Page 1

Celebrating 100 Years of Marine Aviation www.cherrypoint.marines.mil

Vol. 70, No. 19

May 17, 2012

End of an era

Cherry Point Marine named firefighter of the year at age 21 CPL. SAMANTHA H. ARRINGTON @SHARRINGTONUSMC

MCAS CHERRY POINT

For one small town Marine, the dream of becoming a firefighter never wavered. At age 21 and among the youngest ever named Marine Corps Firefighter of the Year in 2011, one can say that Lance Cpl. Daniel C. Dawson, an aircraft rescue and fire fighting specialist with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271, made his dream come true. The Checotah, Okla., native was 16 years old when his fire fighting dreams began. “I started cruising by the local fire department. It caught my eye seeing what the guys did,” said Dawson. “I talked to them and they told me to come back at 17 to start volunteering, so I did.” Dawson said he tries to be the best Marine and firefighter possible and his passion for what he does makes it easy. “My favorite part is saving lives,” said Dawson. “If you love what you do, you’ll never work See FIREFIGHTER page A9

LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART

Col. Daniel B. Conley, commanding officer of Marine Wing Support Group 27, speaks during his group’s deactivation ceremony Monday, at Miller’s Landing aboard Cherry Point, N.C. He said, “I’m sad to see the group deactivated, however, from a strategic standpoint, I understand why it is necessary.”

Support group stands down after 60 years of success LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART @STSTEWARTUSMC

MCAS CHERRY POINT

CPL. SAMANTHA H. ARRINGTON

Lance Cpl. Daniel C. Dawson, an aircraft rescue and fire fighting specialist with Marine Wing Support Squadron 271, dons his fire protection equipment at Marine Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, May 10. Dawson was named the 2011 Marine Corps Firefighter of the Year.

Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. James F. Amos’ plan to reduce the Marine Corps’ numbers by approximately 20,000 Marines, hit home when 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing’s Marine Wing Support Group 27 deactivated Monday, during a ceremony at Miller’s Landing aboard Cherry Point. As part of the Marine Corps drawdown, Marine wing support squadrons will be tactically reorganized to fall under Marine aircraft groups. Each squadron within the group is capable of creating and maintaining an entire airbase and have continuously deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in support of NATO International Security Assistance Force operations. “I’m sad to see the group deactivated, however, from a strategic standpoint, I understand why it is necessary,” said Col. Daniel B. Conley, commanding officer of MWSG-27. “I have had the privilege of working with the most outstanding Marines I have ever worked with in my career.” According to Conley, the deactivation of the support group is the first of three that are planned to be deactivated within the next month across the Marine Corps. “These kinds of things happen,” said Gunnery Sgt. Jesus M. Gonzales, MWSG-27 administration chief. “It’s unfortunate, but we will adapt and overcome to accomplish the mission,” Gonzales added.

LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART

Col. Daniel B. Conley, commanding officer of Marine Wing Support Group 27, and Sgt. Maj. Michael E. Sprague, sergeant major for MWSG-27, case the group’s colors during a deactivation ceremony Monday.

CNATT saves $1.1 million by streamlining practices Squadron awarded for achievements LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART @STSTEWARTUSMC

MCAS CHERRY POINT

Cherry Point’s Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training cut their training cost by more than $1 million in the last year and established a streamlined training process to get Marines to the fleet faster, with more knowledge. The American society for Training and Development noticed the schools initiative and awarded CNATT the Excellence in Practice Award, May 7, during a confer-

ence in Denver. “Our Marines had to work hard and communicate to make this accomplishment possible,” said Lt. Col. Paul M. Melchior, commanding officer of CNATT. He credited his Marines “never quit” determination. It all started when CNATT unit leaders across the ranks recognized a primary area that needed improvement and put into action a plan to fix it. Melchior said the primary area of concern was students spending too much time at the school waiting on classes

to begin. Apart from budgeting issues, the students had too much down time and were becoming bored allowing them to potentially get into trouble. To reduce the amount of time, the command set a goal to implement change by providing night classes and a more flexible schedule for the Marines in training. Now, after about a year of trial and error, Melchior said the Marines of CNATT were successful in reducing training time 30 percent, and disciplinary issues dropped more than 50 percent.

‘Atlantic Nomads’ change commanders LANCE CPL. SCOTT L. TOMASZYCKI MCAS CHERRY POINT

LANCE CPL. SCOTT L. TOMASZYCKI

Lt. Col. Alfred M. Sanchez, left, and Lt. Col. John R. Siary salute the colors during a Marine Air Support Squadron 1 change of command ceremony aboard Cherry Point, N.C., Friday.

@ZYCKIUSMC

Lt. Col. John R. Siary stepped down from command of Marine Air Support Squadron 1 for Lt. Col. Alfred M. Sanchez to become the squadron’s 66th commanding officer, May 11, during a ceremony here, Friday. MASS-1 is part of Marine Air Control Group 28 and acts as a relay for tactical air support requests between Marines on the ground and aircraft above. Siary commanded the unit since November 2010. “My time with MASS-1 was very challenging;

we faced two deployments right when I took command,” Siary said. “We sent two detachments to Operation Enduring Freedom and two combat tours later, here they are, and they’re looking good today ready to turn over to a new CO. “Now, I’m going to head down to Maxwell Air Force Base to be an instructor at the Air War College.” Sanchez said its always about leadership. “I’m looking forward to working with the team of Marines that are in place now, being able to conduct our mission and doing our part to continue to make this control group the best in the Marine Corps,” he said.

SEASONED DEVIL DOG TALKS Aviation Anniversary A2

Davis farewell

B1

Firefighter Awards

A7

Mess Hall Menu

B2

Chaplain’s Corner

A9

The Local Buzz

B3

ABOUT THE PAST AND FUTURE OF

MARINE AVIATION

See A5 for photos and story

With your smartphone download a QR code reader and scan the code.


A2 May 17, 2012

Youtube.com/MCASCPPA

The Windsock

Marine Aviation was officially born on May 22, 1912, when 1st. Lt. Alfred A. Cunningham, pictured left in a Curtiss hydro-aeroplane in 1914, reported to the Naval Aviation Camp at Annapolis “for duty in connection with aviation.” This was several months after the camp was established in 1911, manned by Lts. T. G. Ellyson, John Rodgers and J. H. Towers. The camp consisted of several mechanics and three aircraft. Cunningham soloed after only two hours and 40 minutes of instruction in a Wright Bros. Model B-1, and became Naval Aviator No. 5. In the spring of 1912, Cunningham was ordered to Annapolis for flight instruction. When the United States joined World War I in 1917, the Marine Corps had just five aviators including Cunningham and 30 enlisted men. At war’s end, Marine aviation included 282 officers and 2,180 enlisted men. Marine aviators won two Medals of Honor during World War I.

The Marine Corps welcomed its first F-35B aircraft, the Marine Corps variant of the F-35 Lightning II, at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., Jan. 11. The F-35B, one of three variants of the Joint Strike Fighter, is a tactical fixedwing aircraft that is to be the replacement for several aging jets within the Marine Corps. The F-35B’s mission is to support the Marine Corps’ tactical and operational needs for close air support in austere conditions and locations that may be inaccessible to traditional fighters. Thanks to its short takeoff and vertical landing capabilities, the F-35B is designed to operate from expeditionary airfields in remote, nonpermissive environments with shorter runways, contributing to the Marine Corps’ role as the nation’s expeditionary force-in-readiness.

LANCE CPL. MICHAEL R. LOUCEL Job Title: Warehouse Clerk Unit: MACS-2 Hometown: Rockledge, Fla. Age: 21 Date Joined: Aug. 22, 2011

The editorial content is edited, prepared and approved by the Public Affairs Office at Cherry Point. Correspondence should be addressed to: Commanding Officer, Public Affairs Office, (Attn: Individual concerned), PSC Box 8013, MCAS Cherry Point, N.C. 28533-0013. To provide comments or suggestions call 252-466-4241 or email: cherry.point.windsock@gmail.com. Windsock is a registered trademark. To address any distribution problems please contact the distribution manager at Ellis Publishing at 252-444-1999. This Department of Defense newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the DoD. Contents of the Windsock are not necessarily the official views of or endorsed by the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, United States Marine Corps, Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, or the Public Affairs Office, Cherry Point, N.C. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, the U.S. Marine Corps, or Ellis Publishing Co., of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other nonmerit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. The Windsock is published by Ellis Publishing Co., a private firm in no way connected with the Department of Defense or the U.S. Marine Corps under exclusive written contract with Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, N.C. The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the PAO.

Lance Cpl. Michael R. Loucel is a warehouse clerk with Marine Air Control Squadron 2, where he receives and ships supplies to and from other offices in the squadron. Loucel, a native of Rockledge, Fla., said he enjoys the hours and hard work he puts in every day. “I am not stuck behind a computer day after day for hours at a time,” said Loucel. “I’m either carrying heavy boxes or driving a forklift. I enjoy working hard.” Loucel said the hardest part of his day is when the work is slow and there is not much for him to do. He likes to keep busy in order to stay on time with the squadron mission. “The missions for any Marine Corps unit would fail without the supply Marine,” said Loucel. “Without us they would have a harder time getting the right gear for deployments. We provide the gear needed to keep the trucks rolling and the radios squawking.”

