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The Hewitt School

Upper School Course Catalogue

2013-2014


This Upper School Course Catalogue represents an overview of the courses that are being offered in the 2013-2014 academic year. Upper School students should read the course descriptions and choose courses that will challenge and inspire them. As students register for courses, they should consult with their advisors, the Head of Upper School, the Director of College Guidance, the Dean of Teaching and Learning, and their parents/guardians. Courses may be cancelled or changed prior to the fall of 2013, pending enrollment, staffing, and scheduling. Graduation Requirements The Hewitt School requires a minimum of 24 credits for graduation. Students are also required to take a minimum of 5 academic courses per year in addition to creative arts, technology, and physical education. The following is a breakdown of the credits. English Mathematics Classical and Modern Languages History Science Creative Arts Technology* Physical Education

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 1 credit* 4 years

*This graduation requirement applies to the class of 2014 only. Hewitt’s Online Course Policy: It is expected that Hewitt students fulfill all of their graduation requirements and yearly coursework through courses offered by The Hewitt School. Courses offered at other institutions, including online courses and summer courses, do not fulfill Hewitt’s graduation requirements and are not reflected on a student’s official transcript. In the event that a student enters Hewitt after ninth grade and has not met a requirement normally offered in a grade prior to her enrollment, the Head of Upper School, Dean of Teaching and Learning, and Director of College Guidance will work with the student and her family to identify and approve a course online or at another institution. Advanced Placement and Honors Criteria Students who have met the stated criteria and who receive departmental permission are eligible to pursue study in Advanced Placement or Honors courses provided that their overall academic history has been strong and indicative of Advanced Placement or Honors work. Eligibility is determined on a case-by-case basis.

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ENGLISH 4 credits required British and European Literature (Grade 9 – 1 credit) The ninth grade English course develops students’ maturing skills in reading and writing, while focusing on particular themes in European literature: significantly, the individual’s pursuit of spiritual and/or religious harmony. The writing program is multifaceted, emphasizing a process-oriented approach to the critical essay. Students also write poetry, responses to the reading, dramatic monologues, and fiction. Literature includes William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, poetry by the British Romantics, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, and modern European short stories. Vocabulary is taught from a supplementary text, and grammar, punctuation, and usage are taught in the contexts of reading and writing. American Literature (Grade 10 – 1 credit) Selected works of 19th, 20th and 21st century United States literature are the focus of this course, which complements the study of tenth grade United States history. Themes such as the importance of nature, self-reliance, and individualism are explored. Genres and literary terms are reviewed through the study of a range of novels, short prose pieces, poetry and drama. Texts include Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Anna Deveare Smith’s Fires in the Mirror. Both the style of the writers studied and students’ own styles of writing are carefully examined and enriched. Usage, punctuation, correct citation of sources, and grammar are also reviewed in the context of students’ writing. Literary Monsters (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) The hunt begins with classic creatures of terror such as the monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, vampires in Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and ghosts in Henry James’ The Turn of the Screw. These stories serve as the basis of a critical inquiry into the cultural role of monsters, which often figure or represent one’s own repressed fears and desires. The class looks in particular at the way many monsters seem to signify the perceived threat posed by groups such as women, the working class, colonial subjects, etc. Texts include: Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis, Doris Lessing’s The Fifth Child, J.M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians, Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel Maus, and the George Romero film Night of the Living Dead. Students are expected to write on a regular basis both inside and outside of the classroom in forms that range from focused freewrites and blog posts to traditional essays and tests. Finally, students are asked to continue their study of grammar and style by reading selections from Diane Hacker’s traditional A Writer’s Reference and Karen Elizabeth Gordan’s more idiosyncratic The Transitive Vampire: A Handbook of Grammar for the Innocent, the Eager, and the Doomed. Postcolonial Literature (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) The postcolonial writers included in this course strive to present a vision of the Caribbean and of Africa from the perspective of the colonized rather than the colonizer. The class looks to these writers as a corrective to a single story that has often been told about these two regions of the world – a single story that the Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has called dangerous because it tells only part of a much more complex tale of 3


