on getting you where you want to go. On top of all of these things you have your classes, sports, clubs, and jobs to try to keep up with. Senior year is about Buisness Manager having fun and enjoying your last year of high school, but get all you’re stuff done, then you have time to play. So to all you underclassmen, take advantage of you’re high school years. Once you come to the end its alot of work. Do good in your classes, and be here as much as you can! That will you give you a head start on all the other people that will be trying to get to the same place you will be. After all is said and done and meeting all the dozens of deadlines then all you have time to play. All the seniors trying to get into college, good luck!

Student Forum What do you think should be done to improve our school building? “Remodel the whole (school) thing.” –Shamika Blackhorse, ‘12

Lorisa Miller

“First of all, new lockers, (new) Main Gym and Aux Gym. Better food, cafeteria (adding) more lines for food line.” –Zach Heal, ‘11

Not just a Cheerleader When I arrived here at M-CHS this year, it seemed like students already had their minds made up about who I am because of the fact I am a cheerleader. They didn’t take the time to get to know me and chose to judge me on some of our past cheerleaders reputations. People that I have never met before choose to use inappropriate and hurtful slang to describe me just based on the fact that I’m a cheerleader. Being a freshman is hard enough without having to deal with being called names every time I turn around. The fact of the matter is, not all cheerleaders are even close to what we are proclaimed to be at M-CHS. I don’t act like any of the harsh words they use. I’m not flaunting myself to guys like some girls are; I’m not constantly showing cleavage and acting like my body defines me. It makes me feel bad about myself when I get called names in the hallway or at lunch by random people because they have never gave me a chance to really show them who I am. Just because some cheerleaders make the choice to make bad reputations for themselves, doesn’t mean all of the Staff Reporter cheerleaders carry bad reputations. I may act like being called these “Duct tape is like things doesn’t bother me but really the force, it has a they do and it does hurt. People don’t light side, dark realize the affect their words have on others and it seems to make it worse side, and keeps the when the people who call me these whole world irrelevant words don’t even know me. together.” They don’t take the time to get to know me or what I think or feel or who I am, they just make assumptions based on other girls. It really makes me angry because they’re people I have never even spoken to in my life and they call me names and make me feel bad about myself because of something I like to do and have fun doing. Some teachers think this way as well and don’t have very good views on cheerleaders in general. Some teachers may think of us as ditzy, but the truth is, not all cheerleaders are dumb either. We aren’t: I get almost straight A’s and always do my class work and homework. I try my best in class and out of class. People should consider the particular individual instead of judging us on what we do as a sport. They should find out who we are as people, not just generalize us for being cheerleaders.

OPINION

“Like the building, its alright with me, rules should change around the building” –Jackie Klonoski, ‘10

Krissey Gonzales

“More school funding, and more school field trips.” –Ray Silas, ‘09

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Press 08Panther N 2010

CLUB FEATURE

OVEMBER

b u Cl views e r P

From Student Government to Chess Club, M-CHS has it all. Got time? Join a club.

Student Government Student Government is promoted by Caitlin Brewer, a social studies teacher, and Ed Rice, the Career and Technical Education director at M-CHS. Student Government organizes different activities for the student body and the community as well.

French & Spanish

Foreign Language Club Sonja Copeland, a French teacher, and Jim Hillstead, a Spanish teacher at M-CHS, are the Foreign Language Club sponsors this year. The Foreign Language Club is divided into two languages, French and Spanish. “French and Spanish Club is offered so that students have an outlet to share in the cultures that are associated with the French and Spanish languages,” Copeland said, via email. Foreign Language Club has been offered for five consecutive years and recently sponsored a French Week, October 11-14. They are planning to go to Europe in November.

It includes representatives from each grade level. Student Government is in charge of planning school dances, Spirit Week and Homecoming Week; as well as other awareness weeks such as Red Ribbon Week. Student Government meets every Tuesday during lunch in room 114.

Chess Club Are you someone who likes to work individually? Then chess club is for you. Chess club is meets in the library during lunch.

AISES and Native American Club work together

Left: Native American Club students and teacher Betty Ray. Top Right: Cheyenna Sherlock, president of AISES. Bottom Right: Sheridan Well, vise president of AISES.