COMMANDING OFFICER MCAS CHERRY POINT COL. PHILIP J. ZIMMERMAN

PUBLIC AFFAIRS DIRECTOR MAJ. WILL KLUMPP PUBLIC AFFAIRS CHIEF MASTER SGT. MARK E. BRADLEY PRESS OFFICER 2ND LT. HECTOR R. ALEJANDRO PRESS CHIEF CPL. TYLER J. BOLKEN

EDITORS CPL. SAMANTHA H. ARRINGTON CPL. SANTIAGO G. COLON JR. STACEY R. SWANN

Highlight Your Marine or Sailor Superstar

STAFF WRITERS CPL. BRIAN ADAM JONES CPL. GLEN E. SANTY LANCE CPL. ANDREA CLEOPATRA DICKERSON LANCE CPL. CORY D. POLOM LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART LANCE CPL. SCOTT L. TOMASZYCKI

Call or email The Windsock cherry.point.windsock@gmail.com

REMEMBER TO RECYCLE

466-3542 LANCE CPL. CORY D. POLOM


Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

The Windsock

May 17, 2012

A3

CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTH

A K-MAX helicopter with Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 rests on a helipad prior to liftoff for a supply mission in Helmand province, Afghanistan, April 30. The K-MAX has flown more than 400 missions supporting Marines at various locations.

3rd Marine Aircraft Wing (FWD) explores the use of unmanned helicopters CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTH MARINE CORPS AIR STATION MIRAMAR / 3RD MARINE AIRCRAFT WING

HELMAND PROVINCE, Afghanistan – Improvised explosive devices have changed the way the Marine Corps engages hostile forces. The need has risen for supplies to reach the most remote parts of Afghanistan quickly, reliably and safely. Late last year, the Corps began experimenting with the K-MAX – an unmanned helicopter, able to transport large amounts of cargo and reduce the need for convoys. With troops spread across a desolate country with few paved roads, steep mountains, rocky terrain and abrasive weather, the K-MAX has arrived to help deliver supplies across the harsh lands of Afghanistan. Presently, convoys are exposed to many potential dangers, such as improvised explosive devices and ambushes. Both have claimed the lives of Marines in the past. “The need [for an alternate transport solution] came about because the Marine Corps wanted to get trucks off the road,” said Maj. Kyle O’Connor, the detachment officer in charge for Cargo Resupply Unmanned Aircraft Systems [CRUAS], a component of Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1. “They wanted to be able to deliver supplies from one locale to another without putting Marines in danger of improvised explosive devices,” he said. “The Marine Corps needed a fast, reliable platform with which to deliver to COPs [Combat Outposts].” The K-MAX platform has a unique configuration. The two sets of rotors are mounted side-by-side and turn in opposite directions. Each rotor on the helicopter is mounted at a slight angle to the other so that the blades can spin simultaneously without colliding. This configuration allows for superior stability and power while eliminating the need for a tail rotor. K-MAX has, thus far, fulfilled the Corps’ request of transporting large amounts of cargo over great distances in an expeditious manner. O’Connor explained that in the month of March alone, the K-MAX ferried approximately 500,000 pounds of cargo and has transported more than 1.3 million

CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTH

A K-MAX helicopter with Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 rests in a hangar in Helmand province, Afghanistan, April 30. The K-MAX platform has two sets of rotors mounted side-by-side and turn in opposite directions. This configuration allows for superior stability and power while eliminating the need for a tail rotor.

pounds since its arrival five months ago. It has flown roughly 400 missions in theater. O’Connor said the K-MAX has performed so well that the original six-month trial has been extended in theater. “It’s such a new system for the DoD [Department of Defense] that there isn’t a whole lot of reliability data for it,” he said. “Since it’s done so well, the deployment extension is going to give us more time to continue to gather data on its performance and transport more cargo.” The data collected will give Corps officials insight on whether to keep the K-MAX as a permanent addition to the Corps’ unmanned squadrons. “We’re flying to see if there are any issues and see if problems come up,” O’Connor said. While data is being collected, new tac-

tics, techniques and procedures have been created to weave the K-MAX into everyday operations across Helmand province. Sgt. Trevor Scarberry, an air vehicle operator with CRUAS said he has helped create new procedures for the aircraft. “Since no one has done this and it’s all brand new, we’re having to develop new ways of doing things,” said Scarberry, of Choctaw, Okla. He said new procedures have been implemented for safety, landing zone and air space coordination. One such procedure ensures the safety of ground crews unloading the K-MAX once it reaches its destinations. The intermeshing duel rotors spin within a few feet of the ground and surrounding personnel must be keenly aware of the down tilt of the rotor blades. Even though the K-MAX is still in its trial run, Scarberry said he is very pleased

with the performance of the aircraft. “The precision of the system is amazing,” he said. “I’ve been impressed and surprised.” In addition to resupplying units on the ground, the K-MAX will also support the reduction of international troops. While NATO forces prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan, the K-MAX will be working alongside them. “As the drawdown occurs, there will be fewer vehicles and a greater demand for air transportation,” O’Connor said. “With K-MAX being extended, we hope to use it to assist in retrograde operations.” O’Connor added since February, the K-MAX has helped retrograde equipment from several combat outposts and will likely continue these types of operations in the future.

GET READY FOR YOUR NEXT MISSION Be one of over 650 veterans to join the ranks at Schneider National this year. With core values of safety, integrity, excellence & respect, Schneider is a natural fit for anyone with a military background. - Military Apprenticeship Program: Earn an extra

$1,069/month your first year (plus your paycheck) - The best training in the industry, including tuition

reimbursement for CDL training - Guaranteed home time for drill & annual training - Extended benefits & differential pay if deployed

for up to 18 months - Hiring all ranks and all MOS from all branches - Opportunities across the U.S. — travel to see

new places or stick close to home

403 W. Main St., Havelock Wed-Thur 4:30-11:00pm Fri-Sat 4:30-12:00pm Sun 10-4 Brunch

Grand Opening

www.discoveryDiving.com Dive Shop • Events • Exploration • Training

Reservations are highly encouraged!

BUY 1 ENTREE GET 1 HALF PRICE

GI BILL APPROVED INSTRUCTOR PROGRAM

INTERESTED IN HAVING A PROFESSIONAL SCUBA CAREER?

Come & Discover the Next Exciting Frontier!!!

222

www.schneiderjobs.com 1-800-44-PRIDE

252-728-2265

Join us for dinner nightly Live music starts playing nightly at 7PM

expires 5/31/12

222

414 Orange St., Beaufort NC 28516

www.cadencerestaurant.com

Go Pro! Love Your Job! Travel!


A4 May 17, 2012

The Windsock

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

SGT. PAUL ROBBINS

Lance Cpl. Ryan Petty, a crew chief with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 265 (REIN), 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit, poses with a Japanese girl during a static display of CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters at the Atsugi Air Show, Atsugi Naval Air Facility, Japan, April 28. The Marines’ participation in the event comes one year after their assistance to Japanese tsunami victims during Operation Tomodachi. The 31st MEU is the United States’ expeditionary force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region.

HMM 265 Dragons return to Atsugi, one year after Operation Tomodachi SGT. PAUL ROBBINS 31ST MARINE EXPEDITIONARY UNIT

ATSUGI NAVAL AIR FACILITY, Japan – One year after rendering assistance to Japanese tsunami victims during Operation Tomadachi from a base of operations in Atsugi, the Dragons of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 265 (Reinforced) returned for an encore. Three CH-46E Sea Knight helicopters and 16 Marines, part of the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit’s Air Combat Element, conducted a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief demonstration along with a static display for the Atsugi Air Show, April 28. “We demonstrated a section of CH-46E helicopters delivering supplies to a landing zone and evacuating a casualty to safety,” said Capt. Joseph “Raw” McConnell, a CH-46E pilot and native of Scarborough, Maine. The Marines were invited by the base commander, Navy Captain Steven Weiman, to participate in the air facility’s first air show in 12 years. The show gathered more than 31,000 Japanese citizens and base family members

for a display that featured more than two dozen aircraft from Marine Corps, Navy and Japanese forces. The Marines received a warm welcome and widespread recognition from the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Forces and citizens of Atsugi, who remembered their actions in March of 2011. “We were really impressed by (the Marines), because everyone had left for evacuation except Japanese,” said Lt. Cmdr. Ryuji Mori, Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force. “Only the Marine CH-46 came here to our rescue, just like Superman!” The Dragons arrived in Atsugi on March 13, 2011, with eight helicopters and more than 100 Marines and Sailors to assist in the relief of Japanese citizens devastated by the effects of the tsunami. The squadron conducted humanitarian aid and disaster relief operations for more than four weeks, delivering much needed supplies to the survivors of the event. Even though a year has passed, the memories of that operation are ever present in the minds of those Marines

who were there. “It feels great to come back and meet face to face with the JMSDF pilots that we worked with and the people who were directly impacted by our efforts last year,” said McConnell. The level of excitement for their return surprised the Marines, who faced an endless crowd of admirers during the six-hour show. Long lines to board and view the inside of the aircraft were matched by the lines to meet the Marines themselves. “It was an honor to come back here and have all these people recognize us,” said Sgt. Paul Rathbun, a crew chief for HMM-265 (REIN) and native of Shinglehouse, Penn. “We were taking pictures with them and signing autographs all day.” The 31st MEU serves as the United States’ force in readiness for the Asia Pacific region, and the Marine Corps’ only continually forward deployed expeditionary unit.

