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The Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway from Northern California’s Lassen Volcanic National Park to Southern Oregon’s Crater Lake National Park.

www.volcaniclegacybyway.com


Volcanic Leg

All Amer Welcome

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F

reedom - the freedom

Association has been promoting a region that is known for its great outdoor recreation, adventure opportunities and scenic wonders. This guide is designed to help you discover the freedom and scenic beauty in the Shasta Cascade region. Gather up the family, get in the car and out of the city, and you too can discover what Americans have been experiencing for over 100 years - the magic of rekindling relationships with a scenic driving vacation.

to travel a mile a minute. I m a g ine a life when a twenty mile trip might take all day, the automobile gave us this freedom. In 1908 the Ford Model T sold for $850.00 and this changed America forever. Its simplicity, toughness and design were perfect for the deeply rutted roads of the west, and the American driving vacation became a lifestyle. For more than eighty-two years the Shasta Cascade Wonderland

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acy Scenic Byway

rican Road 6

Table Of Contents Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

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All American Road Intro & Map

Lake Almanor/Chester

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All American Road

Lassen Volcanic National Park

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All American Road

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Old Station/McCloud

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All American Road

McCloud/Tulelake

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All American Road

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Klamath/Wildlife

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All American Road

Crater Lake National Park

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All American Road

Resources

Back Page

Information about lodging and traveler services is available from the visitor’s bureaus and chambers of commerce along the route. Those phone numbers are listed at the end of each route in the “drive tips”. For general information about the region:

Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782

or at our website: www.shastacascade.com

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Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

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All American Road So Much To Experience One of just 27 All American Roads in the entire United States, the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway connects Lassen Volcanic National Park in Northern California and Crater Lake National Park in Southern Oregon. The volcanic activity of the Cascade Range has created unique geological formations that can only be seen in this part of America. Gigantic obsidian glass flows, steaming mud pots, and lava tube caves surrounded by a wide diversity of scenery make this an unforgettable experience. The byway travels through dense forests, across broad wetlands, along clear swift streams, and through massive farms and ranches. These wide open-spaces make this area adjacent to the byway an ideal setting for hiking adventures, great fishing and whitewater boating. The communities along the byway are eager to tell their story and share their uniqueness with you. The Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway is about blue skies, virgin forests, clear lakes and streams, and uncrowded openspaces. It will excite your senses, refresh your soul and offer the possibility of taking your breath away at every bend in the road.

“ The byway travels through dense forests, across broad wetlands, along clear swift streams, and through massive farms and ranches.�

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Hikers in Lassen Volcanic National Park


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

All American Road

Lake Almanor/Chester Recreational Paradise The southernmost point of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway is Lake Almanor, also the southern end of the Cascade Mountain Range. This area by itself could be a complete vacation. In reality it’s not an ending or beginning point, but a crossroad. In a small amount of space, this is where Highways 89, 32, 36, and 44 converge. Know as a “water lover’s playground,” Lake Almanor Basin has been known as a recreational paradise for decades. Summertime activities on Lake Almanor include waterskiing, jet skiing, sailing, parasailing, boating, and fishing (which can be done year round). A paved recreational trail for bikes and hiking follows the west shore of the lake, offering great views and water access.

unique distinction of once having been the largest company lumber town in the west. A 24 foot tall statue of the legendary logger Paul Bunyan honors the town’s heritage. The road north out of Westwood provides wintertime

Sailboarding Lake Almanor Photographer Tom Rath

The next town you will come upon was originally developed as a logging and sawmill community, though its current charm comes from quaint B&B’s and 1950’s style motels. Chester provides the largest base of lodging opportunities on the southern portion of the byway. Several of the restaurants

access to the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway, as the road through Lassen Volcanic National Park is usually closed from November to May. Just a few miles off the byway and east of Westwood is Susanville. The cliffs and gorge of the Susan River flank its western limits and is the eastern end of the Bizz Johnson Recreational Trail. Following the legal abandonment of the Lassen R.R. Branch Line by the Southern Pacific Railroad, the Bureau of Land Management quickly obtained this seemingly “useless” land in order to create this rail to trail conversion. It is considered by many to be one of the most exhilarating trails in Northern California; it is available for hiking, biking, Kayaking Lake Almanor horseback riding and fishing. Photographer Shannon Morrow Hwy. A-21 meets Hwy. 44 which eventually connects back to and businesses date from the early Hwy. 89 at Old Station. This portion 1920’s, including the bowling alley of Hwy. 44 with its wide open spaces which has been a dance hall, cafe, and is popular with snowmobilers in the pool hall. Westwood is just to the east winter months. of Lake Almanor/Chester. It has the 6


Drive Tips

Distance: 133 miles Minimum Driving Time: 4 hours Best Time to go: Year-round, some portions- May to October only.