people and place. Conscious of these dangers, the Caribbean writer Jean Rhys has returned to the events of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre from the perspective of the Jamaican-born character Bertha, the madwomen in the attic, in her novel Wide Sargasso Sea. The African writer Chinua Achebe likewise tries to illuminate in his novel Things Fall Apart an African culture that had been relegated to darkness in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness. In reading these and other Afro-Caribbean writers, students look at how the colonial condition has affected relationships between men and women, children and adults, rich and poor, natives and tourists, defenders of human rights and apologists for apartheid. The class witnesses young women coming-of-age in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions and Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, the travails of the so-called Lost Boys of Sudan in Dave Eggers’ The Autobiography of Valentino Achak Deng and the Christopher Quinn documentary God Grew Tired of Us, and the creolization of language in the poetry of Derek Walcott. Students enrolled in this course write on a regular basis both inside and outside of the classroom in forms that range from focused freewrites and blog posts to traditional essays and tests. Finally, students continue their study of grammar and style by reading selections from Diane Hacker’s A Writer’s Reference. Searching For Self: The Modern Novel (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This elective offers a group of notable British and European novels that demonstrate social and stylistic revolutions; from the eighteenth-century novel of manners to midnineteenth century realism, to twenty and twenty-first century techniques of epiphany, stream of consciousness, and poetic symbolism. Protagonists include the restless, romantic Madame Bovary of Flaubert’s eponymous masterpiece of realism; the tormented Raskolnikov in Dostoevsky’s powerful psychological novel, Crime and Punishment; the complex and mysterious Marlow, a prototype for future modernistic characters, in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness; and Jugnu and Chandra, the tragic PakistaniBritish couple in Nadeem Aslam’s 2005 novel Maps for Lost Lovers. Each novel presents dramatically different settings, yet thematic unity emerges in the common struggle of the protagonists for definition of self within a hostile or repressive culture. Class work explores narrative techniques, especially those of the novelist’s viewpoint, use of realistic detail, symbolism and figurative language. AP English Literature (Grade 12 – 1 credit) This course conducts students through a survey of world literature that generates nuanced conversations about the class theme: “To Be or Not To Be: Identity at the Intersections.” Students determine the characteristics that define each genre and consider the development of drama, epic, lyric poetry, and the novel. The class is run as a seminar so that participation in discussions is essential. Analytical writing assignments enable students to develop their ability to express their thoughts critically, clearly, and accurately. Students take the AP English Literature and Composition examination in May. Prerequisite: grades 9-11 A- average in English and departmental permission

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HISTORY 3 credits required European History (Grade 9 – 1 credit) This class provides a survey of European history from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Topics include the late Middle Ages, the Age of Absolutism and growth of monarchies, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, and the Industrial Revolution. Both Eastern European and Western European perspectives are considered. Students learn how to identify and analyze the political, economic, social, intellectual, military, and cultural themes. They read primary and secondary sources and are asked to think about a variety of historical views and to come to their own conclusions as to why the past is important to study today. Projects include presentations, analyses of art and architecture, and biographical research. Students focus, too, on projects in several genres that integrate their history and English studies to arrive at a multidimensional sense of the periods they examine. United States History (Grade 10 – 1 credit) This course is designed to give students a grasp of the facts of the nation’s past from the tri-cultural Encounter (among the peoples of Western Europe, Western Africa, and North America) through the 1980s. Students achieve mastery of the relevant geography and the ability to interpret primary sources as well as to discern bias in secondary sources. They examine varieties of history (military, medical, demographic, political, and religious to name just a few) through time. Projects focus on individuals and their roles as expressive of the evolving American personality – for example the daring of the Corps of Discovery that was grasping in territorial expansion yet idealistic at the same time. Students write often to express such tensions and ambivalence and to recognize their contemporary manifestations. Honors United States History (Grade 10 – 1 credit) The honors section requires students to work in an independent way to achieve mastery and understanding in this survey course in United States history from Contact (among the peoples of Western Europe, Western Africa, and North America) to the present. Reading and writing skills are refined and practiced often to encourage students to acknowledge how agile they can be when asked to express a sense of history. Students write frequently, analyze primary sources, statistics, and graphs, and explore issues in historiography collaboratively. Students are expected to engage in lively discussions and explore controversies. Themes are American identity, culture, demographic change, economic transformation, geographic and environmental issues and determinism, global responsibilities, politics, the military, diplomacy, citizenship, reform movements, religion, and slavery and its legacy. Prerequisite: grade 9 A- average in history and departmental permission Regional Studies: East Asian Studies/Southwest Asia (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This year-long course is open to juniors and seniors and explores two non-European cultures and histories thematically. The focus is primarily on China and India. Some of the topics addressed are the roles of women, childhood and education, literature, art and 5


architecture, religious and non-theistic philosophies, environment and resource management and crises, demographics, population policies, emerging diseases, politics and government, reform, revolution, and social change. Students will examine secondary and primary sources, visit museums and cultural centers, and watch films. They should expect to think analytically and collaboratively to examine themes through projects. The 2013-2014 East Asia course is one half of a two-year regional studies program that also includes Southwest Asia (often referred to as the Middle East), which will use the same rubric to examine Turkey, Israel, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, and Palestine. Both East and Southwest Asia continue to grow exponentially in their material, political, and cultural impact on the world. Globalization, Protest, and Change: the Post 1945 World. (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) “Men, for years now, have been talking about war and peace. But now, no longer can they just talk about it. It is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it’s nonviolence or nonexistence.” In 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. noted the nuclear anxieties of the post-war world in his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech. Existential fears related to nuclear weaponry were a part of the post-1945 environment, and so were tremendous changes in global culture, politics, and economics, all of which affect our contemporary, increasingly intertwined world. As a result, the post-World War II era deserves significant attention from the student who seeks to understand her society and its challenges. This course delves into a wide array of topics including post-war rebuilding in Asia and Europe, the Cold War, anti-colonialism, the American Civil Rights Movement, the global student movement of the late 1960s, American cultural and economic “imperialism,” the world environmental movement, women’s liberation movements of the 1970s and 1980s, the fall of the Soviet Union/ European communism, and the advent of the internet, among other topics. AP Art History (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) AP Art History offers students the equivalent of an introductory college course in art history. Students achieve an informed, sensitive understanding of painting, sculpture, architecture, and other art forms within their historical and cultural contexts; the skills and vocabulary necessary to analyze these visual arts; and the ability to express understanding and analysis clearly and gracefully both orally and in writing. Two units are non-European, and they are Islamic and West African art. Other units are EuroAmerican and, following Greek and Roman art histories, they are based overwhelmingly on Christian tradition and iconography, although classical references continue to the present as well. Students gain pleasure from no longer merely looking at art: they understand it in an informed and critical manner. Along with extensive reading and writing, students look at art images every day and visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art once a week.

