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Commencement 3

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13

6 Here s I ing Spr

Electric For est 8

Tips for Earth Day page 5


Staff

About us

Contact Us

editors   Josh Osborn — Photo Editor   Web Editor   Eric Rothoff   Alec Batchelder

The Bay Window is a studentrun newspaper at Muskegon Community College, written, edited and produced by students.

Writers:   Faith Troyer   Eric Rothoff   Jordan Schwing   Robert Mackie   Lindsey Bramer   Naomi Elenbaas   Josh Osborn

The Bay Window provides information about state, local, and school related issues and highlights the various aspects of being a student at Muskegon Community College.

The Bay Window – Room 208 Muskegon Community College 221 South Quarterline Road Muskegon, MI 49442 231–777–0542 baywindow@muskegoncc.edu

Photography:   Kimberly Page   Josh Osborn Design/Layout:   James Carey   Kristine Barrett Advisors:   Nancy Slater   Jennie Naffie

As a student run paper, ideas written in editorials and columns are the views of the writers and not necessarily of the student body, staff or administration. Information in ads are the responsibility of the advertisers. For more information on us and to see prior issues of the Bay Window newspaper, visit our website.

Interested in participating? You can also stop by the Bay Window office, Room 1131, on Wednesdays at 12:00pm to attend a staff meeting. There we discuss story ideas and volunteer for assignments. Guest are welcome to sit, observe, and offer their input. Participation in the Bay Window newspaper can count as work-study, workassistance, internship, credit hours, or extra credit depending on your financial aid eligibility or instructor.


NEWS

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

MCC’s Budget ERIC

Rothoff

  $1.2 Million dollars. While only 3.6% of the budget, it is a large sum of money. That is how much President Dale Nesbary and the MCC administration needs to balance college’s budget.   Currently, the plan to balance the budget is to eliminate 10 positions (saving about $826,000), raise classroom fees (making between $475,000-$950,000), and increase tuition (raising about

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13

$580,000). But the administration has been looking into every idea to increase saving and revenue without effecting the students at Muskegon Community College.   They have met with every department and unit at MCC to discuss ideas for both cutting expenses and increasing revenues. They have even held meetings throughout Muskegon County to hear what the citizens have to say. EVERY idea was listened to and recorded. Suggestions from stopping Friday classes, and print less in color, through eliminating security and charging for parking are being evaluated.   Do you want to help MCC save money or raise revenues? There will be a posted list of suggestions that have been made, and a place to give your own suggestions. (Or you can email

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your suggestions to the President’s office, president@muskegoncc.edu)   I personally have two suggestions that I think will increase revenues without costing students more. The first is to encourage the use of “open source” or Professor written books for classes rather than students paying $75+ for commercial textbooks. If MCC then put a development fee of $25-$50 on these classes, students would save money, and the college would increase revenues.   The second suggestion is to increase advertising to nearby out-of-district students. MCC’s out-of-district rates are about the same or lower than the indistrict rates of our neighboring community colleges. Let’s use this to both increase enrollment, and bring more business to Muskegon.

All the World’s a Stage FAITH

TROYER

The words poured from his lips like jewels and gave life to the very paper they were written on.   William Shakespeare is an accomplished playwright and poet who have taken all of our hearts and minds by storm.   Born in England on April 23rd, 1564, Shakespeare grew to be the greatest writer in the English

language. Having and many have said it written over thirty– was amazing and they eight plays and would do it again in a 154 sonnets, this heartbeat. man knew what   On April, 23rd, 2013, hard work was and the poetry class, also loved his audience. taught by Mary Tyler,  Muskegon is putting on a poetry Community slam in honor of William College offers a Shakespeare’s birth class, taught by over 449 years. It will be Mary Tyler, a very held in the Overbrook accomplished Theater on April, 23rd, instructor, about 2013. There will be Illustration by Naomi Elenbaas Shakespeare Shakespeare’s life free food and drink and writings. and plenty of live   She loves Shakespeare and is entertainment provided by the perfect person to teach this the students reading their own class. Every summer, the class goes works. It will be a wonderful day to Stafford, Canada to have the of culture and Mr. Shakespeare full Shakespearean experience would have been proud.


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Features

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

MCC’s Commencement by Faith Troyer The Bay window   Every year for the students of Muskegon Community College look forward to earning their two year degrees and spreading their wings. We all know how hard it is staying up until 4:00am in the morning studying for a French exam at 9:00am the same day; many hours spent in the computer lab slaving over the fifteen page paper due the next day. Now, spring is coming and that means caps and gowns and hard earned degrees. In this town of Muskegon, we need hard working individuals such as local graduates to keep the economy going. Going to school while working a full time job, and adding children in the mix, can’t be an easy task and we commend all of you graduates this year and congratulate you

all on your hard work and determination. I got to sit down with Bonnie Lownds, a current Courtesy of MCC student but Bonnie Lownds soon to be MCC graduate and asked her a few questions about her thoughts, feelings and future plans after graduation.   What is your major and how do you plan on applying that to your future endeavors?   “My major is sign language interpreting. After I graduate from MCC, I will go to LCC (Lancing Community College, which is third in the nation). When I graduate from there, I want to be an educational or medical interrupter.”   What is your favorite class you’ve ever had and why?

