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SCULPTURE GARDEN GUIDE AND SITE-SPECIFIC WORKS

ARTIST: TITLE

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Welcome to the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Enjoy the Edwards Sculpture Garden and discover unique, sitespecific sculptures and installations throughout the Museum grounds. To make your visit more enjoyable, please be aware of the rules in the Museum: • Running is not permitted in the Museum galleries, lobby, Sculpture Garden, and theater.. • If you have a child under the age of five, we recommend you hold his or her hand as you walk through the galleries and garden. • The role of our Security Service Representatives is to protect you and the artwork. Please respect their requests. • Food and beverages are only allowed in the Museum Cafe and terrace tables. • Sketching is permitted. To protect the artwork we ask you that you use pencils only. You may ask for a pencil at our front desk. Visitors are reminded that touching the artwork is not allowed unless otherwise indicated. Looking for an artwork you can interact with? Check out Liquid Ballistics by Roman de Salvo. This guide is intended for families with children ages 5 and older. Inside you will find questions for self-guided tours, activities, and suggestions for future exploration. For accessibility, use the elevator to the Coast Room, and then to the ramp outside. Some of these pieces can also be viewed from a distance, from the above terrace.

WELCOME

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Edwards Sculpture Garden A. Iran do Espírito Santo, Drops I, 1997 B. Nancy Rubins, Pleasure Point, 2006 c. Gabriel Orozco, Long Yellow Hose, 1996 d. Judith Shea, Eden, 1987 e. Ed Ruscha, Brave Men of La Jolla, 1995–1996 f. Mauro Staccioli, Untitled, 1987 g. Richard Fleischner, Froebel’s Blocks, 1983 h. Roman de Salvo, Liquid Ballistic, 2001 i. Erika Rothenberg, Monument to a Bear, 2002–2003 j. Marcos Ramírez ERRE, Crossroads (Border Tijuana—San Diego), 2003 k. Vito Acconci, Garden Installation (Displaced Person), 1987 l. Niki de Saint Phalle, Big Ganesh, 1998 M. Andy Goldsworthy, Three Cairns, 2002 N. Jonathan Borofsky, Hammering Man at 3,110,527, 1988 O. Stephen Antonakos, Incomplete Neon Square for La Jolla, 1984 P. George Trakas, Pacific Union, 1986–1988

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Garden history As part of Ellen Browning Scripps’ first home South Moulton Villa, the lush formal garden now known as the Edwards Sculpture Garden was designed by landscape artist [definition: one’s job is the decorative and functional alteration and planting of grounds, especially at or around a building site] Kate Sessions who created many of San Diego’s most beautiful gardens in the late 1800s. The meandering garden facing Coast Boulevard was well known and well admired. Miss Scripps and her team of ten gardeners were constantly moving plants and trees from one place to another, which changed the view of coast from the windows of the house. By the 1940s, Ms. Scripps’ South Moulton Villa was turned into La Jolla’s first institution for art. From many names such as La Jolla Art Center to La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art and now Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the property and the garden underwent several renovations. The current design was not constructed until the 1980s. In 1986, architect Robert Venturi was commissioned to design an expansion for MCASD. Venturi expanded the Edwards Sculpture Garden space by adding new stairs, ramps, retaining walls, and paths to accommodate the stylized natural landscape. Venturi wanted to make sure he preserved the garden’s organic forms, contrasting it with the geometric forms of the building itself. The renovation was completed in 1996 and included the addition of what Venturi refers to as the “art wall,” where Ed Ruscha’s Brave Men of La Jolla is presently displayed. After Venturi’s renovations were complete, MCASD commissioned local landscape [definition: An expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view] architectural firm Garbini & Garbini to provide a new design for the Edwards Sculpture Garden. The firm’s design focused on the Museum’s sculpture garden, coastal planting, and the historic preservation of Ms. Scripps’ 1930s vintage garden. The garden displays installation artworks from the Museum’s permanent collection and features an array of specimen cactus, palms and succulents, and accent shrubs dating back to the original 1930s coastal garden.