Ashford University is enhancing the minds of today’s Marines. Complete your degree at home or abroad. Discover a supportive learning community designed for you to go to school while you serve. Ashford’s digital tools allow you to keep in touch with your courses while on the go. Even deployment doesn’t mean your education is over – you can continue while deployed or pick up where you left off when you return. To learn about all your benefits, contact Ashford today. Call 800.332.1783 or visit military.ashford.edu/windsock today.

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association (ncahlc.org). Benefits subject to eligibility. Visit military.ashford.edu for complete eligibility requirements.

Ashford University • 400 North Bluff Blvd. • Clinton, IA 52732

12AUAM0630 • AC-0255


Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

The Windsock

May 17, 2012

A5

PHOTOS BY LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART

Retired Lt. Gen. Philip D. Shutler speaks to Marine officers at Miller’s Landing here, May 3. The Marines gathered around Shutler while he spoke about his time in the Marine Corps. He also spoke about the past, present and future of Marine Corps aviation.

LANCE CPL. STEPHEN T. STEWART MCAS CHERRY POINT

@STSTEWARTUSMC

Hundreds of Marine officers gathered to listen to retired Lt. Gen. Philip Shutler speak about Marine Corps aviation May 3, at Miller’s Landing aboard Cherry Point. The 85-year-old former Marine aviator and infantry officer spoke to the officers in attendance about the dynamic history of Marine aviation. “The excellence has always been there,” said Shutler. “Marine Corps aviation will always be the best in the world.” Shutler, who joined the Marine Corps in 1947, spoke to those gathered about what makes the Marine Corps unique, evoking historical examples from World War II, Korea and today. He said the Marine Corps is uniquely suited to integrate ground attack with closeair support and pointed to recent events in Afghanistan and Libya as evidence to that. “It was an honor to hear from a retired Marine with

that much knowledge,” said Capt. Eric D. Albright, an AV-8B Harrier pilot with Marine Attack Squadron 223. “He knows from personal experience.” Albright returned just weeks before from a sixmonth deployment to Afghanistan. He said it was a privilege to be able to hear Shutler’s wisdom and relate it to his recent experiences in combat. Shutler served as a platoon leader and as a reconnaissance company commander in Korea. He was designated a naval aviator in 1952 and served in various fighter and attack squadrons throughout his career before retiring in 1980 as director of operations for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis, commanding general of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, met Shutler at a function in Washington and invited him to come speak at Cherry Point. “The amount he has accomplished in his time in the Marine Corps is motivating to all the junior Marines here,” said Davis.

Retired Lt. Gen. Philip D. Shutler raises his glass to Marine officers during a group discussion at Miller’s Landing here, May 3. “The excellence in Marine Corps aviation has always been there,” said Shutler. “Marine Corps aviation will always be the best in the world.”

Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis presents retired Lt. Gen. Philip D. Shutler a plaque thanking him for speaking to Marine officers about the history of Marine aviation May 3, at Miller’s Landing here. Shutler, who joined the Marine Corps in 1947, spoke to the crowd about what makes the Marine Corps unique, evoking historical examples from World War II, Korea and today.

Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis speaks to Marine officers during a group discussion at Miller’s Landing here, May 3.


A6 May 17, 2012

The Windsock

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

Marines sweep competition at Warrior Games SGT. AARON HOSTUTLER DEFENSE MEDIA ACTIVITY - MARINES

Quantico, Va. – The All-Marine Warrior Games team won the Chairman’s Cup for the third year in a row at this year’s Warrior Games. The games, which took place May 1-5, at the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, showcased wounded, ill and injured service members from all branches. The Chairman’s Cup is awarded to the team that wins the most medals in competitions including archery, cycling, shooting, wheelchair basketball, seated volleyball, swimming and track and field. The Marines took 89 with the Army being their closest competitors with 63 medals. The rest of the teams, the Navy/Coast Guard, Air Force and Special Operations had a combined score of 57. One event the Marines dominated was shooting. There they took 20 out of 24 medals including all eight of the gold. Every time the gold medals were awarded the Marines hymn played, so by the end of the event the competing services knew it by heart. “I heard it eight times last year. I heard it eight times this year and I’ll hear it eight times next year,” said Roger Withrow, a shooting coach with the Marines team. “We’re ready. Bring it on.” During the 2011 Warrior Games the Marines took the same number of medals, proving their worth behind a weapon and that every Marine is a rifleman.

PHOTO BY PAT CUBEL

Cpl. Justin Jones, Sgt. Joey Smith and Lance Cpl. Lance Weir receive the Chairman’s Cup from Admiral Winnefeld, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, at the closing ceremony of the 2012 Warrior Games aboard the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., May 5.

Offer available for select 3 and 4 bedroom homes available TODAY for immediate move in at Binder Oaks and Nugent Cove Legacy neighborhoods! Present this ad at the Military Housing Office or the AMCC Leasing Center located at: Bldg 286 Cherry Point, NC 28532 tNo Deposits, Move In Fees, or Credit Check required tBasic Electricity, Water & Garbage Service Included tPet friendly with no pet deposit or fees required t24-Hour Onsite, Dependable Maintenance Service tLawn Service Included tConvenient to base amenities and work tAccess to AMCC Community Center includes swimming pool, free wireless, and 24/7 Fitness Center Not valid for current AMCC residents. New resident must move in by June 30th, 2012 in Nugent Cove legacy homes or Binder Oaks to be eligible for this special. May be eligible for DMO/TMO move. Restrictions May Apply.

Choose your body shop like you'd choose your car. • Trained & Experienced Professionals • Exact Color Match • Percision Repairs • Claim Assistance

• Expert Repairs on all Makes & Models • Satisfaction Guaranteed • State-Of-The-Art Equipment & Procedures While differences in repair estimates are common, lower estimates may not include all necessary work. It's easy for some body shops to underbid by simply overlooking details. We will work with your insurance company to provide you with a comprehensive appraisal and solid service all at a fair prices.

Quality Body Shop We'll restore your confidence while we restore your vehicle. 1305 East Main Street Havelock, NC 28532 252-447-3066 or 252-447-2086

I AM

CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED

“PARDON OUR NOISE, IT’S THE SOUND OF FREEDOM” For more than 70 years, those “Sounds of Freedom” have echoed our local skies.

Be a part of The Past – The Present – The Future of our local economy and show your support of MCAS Cherry Point. Every other Thursday, the Havelock News and New Bern Sun Journal will list names of supporters along with articles showing the importance of Cherry Point to our local economy. WE CANNOT AFFORD TO LOSE CHERRY POINT! For $25.00 you can show your support of Cherry Point with the airplane below and WAIT, THAT’S NOT ALL –your name will be added to a petition list to “KEEP CHERRY POINT”. “THERE’S STRENGTH IN NUMBERS! $5.00 will be donated to the Allies for Cherry Point’s Tomorrow.

Y POINT! I / WE SUPPORT CHERRith Family The Sm

Each jet will represent your signature and name on the petition list and will also go toward sponsorship of the Cherry Point page.

Name on Jet: _______________________________________________ Person Submitting Ad (not in ad): ______________________________ Telephone # (not in ad): ______________________________________ Jet can be brought into the Havelock News office at 230 Stonebridge Square, Havelock, NC 28532 or E-mail: rsmith@freedomenc.com Pay by Cash, Debit or Credit Card. Mail to: Havelock News, Attn: I Support Cherry Point, P.O. Box 777, Havelock, NC 28532


Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

The Windsock

May 17, 2012

A7

Cherry Point emergency personnel receive awards

LANCE CPL. CORY D. POLOM

Assistant fire chiefs Kazimieras L. Prapuolenis, left, and Rodney T. Wade, far right, pose with emergency services personnel from the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point Fire Department following an awards ceremony at Fire Station 3, May 10. The awards recognize the hard work and self-sacrifice of each recipient, on and off duty, Wade said. During the ceremony, the recipients from 2010 were also recognized. Cherry Point Fire and Emergency Services personnel are trained and certified Department of Defense firefighters and certified emergency medical technicians. They respond to structural fires as well as aircraft emergencies, wood fires, hazardous materials incidents and automobile accidents in addition to other obligations.

From the left, the awardees are: Joseph H. Smith

Raymond J. Bane

2010 B-Shift Firefighter of

2011 Firefighter of the Year

Brandee J. Ridgway 2010 Firefighter of the Year

the Year

STAY 3 WEEKs GET THE 4TH WEEK FREE 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS

Lawrence A. Berdan

Eric A. Slaughter

2010 Emergency Medical Services Provider of the Year

2010 A-Shift Firefighter of the Year

BAR-B-Q PLATTER

Includes: BAR-B-Q, POTATO SALAD, COLESLAW & HUSHPUPPIES (Valid on both Regular & Large Platter)

COMBO DARK PLATTER Includes: THIGH, LEG, BAR-B-Q, POTATO SALAD, COLESLAW & HUSHPUPPIES

1.00 OFF $2.00 OFF

$ *ACTUAL PHOTO*

Housekeeping Provided. Everything Furnished. Move In Today! No Waiting - No Deposits Pay by Day: $59.00 Pay by Week: $299.00

• NEWPORT • HOSTESS HOUSE

* not valid with any other offers or discounts. Valid at participating locations • expires 5/31/12

* not valid with any other offers or discounts. Valid at participating locations • expires 5/31/12

8 PIECE CHICKEN BOX

CHICKEN DARK PLATTER

Includes: 2 THIGHS, 2 LEGS, 2 WINGS, 2 BREASTS & 2 DZ. HUSHPUPPIES

Includes: THIGH, LEG, POTATO SALAD, COLESLAW & HUSHPUPPIES

Only $9.99 Only $4.99 * not valid with any other offers or discounts. Valid at participating locations • expires 5/31/12

* not valid with any other offers or discounts. Valid at participating locations • expires 5/31/12

Quiet Serene Settings • Security Guard • Housekeeping Provided Low Rates For Unassisted Seniors & Handicapped

NEWPORT ~ 252.223.6020

Join Us for Sunday Brunch! 1419 E. MAIN ST., HAVELOCK, NC • 252-447-5885

Relax and Leave the Cooking to Us.