Christian Concert in Fremont by Naomi Elenaas The Bay window

  Born in Sydney, Australia they grew   Coming up on up with music, along April 26, two brothers with their father being come together to a promoter for music, Fremont, Michigan that influenced them to share the spiritual to their musical career relationship they now. “In a lot of Courtesy of Twitter have with God with ways I feel like music for King and Country everyone else with chose me and as I music. Brothers Joel grew older, I made a and Luke have forged a distinctive clear decision to fully lean into it.” sound that has earned them an was how Joel explained on their enthusiastic fan base as well as the web page what music meant to respect of industry professionals him. Their group name “for King who keep tapping their music for and Country” was based off of use in high profile history when the British would go TV shows. to war and shout out “For King

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13   “Can I have two? Either abnormal psychology or Shakespearian Lit. I liked psychology because it interests me, in fact I would I would like to have a major in Psychology and Shakespeare because I got to go to Stratford, Canada and it was an amazing experience.”   What advice would you give to those attending this summer who have never taken college classes?   “To take your homework seriously and ask the instructors questions, and not to worry about being what you want to be just yet, because you can always change your major more than once.”   What University are you planning on attending this fall?   “I’m going to LCC but in my third year, I’ll duel-enroll at Siena Heights with a Bachelor’s degree in Applied Arts.”   Commencement Ceremony will be begin Thursday, May 2, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. at the L.C. Walker Arena, 955 4th Street, Muskegon.

and Country.” Shouting out loud for what they truly believe in. “We want to deliver a message that is about believing in something much bigger than oneself,” explains Luke. It would seem that both brothers run on the same belief that they would like to share with the world.   Tickets to see ‘for King and Country’ are $10.00 at the door, VIP are $15.00 and the meet and greet will be at 6pm. Doors open at 6:30pm, show starts at 7pm. Location is at; Fremont High School, 5421 South Warner, Fremont, MI 49412.   For more information about ‘for King and Country,’ check out their web site at www.forkingandcountry. com for more details.


Features

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

Earth Day by Lindsey Bramer The Bay window   Earth Day was born from the pinnacle of raging protests and hippie culture in 1970, as environmental consciousness was sparked by a massive oil spill off the coast of California. By channeling the energy of protesters across the country, an Recycle Binds environmental movement was formed, rallying from sea to shining sea to raise awareness and protest the deterioration of the environment. April 22 is an important reminder

Bark for Life JORDAN

Schwing

  Dog Star Ranch and The American Cancer Society are joining together to present “Bark for Life”, a charity event that brings man and man’s best friend together to participate in a non-competitive walk. The event takes place on April 20th,

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13

of our impact on our planet. Earth is our only home. It is our job to protect her, not damage her. Mother Nature has a balance that we upset and accelerate, so out of respect, there are simple things we can do in our daily lives to reduce our impact on Earth.   1. Plant trees. Help forests thrive while we still have them. Stop deforestation!   2. Carpool. Save money. Save nonrenewable resources.   3. Walk to your destination. Enjoy Photgraph by Kimberly Page the stroll. Ride a bike.   4. Purchase a reusable water bottle.   5. Recycle. Save space in trash cans and landfills and limit the production of new plastic waste.

in the afternoon, at the Dog Star Ranch. The event is promised to be punctuated with “demonstrations, contests, games and giveaways”. This event costs a modest entry fee and all funds raised go to The American Cancer Society. Don’t miss out on an opportunity to join together with fellow dog-

Photograph by Nancy Slater Frida

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  6. Avoid plastic silverware. Though it may be convenient, it costs money and wastes energy to produce a utensil to be purchased, used once, tossed in the trash (or ground), and sent to a landfill. The negative effects of plastic silverware outweigh the benefits.   7. Carry a leftover grocery bag with you to pick up trash while walking on the beach, through the woods, at parks, and around town.   8. Turn off the lights when you leave the room. Maximize sunlight usage!   9. Turn down the thermostat. Bundle up with blankets.   10. Take shorter showers (or don’t shower at all. It works in some communities).   11. Use cold water for laundry. Reduce energy usage.   12. Buy used. Buy consignment. Rent. Reduce. Reuse.   There is beauty and harmony in everything. Appreciate what our planet has to offer, and take action.

enthusiasts to enjoy the outdoors and contribute to a great cause. The American Cancer Society and Dog Star Ranch   A Cancer Benefit involving a non-competitive dog walk, punctuated with “demonstrations, contests, games and giveaways.”   Saturday April 20th   12:30 PM to 3:00 PM   Registration begins at 1:00PM   The walk begins at 2:00 PM    Dog Star Ranch    4200 Whitehall Rd.    Muskegon, MI 49445   For more information, contact:   Teresa McDaniel   Email: Tab2610@aol.com   Phone: 231-638-1784