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AP Human Geography (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This course offers qualified students the equivalent of a first-year college course in Human Geography by focusing on populations, cultural practices and processes, political organization of the earth’s surface, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. Topics in these broad areas include, for example, population and natural hazards; symbolic landscapes and ethnic sense of place; the nation-state, colonialism, and political-territorial arrangements; the Green Revolution, globalization and the international division of labor; and uneven development, ghettoization, and gentrification. Students learn to use and think about maps and spatial data, define regions, characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places, and interpret the implications of human associations and natural phenomena. This course prepares students to continue study for careers in nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), government and international business, military planning, and collective action. Prerequisite: grades 9-11 A- average in history and departmental permission (This course will not be offered in 2013-2014.) Introduction to Economics (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This course serves as an introduction to the principles of both macroeconomics and microeconomics. Students will investigate economic principles such as scarcity, supply and demand, comparative advantage, externalities, inflation, money and banking, and unemployment. Historical case studies, current events and the work of leading economic philosophers such as John Maynard Keynes and Karl Marx will give students a practical and theoretical framework for economic mastery. The course will blend history, philosophy, and mathematics and students should expect to tackle both abstract theories as well as real world scenarios. While the scope of the course is broad, there will be opportunities for students to explore areas of interest more in-depth through long-term projects.

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Mathematics 4 credits required Geometry (Grade 9 – 1 credit) The Geometry course begins with an in-depth logic and reasoning unit, in which constructing a valid argument is stressed. Students then apply this reasoning to writing formal geometric proofs involving line segments, angles, triangles, parallel and perpendicular lines, and quadrilaterals. After proving theorems, the students use these theorems to solve algebraic problems and classify geometric figures. Next, the course moves from planar geometry to the coordinate plane, beginning with a review of the basics from Algebra I. Students use techniques of proof to validate statements in the coordinate plane. Transformations and isometries in the coordinate plane are defined and studied. A unit on measuring perimeter, circumference, area, surface area, lateral area, and volume of geometric figures concludes the course. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Accelerated Algebra I Honors Geometry (Grade 9 – 1 credit) The Honors Geometry course begins with a rigorous logic and reasoning unit, in which constructing a valid argument is stressed. Students then apply this reasoning to writing formal geometric proofs involving line segments, angles, triangles, parallel and perpendicular lines, and quadrilaterals. After proving theorems, students use these theorems to solve algebraic problems and classify geometric figures. Next, the course moves from planar geometry to the coordinate plane, where students review the basics from Algebra I. Students use techniques of proof to validate statements in the coordinate plane. Transformations and isometries in the coordinate plane are defined and studied. A unit on measuring perimeter, circumference, area, surface area, lateral area, and volume of geometric figures concludes the course. Students in the honors class study each topic in greater depth and solve more complex problems. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Accelerated Algebra I and departmental placement Algebra II (Grade 10 – 1 credit) This course is an analytic and graphical approach to families of functions including constant, linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Domain, range, intercepts, roots, and behavior of each family are examined. Transformational relationships and inverse relationships between functions are studied, as is the basic operations of functions and composition of functions. Students study techniques for solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, exponential, and logarithm equations. Students then use these techniques to model and solve real world problems using functions. Prerequisite: Geometry or Honors (formerly: Accelerated) Geometry Honors Algebra II (Grade 10 – 1 credit) This course is an analytic and graphical approach to families of functions including constant, linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Domain, Range, intercepts, roots, and behavior of each family are examined. Transformational relationships and inverse relationships between functions are studied, as is the basic operations of functions and composition of functions. Students study techniques for solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, radical, exponential, and logarithm 8