ASHLEY ROMINE STAFF REPORTER

American Indian Science and Engineering Society is a returning club, from years past, sponsored by Sara Broersma, social studies teacher. The purpose of AISES is to increase the representation of American Indians and Alaskan Natives in engineering and other technology disciplines. AISES is designed to inspire Native American students to achieve excellence in math and science and to seek out careers that are based on those fields. The AISES students are bringing the Star Lab to M-CHS in December. The Star Lab is a Native American astronomy and story telling balloon dome. AISES students also plan on attending the Mesa Verde National Park luminaries, the first week of December. Material will be presented at the open house about math, engineering, and archeoastronomy of the Ancestral Puebloans. “We are looking forward to providing activities for Native American Month in November,” Broersma said.

AISES will be attending two conferences this year. November 11-13, AISES will be traveling to Albuquerque for a conference. But it is only for junior and seniors because it is at the national level. Fort Lewis College will be hosting an AISES conference in the spring. M-CHS also offers a Native American Club which is different than AISES, and it is advised by the Navajo Language and Culture Teacher Betty Ray. But the two groups that are open to all students, plan on joining forces from time to time. “We are looking forward to planning some activities together in November,” Broersma said. Go online to www.aises.org for more information. “Emotionally, I want for out Native American students to be provided the same opportunities in school, future careers, and in life as any other student in our school,” Broersma added.


Panther Press

CLUB FEATURE

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

Family, Career and Community Leaders of America is offered by Bethany Carriger, a family and consumer science teacher. Students must be enrolled in or have taken a family consumer class to join this club. The purpose of FCCLA is to promote personal growth and leadership development through family and consumer science studies, according to the organizations website. The club does community projects/events that they think the community could use.

“We’re having three community events this year: a pumpkin carving event on Thursday, October 28th, a Christmas Community night (we did this last year and it was wildly fun and successful!), and a spring Tea

Extra-Curricular Activities

Snow Sports Club is returning to M-CHS again this year. The Snow Club will travel to Telluride five times this winter. If you’re interested see Drew Pearson in room 108. For pass information visit www.tellurideskiresort.com/pass. Yearbook sponsored by Linda Brewer. Panther Press and Indigenous Magazine are sponsored by Nate Thompson. The Honors Diploma Program is coordinated by Eric Chandler. Knowledge Bowl is advised by Deb McVicker. Band is coordinated by Rodney Ritthaler and choir is coordinated by Marla Sitton. If anyone is interested in any of these extra-curricular activities, talk to the coordinator in charge of the activity for more information.

So what can an artsy student do? They join the National Art Honor Society because it inspires and recognizes those students who have shown an outstanding ability in art. Sponsoring National Art Honor Society is art teacher, Deborah Harriman. NAHS is designed specifically for high school students in grades 9-12. The NAHS strives to help members in working toward accomplishing the highest principles in art, and to sharpen the art education of the school and community.

FFA Future Farmers of America is one the largest organizations at MCHS. It is supported by Amanda Ramos, the Agricultural teacher. FFA is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of students and is and extension of M-CHS agricultural classes. The mission of FFA is to prepare the upcoming generations of farmers and ranchers for the challenges of nourishing an increasing population, according to ffa.org. The National FFA Organization promotes healthy lifestyles and encourages excellence in scholarship. Their motto is: “Learning to do, doing to learn, earning to live, living to serve.” If students are interested or would like more information, go to www.ffa.org or talk to Amanda Ramos.

Party for girls of all ages,” Carriger said via email. FCCLA plans on sponsoring many fundraisers in order to travel to Denver to compete in Star Events at the State Leadership Conference this spring. If students and staff ever see caramel apples and breakfast burritos at the high school, they were made by FCCLA for fundraising. “The advisors are so much fun,” Meggie Curtis, M-CHS chapter president of FCCLA, said. “We laugh all the time.” FCCLA meets on Thursday’s during lunch in room 308. More information about FCCLA can be found online at www.fcclainc.org or you can talk to Bethany Carriger.

NHS

M-CHS also offers many extra-curricular activities that are non-sport oriented.

NAHS

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National Honor Society is a national organization established to recognize the outstanding high school and middle school students. NHS is sponsored by family consumer science teacher, Bethany Carriger. The organizations website says NHS is much more than just the honor roll: NHS serves to honor the students who have proven excellence in the areas of scholarship, leadership, service and character.