Unwanted Tattoos, Facial Hair or Blemishes?

11:30am - 3:00pm Adults $15.95 Children $8.95

You need to see William J. Hall MD Board CertiÀed Facial Plastic Surgeon

Enjoy Chef Smoke's Prime Rib Every Sunday and Much More!

R20 Method Tattoo Removal • As seen on MSNBC • Revolutionary method erases tattoos in 6 months instead of 12 - 18 months by the old technique • Developed at Harvard University • Minimal pain • Works on all skin types Diode Laser Hair Removal • Any area of the body • Painless and safe • Guaranteed results after 6 treatments • Competitive Pricing

Voted Best Chef Three Years in a Row! Voted Best Brunch in New Bern!

Catering and Banquet Centre

Bring the Family & See For Yourself!

Make Reservations Today!

Don't Forget Your Church Bulletin to Receive 15% OFF your ENTIRE PARTY!

2301 Neuse Blvd. New Bern, NC 28560

252-633-1193 TheFlameCatering.com

Walk-in Aesthetics Center 4426 Arendell St., Morehead City, NC • 252.240.3223

www.facialsandÀllers.com


A8 May 17, 2012

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

The Windsock

President Obama speaks to troops at Bagram Air Field

ARMY SGT. ROLAND HALE

President Barack Obama visits Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, to greet Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines on the anniversary of the death of Al Qaeda leader, Osama Bin Laden, May 2. President Obama told the crowd that he is proud of them and that many of the positive events in Afghanistan occurred in part because of all that the U.S. armed services have done.

Now Serving Carteret and Craven County

When it comes to accident damage...

(252) 808-3100 www.mooresportsmed.com We accept and file most insurance including Tricare

Adult & Pediatric Orthopedic Injuries Robotic Joint Replacement Sports Medicine Hand Surgery ~ Fracture Care Getting you back to the lifestyle and activities you love

A National winner of customer service & satisfaction awards Roberts’ Body Shop always puts the customer first.

Roberts’ Body Shop in Havelock has been servicing people in this area for over 40 years. We have what it takes to restore your car to pre-accident condition using the finest stateof-the-art equipment and the latest frame-straightening techniques. Don’t settle for anyone less than the best. We’ll even work directly with your insurance company.

Guess What Time It Is?

Book Your Vacation Flight Now Served by

DELTA and US AIRWAYS, & Charlotte.

with direct ights to Atlanta

ROBERTS’ BODY SHOP

CLOSE. CONVENIENT. CONNECTED.

562 U.S. Hwy 70, Havelock, NC 28532

(252) 447-3274

www.robertsbodyshop.biz

Jeffrey K. Moore, M.D. Orthopedic Surgeon East Coast Square 4251 Arendell St., Morehead City, NC

www.CoastalCarolinaAirport.com

Chuck Pfaff PA-C McCarthy Blvd. 612-B, New Bern, NC

SPONSORED BY AURORA/RICHLAND TOWNSHIP CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

MAY 25TH - 27TH, 2012 AURORA, NC Friday, May 25th 6:00 pm Opening Ceremonies - Vendors Available 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm Live Music - The Ginger Thompson Band

Saturday, May 26th 8:00 am - 11:00 pm Festival 8:30 am 5K Run - Downtown 9:00 am Veteran’s Breakfast – Open to all Veterans 9:00 am - 3:00 pm AFM Fossil Lectures Main Museum Building Featuring: Mr. David Bohaska from the National Smithsonian with: “The Origin and Evolution of Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises” 11:00 am Parade 12:00 pm Lawn Mower Pulls 12:00 pm Veterans Presentation (Directly After Parade) 11:00 am - 4:00 pm PCS Tours (See the Mine and some of the Worlds Largest Draglines)

1:00 pm - 6:00 pm Live Music 3:00 pm - 7:00 pm Fossil Museum Auction (Behind the Learning Center) 7:00 pm - 11:00 pm Street Dance - Train Wreck

Saturday All Day Activities Foods and Crafts, Live Stage Entertainment, Carnival, Children’s Rides, Helicopter Rides, Car Show, Smithsonian Institution, Fossil Finds at Various Sites in Aurora, Mysterious Fossil Find (In Reject Piles),Water Balloon Toss at Celebrities, Educational Tent with various local museums including the Schiele, Ronald McDonald

Sunday, May 27th Church Service and All Day Gospel Sing

° UNIVERSALPICTURES PRESENTS IN ASSOCIATION WITH HASBRO A BLUEGRASSFILMS/FILM 44 PRODUCTION A PETER BERG FILM “BATTLESHIP” TAYLOR KITSCH ALEXANDER SKARSGARD RIHANNA BROOKLYN DECKER TADANOBU ASANO EXECUTIVE AND LIAM NEESON MUSICBY STEVE JABLONSKY PRODUCERS JONATHAN MONEBASEDBRADEN AFTERGOOD PRODUCEDBYWRITTENBRIAN GOLDNER SCOTT STUBER DIRECTED PETER BERG SARAH AUBREY DUNCAN HENDERSON BENNETT SCHNEIR A UNIVERSALPICTURE ON HASBRO’S “BATTLESHIP” BY JON HOEBER & ERICH HOEBER BY PETER BERG VISUAL EFFECTS AND ANIMATION BY INDUSTRIAL LIGHT & MAGIC SOUNDTRACK ON BACK LOT MUSIC AND VARÈSE SARABANDE

© 2011 UNIVERSAL STUDIOS “BATTLESHIP”™ AND © HASBRO


Twitter.com/MCASCPPA

May 17, 2012 A9

The Windsock

FIREFIGHTER from page A1 another day again in your life.” Dawson competed against more than 900 other Marines to be named Firefighter of the Year. Winning the award is judged on performance on and off duty. “My civilian fire side really helped out,” said Dawson. “My master sergeant said that it was crazy I was being submitted for the award because I’m a lance corporal. Most Marines nominated are corporals and sergeants.” Dawson is stationed at Marine Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue. In August he will travel to the Department of Defense Fire and Emergency Services Awards ceremony in Denver to compete with the other military branches for the title of “DOD Firefighter of the Year.” “I believe he’s the first lance corporal and the youngest ever to win this award,” said Staff Sgt. Benjamin A. Parmele, Dawson’s section leader at MWSS-271. “On top of that, he’s also the first to win this award in our squadron. I am immensely impressed and proud.” Dawson linked his fire fighting dreams with a life in the Corps in 2010. A conversation with a close family member sealed the deal. “My sister was a Marine and Harrier mechanic,” said

Dawson. “She’s the one who told me about crash crew. I figured I’d get my fire fighting certificates and serve my country as well. It worked out.” Dawson may be the second Marine in his family, but he is the first firefighter. “My dad was all about it and Mom was scared because she worries about me running into burning buildings, but it’s what I love to do, so she copes with it,” said Dawson. “She’s happy for me and she supports me.” Dawson volunteers with the local civilian department and rarely takes a day off. “I mostly stick to the grind,” he said. “I haven’t’ slept in since I went back home on leave December of last year.” Above all, Dawson enjoys what he does and said because of the long hours he spends at the fire stations, he views the Marines and firefighters as family. Fellow Marine, Cpl. Alexander J. Stead, spoke highly of Dawson and said he doesn’t see how he finds the time to volunteer so often. Stead describes Dawson as a hard worker and one of the best firefighters he knows. Although his passion for his job persists, Dawson said he will cut back his hours soon and is looking forward to extending his family.

“I’m getting married June 2 and ... I’ll be spending a lot more of my off time with her,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons I went so gung ho, because I know ... I’ll have to cut back.”

CPL. SAMANTHA H. ARRINGTON

Lance Cpl. Daniel C. Dawson, an aircraft rescue and fire fighting specialist with MWSS-271, dons his fire protection equipment at Marine Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue, May 10. Dawson was named the 2011 Marine Corps firefighter of the year.