For Regional Information: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association, 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782 www.shastacascade.com

Along the byway: Chester/Lake Almanor Chamber of Commerce, 530-258-2426, and Westwood Chamber of Commerce, 530-256-2456.

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services are available in Chester, Lake Almanor, Westwood and Old Station, with other limited services along the route.

Lassen National Forest

OLD STATION

Eagle Lake

89

Shingletown 44

Pin

Caribou Wilderness

LASSEN PEAK

10457ft

Sus

an

1

A2

36

Mineral

Mill Creek

WESTWOOD

A1 3

36

32

er

36

CHESTER

89

SUSANVILLE

Riv

36

Childs Meadows

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139

e

44

Lassen Volcanic National Park

89

Lake Almanor

147

Mountain Meadows Reservior 89

70

7

Quincy

Bizz Johnson Trail


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

All American Road

Lassen Volcanic National Park Volcanic History and Scenic Wonder earth’s surface. This natural source provides a constant supply of hot water for the Drakesbad Guest Ranch swimming pool.

The very existence of Lassen Volcanic National Park is linked to a loud awakening of Lassen Peak in 1914. This was a beginning of a seven-year cycle of sporadic volcanic outbursts with the major eruption occurring on May 19, 1915, causing a massive collapse of the summit crater spilling flowing lava towards the Sacramento Valley. Three days later a great explosion blasted out a new crater. The area was designated a National Park in 1916 because of its significance as an active volcanic landscape. The park is a compact laboratory of volcanic phenomena and associated thermal features. Several groups of hot springs and fumaroles remain as remnants of this volcanic activity. Most of these lie in, or are closely adjacent to, Brokeoff Volcano’s caldera. When entering the park at the southern end, the first easily accessible volcanic area is called Sulphur Works. Adjacent to Hwy. 89, it is definitely worth the stop to see nature releasing a small

Back on the byway, a few miles north of Sulphur Works, is the parking area for Bumpass Hell and Lake Helen. Lassen Volcanic National Park Manzanita Lake

Bumpass Hell is an approximate one hour hike and is well worth the outing. It is the largest geothermal feature in Lassen Park. In 1864, Kendall Vanhook Bumpass, a well known hunter and mountain man, discovered this area. He was the first known person to accidentally step through the thin crust and suffered a severe burn which eventually led to the amputation of one of his legs. Therefore, this area provided his own personal hell and the area has been known as Bumpass Hell ever since.

Lassen Volcanic National Park Kohm Yah-Man-Nee Visitor Center

sample of its fiery core. In the Warner Valley, (accessible only in the summer months from Chester) two hot springs deliver clear boiling water to the

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Lassen Volcanic National Park Bumpass Hell


Drive Tips

Distance: 33 miles Minimum Driving Time: 2 to 4 hours Best Time to go: Late May-November For Regional Information: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association, 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782 www.shastacascade.com

Along the byway Lassen Volcanic National Park, 530-595-4444, Chester/Lake Almanor Chamber of Commerce, 530-258-2426, Red Bluff/Tehama County Chamber, 530-527-6220, and Redding Convention & Visitors Bureau, 530-225-4100

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services are available in Chester, Lake Almanor, Red Bluff, and Redding, with other limited services along the route. Lassen National Forest

89 44

44

Manzanita Lake Loomis Museum

Lassen Volcanic National Park

LASSEN PEAK

10457ft

Bumpass Hell Lake Helen

Kings Creek

Caribou Wilderness

Drakesbad

1

A2

Sulphur Works

Chester Warner Valley Rd.