equations. Students then use these techniques to model and solve real world problems using functions. The honors class concludes the year with an in-depth exploration of rational functions and their properties. Prerequisite: A- average in either level of Algebra I and of Geometry Precalculus (Grade 11 – 1 credit) This course extends the concepts of algebra and coordinate geometry and prepares students for the study of calculus or statistics. In the first semester, students begin studying the applications of trigonometry through and examination of trigonometric functions, identities, and equations. A first semester project that investigates the relevance of trigonometry in professional careers is required of all students. In the second semester, students delve into the exploration of functions through an analysis of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Throughout the year, students are expected to interpret and represent functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically. Graphing calculators are used extensively in the course to engage students in problem solving and application of mathematics to real life situations. Prerequisite: either level of Geometry and Algebra II Honors Precalculus (Grade 11 – 1 credit) This course extends the concepts of algebra and coordinate geometry and prepares students for the study of calculus or statistics. In the first semester, students engage in an in-depth study of the numerous applications of trigonometric functions, identities, and equations. In the second semester, students delve into the exploration of functions through an analysis of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Throughout the year, students are expected to interpret and represent functions algebraically, numerically, and graphically. The year concludes with a unit on statistics and probability. Graphing calculators are used extensively in the course to engage students in problem solving and application of mathematics to real life situations. This course introduces the concepts of continuity and limits and is a prerequisite for the AP Calculus AB course. Prerequisite: A- average in either level of Geometry and of Algebra II; departmental permission Statistics (Grade 12 – 1 credit) This course is designed to examine how data and statistics shape our world. Students learn the importance of collecting and studying data in real-life situations. This course offers critical examination of how statistics can be used and manipulated to achieve intended goals and claims. Through reading, research, discussion, and calculations, student get a clear view of how statistical data and inference influence the world around us. Students are held responsible for derivation, application and analysis of basic statistical formulas and use their knowledge to draw conclusions and do their own studies. This course explores data analysis, data production, statistical inference, and probability. Class projects include an examination of how statistics are used by the media and by advertisers to mislead their audience, as a well as a year-end assignment whereby students design and implement their own study and run their own statistical analysis on their findings. Prerequisite: either level of Precalculus 9


Calculus (Grade 12 – 1 credit) Calculus begins with a review of functions, trigonometry and graphing before exploring the concepts of limits and the definition of a derivative. The theory and techniques of differential calculus are developed and applied to topics including optimization techniques, related rates, and the study of change in physics, economics, and geometry. Numerical approximation methods and integration techniques are applied to the contexts of areas, volumes, and rectilinear motion, again from both theoretical and mechanical perspectives. The distinctions between anti-derivatives, definite integrals, and improper integrals are addressed. While this course gives a sound foundation for the study of calculus in college, it is not intended as preparation for the Advanced Placement test. Prerequisite: either level of Precalculus and departmental permission AP Calculus AB (Grade 12 – 1 credit) The material in this course follows closely, but is not limited to, the guidelines of the AP Calculus AB syllabus. Following a short review of functions, trigonometry and graphing, the concept of a limit and the definition of a derivative are introduced. The theory and techniques of differential calculus are developed and applied to topics including optimization techniques, related rates, and the study of change in physics, economics, and geometry. Numerical approximation methods and integration techniques are applied to the contexts of areas, volumes, and rectilinear motion, again from both theoretical and mechanical perspectives. The distinctions between anti-derivatives, definite integrals, and improper integrals are addressed. Differential Equations and slope fields are studied to end the course. Students take the AP Calculus AB examination in May. Prerequisite: grades 9-11 A- average in either level of Geometry and Algebra II; Aaverage in Honors Precalculus; departmental permission Advanced Problem Solving with Mathematical Modeling (Grade 12 – 1 credit) This is a course in undergraduate level mathematical problem solving and modeling. The course will begin by delving into common problem-solving techniques employed frequently by professional mathematicians. The course will then tackle introductory topics in undergraduate level mathematics by examining both standard and non-standard problems in each domain. Students will learn not only to solve problems, but how to construct a convincing argument that their solutions are correct. These undergraduate topics will include Discrete Mathematics, Graph Theory, Combinatorics, Number Theory, Geometry, and Calculus. The focus of this course is to develop the critical thinking and analysis skills that will prepare students for a broad range of undergraduate level mathematics courses and for their future professional lives. This course will put the skills learned in all previous mathematics courses, and in this one, to true mathematical practice. Prerequisite: Calculus or AP Calculus AB; departmental permission

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SCIENCE 3 credits required Biology (Grade 9 – 1 credit) The ninth grade biology course provides students with a comprehensive study of the major concepts of the subject. During the first semester, the topics include: scientific method, ecology, organic chemistry, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division, and genetics. Some of the highlights of the first semester are labs involving water testing and the effects of oil on a bird’s feathers. The class also takes a trip to Soundwaters in Stamford, Connecticut where students participate in a class on adaptations, as well as board a floating laboratory to examine the rich diversity of life in the Long Island Sound. In the second semester DNA, chromosomes, evolution, and human organ systems are explored. The year culminates with a semester long project on zoo habitat design. Each topic is reinforced with appropriate labs. Chemistry (Grade 10 – 1 credit) This course investigated the major areas of chemistry. Topics covered include atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical bonding, the nature of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students perform laboratory experiments, analyze results, and report their findings in both written and oral presentations. Students who in the first semester demonstrate mastery of the concepts will have the option of applying for honors credit in the second semester. Honors eligibility will be determined by the instructor, based on grades-to-date and assessment of the student’s work in the laboratory. In conjunction with supplemental work, those who pursue the honors option will also complete an additional project featuring research, lab work, and a formal presentation of findings before a panel of experts. Environmental Science (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) Students will learn the fundamentals of environmental science in order to develop a deep understanding of the impact humans are having on an increasingly changing world. Students will investigate the complexities of environmental interactions through case studies, lab experiments, and fieldwork. The course will focus on environmental issues such as climate change, alternative energy, biodiversity and sustainability, and environmental health and toxicology, allowing students to think more critically about these complex issues. Physics (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This course investigates first-year physics topics with a strong emphasis on Newtonian mechanics. Topics will include kinematics, Newton’s Laws, work and energy, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and special relativity. Students design and conduct inquirybased laboratory investigations to better understand the natural world. Students utilize their knowledge of geometry and algebra (level II). Extensive demonstrations and laboratory work are included to support the course material. Honors Physics (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This rigorous course in physics utilizes algebra, trigonometry, and introductory calculus 11