HOSA

Broken bones. Fires. Ambulances and EMT’s. If these traumatic topics are your cup of tea then the newly formed Health Occupations Students of America club is for you. HOSA is lead by Lori Mott, first responder and fire science teacher in room 610. The purpose of HOSA is to promote career opportunities in the health care industry and to enhance the quality of health care to all people. Talk to Lori Mott or go online to www.hosa.org for more information about how this organization can help with your career goals.

Drama Club/Thespians

Are you into drama? Thespians club could be for you. Thespian club is the highest level of drama at M-CHS. Sponsoring Thespians is Bennie Palko, the drama teacher.

Thespians are a national organization. The only drama students who are part of Thespians are those inducted in. Drama students must have 10 points to be inducted into Thespians. Drama club is offered to any and all students, those who score points by performing in shows, seeing shows, and helping with tech move up to the Thespian level. Impulsive Improvisors are another part of drama club also. For more information talk to Bennie Palko in room 605.

Communications Club A communications club is coming to MCHS. Sponsoring this club is Nate Thompson, the media teacher. More information to come. If you think you would be interested in this club, feel free to talk to Nate Thompson in room 110.


Press 10Panther N 2010

SPORTS

OVEMBER

Historic moment for M-CHS golf

Courtesy Photo

RUDY GONZALES STAFF REPORTER

Brian Grubbs, Chris Aiken, Chris Black and Jakob Rudosky accomplished a feat by being the first MCHS golf team to make it to state in the past 39 years. They were one of three teams to make it to state in M-CHS history. The last teams to make it to state were the teams of 1968 and 1971, according to the Cortez Journal. M-CHS Golfers have been progressing and this year they tied for second-place in the Colorado Class 4A State Championship which took place in Colorado Springs. "It is a really good accomplishment and we should be proud of ourselves," Grubbs said. Chris Aiken lead the way for the team with twoday scores of 75 and 72, totaling 147 for 7th place.

Grubbs finished in 11th place with scores of 73 and 77, totaling 150 for 11th place in the tournament. Grubbs has been golfing ever since he can remember and placed 11th at state. Grubbs is currently planning on going to play golf at St. Peters College in New Jersey. Jakob Rudosky tied for 18th place scoring 77 and 75 for a total of 152. The two seniors of the team are Brian Grubbs and Chris Black. Black finished with scores of 81 and 76 for a total of 157 putting himself in 34th place.

Charityy Beautyy Pageant!! On November 2nd at

5:30 pm at Montezuma-Cortez

N Male Beauty Pageant N Spaghetti Dinner N Silent Auction

High School. We will be holding a

Male Beauty Pageant followed by a

Spaghetti Dinner and a

Silent Auction. Come help us raise money to help with

Donations and Volunteers are welcome! Please contact Corin Wolf @ 739-6963

TICKETS: Beauty Pageant $5 Spaghetti Dinner $5

Stevi LaRue’s hospital bills!

Combined Ticket (Pageant and Dinner) $8

Courtesy Photo

Super fun sports time with

Mike Bracamonte

Come help us raise money for the family of Stevi LaRue!

Above: the boys golf team celebrate their individual perform ances, including a Coach of the Year award head coach Micah Rudosky. Pictured from left are Coach Micah Rudosky, Brian Grubbs, Chris Aiken, Jakob Rudosky, Chris Black and Assistant Coach Brett Grubbs Below: Chris Black and Brian Grubbs receive the regional trophy on September 21.

Rudy Gonzales

A problem we see with sports inside school is that some school activities and sports do not get credit for what they do. Instead, they get made fun of by people that think they are better at life. These activities include band, golf and soccer. A few of the things people say about these groups are that they are “too easy” or “just for geeks and sissies”. But they really aren’t. Band and Golf are some of the most successful programs in our school (next journalism of course). When people say stuff about band we think: “I’d like to see you pick up a flute or trumpet and fail epically” -- just so they can see that it takes actual skill to play an instrument. Golf isn’t exactly the easiest thing to

do either. It requires a lot of skill and concentration, something a lot of people don’t have. We’ve tried golf and it owned us severely. As far as soccer goes, people might say that it’s gay or too easy and anyone could do it. Soccer isn’t just another one of those “jock” sports that any kid could play. Lots of running is required and players only get one break at half time. Before people degrade others for what sport they play maybe they should try it out and see how difficult it really is. We definitely can’t say anything bad about the winter sports and applaud anyone who is trying out for swimming, basketball or wrestling this year.

