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Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) Fire Safety Report

January 2009


EH&S Mission and Introduction The goal of Environmental Health & Safety is to provide and ensure a safe and healthy environment for students, faculty, staff and visitors through comprehensive service oriented programs. EH&S is also the primary contact for federal, state, and local regulatory agencies regarding matters of health, safety and the environment. On August 14, 2008 the Higher Education Opportunity Act was signed into law. Under the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) institutions maintaining on-campus student housing facilities must publish an annual fire safety report containing information about campus fire safety practices and standards. Under the law the first of these reports is required to be published in October 2010, covering calendar year 2009. Florida Atlantic University is proud of its commitment to safety, including fire safety, and has elected to begin publishing this report in October 2009, covering calendar year 2008. Florida Atlantic University has made a serious commitment to fire safety. FAU has a full-time Fire Safety Coordinator, in the Department of EH&S, dedicated to fire safety for students, faculty, staff, and visitors. FAU works with the municipal fire department (Boca Raton Fire Department) and the Florida State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office to meet or exceed applicable local and state code requirements. All on-campus residence halls are equipped with complete automatic fire sprinkler systems, automatic fire and carbon monoxide alarm systems which notify occupants and initiate a fire department response, and portable fire extinguishers for use by trained persons. Cooking equipment, including kitchens designated for student use, are protected by automatic cooking fire suppression systems. All fire protection systems are inspected regularly by FAU staff. Inspection and maintenance on these systems is conducted at intervals required by code or more frequently.

Questions about fire safety should be directed to Taff Geleta, Fire Safety Coordinator 777 Glades Rd Building 69 - Room 112 Boca Raton, Fl 33431 561.297.0030 tgeleta@fau.edu

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IMPORTANT PHONE NUMBERS Emergency Numbers: From any FAU location…………………………………................. 911 FAU Police (Non-Emergency): Boca Raton Campus…………………………………...................... 7-3500 Residence Halls/Apartments……………………………………….. 7-3500 Davie Campus……………………………………………............... 6-1140 Fort Lauderdale Campus……………...……………………………. 6-5018 Jupiter Campus………………………..……………………………. 6-8700 Treasure Coast Campus/Harbor Branch……………………………. 6-3401 FAU Housing and Residential Life: Director of Housing…………………………………………………561-297-3106 Assistant Director for Residential Life…………………………….. 561-297-3129 Assistant Director for Jupiter Housing…………………………….. 561-297-3129 Algonquin Hall……………………………………………...………561-297-5200 Business Professional Women‟s House………..………………….. 561-297-5029 Glades Park Towers………………….…………………………….. 561-297-5340 Heritage Park Towers………………..…………………………….. 561-297-5200 Indian River Towers…………………...……….. ………………… 561-297-5000 University Village Apartments………..…………………………… 561-297-5029 MacArthur Residence Hall……………...…………………………. 561-799-8828 FAU Campus Safety: University Architect & VP for Facilities……………………………561-297-3106 Director of EH&S………………………………………….............. 561-297-3129 EH&S Department…………….…………………………… ………561-297-3129 FAU Fire Safety Coordinator……………………………….………561-297-0030 Other University Departments: Physical Plant………………………………………………………. 561-297-2240 Counseling Center………………………………………………….. 561-297-3540 Health Services…………………………………………………….. 561-297-3512 Boca Raton Agencies: Boca Police Department (Non-Emergency)……………………….. 561-368-6201 Boca Fire Department (Non-Emergency)………………................. 561-982-4000

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Table of Contents

I.

Summary of On-Campus Student Housing Facilities.............................. 5

Boca Raton Campus.................................................................................................. 7 Jupiter Campus…….................................................................................................. 25 II.

Fire Safety Policies, Procedures and Guidelines...................................... 31

Fire Safety In The Student Housing Facilities …………………................. ………32 Cooking Safety.......................................................................................................... 36 Smoking Safety….…………….................................................................... ………40 Electrical Safety............................................................................................. ………43 Candle/Open Flame Safety............................................................................ ………47 Portable Space Heater Safety........................................................................ ………52 Microwave Oven Safety................................................................................ ………54 Holiday Decorations & Tree Safety.............................................................. ………55 Fire Safety Storage ………………………................................................... ………57 Emergency Response & Evacuation Procedures....................................................... 60 Fire Safety Education & Training Program............................................................... 67 Plans for Future Improvements in Fire Safety.............................................. ………81

III.

Life Safety Planning and Management Guide ......................................... 82

Public Assembly Events…………………………………........................................ 83

IV.