36

Mineral 172

Childs Meadows

CHESTER

Mill Creek

32

Lake Almanor A1 3

147

36

WESTWOOD

89

Continuing on the byway just a short distance to the north is the parking area for climbing Lassen Peak. The parking area, just over 8,000 feet, provides access to an easy trail to the 10,457 foot summit. This several hour hike to the top offers unparalleled views of all of Northern California. Other great hikes in the park include the Kings Creek Trail and Falls, as well as Summit Lake with both trails accessing the Pacific Crest Trail to the east of the highway. On the north edge of the park is Manzanita Lake. This area has the most accessible camping in the park as well as a park store. Loomis Museum, near Manzanita Lake, is named after B.F. Loomis who as an amateur photographer and naturalist took the invaluable photos of the Lassen Peak eruptions in 1914, 1915 and 1917. His early photographs were some of the first published after Lassen Peak began erupting in 1914. His photographic work and eye witness reports helped develop

the nation’s interest and contributed to the establishment of Lassen as a national park. Loomis owned all the property around Manzanita Lake and his love for the new park encouraged him to donate his property in order to preserve this incredible asset. A stop in the small museum provides both the photographic and interpretive description of the volcanic nature of this prized park. At the southwestern entrance, the Kohm Yah-Man-Nee Visitor Center is now open year round. Open in the fall of 2008, the building has met the high environmental standards to earn the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design’s top rating. The visitor center will include an information station, along with permits, interpretive exhibits, a concession-run gift shop and restaurant! In an era that all too often ignores the importance of nature and special places, Lassen remains a sacred and enchanting destination. 9


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

All American Road

Old Station/McCloud Creek, Rivers and Waterfalls This section of the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway begins at the northern edge of Lassen Volcanic National Park and is a continuation of the volcanic terrain from Lassen.

campgrounds, as well as classic mid 19th century resorts. The intersection of Hwy. 89 and 299 allows for several optional side trips to the communities of Burney and Fall River Mills. Both have lodging and a variety of restaurants. In Fall River Mills, the historic Fort Crook Museum is open May to November, with a huge collection of memorabilia from early settlers and Native American artifacts.

Just a few miles north of the park is Old Station, which traces the historic Lassen and Nobles Emigrant Trails, both designated by Congress as National Historic Trails. Just north of Old Station is Subway Cave offering an opportunity to walk through a volcanic lava tube. The 1/3 mile long cave has a constant temperature of 46 degrees even when the outside temperature during the summer months may

Heading back to Hwy. 89 and north of the intersection about six miles is what Theodore Roosevelt called the “eighth wonder of the world,” McArthur-Burney Falls State Park. The never-changing

McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

approach 100. Besides a sweater, you’ll need a flashlight, as there is no lighting inside this volcanic spectacle.

water volume over the falls is what makes it so unusual. The sources of most of its water are springs, just a 1/2 mile above the falls. The state park also includes an extensive campground and Lake Britton.

Further along Hwy. 89 is Hat Creek, considered by many as one of the best trout fly-fishing streams in the country. Numerous access points, as well as campgrounds, provide the makings of a great summer vacation. These cold spring fed waters are a perfect habitat for trout. Continuing north on Hwy. 89 are several private and Forest Service

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The scenic drive continues north on Hwy. 89 with uncrowded roads and a number of forest access roads that will truly get you “off the beaten path”. Hwy. 89 and the McCloud River loop offers the chance to see three spectacular water falls – Lower,


Drive Tips

Distance: 70 miles Minimum Driving Time: 3 hours Best Time to go: March-November For Regional Information: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association, 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782 www.shastacascade.com

Along the byway: Burney Chamber of Commerce, 530-335-2111, Fall River Valley Chamber, 530-336-5840 and McCloud Chamber of Commerce, 530-964-3113.

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services are

available in Old Station, Hat Creek, Fall River Mills, Burney and McCloud, with other limited services along the route.

WEED Mt. SHASTA

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14162ft

Mt. SHASTA

McCLOUD

DUNSMUIR

BARTLE

McCloud Falls

89

McCloud River

Castle Crags State Park

McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park

Big Lake Lake Britton

299

Pit River

Whiskeytown Shasta-Trinity Nat’l Rec. Area

Shasta Lake

BURNEY

HAT CREEK 299

S H A S TA

Shasta Lake City

Subway Cave

OLD STATION 89

299

Redding

FALL RIVER MILLS

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Anderson Anderson

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Lassen Volcanic National Park

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Lassen National Forest

Middle and Upper McCloud Falls. It has been said that each of the falls has its own unique qualities: Lower Falls is known to be the family area, Middle Falls is a photographer’s paradise, and Upper Falls is complete with massive areas of water to swim, along with plenty of areas for picnicking. Your next stop is McCloud, a great stopover or even a place to enjoy the evening.