Sculpture: a three dimensional piece of art made by shaping or combining materials, usually wood, rock, metal, glass, or marble Site-specific: art that is made with a certain location in mind and whose location influences the meaning of the art. Which of these pieces do you think is site-specific? Circle their names as you walk through the sculpture garden! You can find the name of each piece on the object label [definition: sign next to the artwork that says the title, artist and material the art is made of] near it. Pleasure Point Big Ganesh Garden Installation (Displaced Person) Long Yellow Hose Crossroads Liquid Ballistic Froebel’s Blocks

Eden Untitled Brave Men of La Jolla Drops I Hammering Man at 3,110,527 Three Cairns Crossroads Monument to a Bear

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NANCY RUBINS Pleasure Point 2006 nautical vessels, stainless steel, wire

How do you think the boats stay up in the air? There are wires connecting the boats that hold them up and attach them to the roof. The tension [definition: stiffness as a result of something being stretched as tight as possible] of the wires keeps the boats together so it’s safe to walk under them.

DRAW THEM IN HERE How many boats can you count? What colors do you see?

WHY BOATS? What activities do we do with boats? Boats are especially important to San Diego because they allow people to fish for food that they can cook or that can be served in restaurants. Boats are also fun for tourists or families to spend a day in the ocean. Nancy Rubins’ boats point right at the Pacific Ocean. Maybe she’s telling us to go for a swim!

NANCY RUBINS: PLEASURE POINT

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What kind of animal head does Ganesh have? Why might he have that animal’s head? It is said that Parvati, a goddess of Hinduism [definition: major Indian religion which worships a number of gods and believes in reincarnation, or rebirth after death], created Ganesh one day to help guard her washroom. When her husband Shiva came home, he was so angry with Ganesh for restricting his access that he cut off Ganesh’s head! Parvati told Shiva to find the nearest animal, an elephant, and reattached the elephant head to save Ganesh.

Niki de Saint Phalle Big Ganesh 1998 steel, polystyrene foam, polyurthane, automotive paint, electronic component, light bulbs, and iron base

Niki de Saint Phalle put a mouse next to Ganesh. There are many possible meanings for this, such as… 1.

2.

3.

In mythology, Ganesh is said to ride atop a mouse, showing humility in his lack of embarrassment at utilizing such a small animal.

Elephants don’t get along well with mice. Elephants have bad eyesight, so they are annoyed by mice which are too small for them to keep track of.

In Indian culture, mice are thought to be untamed creatures. Putting Ganesh next to his “pet” shows a balance between the calm elephant and the wild mouse.

Can you think of another MEANING? Invent your own! How do you think Ganesh feels about the mouse? How would you feel if a mouse was following you around? NIKI DE SAINT PHALLE: BIG GANESH

Niki de Saint Phalle’s sculpture of the Hindu [definition: an individual practicing Hinduism] god Ganesh shows her interest in mythology and storytelling. Ganesh is the Hindu god of the arts, sciences, success, education, and wisdom. More of Niki De Saint Phalle’s oversized sculptures can be found around San Diego, from Balboa Park to the UCSD campus. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO 6


Vito Acconci is interested in forms and the environment, and how those things can work together. He used to be involved in performance art [definition: a type of art that combines visual art, things you can see, with theatrical art, things you can do]. His work almost always needs you, as the audience, to confront the piece actively!

Who do you think Acconci traced to make the form [definition: the visible shape of something, also known as the positive space] of this piece?

Trace your hand at home and cut it out to make a piece that uses form (positive space) and negative space!

Do you think you could fit into the negative space here?

VITO ACCONCI Garden Installation (Displaced Person) 1987 concrete, stones, dirt and grass

VITO ACCONCI: DISPLACED PERSON

What does “displaced” mean? It means something has been taken out of its original place and put into a new, unfamiliar one. How would the meaning of this piece change if Acconci used a different word in the title?

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Long Yellow Hose is a piece of art made from found objects [definition: something the artist found that was not designed to be art and already had another purpose]. Gabriel Orozco likes to use found objects for art in order to say something about the purpose they already have. Notice how the hose is laid on top of plants that rely on water to live.