Fire Safety and Protection Systems............................................... ………82

On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Protection Systems......................... ………92 Inspection & Testing of Fire Protection & Life-Safety Equipment............... ………93 Boca Campus Student Housing Generator System....................................... ………118 2009 Fire Safety Survey Report..................................................................... ………120 V.

Fire Drill Program........................................................................... ………124

Fire Drill Procedures for On-Campus Student Housing Facilities............................ 125 Fire Drill Response Form.......................................................................................... 128 Records of Mandatory Supervised Fire Drills........................................................... 129 Student Housing Evacuation Points........................................................................... 130 VI.

Fire Safety Statistics and Reporting............................................... ………131

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On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Fire Safety Statistics................................... 132 Campus Fire Report................................................................................................... 134 Campus Fire Log........................................................................................................135 VII.

Other Information....................................................................................... 138

Boca Raton Housing Campus Map........................................................................... 139 MacArthur Housing Campus Map……………………………................................ 140

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I. Summary of On-Campus Student Housing Facilities

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Fire Safety System Description of On-Campus Student Housing Fire Safety Systems Each Department of Residential Facilities/Resident Life housing facility has the following: Complete automatic sprinkler system. The fire alarm system is monitored by the FAU Police Department and Boca Raton Fire Department for FAU at Boca. Fire alarm system is monitored by commercial central station monitoring service for FAU at Jupiter. Smoke alarm and carbon dioxide detector in each sleeping room, interconnected and in common areas in suites and apartments. Egress corridors and stairwells are fire rated. Residents with disabilities are accommodated according to their needs. Number of regular mandatory supervised fire drills FAU Boca Raton campus Residential Facility/Resident Life housing facility has one fire evacuation drill conducted and evaluated by FAUâ€&#x;s Fire Safety Coordinator, Assistant Director for Residential Life, and FAU PD each semester. FAU Jupiter campus Residential Facility/Resident Life housing facility has one fire evacuation drill conducted and evaluated by FAUâ€&#x;s Fire Safety Coordinator, Assistant Director for Jupiter Housing, and a commercial central station monitoring service each semester.

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BOCA RATON CAMPUS Algonquin Hall Algonquin Hall is one of the oldest residence halls on FAU Boca campus. It was built in 1965 and renovated in 2007 to rejuvenate living accommodations and improve safety and security. The building is two stories high, with 43,398 sq ft, and is 24 feet in height. There are _____ roomâ€&#x;s with____ beds and students that reside in Algonquin Hall. The mechanical and electrical rooms are secure and accessible only by authorized personnel. The occupant load factor for the entire building is ____.The structure is built of prestess concrete. There are three stairwells for Algonquin Hall. They are located at the northeast, southeast end of the building and an additional stairwell in the middle of the building. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically. The building is equipped with an emergency backup generator.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in the common area of the bedroom suites are interconnected, so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other suites within the building will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. ADA rooms are equipped with a strobe in every bedroom and

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bathroom along with smoke detectors and a fire alarm horn/strobe in the common area of the suite. Fire/Smoke Dampers:

The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A.

FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled building. Each sprinkler system is installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are sprinkled.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.37, Longitude: -80.105 Indian River St is 238 yards south of Algonquin Hall Brevard Ct is 236 yards east of Algonquin Hall Dade Ave is 38 yards west of Algonquin Hall Glades Rd is 423 yards south of Algonquin Hall Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 1,244 yards west of Algonquin Hall BRFD Station 1 is 1.38 miles southeast from Algonquin Hall

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Business & Professional Woman’s Scholarship House BPW Scholarship House was established to provide campus housing for women with strong academic promise on FAU Boca campus. It was built in 1996. The building is single story, with 4,344 sq ft, and is 14 feet in height. There are _____ room‟s with ____ beds and students that reside in BPW Scholarship House. The occupant load factor for the entire building is ____. The structure is built of prestess concrete. The main entrance to the building is on the west side of the building and there are emergency exits are at the north and south end of the building. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically. The building is equipped with an emergency backup generator.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the building‟s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. ADA rooms are equipped with a strobe in every bedroom and bathroom along with smoke detectors and a fire alarm horn/strobe in the common area of the suite.

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FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A.

FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled. The sprinkler system installed is in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are sprinkled.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: 1. Latitude: 26.367, Longitude: -80.09 2. Florida Atlantic Blvd is 125 yards west of BPW 3. NW 20 St is 335 yards north of BPW 4. Palm Beach Ave is 328 yards northwest of BPW 5. Glades Rd is 539 yards south of BPW 6. Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 2,058 yards west of BPW 7. BRFD Station 1 is .89 miles southeast from BPW

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Glades Park Towers Glades Park Towers is the newest residence facilities at FAU Boca campus. It was built in 2004; the building is seven stories that have two towers, one on the north and south side with a commons in between them. GPT north has 70,791 sq ft, GPT south has 70,791 sq ft, and GPT Commons has 10,145 sq ft, both towers and common area equal 151,727 sq ft. It is approximately 73 feet in height. There are _____ roomâ€&#x;s with ____ beds and students that reside in Heritage Park Towers. The occupant load factor for GPT north is ____, and GPT south is ____. The total occupant load for north and south GPT is ____. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. There are two stairwells for both north and south towers, and are located on the north and south side of each tower. There are two elevators in both the north and south towers. The two major exterior doors on the west and east side are glass while the rest are metal and all the windows are not operable. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the east and west side of the commons. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically. The building is equipped with an emergency backup generator.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp,

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flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A.

FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are equipped with a sprinkler and elevator equipment rooms are not sprinkled and have a 2 hour fire rated wall.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.369, Longitude: -80.104 Indian River St is 229 yards south of GPT Brevard Ct is 118 yards east of GPT Dade Ave is 157 yards west of GPT Glades Rd is 419 yards south of GPT Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 1,317 yards west of GPT BRFD Station 1 is 1.3 miles southeast from GPT

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Heritage Park Towers Heritage Park Towers is one of the newest residence facilities at FAU Boca campus. It was built in 2007; the building is seven stories that have two towers. One on the north and one on the south side with a commons in between them. HPT north has 70,791 sq ft, HPT south has 70,791 sq ft, and HPT Commons has 10,145 sq ft. Both towers and common area equal 151,727 sq ft. It is approximately 73 feet in height. There are _____ roomâ€&#x;s with ____ beds and students that reside in Heritage Park Towers. The occupant load factor for HPT north is ____, and HPT south is ____. The total occupant load for north and south HPT is ____. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. There are two stairwells for both north and south towers, and are located on the north and south side of each tower. There are two elevators in both the north and south towers. The two major exterior doors on the west and east side are glass while the rest are metal and all the windows are not operable. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the east and west side of the commons. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically. The building is equipped with an emergency backup generator.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, 16 | P a g e


flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. There is also duct mounted smoke detector in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system.

FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are equipped with a sprinkler and elevator equipment rooms are not sprinkled and have a 2 hour fire rated wall.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.368, Longitude: -80.104 Indian River St is 20 yards south of HPT Brevard Ct is 172 yards east of HPT Dade Ave is 106 yards west of HPT Glades Rd is 209 yards south of HPT Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 1,462 yards west of HPT BRFD Station 1 is 1.3 miles southeast from HPT

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Indian River Towers

Indian River Towers is the first residence hall towers at FAU Boca campus. It was built in 2001; the building is five stories that have two towers. One on the east and one on the west side with a commons in between them. IRT west has 95,275 sq ft, IRT east has 92,872 sq ft, and IRT Commons has 14,797 sq ft, both towers and common area equal 202,944 sq ft. It is approximately 54 feet in height. There are _____ roomâ€&#x;s with ____ beds and students that reside in Indian Park Towers. The occupant load factor for IRT east is ____, and IRT west is ____. The total occupant load for east and west IRT is ____. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. There are two stairwells for both east and west towers. The east towers are located on the north and east side of the tower. The west towers are located on the west and south side of the tower. There is also a 2nd level stairwell that allows you to exit into the common area and out the main doors. There are two elevators in both the east and west towers. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the north and south side of the commons. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically. The building is equipped with an emergency backup generator.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, 19 | P a g e


flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. There is also duct mounted smoke detector in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are equipped with a sprinkler and elevator equipment rooms are not sprinkled and have a 2 hour fire rated wall.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.368, Longitude: -80.103 Indian River St is 23 yards south of GPT Brevard Ct is 11 yards east of GPT Dade Ave is 155 yards west of GPT Glades Rd is 215 yards south of GPT Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 1,432 yards west of GPT BRFD Station 1 is 1.3 miles southeast from GPT

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University Village Apartments

University Village Apartments are the first apartment style residence at FAU Boca campus. It was built in 1995; the units have studio style and two story style apartments. The two story apartments are on the first level and some on the second level making those style apartments appear to be three stories tall. The alternating heights of the units are 20 feet at the lowest and 30 feet at the highest for each unit. There is total of 14 units. Building 58 thru 60 have A, B, C, D, and E sections. Building 57 has A, B, and C sections. There is an administration building that is 15 feet in height and has 8,240 sq ft. UVA building 57 has 17,737 sq ft, UVA building 58 has 33,600 sq ft, UVA building 59 has 33,940 sq ft, UVA building 60 has 33,780 sq ft. All of the units and administration building have a total of 127,297 sq ft. There are _____ roomâ€&#x;s with ____ beds and students that reside in University Village Apartments. The occupant load factor for all of UVA is ____. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the east side of the administration building. There are nine stairwells that run down the center of the corridor for the apartments. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department.