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Subway Cave


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

McCloud/Tulelake Shasta in View

the Mt. Shasta Board and Ski Park, the only ski resort on the Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway.

This portion of the All American Road has the distinction of having a view of Mount Shasta for almost the entire section. Majestic Mount Shasta at 14,162 feet is the tallest volcano in California and can often be seen from more than 100 miles away. For centuries, the mountain has served as the anchor for the Cascade Range, as a spiritual center for Native Americans, and as a nature lover and mountain climber’s paradise. The mountain

Beginning in McCloud, which is on the southern slope of Mount Shasta, this picturesque community offers everything from luxury accommodations and fine dining to camping and picnicking. McCloud is a town of superlatives - from having the oldest golf course in Northern California Living Memorial Sculpture Garden

to the best dinner train experience, it is a beautiful historic town worth a visit.

itself has been recognized as one of the seven sacred mountains in the world. Its interesting history, tales of lore, myths and legends continue to attract visitors from around the world who believe the mountain has a spiritual aura. Located on its slopes is

Moving up the byway, at the base of the mountain is Mt. Shasta City. From the warmth of the chalets at Mount Shasta Resort to the largest campground in

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All American Road cars to help provide a truly unique resort experience.

the area on Lake Siskiyou, it’s a great place to stay or enjoy a relaxing stroll. The city is known for its wide variety of bookstores, galleries, gift shops

Continuing your trek north, Weed, a Middle McCloud Falls

town on the western slopes of Mount Shasta should be your next stop. The Weed Historic Lumber Town Museum offers a collection of artifacts including the original lumber company store, as well as a collection of antique logging equipment. Nearby Lake Shastina is known for its challenging 27 hole “Magnificent Monster” golf course and water recreation. At Weed the byway heads towards Oregon on Hwy. 97. Just a few miles north is The Living Memorial Sculpture Garden, a heart warming memorial dedicated to veterans. The garden consists of eleven sculptures, each is sure to provoke a different memory from the veterans, and an immense amount of gratitude from all

and good restaurants, as well as Sisson Museum and Mt. Shasta Fish Hatchery. The best access point for the mountain itself is the Everett Memorial Highway which begins in downtown Mt. Shasta City. Dunsmuir, just south of the byway and Mt. Shasta City has a century long history as a railroad town. Dunsmuir is like stepping back in time with its quaint and picturesque downtown. The town may be one of the few places that you can actually spend the night in a 19th century railroad car. Railroad Park Resort, located south of Dunsmuir near Castle Crags, has a collection of old cabooses and dining

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Shasta Sunset Dinner Train


McCloud/Tulelake CONTINUED visitors. Continuing north on the byway is Grass Lake and Deer Mountain. Grass Lake provides a scenic stop over point

wildlife refuge and Tulelake. On the California side of the border there are three prominent wildlife viewing areas, the Lower Klamath Tule Lake, and the Butte Valley National Wildlife Refuges. The Lower Klamath NWR has the distinction of being the first refuge set aside for waterfowl in the nation. Seventy-five percent of the wildlife migrating along the west

Butte Valley National Grasslands

while Deer Mountain is popular for winter snowmobiling and backcountry snowshoeing. Don’t forget to take in another view of Mount Shasta looking at its northern and glaciated side.

Lower Klamath NWR

One of the least populated areas of California is also known for the most wildlife population. Literally millions of birds pass through this area annually on the Pacific Flyway. When descending Hebron summit on Hwy. 97 you are entering Butte Valley, the only National Grasslands in California. The small town of Dorris near the Oregon border has several interesting distinctions. Several years ago the residents were looking for some way to gain attention to their community so they erected the tallest flagpole west of the Mississippi. On a clear day you can see this flag waving from more than ten miles away from the south. Leaving Dorris heading for the Oregon border on Hwy. 97, the intersection of Hwy. 161 is just a few minutes out of town. This road paralleling the border leads to the

Lava Beds National Monument Blue Grotto Photographer David Hays

coast Pacific Flyway visit these refuges. During the year, over 260 species of birds use the refuge including the largest concentration of wintering American bald eagles in the continental United States. Although fall and winter may be best for wildlife viewing, there are numerous wildlife viewing opportunities throughout the year. The community of Tulelake on the eastern side of the refuges is known