concepts. First semester topics include: kinematics, Newton’s Laws, work and energy, vibrations and waves, electricity, and magnetism. In the second semester students investigate applications in physics, as well as special topics such as astronomy, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. Students design and conduct inquiry-based laboratory investigations to solve problems and develop a more sophisticated understanding of the natural world. Advanced Placement Biology (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a college level introductory biology course. Topics covered in this advanced course fall into three major areas: molecules and cells, heredity and evolution, as well as organisms and populations. The course is accompanied by numerous inquiry-based labs, which further student understanding of the course topics. The course is rigorous and requires a significant time commitment. This course prepares students for the Advanced Placement Biology examination in May. Anatomy (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) Anatomy focuses on health and disease in the human body. The course covers the following body systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, central and peripheral nervous, as well as the cardiovascular system, in particular heart disease. Students learn how to present patient pathology and complete a semester project on specific disorders. The year culminates in a surgery project in which students create dynamic presentations and often interview health professionals. All topics are reinforced with appropriate lab work, including several dissections. In addition, the class observes a cardiac surgery or neurosurgery via video conferencing at the Liberty Science Center.

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MODERN LANGUAGES 3 credits of a modern or classical language required

French French III (1 credit) In this course, students continue to explore selected aspects of French-speaking cultures, as expressed through literature and other materials. The course introduces a formal examination of literature through the close reading of French and francophone texts and the writing of compositions and analytic essays on the authors and their philosophies in the context of their time periods. Historical periods covered include the 16th Century Religious Wars, as depicted in Alexandre Dumas’ La Reine Margot, and the Romantic Period, as seen in Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac. Francophone literature includes La réclusion solitaire (Morocco) and Prière d’un petit enfant nègre (Guadeloupe). In addition, this level reviews and consolidates all grammatical structures and introduces more complex and advanced grammatical topics in context. Prerequisite: French II French IV (1 credit) This course deepens students’ knowledge of grammatical constructions and their ability to converse in French. Readings include cultural material and unabridged literature, selected poems, short stories, and excerpts of representative works by various authors. At this level and beyond, students are expected to contribute freely to class discussions on the themes being studied. During the year, students will complete a research project on the role of women in the francophone world using a variety of local sources as well as establish a link between their research and class readings. Typical literature includes: Le petit prince by Saint Exupéry and works from a range of francophone authors such as Assia Djebar, Leopold Sedar Senghor, Andrée Chedid, and JMG Le Clézio. Each of the texts enables students not only to develop their French language skills, but also to deepen their awareness of French and francophone culture and history. Prerequisite: French III French V/French V Honors (1 credit) This high intermediate/advanced culture and conversation class provides students with a variety of opportunities to learn about the French‐speaking world. Through the rich literary and cinematic traditions of France and the Francophone world, students will engage with questions relating to society, history, art, literary movements as well as current events. Students focus on the philosophies from the twentieth-century Existentialist, Absurdist and Surrealist movements as well as analyze poetry from the end of the 19th century. Titles typically included are Huis Clos by Jean-Paul Sartre, L’Étranger by Albert Camus and poems by Charles Baudelaire and Arthur Rimbaud. Selected works from the Francophone world are also introduced, such as excerpts from the works of Mariama Bâ, J.M. Le Clezio, Nancy Huston, and Leopold Sédar Senghor. Students discuss literature, take part in debates, make presentations, “les exposés”, and write analytical and creative compositions based on the works studied. Films studied may include but are not limited to: “Le Chien Andalou” directed by Luis Bunuel, “L’enfant” by the Dardenne brothers

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and “Entre les murs” by Laurent Cantet. There is a regular revision of grammatical concepts based on students’ needs. This course is conducted entirely in French.