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Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. There is also duct mounted smoke detector in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are sprinkled.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.367, Longitude: -80.097 Florida Atlantic Blvd is 50 yards west of UVA NW 20 St is 141 yards northwest of UVA Glades Rd is 513 yards south of UVA Boca Airport on the FAU Boca campus perimeter and is 1,994 yards west of UVA BRFD Station 1 is .9 miles southeast from UVA

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JUPITER CAMPUS MacArthur Residence Hall I

MacArthur Residence Hall I is the first residence hall at FAU Jupiter campus. The building was built in 1999 and is three stories tall with 45,682 sq ft. It is approximately 36 feet in height. There are 142 rooms which house 142 beds and students that reside in MacArthur residence Hall I. The occupant load factor for MRHI is 142. The building is fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the east and west side of the building. There are two stairwells in the building and they are at the north and south end of building. There is one elevator in the building. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. The ADA rooms are also equipped with strobes that are interconnected to the sound base units to correspond to ADA requirements.

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Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. There is also duct mounted smoke detector in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are equipped with a sprinkler and elevator equipment rooms are not sprinkled and have a 2 hour fire rated wall.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.888, Longitude: -80.116 Parkside Drive is 336 yards west of MAC I University Blvd is 183 yards northwest of MAC I Main St is 88 yards north of MAC I Donald Ross Rd is 623 yards south of MAC I I-95 is 1,484 yards west of MAC I PBCFD Station 16 is 1.12 miles northeast from MAC I

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MacArthur Residence Hall II MacArthur Residence Hall II is the second residence hall at FAU Jupiter campus. The building was built in 2001 and is three stories tall with 45,682 sq ft. It is approximately 36 feet in height. There are 147 rooms which house 147 beds and students that reside in MacArthur residence Hall I. The occupant load factor for MRHI is 147. The building is fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power. The structure is built of prestress concrete. Major exterior entrances are on card access and students use their student IDs to enter this building. The building is also monitored with a closed circuit TV which is taped and recorded. The main entrance doors are located on the east and west side of the building. There are two stairwells in the building and they are at the north and south end of building. There is one elevator in the building. The exterior of the site is also well lighted with freestanding and wall mounted lighting systems that come on automatically.

FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS

FIRE ALARMS: The building is protected by a supervised, electrically impulse, manually operated fire alarm system with voice evacuation capability, which is installed in accordance to NFPA72.The control panel is microprocessor controlled, fully addressable and expandable. The unit is UL listed and FM approved. There are smoke detectors installed in each bed room that are system types. All sound bases in bedrooms of each apartment are interconnected so that if one base goes into alarm the sounder bases in the other bedrooms within the apartment will also go into alarm. Simultaneously a trouble signal will be generated to the buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm panel and the trouble signal will also be annunciated at the monitoring station which is the campus police department. The ADA rooms are also equipped with strobes that are interconnected to the sound base units to correspond to ADA requirements.

A. Double action manual station pull stations equipped with an addressable interface module are also installed at the all exit doors of the building and other locations as required by NFPA. These pull stations are protected from perpetrators. Notification devices like alarm lights, strobe lamp, flashers, and speakers are also installed in each bedroom as well as on hallways and other locations as required by NFPA72. There is also duct mounted smoke detector in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. 28 | P a g e


FIRE/SMOKE DAMPERS: The building is equipped with fire/smoke dampers in the HVAC system. They are intended for detecting smoke in an air-handling system. This causing an air handling unit to shut down (power to the fan motor is disconnected) the dampers associated with that air handling unit. When the fan motor is energized, the associated fire/smoke dampers will open. This is installed in accordance with NFPA-90A. FIRE SPRINKLER SYSTEM: It is a fully sprinkled with a fire pump on emergency power designed to be a complete wet pipe standpipe and combination sprinkler system installed in accordance to NFPA 13, 14, 20 and 24. There are two sprinkler heads in each room, quick response type with ordinary temperature range of 160 degrees F., except where the area is subjected to high temperatures caused by unit heaters, hot pipes, radiant ceiling, and other heat source, located in unconditioned spaces. These heads have a temperature range of 250 degrees F. Water supply for the sprinkler system is 225 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Light Hazard areas, 130 square feet per sprinkler head maximum for Ordinary Hazard. The fire department connection(s) (FDC) is 2.5� inlet and 250 gpm of system demand. The (FDC) piping size is determined by the fire department pumper truck (generally 150 psi). Calculations for the water supply/fire truck booster pump (500 gpm 1ST standpipe, 250 each additional; 100 psi at roof manifold). In accordance with NFPA-14. All Laundry, mechanical, and trash rooms are sprinkled and have a 1 hour fire rated walls. Storage rooms are equipped with a sprinkler and elevator equipment rooms are not sprinkled and have a 2 hour fire rated wall.