Patience LT. ERIC HAMMEN MARINE WING HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON 2

We live in a microwave society that wants everything done instantaneously and sometimes even that is too slow. Our “high speed” Internet isn’t downloading quickly enough, the trip through the drive-thru is taking too long, and the instant coffee is just too slow. If you’re anything like my family, we pack our lives with “necessary” activities and then hurry up to get there, only to complain and wonder where all the time has gone. We dream of time when we can relax and allow ourselves to be patient with our current circumstances. The problem arises when decisions present themselves. We tend to react immediately without sitting back and letting them work themselves out. I am reminded of a story of two frogs that were dropped into a container of cream. One frog panicked, it quickly fell to the

bottom of the container and drowned. The other, calmly and patiently moved its legs and kept its head above the cream. In a short time and with consistent movement, the frog was able to crawl out of the container on the butter it had created. Are you quick to give up, only promptly to fail? Or do you assess the situation, take a deep breath, and be patient with the solution? Proverbs 19:11 tells us, “A man’s wisdom gives him patience; it is to his glory to overlook an offense.” It is tough to be part of a society that is so impatient and yet live at a time in history where we need patience more than ever. We have a change in political leaders, the economy is transitioning, many are losing their livelihood, and yet we still want everything done immediately. Warren Buffett states “The stock market is designed to transfer money from the active to the patient.” Patience is defined as the state of endur-

ance under difficult circumstances. This can mean perseverance in the face of delay or provocation, without becoming annoyed or upset; or exhibiting forbearance under strain, especially when faced with longterm difficulties. It is also used to refer to the character trait of steadfastness. Like many other characteristics that we are to model, it seems they become most critical when we face certain trials and tribulations. When things are going as planned and all is well, we seem to be much more understanding and willing to endure situations longer. But when things go wrong, we are truly tested. We all have problems at some level, but what defines us is how we react to those situations. Again, it is easy to react favorably to a good situation, but what about when a problem presents itself? Do we allow stress and circumstances to emote a negative response? Or are we patient? Do we slow down, examine the situation, and reflect on a proper response?

People are not going to remember how you handled the everyday normal problems; they will remember how you responded to those tough situations – what you do when the geese knock out both engines and forces you to make an emergency landing in the Hudson River. Patience does not mean you need to act slowly in every circumstance. It just means sometimes we need to sit back and take a breath before we react. Finally, many times when we pray, we ask for God to give us what we need or show us something, and then never allow him the time to answer. Many times we pray “God give me patience, and I want it NOW!” We say we are waiting on God, but in reality, often times he is waiting on us. The answer is there, and he is waiting for our hearts or our lives to be right before the answer is revealed. We need to realize that patience is a way of life through which we are defined.

Longleaf Pines Homes from the

$140’s

ATTENTION BACHELORS, DOD EMPLOYEES, RESERVISTS & MILITARY RETIREES

FOR SALE

Model Home Open Daily

Lawrence Land Company, Inc. 252-672-8800 longleafpinesnewbern.com

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS AT MCAS CHERRY POINT

THINK YOU KNOW ALL THAT BASE-HOUSING HAS TO OFFER?

t Convenient to Base Amenities t Basic Utilities and Renter’s Insurance t Pet-Friendly Community with no pet deposits t Private Single Family Homes t FREE Lawn Service

t 24-hour Emergency Maintenance Team t Professional, On-site Property Management Team t Camaraderie – Neighbors Who Share a Common Bond

Don’t wait! Call today at (252) 463-8428 or stop by the AMCC Leasing Center located at Bldg 286 to speak with a leasing specialist today!

Moose Legion Committee May 30th, 2012 • 10 am - 1 pm Spaghetti, Meat Sauce, Side Salad & Garlic Bread For Plates Contact: $6 Donation Per Plate Havelock Moose Family Center 1797 Delivery available for ve orders 1007 E. Main St., Havelock, NC 28560 (252) 447-3920 or (252) 646-8511 or more. Walk-ins Welcome

No Closing Cost Mortgages! For a limited time only, First Flight is offering NO Closing Cost Fixed and Adjustable Rate Mortgage options.

Rates as low as

2.85%

APR*

*Annual Percentage Rate. Advertised rate is for a 10 year fixed rate mortgage of $100,000. No closing cost offer excludes taxes, insurance, and interim interest, which are the sole responsibility of the borrower. Offer applies to well qualified new business only. Other restrictions may apply. Hazard insurance is required on all loans secured by real property. Rate subject to change without notice. Rate published effective 5/9/2012.

Visit a First Flight location near you or call 800.807.0766 to start the application process today!


A10 May 17, 2012

The Windsock

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

Marines reduce footprint in Marjah SGT. MICHAEL S. CIFUENTES 1ST MARINE DIVISION

CAMP HANSON, Afghanistan – Marines here are making big moves for the future of Afghanistan. Combat engineers in Marjah in direct support of 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, began demilitarizing bases in order to reduce their footprint from military operations, May 4. The battalion is currently manning 17 outposts in the Marjah area, but is planning to cut that number down to three posts to include Camp Hanson. First Lt. John Winslow, engineers platoon commander serving with 2nd Bn., 9th Marines, said his Marines are preparing for the arrival of their replacement units who’ll man the three posts in Marjah. The Afghan National Security Forces here will operate the remaining outpost. “We’ve spent a lot of time tearing outposts down completely or making them smaller to turn them over to the Afghan forces,” said Winslow, a Sacramento, Calif., native. “We’ve been lucky in Marjah because there’s a huge ANSF presence here.” Specifically on Camp Hanson, Marines serving with the guard platoon are providing security from various guard posts around the base. Engineers have already begun to tear down fortified walls to shrink the base’s perimeter. The Marines plan to reduce the posts by half by the end of their seven-month deployment. Winslow said compacting the battalion’s reach is to facilitate efforts to keep Afghan forces in the forefront of security operations in their country. “It’s to wean them off of our support. We’re giving them their own bases and having them use their own logistical support,” he said. Sergeant Timothy Brookshire, a combat engineer serving with Engineers Platoon, said he remembers during his last deployment his unit came to Afghanistan building combat outposts – extending perimeters as more Marines inhabited positions around the country. Now, his mission

SGT. MICHAEL S. CIFUENTES

Sergeant Timothy Brookshire, a combat engineer serving with engineers platoon, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, provides security as his Marines construct new fortified walls around the base’s perimeter here May 4. Combat engineers have torn down some of the fortified walls to shrink the base’s perimeter. The Marines plan to reduce their base’s guard posts in half by the end of their seven-month deployment. Brookshire is a Homer, Ga., native.

has taken a U-turn. “Last year, we were doing IED (improvised explosive devices) sweeps on the roads and building a few combat outposts,” said Brookshire, a native of Homer, Ga. “Now, they’re using engineers in different roles; we’re making our compound smaller. It’s just to make it easier on us so we can eventually transition out.”

In the spring of 2011, two Marine battalions controlled combat operations in Marjah. Through years of mentorship and training, Afghan police and soldiers began to take control of security operations in the area. Winslow said it’s just been a drastic decline in coalition forces, “which is the ultimate goal.”

IC

R TO

S

HI

4000 M.L. King Blvd.~$1,600,000 4020 M.L. King Blvd.~$395,000 1004 Old Cherry Point Rd~$235,000 Tyson & Hooks Realty Tyson & Hooks Realty Tyson & Hooks Realty (800) 284-6844 (800) 284-6844 (800) 284-6844

1904 South Glenburnie Road 1900E........... $217,500 1904B........... $125,000 1904D........... $189,375 1904F........... $193,750

1904A........... $136,250 1904C........... $450,000 1904E........... $187,500 1906 #1 ....... $507,500

#1-8 All For $1,999,000 Tyson & Hooks Realty (800) 284-6844

213 Pollock Street~$275,000 Tyson & Hooks Realty (800) 284-6844

ATTENTION REALTORS: NEED TO RAPIDLY SELL A HOME? Advertise it on the Real Estate Rapid Seller Page Simply Call Celia Rolison at (252) 635-5640 or Latoya Cardona at (252) 635-5645 for Details

3680 Neuse Blvd. ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844..................................$100,000 3709 Trent Road/Formerly Ice House ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ..$194,900

Lots & Land Lots of wide open space for sale

919 Caroline Court/Faireld Harbour ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ...................................... $14,900 5919 Santo Domingo Court/Faireld Harbour ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ......................... $39,900 4 Old Airport Road ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ................................................................... $49,900 3 Old Airport Road ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ................................................................... $51,900 2 Old Airport Road ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ................................................................... $53,900 135 Lane Farm Road ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 .............................................................. $100,000 1698 Simmons Street/Acreage ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ............................................... $150,000 505 Lilliput Drive/Waterfront ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ................................................. $252,000 Waterfront Lot/A Street/Bridgeton #2 ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 .................................... $262,900 Waterfront Lot/A Street/Bridgeton #3 ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 .................................... $283,900 128 Johnson Point Road/Neuse River ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 .................................... $299,000 61-613 Becton Road/Adams Creek ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ........................................ $299,900 589 Waterview Drive/Neuse River ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 ......................................... $399,000 587-589 Waterview Drive/Neuse River ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844 .................................. $699,000 Waterfront Lot Near NBG&C/REDUCED ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844............................. $750,000 585-587-589 Waterview Drive/Island ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844..................................$1,200,000 661 Hanes Farm Road/3.5 +/- ac. Trent River Waterfront ~ Listed by:Tyson & Hook Realty • (800) 284-6844...$1,390,000

EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


The Windsock

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

• GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR

TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY

A11

Recon, Red Dragons train while deployed

• GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY

Thursday, May 24 Kinston, NC

May 17, 2012

Waller Auditorium Lenoir Community College

5:00 Consumer Expo Opens 7:00 Cooking Show Begins

TICKETS ON SALE NOW Online at www.kinston.com or at

in Kinston Presenting Sponsor:

Sponsored by:

SGT. ELYSSA QUESADA

A reconnaissance Marine with Battalion Landing Team 3/1 rappels from a UH-1Y Huey flown by pilots with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 268 (Reinforced) onto USS Makin Island’s flight deck at sea, May 6. The landing team serves as the ground combat element with the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit. The unit embarked USS Makin Island, USS New Orleans and USS Pearl Harbor in San Diego, Nov. 14, beginning a seven-month deployment to the Western Pacific, Horn of Africa and Middle East regions.

TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY • GET YOUR

“PARDON OUR NOISE, IT’S THE SOUND OF FREEDOM”

Allies for Cherry Point’s Tomorrow’s MISSION • Develop a positive and consistent response to the federal budgetary and military mission challenges... • Tell the Cherry Point success story to local, state and congressional leaders... • Support the civilian workforce at Cherry Point and protect FRC East from privatization or downsizing efforts... • Secure new missions and military investments for Cherry Point.

We Cannot Afford To Lose Cherry Point. Look at the Economical Impact Cherry Point has on Craven County Communities: FY11 ECONOMIC IMPACT - WORKFORCE DATA

RT “SUPPO MCAS Y CHERR ” POINT!

Officer Enlisted Civilian NAF Totals

MCAS Cherry Point

2dMAW

Fleet Readiness Center

Naval Health Clinic

Other Tenant Activities

Totals

71 627 850 783

907 7,309 0 0

14 24 3,272 0

62 150 124 0

35 355 332 0

1,089 8,465 4,578 783

2,331

8,216

3,310

336

722

14,915

“ THERE’S ST R E N G T H NUMBER IN S!”

FY11 ECONOMIC IMPACT – DEMOGRAPHIC DATA CRAVEN COUNTY Military Civilian

Active

8,981

Retired

2,960

Active

2,858

Retired

3,118

Family Members:

CARTERET COUNTY Military Civilian

Active

492

Retired

1,283

Active

1,713

Retired

2,326

Family Members:

Military Active 13,278

PAMLICO COUNTY Military Civilian

JONES COUNTY

Active

12

Retired

162

Active

131

Retired

387

Family Members:

Military Active

Military Civilian

GRAND TOTALS

OTHER COUNTIES

Active

19

Retired

0

Active

76

Retired

0

Family Members:

Military Civilian

Active

50

Retired

1,314

Active

583

Retired

560

Retired

6,391

Family Members:

Family Members: Military Active

76

152

Civilian Active

114

Civilian Active

857

Civilian Active

6,974

Military Retired

7,551

Civilian Active

2,193

Civilian Active

1,642

Military Retired

188

Military Retired

0

Military Retired

1,932

Total 10,376

Total

1,049

Total

237

Total

5,372

FY11 ECONOMIC IMPACT – SALARY DATA

$530,178,474 $152,004,000 $411,195,181 $ 20,629,663 $176,724,420

FY11 ECONOMIC IMPACT – PROCUREMENT AND CONTRACTING DATA

• Procurement

$420,408,121

• Construction, Maintenance & Service Contracts

$197,786,406

$1,290,731,738

POINT! WE SUPPORT CHERRY The Scheele Family

POINT! WE SUPPORT CHERRYDick Steward June &

5,361

28

Military Retired

POINT! I SUPPORT CHERRYe Denning Iren

Active

Military Active

3,658

RY POINT! I SUPPORT CHERBil l Denning, USN (Ret.) n tai Cap

5,719

17

3,789

Total

9,554

Military Active

Civilian Active

Military • Active • Retired Civilian • Appropriated • Non-Appropriated • Retired

Civilian

Active Retired

727

Military Retired

Total 38,642

Military

Military Active 14,126

Total 55,676

FY11 ECONOMIC IMPACT – SUMMARY

• Salaries $1,290,731,738 • Procurement $420,408,121 • Construction, Maintenance & Service Contracts $197,786,406 • Utilities $14,955,633 • Education, Training & Travel $19,525,876 • Health & Medical $91,210,043 • Contributions $2,874,622 • Concessionaire Revenue Opportunities $8,978,995 Total

POINT! WE SUPPORT CHERRY on Thompson ar Sh & Alan

POINT! I SUPPORT CHERRY Stegemann

RY POINT! WE SUPPORT CHER e & Jim Kathleen Mus

$2,046,471,434

POINT! WE SUPPORT CHERRYMickey Stokes Pats y &

RY POINT! WE SUPPORT CHER Don & Mar y Mackey

POINT! WE SUPPORT CHER&RY is Dave Janice Dav


May 17, 2012

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

LANCE CPL. SCOTT L. TOMASZYKCI MCAS CHERRY POINT

@ZYCKIUSMC

Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 2 unofficially marked the end of Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis’ two-year tour as commanding general of the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing with a barbecue in his honor aboard Cherry Point, N.C., May 8. Davis is scheduled to relinquish command to Maj. Gen. Glenn M. Walters, May 24, and transition to U.S. Cyber Command as the deputy commander. Davis took command of the wing July 29, 2010, and immediately set about demanding the best from his wing. “When you took command here, you had your priorities: winning the war in Afghanistan, supporting the global mission, and preparing for the unknown,” said Lt. Col. Thomas J. Witczak, commanding officer of MWHS-2, during the picnic. “Those pillars, I believe, were the foundation that made this wing headquarters and this wing number one.” In accomplishing his goals, Davis bolstered and accelerated the wing’s training schedule with participation in Exercise MAILED FIST, Exercise BOLD ALLIGATOR and a

new flight hours program to challenge pilots and aircraft. Elements of 2nd MAW also deployed to Afghanistan and functioned as II Marine Expeditionary Force’s forward deployed aviation combat element. “The priorities are nothing more than words on a piece of paper, how we organize ourselves for getting the job done,” Davis said to the Marines. “The reason those priorities came to be reality is because of you, not because of me.” In closing, Witczak presented Davis with an appreciation plaque, and engraved commemorative brick with a twin brick emplaced in the Miller’s Landing walkway. “I’m immensely blessed,” Davis told the Marines after receiving the gifts. “It’s been my favorite tour by far.” (Right) Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis, commanding general of 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, thanks his Marines for their service during his tenure here. Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 2 held a picnic for Davis May 8 aboard Cherry Point, N.C., to commemorate the end of his nearly two-year tour.

PHOTOS BY LANCE CPL. SCOTT L. TOMASZYCKI

Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis, commanding general of 2nd MAW, speaks with his Marines during a picnic here May 8 commemorating the end of his tenure. Under his command, 2nd MAW took part in Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Odyssey Dawn and other operational commitments around the globe.

Lt. Col. Thomas J. Witczak, right, commanding officer of Marine Wing Headquarters Squadron 2, presents Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis, left, with tokens of appreciation during a picnic for Davis here, May 8.

Marines of the 2nd MAW Band pick teams for a game of ultimate frisbee here, during a picnic thrown in honor of Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis’ nearly two years in command of 2nd MAW, May 8.

Marines of the 2nd MAW Band perform during a picnic in honor of Maj. Gen. Jon M. Davis’ nearly two years in command of the 2nd MAW May 8.


B2 May 17, 2012

The Windsock

HOURS OF OPERATION Monday-Friday Breakfast 6-8 a.m., Lunch 11 a.m.-12:45 p.m., Dinner 4-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday/Holidays Breakfast/Lunch 8:30-11 a.m., Dinner 3-5 p.m.

FAST FOOD LINE

Monday-Friday Breakfast 6-8 a.m., Lunch 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Dinner 4-6 p.m.

Breakfast Menu Assorted fresh fruit, assorted hot and cold cereals, fried eggs and omelets to order, scrambled eggs and hard cooked eggs, grill special, pancakes, French toast or waffles, breakfast potatoes, breakfast meats, creamed beef or sausage gravy, assorted muffins, breads and breakfast pastries

Specialty Bar Menu Monday - Grilled Polish sausage, grilled bratwurst, grilled Italian sausage, grilled frankfurters, rolls, French fries, tater tots, baked beans, corn on the cob, chili, cheese sauce, coleslaw, potato chips, corn chips, pretzels Tuesday - Popcorn shrimp, steamed shrimp, buffalo chicken fritter, grilled chicken strips, sizzlin Caesar salad Wednesday - Beef taco meat, chicken enchiladas, bean burrito, Mexican rice, refried beans, Mexican corn, shredded lettuce, shredded cheese, diced tomatoes, chopped onions, sliced jalapenos, taco shells Thursday - Chinese egg rolls, chilled pineapple chunks, teriyaki beef strips, steamed shrimp, grilled chicken strips, pork fried rice, steamed rice, vegetable lo mein with oyster sauce Friday - Ziti/linguine/fettuccine, spaghetti rigatoni, pasta primavera, lasagna, chicken rotini casserole, baked ziti with four cheeses, penne/rigate/rotini, baked Italian sausage meatballs (ground beef), meat sauce, marinara sauce, alfredo sauce