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Drive Tips

Distance: 100 miles Minimum Driving Time: 2 to 4 hours Best Time to go: April-November, winter for refuges

For Regional Information: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association, 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782 www.shastacascade.com

Along the byway McCloud Chamber of Commerce, 530-964-3113, Mt. Shasta Chamber of Commerce/Visitors Bureau, 530-926-4865, and Weed Chamber of Commerce. 530-938-4624

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services are available in McCloud, Mt. Shasta, Dunsmuir, Dorris and Tulelake, with other limited services along the route. Ashland

97

66

MIDLAND

OREGON

Merrill

DORRIS Butte Valley National Grasslands

Lower Klamath Lake

Lower Klamath N.W.R

Yreka

TULELAKE Hill Road

97

MeissLake

161

Tule Lake N.W.R

Tule Lake

139 Lake Shastina

Lava Beds National Monument

Grass Lake

Deer Mountain

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Living Memorial Sculpture Garden

CALIFORNIA

Mt. SHASTA

WEED

14162ft Mount Shasta Wilderness

Lake Siskiyou

Mt. SHASTA

DUNSMUIR

89

McCLOUD

Castle Crags State Park

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as the horseradish growing capital of the world with more than 1/3 of the world’s crop grown in the area. This portion of Northern California also has WWII history. One of the internment camps for Japanese Americans was just outside of Tulelake, as well as a German/Italian prisoner of war camp. Also in Tulelake is the only wildlife waterfowl manufacturer of down products in the United States. A side trip to the Lava Beds National Monument is worth the time, as this area not only has unusual volcanic features but was the site of the only Native American/ US Army battle in California history.

Shield volcanoes, cinder cones, spatter cones, strato-volcanoes, and lava tubes are all a part of this historic area. The most prominent of all volcanic features in this national monument has got to be the lava tube caves. You won’t want to miss over 700 caves, historic battlefields, and Native American rock art sites; this truly is something unique for you to experience.

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When you have finished exploring this area, go back on Hwy. 161 to Hwy. 97 and a right turn will immediately deliver you into the Oregon portion of this byway adventure.


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

Klamath/Wildlife Nature’s Gathering The beginning of this segment of the byway on the Oregon/California border has an immediate opportunity for a short side trip. The Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge just to the west of Hwy. 97 is home to a

year history, it has had several boom cycles. One of the early dreams of the residents of Klamath Falls was being connected to the rest of America by railroad. This eventually happened with the first train arriving in 1909.

Lower Klamath Lake

significant portion of the bald eagles who visit the refuge each winter. Back on the byway and continuing north on Hwy. 97, the City of Klamath Falls is just a few minutes away. In its 135

Ideally located half way between San Francisco and Portland, it immediately began realizing its potential with the construction by Southern Pacific Railway of the magnificent White

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All American Road Pelican Hotel. The city’s stately new landmark turned Klamath Falls into a playground for wealthy San

eclectic history of the area. The Ross Raglin Theater, constructed in the classic art deco style, is a 60 year old

Fort Klamath Museum Photographer Todd Kepple

Franciscans. By the 1930’s a thriving “entertainment industry” had begun to take hold in Klamath Falls. Brothels and saloons attracted many ranch hands and loggers into town on Friday nights. Today Klamath Falls is a great place to spend a little time as several museums offer a glimpse of the

landmark in Klamath Falls. Just to the west of Klamath Falls is the Running Y Ranch with Oregon’s number one rated golf course. Upper Klamath Lake located to the east of the byway begins just outside of Klamath Falls. Nearly 30 miles long and eight miles wide, the Upper Klamath Lake is the

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Upper Klamath Lake NWR


Klamath/Wildlife CONTINUED cranes, pelicans and bald eagles. If you have enough time, consider renting a canoe at Rocky Point Resort for a tour on the lake.

largest body of freshwater west of the Rockies. Because the lake is so shallow a highly nutritious blue green algae flourishes in the lake. Packed Fort Klamath Church

Your next stop will be at Fort Klamath. Built in 1863, the fort was the first military outpost in the region. A museum, open in the summer, provides an interesting recounting of the antagonism between the settlers coming into the area in the 1860’s and the Native Americans. This finally culminated in the Modoc War of 1872-73. Nearby are the graves of those Indians who were hanged for the murder of General Canby. Among those graves is that of the famous Modoc Indian, Captain Jack. Captain Jack and his men held off the US Army in the Lava Beds south of the state

with an amazing range of micro nutrients, the algae is harvested and processed as a food supplement. At the northern end of the lake, the crystal clear water around Pelican Bay is home to a vast population of rainbow trout. Fly fishermen from around the globe catch some of the largest trout on the continent. There are several lake excursion operators offering informative and exciting tours of Upper Klamath Lake. One of these is a paddle wheeler offering guests a guided tour while they enjoy a sumptuous meal.