FIRE EXTINGUISHERS: There are 5 lb ABC fire extinguishers in every room and 10lb fire extinguishers in all other locations, along with CO2 fire extinguishers in the mechanical, electrical rooms. Multi-purpose dry chemical fire extinguishers with 10lbs nominal capacity are distributed throughout the building at 75ft apart and are installed in accordance to NFPA 10.

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LOCATION: Latitude: 26.888, Longitude: -80.116 Parkside Drive is 403 yards west of MAC I University Blvd is 261 yards northwest of MAC I Main St is 97 yards north of MAC I Donald Ross Rd is 573 yards south of MAC I I-95 is 1,513 yards west of MAC I PBCFD Station 16 is 1.123 miles northeast from MAC I

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II. Fire Safety Policies, Procedures and Guidelines

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II. FIRE SAFETY POLICIES, PROCEDURES & GUIDELINES Fire Safety in the student housing facilities

The residence halls at the Florida Atlantic University are designed for a reasonable level of fire safety. The fire alarm system, sprinkler system, smoke detectors, and extinguishers are all checked on a regular basis. There are fire safety instructions and procedures in effect in all halls which are designed to enhance safety and minimize the hazards of fire and smoke. In addition, housing administration works closely with the University's Department of Environmental Health and Safety, the State Fire Marshal and the Boca Raton Fire Department to explore possible new ways to deal with fire prevention, detection, and suppression. Despite this, it must be recognized that fires can still occur, that fire prevention is everyone's concern, and that the manner in which residents react in the event of a fire can mean the difference between life and death. For these reasons, the following information is provided to you. HAZARDS IN RESIDENCE HALLS AND RESIDENTS' ROOMS DECORATIONS: Flammable items such as tapestries, fishnets, parachutes, sheets and paper may not be hung from walls or ceilings. All decorations (holiday, etc.) must be treated with flame retardant. Christmas trees must be artificial, bearing UL labels. Real trees, natural wreaths, etc. present an extreme fire hazard once they dry and, thus, are prohibited. Decorations that extend down hallway walls are not allowed. Decorations must clear all sprinkler heads by at least 18 inches. ELECTRICAL OVERLOADS: To reduce the risk of fire resulting from overloaded circuits, we strongly recommend the use of a multi-plug circuit breaker outlet if more outlets are needed. Extension cords are a major cause of residential fires – avoid using them. If your circuit breaker trips, it is possible someone on the circuit is overloading it or using a defective appliance. If this happens, report it to the hall office. Also, too many of certain types of appliances such as coffee makers, popcorn poppers, hair dryers, and curling irons may overload the circuits. APPLIANCES: Electrical appliances that can generate heat or malfunction should never be left unattended. They should be unplugged after use and not stored until they are cool enough to touch. Portable Electric Heaters: Personal portable electric heaters should not be used except under extraordinary circumstances and after conditional written approval by the Department of Housing and Residential Life and Environmental Health & Safety.