“Mudy”


Panther Press

Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez

Vs. Moffat County Vs. Pagosa Springs Vs. Bayfield Vs. Central Vs. Montrose Vs. Grand Junction Vs. Fruita Monument Vs. Durango Vs. Bloomfield Vs. Aztec Vs. Central Vs. Montrose

Volleyball

The Numbers

Soccer (Boys)

Cortez Vs. San Juan Crested Butte Cortez Vs. Pagosa Springs Cortez Vs. Wasson Cortez Vs. Canon City Cortez Vs. Palisade Cortez Vs. Palmer Ridge Cortez Vs. Harrison Cortez Vs. Fruita Monument Cortez Vs. Central Cortez Vs. Durango Cortez Vs. Bayfield Cortez Vs. Grand Junction Cortez Vs. Montrose Cortez Vs. Durango

W 3-0 W 2-1 W 3-0 W 2-0 L 2-1 L 2-0 W 2-0 W 2-0 L 3-0 L 3-1 L 3-1 L 3-1 W 3-2 W 3-2 W 3-2

L 6-1 W 4-2 W 3-0 L 3-0 L 8-0 L 2-0 L 7-0 L 2-0 W 4-1 W 1-0 W 2-1 L 5-0

The boys on the soccer team have been focusing on footwork and passing. There are quite a few new soccer players this year and over half of the soccer players are seniors this year and for them this will be their final sea son of soccer.

Some of the Fall Sports

M-CHS Volleyball girls have been winning the majority of their games. The Lady Panthers don’t only play the game mentally but they also play it physically. They don’t let a few points get them down. They keep their heads up and play every point like it is their last.

Battle of the Band

After winning regionals the MCHS band headed to state competition on Oct. 25. As of press time, state results were unavailable. Leading up to state, the Marching Panthers had the highest score out of any competing band coming out of regionals, according to the Cortez Journal. “If we keep up this last week we’ll probably keep first in state,” Jordan Rogers, a senior band member, said. Last year the band placed third at state. They expect to place higher this year seeing as how they made some big changes to their performance. The choreographers added more

movement to the performances to help up their score in the general effect and visual aspects judging categories. Some students like the changes. “They dance like BAMFs,” Kayla Acott said However, adding movement to a performance isn’t always easy on the band members. “It’s nice to add something new, but it sucks we have to do stuff like that to win against the other bands,” Rogers said. Results of the state band competition in Grand Junction will be in late that night, said Rodney Ritthaler, the band director.

SPORTS

11

Softball Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez

Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs. Vs.

Eagle Valley Eagle Valley Prairie View Rifle Palisade Palisade Delta Delta Durango Fruita Monument Fruita Monument Montrose Montrose Grand Junction Central Central

W 10-0 W 15-4 L 11-7 W 17-0 W 13-8 W 17-4 W 11-7 L 12-7 L 6-5 L 20-0 L 23-0 L 7-2 L 14-1 L 4-3 L 21-0 L 20-0

The Lady Panthers softball team has been struggling through their games due to bad batting averages and making bad errors. Near the end of the season for the Lady Panthers their hitting improved because of the practices the coaches were making. In the practices they had the girls practice batting and in their last few games their batting averages went up.

Tennis (Boys) Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez Cortez

Vs. Durango Vs. Aspen Vs. Cedaredge Vs. Hotchkiss Vs. Fruita Monument Vs. Montrose Vs. Durango Vs. Central Vs. Grand Junction

W 7-0 L 6-1 W 7-0 W 7-0 L 7-0 L 5-2 L 5-2 L 4-3 L 7-0

After a 3-1 start to the tennis boys season they start to fall to other schools they are up against. although they are getting these losses the coaches still think they have been seeing improvement in the team. At the Delta tournament on the 24th and 25th of september they place second , being only a few points away from the championship.