Prerequisite for Honors French V: French IV; grades 9-11 B+ average in French; departmental permission Prerequisite for French V: French IV AP French Language (1 credit) The course syllabus is organized around six course themes—Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Personal and Public Identities, Families and Communities, and Beauty and Aesthetics—and explores the interdisciplinary relationships among these broad themes and how people in different cultures and time period might regard the themes in different ways. Literature is a cross-cutting modality that delivers content and informs all six of the course themes. Students will routinely view on-line French newspapers, magazines, and news programs for in-class discussions, which will be held regularly to provide students with the opportunity to converse extemporaneously, reinforcing speaking and listening skills. Students synthesize and analyze material from textbooks, works of literature, and other authentic sources. A recent literature anthology by Richard Ladd (Allons au-delà ! La langue et les cultures du monde francophone), which is organized specifically to provide source material for the AP Themes, Contexts, Essential Questions, and Learning Objectives, will be used in each of the six units of the course. Prerequisite for AP French Language: grades 9-11: A- in French; French IV; departmental permission Spanish Spanish II (1 credit) At this level, students are presented with material from a range of text types, in which they encounter intermediate level vocabulary structures and some advanced grammatical concepts which they use in class activities such as listening exercises, class presentations, and dialogues. Throughout the year, as their language skills develop, they begin the study of literature from the Spanish-speaking world authored by renowned literary figures such as Miguel de Cervantes, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Elias Miguel Muñoz. Prerequisite: Spanish I Spanish III (1 credit) This course reviews and expands upon core content from Spanish I and II, before students move on to more advanced language skills. They are expected at this level to have the necessary skills that allow them to contribute with some degree of fluency to class discussions on a variety of topics. Each thematic unit revolves around the history and culture of a Spanish-speaking country. Additionally, this course aids the students in their very real desire for self-expression by learning grammar in context through reading short stories, poems and plays from a range of well-known Hispanic literary figures such as Octavio Paz, Julia Álvarez, Laura Esquivel and Isabel Allende. Prerequisite: Spanish II

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Spanish IV (1 credit) This course is designed to introduce students to the rich and exciting literature of the Hispanic world through a literary reader. Students are expected to possess advanced skills in the language, such as knowledge of sophisticated grammatical concepts and vocabulary, which enable them to read, discuss, and write about the works of a range of well-known authors such as Pablo Neruda, Ana María Matute, Gabriel García Márquez, and Jorge Luis Borges. Each selection is chosen for its intrinsic merit and for its relevance in the overall context of the author’s work as well as for its linguistic accessibility. In addition, students will read a play by Federico Garcia Lorca as well as go to the Repertorio Español to see it. Prerequisite: Spanish III Spanish V/Spanish V Honors (1 credit) This is a course designed for advanced students with a good command of Spanish language and grammar. It is designed to improve their language proficiency as they use a wide variety of materials and media to explore themes of particular interest to them. Readings include articles from magazines and newspaper, as well as short stories from significant Hispanic literary figures such as Juan Rulfo, Elena Poniatowska, Rubén Dario, and Jose Marti . Students will choose topics for discussion that focus on personal, moral, and social issues. Oral presentations will be given weekly and they will be based on texts, documents, and short movies. All the material will be utilized to reinforce the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills, to build vocabulary and to stimulate class discussions. Prerequisite for Spanish V: Spanish IV Prerequisite for Honors Spanish V: grades 9-11 B+ average in Spanish; Spanish IV; departmental permission AP Spanish Language (1 credit) This course offers advanced students and native speakers the chance to continue to read, discuss, and write about important works by prominent writers of Spain and Latin America such as Carmen Laforet, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Antonio Machado, Julio Cortázar, Miguel de Unamuno, and Mario Vargas Llosa. Students also complete the AP Spanish syllabus using comprehensive printed and audio materials preparing them for the newly integrated listening, speaking, reading and writing portions of the AP Spanish Language examination in May 2014. The test covers subject matter deemed to be comparable to an advanced-level college course in Spanish Composition and Conversation. Prerequisite: grades 9-11 A- in Spanish; Spanish IV; departmental permission

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CLASSICS 3 credits of a classical or modern language required Latin I The objective of this eighth grade course is to acquaint students with the basic vocabulary and concepts of the Latin language. The students learn to recognize and use new words and grammar through studying pictures with captions and reading narrative texts. Students become familiar with day-to-day life in ancient Pompeii and other areas of the Roman empire as it was lived by the cast of characters presented in the Cambridge Latin Course; thus, students are able not only to read fairly long stories in Latin by the end of the year, but also to discuss the practical realities of slavery, politics, education, and architecture in the ancient Roman world. Latin II (Grade 9 – 1 credit) This course introduces students to the more complex grammatical structures of Latin and prepares them for the study of Roman literature. Students encounter language concepts in Latin through translation of long narrative texts in which familiar characters and places recur. These texts enable students both to practice and become comfortable with new vocabulary and syntax and to learn about the cultural and intellectual developments of the Roman Empire. In particular, students explore life in Roman Britain and Egypt, including such aspects as ancient medicine, scientific innovations, and religious practices. Latin III (Grade 10 – 1 credit) In this course, students complete their study of formal grammar and begin continuous reading and translation of original texts. The future tenses, entire passive voice, indirect statement, and ablative absolute construction are covered; other new grammatical concepts are treated as they occur in reading for the class. Students study the philosophies, social hierarchy, and religions of the empire as well. Particular attention is paid to the Siege of the Masada and the religious conflict that occurred during the imperial period. The students also translate an abridged version of Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita (book one) after spring break. Latin IV (Grade 11 – 1 credit) In this course, students are introduced to a variety of Latin poetry and prose, beginning the year with the poetry of Catullus and responding to this poet both analytically and creatively. In the second semester, selections from Cicero’s speech Pro Caelio provide what may be another view of Catullus’ tantalizing mistress “Lesbia.” Furthermore, students study Cicero’s use of ethopoiia and other rhetorical strategies. Finally, the students read selections from Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Myths such as “Daedalus and Icarus,” “Pygmalion,” “Pyramus and Thisbe,” and “Pentheus” introduce students to poetic devices and epic verse. Throughout the year, students work on their retention of Latin grammar and vocabulary and develop their analytical writing in English through short and long critical responses.