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Open flames: Many fires occurring in residence hall are a result of burning candles. Camp stoves open coil heating or cooking elements, kerosene lamps, etc., can be extremely hazardous. These open flame devices are not permitted in student rooms. Similarly, burning incense is not allowed. Cooking on barbecue grills and hibachis is not allowed in or around the halls. Activities such as making candles or waxing skis are not permitted in your room or areas in the halls other than those designated by the Department of Housing and Residential Life and Environmental Health & Safety. Trash: All combustibles, such as paper, should be disposed of in outdoor trash bins as soon as possible. Full wastebaskets and recycling bins are an invitation for fire. Never place newspapers or other combustible or flammable materials in corridors, stairwells, or other common areas. Flammable Liquids (and other hazardous chemicals): Gasoline, ether, paint, glue, etc. are not permitted in student rooms or storage areas. Motorized vehicles are not allowed in the buildings under any circumstances. Smoking: All residence halls are designated as completely smoke free. Smoking is not permitted in residential or common areas of the residence halls. Smoking is permitted outside in designated areas on campus. Careless disposal of matches and cigarette butts is a common cause of fire. Use caution when disposing of such items. Halogen Lamps: Due to the high temperatures emitted from halogen lamps, they are prohibited in residence halls. It has been reported that many fires are caused by materials coming in contact with the halogen bulb or other parts of the lamp. Foam rubber: Foam rubber emits deadly toxic gases when it burns and should not be used in student rooms. Most “bean-bag� chairs are stuffed with foam rubber. Foam rubber-filled items are prohibited in student rooms. Cooking: Cooking is possible in the community kitchens in the residence halls. Kitchens within the University Village Student Apartment Community individual apartment units are intended for primary cooking. Residence Halls are not designed to be primary cooking areas. These kitchens are intended for reheating food or making snacks. Microwaves can cause burns, or even start a fire. Tampering with Fire Alarm System The fire alarm system and firefighting equipment in the residence halls are for your protection. Tampering with smoke detectors, sprinkler heads, sprinkler piping, alarm boxes, and fire extinguishers is prohibited. Remember, this is your life safety equipment. You will be held accountable and liable for any damage that may endanger the lives of other residents. Hanging items from the sprinkler head or pipes is prohibited. It is a misdemeanor punishable by a $1,000 fine and/or jail term.

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False Alarms Fire alarms may be set off in residence halls accidentally or due to tampering. How do you know if it is a false alarm? You don't! So get out! Resident Room Fire Prevention Checklist Check your room for fire safety hazards. The correct answer to all the following questions is “no.” If the answer is “yes”, corrective action should be taken. Note that the following are only examples of fire-safety hazards. Please use good judgment and identify and mitigate other firesafety hazards not listed. TABLE 1. ARE THE FOLLOWING COMBUSTIBLES PRESENT IN YOUR ROOM?

Are the Following Combustibles Present in Your Room Yes No Piles of clothing. Excessively filled recycling bins. Trash-filled wastebaskets. Flammable liquids such as gasoline, acetone, and paint thinner present. Excessive combustible materials on walls and ceiling including: paper, plastics, wood, fishnets, parachutes, or tapestries. TABLE 2. ARE THE FOLLOWING ELECTRICAL, HEATING, AND COOLING ISSUES PRESENT? Are the Following Electrical, Heating, and Cooking Issues Present Yes No Heaters, sunlamps, or light bulbs too close to combustible materials. Appliances such as curling irons, clothing irons, hair dryers, fans, etc. remain plugged in after use. Cooking surfaces and utensils are not cleaned to prevent grease build up. Refrigerator, radio, TV, and stereo amplifiers too close to wall for adequate cooling. Light fixtures not properly attached. Torchiere Halogen Lamps. Circuit breaker for the room trips from time to time. Signs of scorching around light fixtures or electrical outlets. Multiple outlet plugs that do not contain circuit breakers. Extension cords that run under carpets, hang over nails, or run through a doorway. Exposed electrical wires. Light bulbs in lamps exceed maximum wattage.

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TABLE 3. ARE THE FOLLOWING HAZARDS PRESENT IN YOUR ROOM? Are the Following Hazards Present in Your Room Yes

No Curtains and flammables near heat source or open flame Items hanging from sprinkler head or pipes Doorways blocked or partially blocked with furniture Open flame devices, oil lamps, and candles present Aerosol cans near a heat source Matches near an open flame or heat source Fire doors (stairwell doors or room/corridor doors) blocked in open position

Fire Lanes In the event a fire should occur, it is critical that emergency responders be able to access the building, or location of the emergency. Fire lanes and emergency access routes have been provided for this purpose.  Fire lanes (normally marked in red on the curb) may not be blocked at any time. This includes temporary parking for the purpose of "just dropping something off."  Fire hydrants, fire department connections, or other emergency equipment may not be obstructed at any time. Parking is prohibited within 15 feet of a fire hydrant, or fire department connections.  Emergency vehicles have the right-of-way. All vehicles will, when an emergency vehicle approaches from any direction, immediately pull over to the right side of the road to allow the vehicle to pass.

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COOKING SAFETY HOW TO PREVENT COOKING FIRES AND FIRE RELATED INJURIES Why is cooking safety important?  Cooking is the leading cause of house fires and house fire injuries.  According to the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA), 1 in 8 homes will have a cooking fire each year.

How many house fires are caused by cooking?  In 2005, U.S. fire departments responded to 146,400 residential fires that involved cooking equipment. These fires caused 480 deaths, 4,690 fire injuries and $876 million in property damage (NFPA, 2008).

What are the main causes of cooking fires?