Press 12Panther N 2010

NEWS

OVEMBER

M-CHS staff Jay joins school ESS team While Jay was attending A Southern Utah College she wanted to become a nurse but while she was a Teaching. Helping. Learning. sophomore in college she started This is what Sharon tutoring other classJay does working with mates and decided students that need that she wanted to Exceptional Student become a teacher. Services also known as “My favorite thing ESS students. about being a teacher “My favorite thing is when the kids learn about teaching is and retain the inforwhen my students are mation,” jay said. learning and retaining Jay’s hobbies out the information that I side of school consist give them,” Jay said. of scrapbooking, Jay had been a volplaying volleyball ley ball coach and a Cheyenne Heal/Panther Press and basketball, and teacher for Dolores. Jay worked at the M-CMS helping her husband After teaching in and now works at the with his art carving. Dolores she decided to M-CHS. She also has two kids teach at the Cortez who make up her life. Middle until she was transferred to Jay has set personal goals for the M-CHS to fill a position in our ESS future besides accomplishing helping program. the student in passing there classes “It’s very awarding to see them and or needs. (students) accomplish there goal,” Jay “I want to become coach for volleysaid. ball,” Jay said. CHEYENNE HEAL STAFF REPORTER

Krissey Gonzales/Panther Press

Judy is the new spanish teacher at M-CHS

Taletha and Spanish:

Teaching Meets Fun KRISSEY GONZALES STAFF REPORTER

What do Bolivia, Las Vegas, and Cortez have in common? It’s not just the fact these places have Spanish names. They are all places Taletha Judy, our new Spanish teacher, here at M-CHS has lived. For ten years now, Taletha has been fluent in speaking the Spanish language which means she can properly pronounce the names of the places she has lived. She originally took Spanish in high school and soon after decided to pursue the language in more depth. Teaching Spanish allows Judy to combine her love of teaching students and the Spanish language. “I actually lived in Bolivia and that’s what got me hooked (on speaking Spanish),” Judy said. Judy had lived in Bolivia because of her passion for the Spanish language. “I had a mid-life crisis and I was burning out in my other job,” Judy said. “So I decided to pursue my other passion which is teaching.” Before becoming a certified teacher last year, Taletha worked as a substitute teacher in Las Vegas, NV., and was a specialist for a family care center. “I was actually a psycho-social Rehabilitation Specialist for a family care center,” Judy said. “I also substituted for ESL classes for adults.” - Taletha Judy Her hobbies include reading, running, biking, and M-CHS Spanish hiking. Teacher Taletha has set her standards high for not only her students but for herself. “My goal is to be the best Spanish teacher I can be and make it fun,” said the first year teacher. Judy’s teaching philosophy is that the students come first. “Ms. Judy teaches through Games interviews and also through speaking in Spanish back and forth with us,”Ashley Romine, a freshman at M-CHS, said.

“I actually lived in Bolivia and that’s what got me hooked (on speaking Spanish).”

BOOKS New and used Buy - Sell - Trade

970-565-2503 12/1 Pinon Drive Cortez co 81321


s b y 10 Panther Press

s w w o r o ggr

NEWS

13

Part II

Texas native hired to teach English KAYLA MATTHEWS STAFF REPORTER

Katrina Goodman is split between two worlds. She teaches transitions language arts part time here at M-CHS and part time at Cortez Middle School as a Response To Intervention teacher. As an RTI teacher she is responsible for helping at risk students get through difficulties and become successful students. As an English teacher, she is helping freshmen learn how to improve their reading and writing skills. Goodman was born and raised in Houston, Texas, making Cortez a definite change in scenery and lifestyle. Unlike most teachers, Goodman was hired over the telephone since Houston is a long way to come for a job interview. “I thoroughly enjoyed talking to her on the phone,” M-CHS Principal Gordon Shepherd said, adding that, “she is a wonderful person and has an awesome personality.” Shepherd also said M-CHS is extremely lucky to have her as a teacher. “Her resume was unbelievable,” Shepherd said. “I couldn’t believe we were going to get her.” But like most teens in high school, Goodman wasn’t always set on becoming a teacher. When she was younger, Goodman saw herself heading towards a Kayla Matthews/Panther Press career in government or perhaps political science. She also enjoyed Katrina Goodman also teaches part time at the M-CMS. writing narrative essays and creative literature. Goodman also enjoys reading a good mystery book or a novel, watching comedies and dramas, and shopping when she’s outside lost,” Goodman said. “They need to be exposed to all the choices in life and talk the classroom. to someone who actually works in that field to decide whether that is the field “Shopping’s my thing,” Goodman said, adding that is one drawback of com- they want to be in.” ing to Cortez. “You guys don’t have a mall here.” According to Shepherd, if there is anyone who can help students find their On the other hand, Goodman said students do have an opportunity to shop way, it is Mrs. Goodman. for a career. “I like the way she can make kids feel relaxed,” he said. “She can connect with “If kids aren’t exposed to a variety of career possibilities, they’re going to be them fast, to teach what she needs to.”