Canvasback Duck Upper Klamath NWR

line for over five months, which is one of the most interesting episodes of western American history.

While in this area, an interesting side trip which will take just a few minutes on Hwy.140 is Lake of the

Continuing north on Hwy. 62, which closely follows Annie Creek, is some extremely interesting geology, including ancient fumaroles that have undergone extensive erosion creating chimney-like formations. Super heated gases escaping through vents hardened the soil thousands of years ago. Over time erosion washed away the softer surrounding soil leaving tall irregular shaped chimneys. Geologists have been known to swoon at this sight. You are now at the south entrance of Crater Lake National Park, the final segment of your byway adventure.

Upper Klamath Lake

Woods Resort. Mt. McLaughlin, once an active volcano, looms over the lake. This “Nuevo” rustic resort is a great place to stay and the food is excellent. Another wildlife viewing opportunity exists on the north end of the lake, Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. Established in 1928, the refuge attracts more than 250 species of birds including sand hill

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Drive Tips

Distance: 80 miles Minimum Driving Time: 3 hours Best Time to go: Year-round For Regional Information: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association, 530-365-7500 or 1-800-474-2782 www.shastacascade.com

Along the byway: Klamath County Dept. of Tourism, 1-541-882-1501 or 1-800-445-6728

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services

are available in Klamath Falls, Rocky Point, with other limited services along the route. Crater Lake National Park

62 97

Annie Creek

FORT KLAMATH

KLAMATH

62

Sprague R.

West Side Rd

CHILOQUIN

Upper Klamath N.W.R

Upper Klamath Lake

Mt. McLaughlin

9495ft

140

Ashland 5

140

Lake of the Woods

Upper Klamath N.W.R Hanks Marsh

Klamath Wildlife Area Bear Valley Refuge

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KLAMATH FALLS MIDLAND

Klamath R.

Lower Klamath N.W.R

OREGON

Merrill

DORRIS

CALIFORNIA

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161 Lower Klamath Lake

TULELAKE 139

Sunset on Tulelake


Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway

Crater Lake National Park America’s Deepest Lake Crater Lake has been an inspiration to people for hundreds of years. Local Native Americans witnessed the collapse of Mt. Mazama and kept the event alive in their legends. One ancient legend of the Klamath people closely parallels the geologic story which has emerged from today’s scientific research. The legend tells of two chiefs pitted in a battle which ended in the destruction of one of the chief’s home, Mt. Mazama. The battle was witnessed in the eruption of Mt. Mazama and the creation of Crater Lake.

asset was William Gladstone Steel. His preoccupation with the lake began in 1870 and in his efforts to bring recognition to the park he participated in numerous scientific studies, and named many of the lake’s landmarks. Steel’s dream of gaining national park status was realized on May 22, 1902, when President Theodore Roosevelt signed legislation designating Crater Lake as a national park. Also, Steel’s continued involvement helped with the development of Crater Lake Lodge in 1915 and the Rim Drive. The drive which goes completely around the lake was completed in 1918.

In more modern history, Crater Lake was first seen by white men in 1853. That year, three gold prospectors came upon a long sloping mountain. Upon reaching its high point they found the huge awe inspiring lake. Since gold was more on the minds of settlers, the discovery was soon forgotten. The person considered responsible for originally establishing Crater Lake as a significant natural

The lake itself is the deepest lake in the United States and 7th deepest in the world. There is no inlet or outlet to the lake with all the water coming from annual rain and snowfall. Because Crater Lake is filled almost entirely by snowfall, it is one of the clearest lakes in the world. A small volcanic island, Wizard Island, rises 764 feet above

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All American Road the surface of the lake. A small crater rests on the summit of the island. Two species of fish, rainbow trout

The best time to visit Crater Lake is June through October if you wish to complete the loop around the