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Honors/Latin V (Grade 12 – 1 credit) In this course, students explore some of the variety and richness of Latin poetry in the late republic and early imperial periods. Texts include selections from Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Horace’s Odes, with a focus on the philosophical, literary, and political arenas in which these works were composed. The impact of ancient texts on later writers, artists, and intellectual leaders is assessed through the consideration of numerous adaptations (i.e., Milton’s Paradise Lost post-Vergilian epic) as well as through the study of recent critical appraisals such as Greenblatt’s The Swerve: How the World Became Modern, which addresses the significance of Lucretius’s work for the Renaissance. Throughout the year, students hone their contextual mastery of Latin grammar and vocabulary and their comprehension of syntax, meter, and literary devices. Students have numerous opportunities to convey their critical and creative responses in a variety of genres and for different audiences. The honors section requires a more extensive reading list and offers more nuanced assessments.

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PERFORMING ARTS 2 credits of performing or visual arts required

Chamber Choir (Grades 9-12 – 1 credit) The Chamber Choir focuses on the further development and refinement of vocal and choral technique toward the goal of a unified performing ensemble of the highest caliber. Repertoire is chosen from an eclectic variety of eras and styles, from the 13th century to the present. Integral to the course is the study of basic music theory, terminology, sightsinging, and vocal production, as well as the application of languages, history, and other arts as they relate to the specific repertoire being studied. The rehearsal process is geared toward the ongoing development of the skills necessary to be fluent, knowledgeable, and confident singers. The class culminates in at least one concert at the end of each semester, for which the students rehearse throughout the year. Prerequisite: departmental permission Drama (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) The Drama class seeks to develop students' means for self-expression, creativity, and improvisational composition. The class centers on acting skills but also includes directing, audition techniques, script writing, and analysis. Students improvise scenes within certain parameters, rehearse and perform existing monologues and scenes, and write and perform their own. In the second semester, the class culminates in a play to be performed for the school community. Exploring the New York Music World (Grade 9 – ½ credit) New York Music World explores the musical riches of New York City, both historical and contemporary. Students participate in master classes and attend live performances throughout the semester, and they listen to, analyze, and research various musical styles and compositional genres, sharing their findings with the class through a variety of creative presentations on New York music and musicians. Students learn to look closely at a musical composition, identify its style, place it in its appropriate historical context, and reflect critically upon the work and its performance. This is a required ninth grade course. Film Studies (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) Film Studies is a year-long course designed to introduce students to the major concepts of film theory. Students learn about the major concepts behind filmmaking while watching films chosen to illustrate those concepts. The students also create film elements of their own, including storyboards, slide shows, color schemes, scripts and a five-minute short film. Some of the films viewed are Citizen Kane, Casablanca, The Seven Samurai, and Singin’ in the Rain. Handbell Choir (Grades 9-12 – 1 credit) The Handbell Choir is a performance ensemble open to all members of the upper school. The group rehearses and performs handbell music of American Guild of English Handbell Ringers Level 3+, with a great deal of “ensemble ringing” and extended techniques. The class culminates in two concerts at the end of each semester, but there are additional performances for the community scheduled throughout the year. 18


Visual Arts 2 credits in Performing and/or Visual Arts required Ceramics I (Grade 9-12 – 1 credit) This course introduces students to both historical and contemporary traditions of using clay to create art objects and functional ware. In the construction of picture frames, candle holders, maracas, jewelry, functional pottery, and other projects, students learn both throwing on the pottery wheels and the following popular hand-building techniques: pinching, slab rolling, carving, and modeling. Each project also introduces basic artistic concepts such as form, texture, space, pattern, and color. Advanced Ceramics (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) Advanced Ceramics is a challenging second level hand-building and wheel-throwing course for students with previous clay experience. Throughout the year, students refine, build upon, and often combine their construction skills, such as pinching, coiling, slab rolling, carving and modeling, and throwing. Each project requires students to explore basic artistic concepts like form, space, texture, and pattern. The year’s projects include shoes, pop sculptures, houses, thematic masks, alternative teapots, and an independent studio project of choice. Prerequisite: Ceramics I Exploring the New York Art World (Grade 9 – ½ credit) This course explores the artistic riches of New York City. Once a week, students visit art locations in the city during the school day and engage in on-site writing activities. Inschool class periods are dedicated to research, discussions, and presentations. Students learn to look closely at art, interpret it, place it in historical context, and reflect creatively upon it. Students view art from many ages and cultures as well and become familiar with the museum, gallery, and auction worlds. This is a required ninth grade course. Photography I (Grades 9-12– 1 credit) Photography I introduces students to the basics of the traditional black and white darkroom practices. Students learn how to use a 35mm manual film camera, develop black and white film, and use an enlarger in the darkroom to print images. In conjunction with the technical aspects of photography, students explore personal expression through image making and analysis of works by contemporary and historic photographers. Advanced Photography & Media Arts (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) Advanced Photography & Media Arts combines study in traditional analog photography with new media technologies. Students explore advanced printing techniques in the traditional wet darkroom and are introduced to Adobe Photoshop both as a digital darkroom and as new design software. Students analyze both historic and contemporary works of art, illustrate advanced personal themes in their image making, and learn to choose their material (film or digital) based on their concept. A strong emphasis is placed on both art making and the technical understanding of new media technologies. Prerequisite: Photography I