1. Leaving food cooking on the stovetop unattended. 2. Leaving burners or ovens on after cooking. 3. Placing combustible materials too close to heat sources. 4. Wearing loose-fitting sleeves near hot burners.

What other factors can start cooking fires?  Nearly all cooking equipment fires start with the ignition of food, other cooking materials (e.g., grease, cooking oil), or other items normally found or installed in a kitchen (e.g., cabinets, wall coverings, paper or plastic bags, curtains).  59% of reported home cooking fire injuries occurred when victims tried to fight the fire themselves (NFPA, 2008).

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Where is the most common place for a residential fire to start?  The majority of accidental fires in the home start in the kitchen. Ranges accounted for the largest share of home cooking fire incidents, followed by ovens, portable cooking devices, microwaves, grills, and deep fryers (see figure below).

(Figure Courtesy of NFPA, 2008)

KNOW WHAT TO DO IF YOU HAVE A COOKING FIRE If your food starts burning on the stove:      

Turn off the burner. Do not move the pan. Put on a potholder or oven mitt. Slide a lid over the pan or use baking soda to smother the fire. Leave the lid on until the pot is cool. If you lift the lid too soon, the air will feed the flames and the smoke will set off the fire alarm.  If you can‟t do this without being burned, then evacuate and activate the fire alarm. If your food starts burning in a toaster oven or microwave:    

Turn the power off and/or unplug. Keep the door closed to smother the fire. If you open the door, the air will feed the flames and the smoke will set off the fire alarm. If you can‟t do this without being burned, then evacuate and activate the fire alarm.

If there is an oven fire:  Turn off the heat and keep the door closed to prevent flames from burning you and your clothing. 37 | P a g e


 Have the oven serviced before you use it again. If there is a grill fire:  Always place the grill several feet away from a house or vehicle. If the fire gets out of control, it could quickly move to other nearby items.  Be ready to extinguish flames and keep a phone close.  Turn off the gas if the fire is in the grill itself. This will stop feeding the fire.  Close the lid.  Shut the gas tank off if the fire is in the hose itself. If you are unable to reach the knob, use the fire extinguisher and call 911. The fire may quickly move to the tank which would be extremely hazardous.  Clear the area and call 911 if the fire is in the tank. WHEN IN DOUBT, JUST GET OUT!!  If someone is burned, cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes. If the burn is bigger than your fist, or if you have any questions, seek medical attention right away. What kind of smoke detector should I use?  Smoke detectors won't prevent a fire but they save lives by alerting you to smoke. If you don't have smoke detectors, install them now. Install a smoke detector in each sleeping room, outside each sleeping area, and on each level of your home.  Test each smoke detector at least monthly.  To prevent nuisance alarms during cooking, move smoke detectors farther from the kitchen and install a smoke alarm with a silence button.

Should I use a fire extinguisher?  Fire extinguishers should be mounted in the kitchen.  Purchase an ABC type extinguisher for extinguishing all types of fires.  Learn how to use your fire extinguisher before there is an emergency.  Remember, use an extinguisher on small fires only. If there is a large fire, get out immediately and call 911 from another location.  Trying to fight a fire yourself when it‟s too large can cause far more extensive damage and can result in greater damage or unnecessary injury.

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References and Additional Resources:  National Fire Protection Association. (2008). Cooking. http://www.nfpa.org/categoryList.asp?categoryID=282&URL=Research+&+Reports/Fac t+sheets/Home+safety/Cooking+safety  National Fire Protection Association. (2008). Home Fires Involving Cooking Equipment.  U.S. Fire Administration. (2008). Cooking Fire Safety. http://www.usfa.dhs.gov/citizens/all_citizens/home_fire_prev/cooking.shtm

WHEN IN DOUBT, JUST GET OUT!! If someone is burned, cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes. If the burn is bigger than your fist, or if you have any questions, seek medical attention right away.

What kind of smoke detector should I use? Smoke detectors won't prevent a fire but they save lives by alerting you to smoke. If you don't have smoke detectors, install them now. Install a smoke detector in each sleeping room, outside each sleeping area, and on each level of your home. Test each smoke detector at least monthly. To prevent nuisance alarms during cooking, move smoke detectors farther from the kitchen and install a smoke alarm with a silence button.

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SMOKING SAFETY Smoking-related fires are still the most common fires in America, and in the past ten years, there has been a clear-cut movement towards addressing the issue of smoking in the workplace, in particular the legal implications of passive smoke on non-smoking employees and its consequences in the case of fire. The University is required to comply with Florida Clean Air Act Section 386.201.211 of Florida Statutes by maintaining University facilities free from tobacco smoke.