Weekly Menu

Thursday May 17 Lunch - Chicken and dumplings, pasta toscano, steamed rice, steamed vegetable medley, harvard beets, cream of spinach soup Dinner - Braised pork chops, turkey meatloaf, buttered egg noodle, Islander’s rice, Lyonnaise wax beans, broccoli polonaise, brown gravy, chicken gumbo soup Friday May 18 Lunch - Roast turkey, French fried shrimp, fried fish, dirty mashed potatoes, green beans, calico cabbage, hush puppies, tartar sauce, cocktail sauce, New England clam chowder Dinner - Tater tot casserole, baked tomato pork chops, savory baked beans, peas and mushrooms, Manhattan clam chowder Saturday May 19 Lunch - Baked ziti with four cheeses, arroz con pollo (Chicken), club spinach, corn o’brien, toasted garlic bread, smoked ham and cabbage soup Dinner - Three bean chili, apple glazed corned beef, shrimp curry, cilantro rice, parsley buttered potatoes, vegetable stir fry, savory summer squash Sunday May 20 Lunch - Vegetable beef supreme soup, baked citrus herb, crusted fish, fried chicken, brown rice pilaf, red bliss smashed potatoes, cream gravy, green bean casserole corn Dinner - Turkey noodle soup, creamy cajun shrimp penne, meat loaf, roasted garlic mashed potatoes, brown gravy, Louisiana style smothered squash, okra melange Monday May 21 Lunch - Pepper steak, turkey monterey roasts, rosemary red potatoes, steamed rice, wax beans creole, stewed chick peas and zucchini, southwestern corn chowder Dinner - Veal parmesan, Tex-Mex chicken and rice, penne rigate noodles, scalloped cream corn, broccoli and red peppers, Spanish chorizo and potato soup Tuesday May 22 Lunch- Linguini with clam sauce, bayou chicken, rissole potatoes, mashed cauliflower, sauteed green beans and mushrooms, beef with vegetables and barley soup Dinner - Country fried, steaks, baked turkey with noodles, mashed potatoes, creamed ground beef, peas, squash and carrot medley, bean with bacon soup Wednesday May 16 Lunch - Chicken piccata, bayou jerk pork loin, chipotle roasted sweet potatoes, Islander’s rice, steamed spinach with garlic Lyonnaise carrots, mango and black bean salsa, cream of mushroom soup Dinner - Hungarian goulash, creole shrimp, brussels, sprout parmesan, corn, chicken tortilla soup

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT YEAR 2011 ANNUAL WATER QUALITY REPORT ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS MCAS CHERRY POINT

Our annual water quality report, as presented, covers testing performed between January 1 and December 31, 2011. We dedicate ourselves to producing and seeking new methods for delivering to you, the best quality drinking water meeting state and federal standards. We remain vigilant in meeting the goals of source water protection, water conservation and community education while continuing to serve the needs of all our water users. Substances that could be in water To ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U.S. EPA prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals, in some cases, radioactive material, and substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Substances that may be present in source water include: Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, or wildlife; Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or may result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; Pesticides and Herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources, such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses; Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production and may also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems; Radioactive Contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or may be the result of oil. Lead in home plumbing If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. We are responsible for providing high-quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

t in

MC

MCAS CHERRY POINT NAVAL HEALTH CLINIC

STATION THEATER

E Street

Movie Hotline: 466-3884 Visit us at www.mccscherrypoint.com

Adults only $4 • Kids (4-12) only $3 NOW

SHOWING

Thursday, May 17 6:00pm - American Reunion R

Friday, May 18 5:00pm - The Hunger Games PG 13 8:30pm - American Reunion R

Saturday, May 19 1:00pm 4:30pm 6:30pm 8:45pm

-

The Hunger Games PG 13 Wrath of the Titans PG 13 21 Jump Street PG 13 American Reunion R

Sunday, May 20 2:00pm - Mirror Mirror PG

Tuesday, May 22 6:00pm - Happy Feet 2

••• MOVIE SYNOPSIS ••• Mirror Mirror - Starring: Julia Roberts, Lily Collins, Armie Hammer. Seven courageous rebel dwarfs join forces with Snow White as she fights to reclaim her birthright and win her Prince in this magical comedy filled with jealousy, romance, and betrayal that will capture the hearts and imaginations of audiences the world over. Wrath of the Titans - Starring: Sam Worthington, Ralph Fiennes, Edgar Ramirez. The epic battle between the Titans and the gods continues in this sequel set ten years after the events in "Clash of the Titans," as Perseus descends into the underworld on a mission to rescue Zeus from the clutches of Hades, Ares, and Kronos. Happy Feet 2- Animation - Starring the voices of: Elijah Wood, Robin Williams, Pink. In the great nation of Emperor Penguins, deep in Antarctica, you're nobody unless you can sing--which is unfortunate for Mumble, who is the worst singer in the world. He is born dancing to his own tune--tap dancing. Though Mumble's mom, Norma Jean, thinks this little habit is cute, his dad, Memphis, says it "just ain't penguin." Besides, they both know that, without a Heartsong, Mumble may never find true love. The Hunger Games - Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson. Sixteen year old Katniss Everdeen volunteers in her younger sister's place to enter the games, and is forced to rely upon her sharp instincts as well as the mentorship of drunken former victor Haymitch Abernathy when she's pitted against highly-trained Tributes who have prepared for these Games their entire lives. 21 Jump Street - Starring: Stanley Wong, Brett Lapeyrouse, Caroline Aaron. Schmidt and Jenko are more than ready to leave their adolescent problems behind. Joining the police force and the secret Jump Street unit, they use their youthful appearances to go undercover in a local high school. As they trade in their guns and badges for backpacks, Schmidt and Jenko risk their lives to investigate a violent and dangerous drug ring. But they find that high school is nothing like they left it just a few years earlier - and neither expects that they will have to confront the terror and anxiety of being a teenager again and all the issues they thought they had left behind.

Water main flushing Distribution mains (pipes) convey water to homes, businesses, and hydrants within the Air Station. The water entering distribution mains is of very high quality; however, water quality can deteriorate in areas of the distribution mains over time. Water main flushing is the process of cleaning the interior of water distribution mains by sending a rapid flow of water through the mains. Flushing maintains water quality by removing iron and manganese, which pose no health concerns but affect taste, clarity, and color. Additionally, sediments can shield microorganisms from the disinfecting power of chlorine, contributing to the growth of microorganisms. Flushing helps remove stale water and ensures the presence of fresh water with sufficient dissolved oxygen, disinfectant levels, and an acceptable taste and smell. Important health information Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.Immuno compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants may be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. The U.S. EPA/CDC (Centers for Disease Controland Prevention)guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 or http:// water.epa.gov/drink/hotline. What’s your water footprint? The water footprint of an individual, community,or business is the total volume of freshwater that is used to produce goods and provide services. For example, 11 gallons of water are needed to irrigate and wash the fruit in one half-gallon container of orange juice. Thirty-seven gallons of water are used to grow, produce, package, and ship the beans in that morning cup of coffee. Two hundred and sixty-four gallons of water are required to produce one quart of milk, and 4,200 gallons of water are required to produce two pounds of beef. According to the U.S. EPA, the average American uses about 100 gallons of water daily. In fact, in the developed world, one flush of a toilet uses as much water as the average person in the developing world allocates for an entire day’s cooking, washing,cleaning, and drinking. The annual American per capita water footprint is about 8,000 cubic feet; twice the global per capita average. With water use increasing six-fold in the past century, our demands for freshwater are rapidly outstripping what the planet can replenish. To check out your own water footprint, go to http:// www.h2oconserve.org or visit www.waterfootprint. org to see how the water footprints of other nations compare. For more information about this report, or questions relating to your drinking water, please call Steve Reavis, Facilities Maintenance Department, at (252) 466-6850 or Cheryl Murray, Environmental Affairs Department, at (252) 466-5151. To see the full report visit: http://1.usa.gov/2011waterreport.

Your Survival Guide to Safe and Healthy Travel LAURIE A. VARNER

Cherry P o AS

Facebook.com/MCASCherryPoint

Summer is just around the corner, here are some safety tips you can use on your vacation. More and more Americans are traveling internationally - for vacation, business, volunteering, and to visit friends and family. Whatever your reason for traveling, the information on this page will help you to be proactive, prepared, and protected when it comes to your health - and the health of others - while you are traveling. Be Proactive! Take steps to anticipate any issues that could arise during your trip. • Learn about your destination. • See a doctor before you travel. • Think about your health status. Are you too sick to travel? (Recent illnesses, injuries, or surgeries) Do you have any special health needs? (Babies and small children, pregnancy, people with disabilities, people with weakened immune systems) Be prepared! No one wants to think about getting sick or hurt during a trip, but sometimes these things happen. You may not be able to prevent every illness or injury, but you can plan ahead to be able to deal with them. • Pack smart. • Plan ahead for illnesses or injuries during your trip. • Know what to do if you become sick or injured on your trip. • Know and share important information about your trip. Be protected! It is important to practice healthy behaviors during your trip and after you return home. This section outlines how you can protect yourself and others from illness during your trip. • Pay attention to your health during your trip. Use sunscreen and insect repellent as directed.

Be careful about food and water. • Try not to take risks with your health and safety. • Limit alcohol intake, and do not drink alcohol and drive. • Wear a seat belt. • Wear protective gear when doing adventure activities. Respect your host country and its people by following local laws and customs. • Pay attention to your health when you come home.

TRICAREONLINE THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT

TriCare offers free application. Download Express Rx on your smartphone to instantaneously access your medical information.