Why is water so important to the garden? San Diego is a desert so without water, plants couldn’t grow here! What else needs water to survive?

Do you have a hose in your home? Think about the plants you have in your garden at home or the plants at a local park. What design would you make? Design it here.

Gabriel Orozco Long Yellow Hose 1996 plastic watering hose

FUN FACT This hose is 1,200 feet long. That’s longer than three football fields!

Gabriel orozco: long yellow hose

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What do you think this cannon does now? The cannon doesn’t work as a weapon! What do you think the cannon does now? Look—there are handles to play on the cannon like a seesaw, and pumps so that water can flow through it like a fountain!

Roman de Salvo likes to turn common items or found objects into works of art. He changes an object’s usual purpose into something that either looks pretty or means something important. What do you have at your home that you could turn into a piece of art? How can you turn these objects into art?

Roman de Salvo says himself that the cannon is a “testament to bygone hostilities” looking back to the Spanish invasion.

Doesn’t this cannon look like it’s defending against a sea invasion? This area of California was invaded by Spain in the 1500s. This artwork reminds us of early settlements in the San Diego area.

ROMAN DE SALVO Liquid Ballistic 2001 mahogany, diaphragm pump, water, storage tank, brass, plumbing hardware, fasteners

DID yOU KNOW? A twin version of this cannon exists in Brooklyn, NY as part of the Public Art Fund.

ROMAN DE SALVO: Liquid Ballistic

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Richard Flesichner is a minimalist artist, which means he uses simple shapes and colors in order to say something more complicated. Blocks like the ones here allow kids to connect learning with fun. What do you have fun learning?

These are supposed to look like Toy blocks! They teach kids like you and your friends about shapes and building, and about how those shapes can fit in to nature. What shapes do you recognize in Richard Fleischner’s art? What would you build with your blocks? Try it at home!

What ARE SOME differences between art and nature? Are the blocks art? Could you do this with rocks found in the forest or beach? FUN FACT

Richard Fleischner Froebel’s Blocks 1983 limestone

richard fleischner: froebel’s blocks

Friedrich Froebel is the name of the man who invented kindergarten! He created songs, games, and toys like the toy blocks to help kids learn. Even the famous architect Frank Lloyd Wright is known to have used them when he was little.

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What might this man and woman be saying to each other? Consider how close they are standing to each other, what they are wearing, and where they might be.

Draw in the missing heads and bodies for these people!

PHOTO OPPORTUNITY Photo Opportunity! Try using a camera phone to take a picture with your heads positioned where the man and woman’s heads are on the sculpture. Be careful and touch the work. Take your picture and upload it to Flickr. Don’t forget to tag Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego.

judith shea Eden 1987 bronze

judith shea: Eden

This piece is influenced by the story of Eden found in Christianity [definition: the religion founded from the life and the teachings of Jesus Christ, professed by Eastern, Roman Catholic, and Protestant bodies]. A passage in the Bible [definition: the sacred scripture or book of Christianity], tells the story of how Adam and Eve lived together in the paradise garden of Eden until Eve was tempted by a snake to eat the apple of knowledge, which God told her not to eat. Because the rules were broken, God made them leave the garden and live in the desert. How do you think Judith Shea’s sculpture represents the story?

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MAURO STACCIOLI Untitled 1987 plywood, cement, red pigment, and metal

Do you recognize this shape? Where else might we see this shape in daily life?

The straight lines that make the triangle are supposed to remind the viewer of the straight lines on the Museum’s building. The triangle also points towards the horizon, which is another straight line. This piece shows that the artist likes how shapes respond to the environment; this piece is known as environmental art.

In this piece, the artist plays with the red triangle’s contrast [definition: opposite colors that stand out more when put next to each other] with the blue of the ocean and the sky. Which colors do you think would contrast with the colors listed here?

Mauro STACCIOLI: untitled

Red

blue ___________

Black

___________

Yellow ___________ Green

___________

Silver

___________

Try contrasting triangles of different colors with the colors of the landscape around you!