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Studio Art I (Grades 9-12 – 1 credit) This is the initial course for any student who has not taken studio art in the upper school. Students produce a wide variety of work preparing them for continued study. Lessons include observational, imaginative, and abstract drawing and painting, printmaking and mixed media collage, and mixed media sculpture. Artists are encouraged to develop a personal voice. There are at least two museum or gallery visits. Advanced Studio Art (Grades 10-12 - 1 credit) This course is open to students who have completed Studio Art I or its equivalent. It may be taken three times because the curriculum changes annually. Projects include figure, portrait, or landscape drawing (alternate years), observational and creative painting, and various types of printmaking. The centerpiece is a series of individual projects with an emphasis on developing skills, meaning, and metaphor. There are at least two museum or gallery visits. Prerequisite: Studio Art I Studies in Contemporary Art (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) This course focuses on current museum and gallery exhibitions, with particular emphasis on Modern and Contemporary Art. Students visit shows and reflect on them in presentations, writing, and discussion. The class looks at art in a variety of contexts, including aesthetics, philosophy, psychology, religion, multiculturalism, feminism, history, literature, society, and politics. Projects include: reports and reviews on artists and movements; virtual gallery “exhibitions”; and on-site observational and reflective writing. In addition to frequent field trips, students engage in conversations with art world professionals, view art videos, and explore written and online resources. Advanced Creative Arts Seminar (Grades 11 and 12 – 1 credit) The Advanced Creative Arts Seminar is designed for third and fourth year students who have successfully completed the introductory and advanced courses in their respective discipline and who have demonstrated a profound and significant commitment to the medium. Through the support of their peers and guidance of the instructor, students in the Seminar will develop their own artistic projects with ongoing assessment of the progress of the thematic material, subject matter, and composition. Seminar students are expected to schedule regular working periods in the studio (or in the field) as well as regular individual meetings with the instructor. Periodic Seminar sessions are dedicated to colloquia with Seminar students in other artistic disciplines. Prerequisites: Level I and Advanced courses in the discipline; application (to be submitted after registration); and departmental permission. (For the 2012-2013 year, advanced students in Ceramics and Photography are eligible to apply for the Seminar.)

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TECHNOLOGY 1 credit required for class of 2014 Advanced Robotics (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) This course enables students to proceed from designing robots that can follow directions to designing robots that can "think" and act on their own. Students engage in a recursive project development cycle that includes problem identification, hypothesis testing, revision, and implementation. The programming concepts applied during the course include conditionals, recursion, variables, program architecture, compiling, data storage and processing, and debugging. The engineering concepts covered are stability, locomotion and power, sensor placement and gear design. Students are expected to publish their work in various online programming and robotics forums. This course, which is year-long and graded, is an excellent precursor for those interested in collegelevel work in design, architecture, engineering, computer science, physics, or biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: Robotics or Principles of Programming Broadcast Journalism (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) The purpose of this course is to foster a thorough and critical understanding of the television news media industry in today’s digital world. Students will receive real-world experiences and are expected to produce news segments, exhibit correct equipment usage, and write broadcast-style scripts. Advanced Photography & Media Arts (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) Advanced Photography & Media Arts combines study in traditional analog photography with new media technologies. Students explore advanced printing techniques in the traditional wet darkroom and are introduced to Adobe Photoshop both as a digital darkroom and as new design software. Students analyze both historic and contemporary works of art, illustrate advanced personal themes in their image making, and learn to choose their material (film or digital) based on their concept. A strong emphasis is placed on both art making and the technical understanding of new media technologies. Prerequisite: Photography I Principles of Programming (Grades 10-12 – 1 credit) The Principles of Programming course uses Processing, the open source programming language and environment. Processing allows the user to program images, animations and interactions. The program is used by students, artists, designers, and researchers to explore concepts visually. Students learn to use computer science to create elegant graphics, visuals, and interactive programs. Students also use Processing to interface with the Arduino microcontroller to explore physical computing, enabling them to create projects that can sense and respond to the environment. This course combines both the art and science of programming and requires no previous programming experience. This elective course serves as a prerequisite for Advanced Robotics. (This course will not be offered in 2013-2014.)

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US Course Catalogue