For more information visit: www.tricare.mil/pharmacy www.tricare.mil/homedelivery www.tricare.mil/subscription www.facebook.com/tricare www.twitter.com/tricare https://m.esrx.com https://m.humana-military.com


May 17, 2012 B3

The Windsock

Twitter.com/mcascppa

Announcements ► Indicates new announcement ► Wilmington Food Walking Tour The Heart of Downtown Wilmington Food Walking Tour will happen at the Wilmington riverwalk, Saturday. Participants will get an opportunity to meet the city’s top chefs and will sample food from seven downtown restaurants. This an opportunity to experience what downtown Wilmington has to offer. For more information call 910-545-8055 or visit their website at http://www.lizbiro.com. ► Crystal Coast Boat Show The Downtown Morehead City Revitalization Association will host the Crystal Coast Boat Show, Saturday and Sunday. Capt. Steve Miller, boat show committee chair, said the show is accommodating more boats than last year. The number of vendors has also increased. Plans are also underway to nearly double the space for the “Artrageous” art event held on the waterfront in conjunction with the Arts Council of Carteret County. The Morehead City Chapter of Antique Automobile Club of America will also hold its 39th annual car show Saturday at Katherine Davis Park. A traditional hit at the Crystal Coast Boat Show returns with a Pirate Treasure Hunt for children 12 and under. The kids cruise on a ferry boat, supplied by Crystal Coast Ferry Service, across the harbor to Sugarloaf Island on both Saturday and Sunday to hunt for treasure with “real pirates.” A new feature this year will be an “Alive at Five” free concert, featuring the Steady Eddies. The concert will be open to the public at Jaycee Park on Saturday night from 5-8 p.m. The Steady Eddies are from Wilmington, N.C. For more information call 808-0440 or visit the website http://www.crystalcoastboatshow.com. ► Craven County 300th Anniversary Craven County, North Carolina, is celebrating its 300th Anniversary during 2012. Many exciting events will be taking place throughout Craven County during the year as part of the celebration. Join us for “Clarks Fun Learning Day” on Saturday at 10 a.m. The event will begin at 8 a.m. with breakfast at Clarks United Methodist Church.

Following that will be the 1st annual Clarks Parade beginning at 10 a.m. A barbeque chicken lunch will be served at Clarks United Methodist Church. There will be historical lectures by Allen and Charles Humphrey along with Nancy Allen from Pleasant Hill Zion Church. Beginning at 2 p.m. will be a horseshoe tournament along with a bazaar. All events except for the parade will take place at Clarks United Methodist Church. For more information call 636-6601 or visit the website http://www.cravennc300.org. Motorcycle Poker Run Havelock Pop Warner will sponsor a motorcycle poker run, Saturday, at the Havelock Recreation Center. Sign ups are at the recreation center at May 19 at 9 a.m. and the run starts at 11 a.m. Registration is $15 per person. For more information visit their Facebook page at http://on.fb.me/havelockpopwarner. Hope for the Warriors Hope for the Warriors is announcing early registration for the 7th annual Run for the Warriors. The race will be held at Jacksonville High School Saturday. Early registration prices for the half marathon are $45 and $20 for the 10K, 5K and one mile walk/run. For more information, visit their website at http://bit.ly/hopeforwarriors. Advanced Riders Courses Advanced Rider Track Day is coming to Cherry Point, Saturday-Sunday and June 23-24; and at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field Bogue Aug 4-5, Sept. 15-16 and Oct. 20-21. Advanced Motorcycle Operators School will be at the air station Aug. 9-11. Both courses are free, open to any age or rank and consist of all aspects of rider awareness from knowing motorcycles’ limits to increasing confidence and safety. For more information, contact your motorcycle mentorship program president or installation safety office, or register at http://bit.ly/cherrypointtrackday.

For more information, call 447-8063 or 447-2109. Together For Life The “Together for Life” one-day premarital seminar is held for active duty personnel age 26 and under, within 90 days of marriage. For more information call the chapel at 466-4000 for more information.

AA Beginners Meeting Alcoholics Anonymous meetings aboard the air station are held Wednesdays and Thursdays at 8 p.m. The meetings take place in Room 208 of Building 229, next to the Cherry Tree House. For more information, call 447-2109.

Domestic Violence Victims Support groups for victims of domestic violence are provided by the Carteret County Domestic Violence Program. The group meetings are held every Wednesday at 6 p.m. For more information, call 728-3788.

Al-Anon Family Group Meeting Al-Anon family group meetings are held Tuesdays at 8 p.m. for family members and friends of individuals with possible alcohol problems. Meetings are held at Havelock First Baptist Church.

Marine Corps League Meetings Cherry Point’s detachment of the Marine Corps League meets the third Tuesday of each month at Miller’s Landing at 7 p.m. For more information, call 515-1175.

Station Inspector 466-3449 Fraud, Waste and Abuse If you know of or suspect any fraud, waste or abuse aboard MCAS Cherry Point, call 4662016. This line’s automated answering service is available 24/7.

Now in Building 87 • Exceptional Family Member Program – 466-3305. • Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program – 466-5490. • Substance Abuse Counseling – 466-7568. • New Parent Support Program – 466-3651. • Family Advocacy Program – 466-3264. • Library – 466-3552. • LifeLong Learning – 466-3500. • Military Family Life Consultant – 876-8016. • Retired Activities – 466-5548. Budget for Baby The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers Budget for Baby classes. To register call 466-2031. Breastfeeding Class The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers free breastfeeding classes to expectant mothers. The purpose of the class is to help prepare the mother to be ready and confident to breastfeed once the baby arrives. To register call 466-2031. Veterans’ Assistance A representative from the Veterans Affairs Office visits Cherry Point each Thursday in building 4335. Call 466-4201 for assistance.

HERRY

Disabled Veterans Chapter 26 of the Disabled American Veterans meets the third Tuesday of each month at the Senior Center in Havelock at 7 p.m. For information, contact Cris Young at 259-3427. Enlisted spouses club The Cherry Point Enlisted Spouses Club meets the first Thursday of every month in building 3452. The club is a social/ service organization open to the spouses of enlisted service members. For information call 626-4319 or visit http://www.cherrypointesc.org Friday, Saturday Night Events for Children The Bridge Youth Center on Harker’s Island is for children 6-18 year’s old to participate in recreational activities Friday and Saturday evenings. For more information contact Patrick J. Tivnan at 843-709-0732.

Hotlines 2nd MAW Command Inspector General 466-5038

Marine, Family Programs Office Numbers The Family Member Employment Program, Transition Assistance Management Program, Relocation Assistance Program and accredited financial counselors can be reached at 466-4201. • Child Development Resource and Referral – 4663595.

O FF Limits MCAS C P A

Monthly and Weekly Events Courage to Change Cherry Point and Havelock Courage to Change support group is for friends and families of people who suffer from alcoholism. Meetings are held at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Havelock, Tuesdays at 8 p.m. For more information, call 241-6155 or 670-6236.

Marine and Family Programs

Sexual Assault This procedure is not to replace calling 911 if you are in immediate danger. Immediately call 6654713, which is monitored 24/7. The person answering the call will help you decide the next steps to take. You may remain anonymous. Severe Weather and Force Protection Information Cherry Point personnel call 466-3093. FRC East personnel call 464-8333. DDCN personnel call 466-4083.

Seven Signs of Terrorist Activity Surveillance If terrorists have chosen a specific target, that target area will most likely be observed during the planning phase of the operation. They do this in order to determine the strengths, weaknesses and number of personnel that may respond to an incident. Routes to and from the target are usually established during the surveillance phase. It is therefore important to take note of such things as someone recording or monitoring activities, drawing diagrams or notes on maps.

OINT

REA

98 CENT ONLY STORE (BIG DADDY) WESLEY’S GROCERY COASTAL SMOKE SHOP EXPRESSIONS FRIDAY’S NIGHT CLUB (AKA CLUB INSOMNIA, CLUB CLASSICS, INFINITY LOUNGE) H&D EXPRESS AKA CITGO NADINE’S FOOD MART SUPER EXPRESSWAY TOBACCO OUTLET (HAVELOCK AND NEW BERN) TOBACCO SHOP & GIFTS (BEAUFORT AND NEW BERN) TOBACCO TOWN TOBACCO SHOP (NEWPORT, N.C.) TWIN RIVERS (NOT THE MALL) WHITE SANDS CONVENIENCE STORE

MCB CAMP LEJEUNE AREA BELFAST QUICK MART BELL AUTO SALVAGE II BOTTA BOOMS CASH-N-ADVANCE CJ’S QUICK MART CLUB MICKEY’S COASTAL SMOKE SHOP DASH-IN DISCOUNT TOBACCO D’S DRIVE THRU D’S QUICK MART DOLL HOUSE EASY MONEY CATALOG SALES EXPRESS WAY FANTASIES HIP HOP AND HOOKAHS ILLUSIONS JACKSONVILLE SPEEDWAY AUTO PARTS KINGS DRIVE THRU KWIK STOP MART LAIRDS AUTO & TRUCK CENTER MILITARY CIRCUIT OF JACKSONVILLE MOE’S MART NASH MARKET ONE STOP SHOP PAR TECH PLAYHOUSE PLEASURE PALACE PRIVATE PLEASURES (AKA CARRIAGE HOUSE) RACEWAY AUTO PARTS REFLECTION PHOTO REID’S MART SMOKERS POST SOUTHERN COMFORT SMITTYY’S R&R SPEED MART TALK OF THE TOWN II TENDER TOUCH (AKA BABY DOLLS) TOBACCO ALLEY TOBACCO AND MORE TOBACCO CLUB TOBACCO FOR LESS TOBACCO HOUSE CIGARETTE CENTER TOBACCO LEAF VERONA QUICK STOP VETERANS AFFAIRS SERVICES

OUTSIDE AREAS

CARLAND CENTENNIAL ENTERPRISES, INC. STUDENT ASSISTANCE COMPANY JOSHUA EXPERIENCE/ CLUB ACCESS

The Windsock May 17, 2012  

End of an era: Support group stands down after 60 years of success; Cherry Point Marine named firefighter of the year at age 21; Davis says...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you