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This work includes the following text: “Brave Men Run in My Family.” What are the different meanings of the word “run?”

Did you know that ships, like the one Ruscha uses on the wall, can also run? That happens when the wind blows from behind the ship. The sails catch the wind and it helps the boat to move faster on the water.

To move very fast

To carry a characteristic from one generation to the next

To work or operate

And More!

What “runs” in your family? Blue eyes? A dog? Your sister’s nose? Make your own play on words inspired by Ed Ruscha.

Ed Ruscha Brave Men of La Jolla 1995–1996 acrylic on PVC coated fabric

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ runs in my family!

ed ruscha: brave men of la jolla

Ed Ruscha used to work in advertising [definition: a public notice about a product, like a TV commercial] so he likes to use words in his art!

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The 12-foot sign points away from the U.S.–Mexico border to ten West Coast and international cities. On the back of each city sign, there is a quotation from an important artist who lived there. For example, on the back of the street sign for Paris, France is a quotation from Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968).

Where have you been? Have you ever traveled to any of the cities on the sign? Where do you want to travel? Circle the cities and countries you want to travel to.

This work uses the style of official street signs and tourism markers.

FUN FACT

Marcos Ramírez ERRE, like several artists at the Museum, is inspired by objects found in everyday life. What is the difference between your street sign at home with this piece of art? Would you consider a stop sign art?

Each of the signs shows us the distance to the city from the U.S.–Mexico border. It is even aligned according to the points of a real life compass.

Marcos Ramírez erre: crossroads (border Tijuana - San Diego)

MARCOS RAMíREZ ERRE Crossroads (Border Tijuana – San Diego) 2003 aluminum, automotive paint, wood, vinyl

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FUN FACT Iran do Espírito Santo made twenty sets of dice that can be found along the U.S.–Mexico border, including this one!

Imagine the size of the hands it would take to roll dice that are 16 inches tall by 16 inches wide, and made of concrete!

What did the artist roll in this work? Where do you find dice normally? What sorts of games involve dice? List the games here! ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ What determines if you win or lose in these games? Is it skill or luck?

IRAN DO ESPÍRITO SANTO Drops I 1997 concrete

IRan do espîrito santo: Drops I

As a minimalist [definition: when an artist likes to reduce art to a minimal number of colors, shapes, and lines] artist, Iran do Espírito Santo likes to play with everyday objects in his work. In Drops I, he uses the dice often found in board games to convey the idea of luck. He is looking at the “luck of the draw” and how fate determines which side of the U.S.–Mexico border you are born on. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO 15


Where do you usually find hammers? What kind of work do you do with hammers? What do you consider work? What do you think the Hammering Man is working on? What story would you tell about this piece? Can you imagine hammering for 24 hours a day?

Jonathan Borofsky has hammering men all over the world in Japan and Switzerland and in the U.S. There are men hammering in the cities of New York, Minneapolis, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. He wanted all these hammering men to be hammering all together at the same time. The artist is showing us how everyone is connected no matter what time it is or how far away we are from each other.

Have you ever thought about where your sneakers come from? Jonathan Borofsky Hammering Man at 3,110,527 1988 13/4” thick COR-TEN steel with motorized aluminum arm

Jonathan borofsky: HAMMERING MAN AT 3,110,527

Most likely your sneakers were made in a foreign country like China or Chile by someone you’ve never met. That makes you connected to this person. Think about the things you have in your room–where did they come from? Who made them?

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DID yOU KNOW?

Andy Goldsworthy

Andy Goldsworthy is from Scotland and the word cairn [definition: A mound of rough stones built as a landmark or in memory of someone] comes from the Scottish Gaelic word càrn. An old Scottish Gaelic blessing is “Cuiridh mi clach air do chàrn”or, “I’ll put a stone on your cairn.”

Three Cairns 2002 limestone

The pieces aren’t being held together by anything except their own weight! Next time you are at the beach or playing at home, try to build a mound like Andy Goldsworthy’s. How large can you build it? What shape would you make it? Draw it here! Try making your own cairn with blocks at home.

andy goldsworthy: three cairns

Andy Goldsworthy brought six stonemasons all the way from Scotland to help him make this. He made a total of three cairns—two more sculptures just like this are in Iowa and the other one is in New York.