Algebra teacher brings fun to class

Darcie Biard/Panther Press

DARCIE BIARD NEWS EDITOR

Gordon comes to the math department and teaches algebra.

Brendon Gordon knew he always wanted to be a math teacher. Having the influence of both parents being teachers, he was well on his way to accomplishing his dream. After many years of working with other education related programs, Gordon is now working as a Pre-Algebra and Algebra 1 teacher at M-CHS Gordon has been in education for the past almost twenty years. For five of those, he was the coordina-

tor for MESA (Math Engineering Science Achievements.) The other fifteen he was teaching algebra. Gordon got his Bachelor’s of Arts at St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico. According to Gordon, St. John’s has a, “great books program.” After he got his B.A., he went on to get his teaching certificate through the University of New Mexico. When asked what inspired him to become a teacher, Gordon said, “I just like working with students and seeing them progress and make it to college and making something of themselves.” There are many things Gordon likes about teaching, but as all teachers, he has a favorite. “Having students come back and thank me for helping them learn (is my favorite thing about teaching,”) Gordon said.Both of Gordon’s parents were teachers as well. His father was an Anthropologist at Fort Lewis and his mom was an elementary teacher. Gordon has lived in the Four Corners area most of his life. He told the Panther Press that he moved to Durango, Colorado when he was in the third grade. For a while however, he was teaching in New Mexico in places like Gallup and Deming. “I just like math, I was always good at math. If you can’t do math, you’ll struggle in college, students don’t realize how important math is.” Gordon said when asked why he became a math teacher. Gordon says that one of his favorite memories of his teaching career is one of the times his class made homemade model rockets out of toilet paper tubes. “We were shooting model rockets and a stealth

bomber flew over the horizon,” Said Gordon. Gordon has a variety of hobbies in addition to teaching. He is a football coach, he likes to ski, swim, body surf, and boogie board. One of his favorite hobbies is traveling. Gordon says that over summer vacation he likes to take his family to Mexico as often as he can. Gordon’s wife is also a teacher in Farmington, New Mexico. She is a school psychologist and a special education teacher, “she works with gifted students.” Gordon and his wife have two kids, Bianca, 9, and Gianna, 15. Both girls attend school in Durango, Colorado. According to M-CHS Principal, Gordon Shepherd what drew him to hiring Gordon was his resume and what he’s been involved with in New Mexico. Gordon has an extensive background with working with students who speak English as a second language as well as working with the AISES program and MESA. “He’s a good fit because we have a lot of kids below grade level,” Gordon said. Gordon is bilingual; he speaks Spanish as well as English so Shepherd hopes that he can help students who don’t speak English very well with math. “I want him to have a really great year knowing he helped make a difference.” Shepherd said when asked what his hopes for Gordon this year.


Press 14Panther N 2010

A&E

OVEMBER

‘Harvey’ is a knockout DARCIE BIARD NEWS EDITOR

Recently the M-CHS drama department put on a wonderful play entitled “Harvey.” “Harvey” is the story of Elwood P. Dowd, played by Caden O’Brien, who sees an invisible six foot tall white rabbit by the name of Harvey. When Dowd’s sister, Veta Louise Simmons, played by Kat Alexander, and her daughter Myrtle Mae Simmons, Mariah Kingery, get tired of the embarrassment Dowd is bringing to their family, the two decide to take him to a sanitarium, or mental hospital. When Veta Louise arrives at the sanitarium, she begins to tell Clarissa McNamara, playing Nurse Ruth Kelly, and Dr. Lyman Sanderson, played by Bryan Tripp, abut Elwood and Harvey. When the case begins to get out of control, the head of the sanitarium, Dr. William Chumley, played by Ben Dukeminier, takes interest and things get extremely out of hand. With the help of Duane Wilson played by Cameron Coleman, Dr. Chumley, Dr. Sanderson, Nurse Kelly, and the rest of the cast try to find a way to restore peace and order. Recently the M-CHS drama department put on a wonderful play entitled “Harvey.” “Harvey” is the story of Elwood P. Dowd, played by Caden O’Brien, who sees an invisible six foot tall white rabbit by the name of Harvey. When Dowd’s sister, Veta Louise Simmons, played by Kat Alexander, and her daughter Myrtle Mae Simmons, Mariah Kingery, get tired of the embarrassment Dowd is bringing to their family, the two decide to take him to a sanitarium, or mental hospital. When Veta Louise arrives at the sanitarium, she begins to tell Clarissa McNamara, playing Nurse Ruth Kelly, and Dr. Lyman Sanderson, played by Bryan Tripp, abut Elwood and Harvey. When the case begins to get out of control, the head of the sanitarium, Dr. William Chumley, played by Ben Dukeminier, takes interest and things get extremely out of hand. With the help of Duane Wilson played by Cameron Coleman, Dr. Chumley, Dr. Sanderson, Nurse Kelly, and the rest of the cast try to find a way to restore peace and order. With a superb cast, first-class costumes designed by Sam “Thursday” Dale, and wonderful set design, “Harvey” was definitely a great play worth seeing. I give the drama department my applause. With a superb cast, first-class costumes designed by Sam “Thursday” Dale, and wonderful set design, “Harvey” was definitely a great play worth seeing.