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OPINIONS

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

  Tulip:    Origin: Persia and Turkey    Meaning: The meaning of a tulip varies based on the color of the tulip in question. Meanings can range from: Perfect Love (Red) to Forgiveness (White) JORDAN    Fun Facts: Their name is derived from the Turkish word for gauze, which is commonly used for the turbans men in their culture wear. It references the wrapped shape of the tulips petals.   Daffodil:    Alternative Name: Narcissus   With spring fast approaching,    Meaning: Rebirth; New the world coming back to life and Beginnings nature is beautified by the splashes    Fun Facts: In some cultures, of color that spring flowers create. spotting the first Daffodil of the Flowers have always carried some season is a promise of twelve form of meaning across various months of wealth. cultures, be they a representation   Lilacs: of a particular feeling or the   Origin: Mediterranean expression   Meaning: of a Purple lilacs particular symbolize the first thought, the emotions of love, unspoken while white lilacs words are represent youthful present. innocence. With this in    Fun Fact: The mind and botanical name the innate (Syringa) of the lilac curiosity is derived from the that drives Greek legend of humanity, I a nymph, who in took it upon efforts to escape myself to an angry deity, Photograph by Kimberly Page look into the Crocus turned herself into a meanings or flowering bush. symbolism   Snapdragons: behind several of the more    Origin: Spain or Italy common flowers associated    Meaning: Deception and with spring: Graciousness   Hydrangea:    Fun Fact: It is believed that   Origin: Japan concealing a Snapdragon makes    Meaning: Varies between the individual appear fascinating “Vanity” and “Gratefulness” and “cordial” depending on the situation   For more information of flowers    Fun Facts: The combination and their meanings, please visit: of the Greek words “Hydror,” or http://www.teleflora.com/aboutwater, and “angos,” or vessel. flowers/flower-meaning.asp

Spring is Here

Schwing

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13


Opinions

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

A Story about Dennis by Robert Mackie The Bay window By: Robert Mackie   At the age of sixteen my parents bought my first car. In order to put gas in the tank I went jobhunting, and eventually found one at Arby's. Every single person who walks through those doors has his or her own individual story, and the story that has had the greatest impact on my life is of a homeless man named Dennis. Dennis came into Arby's almost every night, to order a senior decaf coffee; occasionally we would have an extra sandwich or curly fries to feed him. Although I never really knew for sure, you could always tell he was kind of challenged. His company was generally accepted; he mostly sat and watched traffic pass, never bothering anyone until it was time for him to leave. During the winter we would let him sit in our lobby, until we closed the store, so he didn't have to brave the elements until absolutely necessary.   This continued over the course of the next year until one day he came in and announced he had found a job as a janitor at a restaurant. It took another six months of saving money, but he ended up finding an apartment. Only a few months after that triumph, he died. He did not have any living relatives. He lives on only in the memory of the few who were fortunate enough to share his quiet company. Quietly, in a way, is how he lives on. As does the true problem of homelessness in our society.   At the time, I didn't know how much of an impact Dennis had on my life, but now I know he illustrated how powerful the

sheer desire to live is. Even in the most treacherous conditions, we will do our best to find a way to survive. The one trait not only all humans but all living things have in common, is the innate desire to survive. At our core, all we wish to do is to wake up and see tomorrow, and even when given absolutely nothing, most are determined enough to make it one more day. The power of a relentless dedication is one that can be applied to all facets of our daily lives. We can use it to accomplish almost anything and even if we fall short of our goals today, we can awake tomorrow, to try again.

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13

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Entertainment

The Bay Window · Since 1926 www.mccbaywindow.com

Electric Forest

Sherwood Forest is at the heart of the festival, a maze of euphoric lights, mesmerizing music, and an by Josh Osborn endless supply of new people to The Bay window meet. Every corner you turn you   Electric Forest, which takes place are going to see something new at the Double and exciting. JJ Ranch in   With headliners Rothbury, MI, like The String now onto its Cheese Incident third year, has (3 performances), jumped into the Pretty Lights, US music festival Passion Pit, scene with a Empire of the Sun, vengeance. Beats Antique, The four day Knife Party and event had an Dispatch, they Photograph by Josh Osborns, attendance at 25,000 Illustration by Miranda Sagan are sure to draw for last year’s event, as electric FOREST in fans from every well as the expansion genre of music. of the Sherwood Forest, this year’s   Other noteworthy artists that are festival is sure to bring in a larger going to be performing there are crowd. Drawing from last years, Benny Benassi, A-Trak, Kill the Noise,

Monday, April 8, 2013 Issue 8, Volume 13

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Lotus, Baauer, Michal Menert, Clockwork, Digital Tape Machine ft. Joel Cummins & Kris Myers of Umphrey’s McGee, and Tommy Trash.   Electric Forest is more than just a music festival; it is one massive art exhibit, from art pieces throughout Sherwood Forest to acrobats performing for the festival goers over the entire festival.   Camping festivals bring more than just music, once you step into the gates of the camp ground or go to the stages there is always a community that is willing to lend a hand. The community in the festival makes the festival. Electric Forest is surly a blessing in disguise. You truly will not appreciate it until you have attended and experienced the happiness this type of event can bring.


The Bay Window, Mar 8th, 2013