Cairns are traditionally journey markers. Each of the three cairns in Iowa, New York, and LA JOLLA mark the artist’s journeys across America. Where would you build your cairns? MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SAN DIEGO 17


ERIKA ROTHENBERG Monument to a Bear 2002–2003 glass reinforced concrete over steel, bronze plaque, edition 1 of 2

Given the title of the work, do you see what you would expect? Does the word monument [definition: a type of structure created to commemorate a person or important event] in the title of this artwork make you assume the work is supposed to be larger?

Why might the artist want us to honor nature? How are the memorials by Erika Rothenberg and Maya Lin different? How are they similar?

This work is a memorial to a black bear cub that had its paws burned. A memorial can be a monument or holiday intended to celebrate or honor the memory of a person or an event. In the United States, we honor the memory of important leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr. or war heroes as in Maya Lin’s Vietnam War Memorial (at right). In Monument to a Bear Erika Rothenberg asks us to consider nature, like this black bear cub, as a victim that should to be remembered. She wants us to honor nature like we do our war heroes.

ERIKA ROTHENBERG: Monument to a Bear

Photographic view of the apex of the Vietnam War Memorial, West Potomac Park, Washington, D.C., looking from the apex towards the Washington Monument. Courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress, Washington, D. C.

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Thank you for visiting the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego! Don’t forget that your admission is valid for seven days and includes admission to our downtown location at 1100 & 1001 Kettner Boulevard. If you’re in the La Jolla area for longer, please take a look at two of our additional works:

Incomplete Neon Square for La Jolla sits just above the Museum’s box office at an angle of the roofline. Stephen Antonakos plays with light and color. The piece changes with the location of the viewer and the time of day. The neon lights only come on at night, so be sure to stop by and see it after dark!

George Trakas Pacific Union 1986–1988 mixed media outdoor site installation

Pacific Union was designed for visitors to sit, meet, and meditate. George Trakas made sure to use steps, wooden walkways, and benches to engage the viewer. He invites you to enjoy the foliage, to perch atop the slabs of natural granite or huddle underneath them in private den-like hutches. It’s a great place to enjoy the view of the Pacific.

GEORGE TRAKAS: Pacific union and STEPHEN ANTONAKOS: Incomplete neon square for la jolla

Stephen Antonakos Incomplete Neon Square for La Jolla 1984 neon tubes and painted metal

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS advertising: a public notice about a product, like a TV commercial. Bible: the sacred scripture or book of Christianity. cairn: a mound of rough stones built as a landmark or in memory of someone. Christianity: the religion founded from the life and the teachings of Jesus Christ, professed by Eastern, Roman Catholic, and Protestant bodies.

monument: a type of structure created to commemorate a person or important event. negative space: the areas in an artwork that are empty. object label: a sign next to the artwork that says the title, artist, and material with which the art is made.

contrast: opposite colors that stand out more when put next to each other.

performance art: a type of art that combines visual art “things you can see” with theatrical art “things you can do.”

displaced: when something has been taken out of its original place and put into a new, unfamiliar one.

sculpture: a three dimensional piece of art made by shaping or combining materials, usually wood, rock, metal, glass, or marble.

environmental art: artworks that artists created in response to the environment, or when artists use the enviroment as a medium for their artwork.

site-specific: art that is made with a certain location in mind and whose location influences the meaning of the art. Site-specific pieces are installed permanently in a particular place.

form: the visible shape of something, also known as the positive space.

tension: stiffness as a result of something being stretched as tight as possible.

found objects (also known as common objects): something the artist found that was not designed to be art and already had another purpose. Hindu: an individual practicing Hinduism. Hinduism: major Indian religion which worships a number of gods and believes in reincarnation, or rebirth after death. landscape: an expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view. landscape artist: an artist whose job is the decorative and functional alteration and planting of grounds, especially at or around a building site. memorial: a monument or holiday intended to celebrate or honor the memory of a person or an event. minimalist: an artist who chooses to reduce art to a minimal number of colors, shapes, and lines.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