During opening night, Dr. Chumley, played by Ben Dukeminier, asks Mr. Dowd, played by Caden O’Brien, if Harvey, Dowd’s invisible rabbit friend, would ever take Dowd somewhere with his powers.

Ashley Long/Panther Press

Artist of A d a m B urris the Month According to Burris’s teachers he is a dedicated student and he leads Adam Burris is this month’s from example. “He is a natural student leader,” Panther Press Artist of the Month. He was nominated by Rodney Ritthaler said. “When Adam talks or Ritthaler, M-CHS band teacher. This gives orders the other students listen marks the first time a band student to him.” Burris’s main musical influence has been named as Artist of the Mont has been his family. and sets a new trend for the “My family is very musiPress expand this recogMusic cal,” Burris said. “They are nitition all students in the reason I became interis the only the arts. in music.” In the nominathing I know how ested Burris has his sights tion, Ritthaller set on being a musician described Burris as to do in the future. a,“great young “I am going to be a man, terrific musi-Adam Burris musician,” Burris said. cian, natural leader,” M-CHS Senior Specifically, Burris looks Burris has been playup to retired band teacher ing the tuba since middle Ralph “Mr. V” Vavak and his school. older brother. “I picked the tuba because my “They are both an inspiration to brother played it,” Burris said. me.” Burris said. Burris has also been in chamber Music is very important to Burris choir since his Freshman year. and he hopes to become a musician. “I started becoming interested in "Music is the only thing I know music when I was able to sing,” how to do," said Burris. Burris said.

ASHLEY LONG & CHEYENNE HEAL STAFF REPORTERS

.

Ashley Long/Panther Press

Adam Burris plays his tuba at M-CHS field Thursday morning for band practice. Burris was nomi nated for Artist of the Month for November.