Crater Lake Crater Lake Lodge

and kokanee salmon, the result of extensive stocking between 1880 and 1942, live in the lake.

lake on Rim Drive. During the other eight months much of the park is a snow covered wilderness receiving

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Crater Lake, Mt. Thielsen Photographer Todd Kepple


Crater Lake National Park CONTINUED an average of 500 inches of snow annually. When entering the park from the south the Annie Springs entry station brings you to the park headquarters and the William G. Steel Information Center. This is open year-round. Here you will find

Mazama Village. The Mazama Village campground has 198 sites and the Mazama Village Motor Inn has 40 rooms. There is a lake overlook at the Rim Village Visitor Center. From the Rim Village there are several hikes that are worth considering including High Above Crater Lake

detailed information about the park, backcountry permits, exhibits, maps, publication sales and a 16 minute video about the park.

the one to Discovery Point and also to the top of Garfield Peak. These hikes afford visitors a view of Wizard Island, The Watchman, Hillman Peak, Mt. Thielsen and Cleetwood Cove, more than six miles across the lake. Another short walk leads to Sinnott Memorial, with a small museum and ranger presentations during the summer months. This overview gives a spectacular view 900 feet down to the lake’s surface.

Continuing north from the visitor center will soon bring you to the Rim Village. This is the first overlook of the lake as well as the only lodging available on the rim of the lake. Crater Lake Lodge was established in 1915 and went through an extensive remodel in 1995. The views from the lodge are fantastic and meet anyone’s expectations of what a national park lodge should be. Other lodging and camping is available at the Annie Springs entry station in

The 33 mile Rim Drive encircles Crater Lake with each turn of the road giving a different perspective of the lake, rim and surrounding terrain. This drive

Crater Lake Wizard Island Boat Ride

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Drive Tips

Distance: 60 miles Minimum Driving Time: 4 hours Best Time to go: June-October For Regional Information: Klamath County Dept. of Tourism, 1-541-882-1501 or 1-800-445-6728 and Crater Lake National Park, 1-541-594-3000.

Services along the route: Lodging and other traveler services are available in Mazama Village and Rim Village. 138 CHEMULT

230 138

Diamond Lake Junction

209 Crater Lake National Park Cleetwood Cove

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Crater Lake Wizard Island

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Rim Village Crater Lake Lodge Sinnott Memorial Overlook

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Mazama Village Annie Spring Entrance

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is only open during the summer but affords numerous overlooks, many with interpretive signage. The only access to the lake itself is via a steep trail to Cleetwood Cove where boat tours are offered by Crater Lake Lodge Company. These 1 hour 45 minute ranger narrated tours are available from late June through mid September. Tickets are sold in the parking lot at the Cleetwood Cove trailhead.

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providing spectacular views. Kerr Notch and Sun Notch have views down to Phantom Rock and across the lake to Wizard Island. Continuing on the scenic drive, the north junction will lead you out of the park and onto Hwy. 138. This route makes a quick descent down to Hwy. 97 at Diamond Lake junction which is about half way between Bend and Klamath Falls. Keep in mind this entrance or exit to the park is usually only open from June through October.

Numerous picnic areas can be found along the rim drive with several 23


The California Welcome Center, 1699 Hwy. 273, Anderson, California can provide extensive travel planning information for all the scenic drives in Northern California as well as information on public lands and travel services.

Funded in part by Federal Highway Administration. This guide was produced by: Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association

1699 Hwy. 273, Anderson, CA 96007 Phone: 530-365-7500/1-800-474-2782, Fax: 530-365-1258 Email: info@shastacascade.org Guide Editor: Karen Whitaker, Director of Tourism

Helpful Websites: www.shastacascade.com www.volcaniclegacybyway.com www.klamathcounty.com

Other Resources: olcanic Legacy Scenic Byway Information V Lassen Volcanic National Park Crater Lake National Park Lava Beds National Monument Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuges Klamath N.F. Lassen N.F. Modoc N.F. Shasta-Trinity N.F. Plumas N.F. Winema N.F.

530-926-5439 530-595-4480 541-594-3000 530-667-8100 530-667-2231 530-842-6131 530-257-2151 530-233-5811 530-226-2500 530-283-2050 541-947-2151

Northern California's Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway  

From Northern California's Lassen Volcanic National Park to Southern Oregon's Crater Lake National Park

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