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CREDITS Vito Acconci, Garden Installation (Displaced Person), 1987, concrete, stones, dirt and grass. Extended loan of the artist. © 2012 Vito Acconci / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Stephen Antonakos, Incomplete Neon Square for La Jolla, 1984, neon tubes and painted metal. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase with contributions from the Museum Art Council Fund. © Stephen Antonakos 1984. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Jonathan Borofsky, Hammering Man at 3,110,527, 1988, 13/4” thick COR-TEN steel with motorized aluminum arm. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of Matthew and Iris Strauss. © Jonathan Borofsky 1988. Photo by Jimmy Fluker. Niki de Saint Phalle, Big Ganesh, 1998, steel, polystyrene foam, polyurethane, automotive paint, electronic component, light bulbs, and iron base. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of Ron and Mary Taylor to honor Martha Longnecker, Founder, Mingei International Museum of Folk Art. © 2012 Niki Charitable Art Foundation. All rights reserved / ARS, NY / ADAGP, Paris. Photo by Pablo Mason. Roman de Salvo, Liquid Ballistic, 2001, mahogany, diaphragm pump, water, storage tank, brass, plumbing hardware, fasteners. Courtesy of the artist and Quint Contemporary Art. © Roman de Salvo 2001. Photo by Pablo Mason. Iran do Espírito Santo, Drops I, 1997, concrete. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Anonymous gift. © Iran do Espírito Santo 1997. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Marcos Ramírez ERRE, Crossroads (Border Tijuana - San Diego), 2003, aluminum, automotive paint, wood, vinyl. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase. © Marcos Ramírez ERRE 2003. Richard Fleischner, Froebel’s Blocks, 1983, limestone. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase, Contemporary Collectors Fund in honor of Ronald J. Onorato. © Richard Fleischner 1983. Photo by Pablo Mason.

CREDITS

Andy Goldsworthy, Three Cairns, 2002, limestone. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase with funds from Sue K. and Dr. Charles C. Edwards. © Andy Goldsworthy 2002. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Gabriel Orozco, Long Yellow Hose, 1996, plastic watering hoses. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase. © Gabriel Orozco 1996. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Erika Rothenberg, Monument to a Bear, 2002-2003, glass reinforced concrete over steel, bronze plaque, edition 1 of 2. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Gift of Sheridan Brown. © Erika Rothenberg. Photo by Pablo Mason. Nancy Rubins, Pleasure Point, 2006, nautical vessels, stainless steel, steel wire. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase, International and Contemporary Collectors Funds. © Nancy Rubins. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian Gallery. Photo by Erich Koyama. Ed Ruscha, Brave Men of La Jolla, 1995-1996, acrylic on PVC coated fabric. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase with proceeds from Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Art Auction 2006, and from prior donations by Susan and Frank Kockritz and Mr. and Mrs. Norton S. Walbridge. © Ed Ruscha. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Judith Shea, Eden, 1987, bronze. Extended loan of Collette Carson and Dr. Ivor Royston. © Judith Shea 1987. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Mauro Staccioli, Untitled, 1987, plywood, cement, red pigment, and metal. Extended loan of the artist. © Mauro Staccioli. Photo by Pablo Mason. George Trakas, Pacific Union, 1986-1988, mixed media outdoor site installation. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Museum purchase with matching funds from the National Endowment for the Arts, Art in Public Places program. © George Trakas 1986-1988. Photo by Philipp Scholz Rittermann.

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Guide written by Jessica Jacobs and Jennifer Winter Snow, Education Interns, in collaboration with the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego Education Department. At the time of publication, Education Programs at MCASD are supported by The James Irvine Foundation, Qualcomm Foundation, the County of San Diego Community Enhancement Fund, the Samuel I. & John Henry Fox Foundation, and contributions to MCASD’s Museum Fund. Institutional support for MCASD is provided, in part, by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture.

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MCASD'S SCULPTURE AND SITE-SPECIFIC WORKS