Panther Press

A&E

15

Third try is the charm LORISA MILLER BUSINESS MANAGER

It has been one decade for the famous Jackass franchise filming of people inflicting pain, misery, and embarrassment on one another and themselves. And we still can’t get enough. “Jackass 3D” is the fourth movie to the Jackass series along with the series on MTV. The Jackass crew includes Johnny Knoxville, Stev-o, Ryan Dunn, Bam Margera, Jason “Weeman” Acuria, Preston Lacy, Ehren McGhehey and Dave England. “Jackass 3D” opened October 15 and topped Box Office sales with over $21.8 million made the first day. In one week the movie made over $50 million. This puts them at the most successful fall opening ever, which was originally Scary Movie 3 released back in 2003. “It was funnier, more creative and more entertaining then the past movies, the 3D made it a lot better.” Said Hannah Vandevoarde, ’11. “Jackass 3D” beat out “Jackass: The Movie” that made 9.7 million opening day and “Jackass 2” that made 11.8 million opening day. “Jackass 2.5” never went to theaters and went straight to online and on DVD. The movie starts with Beavis and Butthead, cartoon characters from MTV shows, talking about 3D. Then it kicks off with the ridiculously dressed crew, walking toward the camera; some short clips of them tormenting Image from Jackassmovie.com each other in some way and Johnny Knoxville getting hit in The Jackass crew - Top - Stev-o, Preston Lacy, Johnny Knoxville, Ehren McGhehey, Ryan Dunn, Dave England, Bam Margera, the face with a giant airbag in extreme slow motion. Bottom - Chris “Partyboy” Pontius, and Jason “Weeman” Acuria, . This is their fourth movie, but only the third to hit theaters. The slow motion camera that is used throughout the “I had a broken clavicle, three broken ribs, a busted kneecap, and a broken movie and takes 1,000 frames per second. It is called the Phantom High Speed foot,” Margera said on moviefill.com, during in a recent interview. “And the Camera, the most high tech camera available in movie production today. only thing that actually made it in the movie is the clavicle from ‘Electric The history of Jackass movies pits puking against covering your eyes, to avoid Avenue’, where we put the stun guns in the hallway.” seeing some kind of So what’s next? extreme human There is a lot of talk about behavior. Along another Jackass movie. In an with that there is interview by MTV News the going to be somecast of “Jackass 3D” said there thing totally explicit, is more than enough footage or gross. left over for another movie. “They were a lot And there has been a decision more creative,” says Dayton Wilson, ’13, on when “Jackass 3.5” will be “I think they really released. “The plan is [to release had no limit to what Jackass] ‘3.5’ first,” Knoxville they put in the told MTV News, “We had so movie.” much footage left over, ‘3.5’ is This latest film going come out online and on meets those expectaDVD around January. That tions and includes was the last conversation we shameless acts of Image from Jackassmovie.com had [with the producers]. Johnny Knoxville and the “High Five”. nudity, embarrassIn a separate interview with ment and cringe-worKnoxville and Jeff Tremaine, thy stunts. Some of these stunts include “Jet Airplane”, “Heli-cockter”, “High the director, Tremaine said, Five”, “Duck Hunting”, “Midgets in a Bar Fight”, “Beehive Tetherball”, “Electric “There is a four-year gap in between the release of each of the three movies, Avenue”, “The Christmas Tree”, and “T-Ball”. there is good reason for this;” Tramaine said. “It takes four years to truly recovJust from the names you can picture what they did. It isn’t safe either. er, mentally more than anything.”

‘Jackass 3D’ topped Box Office sales at $21.8 million opening day!

Gamers thrilled about ‘Halo:Reach’ DONOVAN YAZZIE STAFF REPORTER

Game fanatics were thrilled when “Halo: Reach” was released September 14. “Halo” is a first person shooter game, found only on Xbox. “Reach” is the 4th game in the “Halo” series. “Halo: Reach” continues the original “Halo” game and follows a team known as the Noble Team in its efforts to defend and save the planet “Reach” is about an invasion of alien species known as the Covenant. The game starts out by letting players know that you are fighting a battle that’s already been lost. But that news hasn’t gotten players down because features of the game still deliver jaw-dropping action, giving gamers a reason to fight for humanity. “Halo: Reach” is the 2nd highest selling game ever, within release of the game

on a single platform, according to neiuindependent.com, the Northeastern Illinois College newspaper. And so far, the game time put in by people who are playing the game has reached over 6,000 years when playing time is combined, according to Austin Pyle, M-CHS senior. “Six thousand straight game plays is quite a bit. It’s a long time for people to play a game,” Pyle said. “It’s the most game play, combined.” To maximize interest, game maker Bungie installed new features to the multiplayer option in “Reach.” First, the newly armor abilities that includes flying jetpacks, cloaking, sprinting, barrel rolling, and armor lock. “(Armor abilities are) pretty cool,” Austin Lewis, junior, said. “It adds more to the game and is better than ‘Call of Duty’ because it has only one (ability), and Halo has six (abilities) and it’s equally balanced.” PCMAG.com calculated sells of 3.3 million copies of Photocredit to Bungie.net “Halo:Reach.” The game sells for $50. For a time when the economy is supposed to be suffering, “Reach” isn’t, if you do the math.


Press 16Panther N 2010

SPECIAL FEATURE

OVEMBER

Editor’s Note: This page recognizes two of the many “awarenesses” that are recognized each month. The bold faced causes are accommpanied by the organizations’ logo or ribbon.

MONTHLY “AWARENESS”

by Abby Lock

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Ovarian Cancer Awareness and Head Lice Prevention Month

Breast Cancer Awareness and Vegetarian Awareness

AIDS Awareness and I Am So Thankful Month

Colorectal Cancer Education and Awareness and Procrastination Awareness


Panther Press - November 2010