Smoking means possession of a lighted cigarette, cigar, pipe or any other tobacco product. Smoking is prohibited in all enclosed buildings, or sections thereof owned, leased or operated by the University. The NO SMOKING POLICY applies to all occupants at all times in each and every enclosed building. Smoking is also prohibited in all open corridors, walkways, atria‟s, and any other area which are partially open to the atmosphere and which, by their configuration, do not allow or provide for through air circulation. Smoking is specifically prohibited within a 12 ft. radius of any structure, device or container bearing “NO SMOKING” sign. Deans, Directors, and Department Heads shall inform all faculty members, ASP, USPS, OPS, College Work Study employees, students, volunteers and visitors in their respective unit of the University Smoking Policy. They shall also investigate complaints of violations of this policy within their department or Physical work space as appropriate, direct complaints to the Director of Environmental Health and Safety.

Employees, students and visitors shall report observed violations of this policy to the supervisor of the area of where violations were observed. Notification may also be provided to the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.

SMOKING POLICY UPDATE As of January 2nd, 2010 Florida Atlantic University has updated the designated smoking areas for Boca Raton campus. There is a new map for Boca Raton campus that shows the “Designated Smoking Areas.” Smoking is not permitted in any of the University Housing buildings, in compliance with the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act. All residents and guests who wish to smoke tobacco must do so at least 20 feet away from any building including overhangs, balconies, stairways and entranceways. In the residence halls, smoking is ONLY permitted in the following areas: GPT West Entrance, HPT East Entrance, IRT South Entrance

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Florida Atlantic University Designated Smoking Area Map

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The State University System of Florida Board of Reagents Office Florida Education Center 325 West Gaines Street Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1950 July 30, 1993 NEW RULE SMOKING IN ALL SUS CAMPUS BUILDINGS TALLAHASSEE—Beginning in the Fall Semester, the smoking lamp is extinguished in all buildings on the campuses of the State University System of Florida, and even in some off-campus buildings.

In general, smoking is banned in any building owned or leased by a state university. Specifically, the ban applies to all state university classrooms, faculty offices, administrative offices, dining facilities, and student residential facilities. Under the Florida Clean Indoor Air Act of 1992, Dr. Charles B. Reed, Chancellor of the State University System of Florida, has issued a Chancellor‟s Memorandum implementing the ban. Each of the ten state universities will implement the Act by adopting its own written policy consistent with the new statewide SUS smoking ban. Each university will post copies of its policy in the workplace, and will furnish copies on request to students, employees and the public. The Clean Indoor Acts (Sec. 386.001, Florida Statutes), which allows designation of smoking areas in some buildings, specifically forbids designation of smoking areas in educational facilities.

Florida Atlantic University Smoking Policy as Prescribed in the FAU Employee Handbook Smoking in University Facilities The State Legislature revised the “Florida Clean Indoor Air Act” in 1992. The revised law specifically forbids smoking in government buildings, educational facilities and recreational facilities.

To meet this statutory requirement smoking will not be permitted in any University facility, specifically including university classrooms, faculty and administrative offices, dining facilities, elevators, hallways, lobbies and restrooms. Receptacles for smoking are located outside most buildings entrances and the University encourages their use in order to maintain a clean outdoor environment.

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ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Electrical fires claim the lives of 200 Americans each year and injure 1,500 more. Some of these fires are caused by electrical system failures and appliance defects, but many are caused by misuse and poor maintenance of electrical appliances, incorrectly installed wiring, and overloaded circuits and extension cords. Hazards of Electricity The primary hazards associated with electricity and its uses are: SHOCK Electric shock occurs when the human body becomes part of a path through which electrons can flow. The resulting effect on the body can be either direct or indirect. Direct Injury or death can occur whenever electric current flows through the human body. Currents of less than 30 can result in death. Indirect Although the electric current through the human body may be well below the values required to cause noticeable injury, human reaction can result in falls from ladders or scaffolds, or movement into operating machinery. Such reaction can result in serious injury or death. BURNS Burns can result when a person touches electrical wiring or equipment that is improperly used or maintained. Typically, such burn injuries occur on the hands. ARC BLAST Arc blasts occur from high amperage currents arcing through air. This abnormal current flow (arc-blast) is initiated by contact between two energized points. This contact can be caused by persons who have an accident while working on energized components, or by equipment failure due to fatigue or abuse. Temperatures as high as 35,000 degrees Fahrenheit have been recorded in arc-blast research. The two primary hazards associated with an arc-blast are: Explosions Explosions occur when electricity provides a source of ignition for an explosive mixture in the atmosphere. Ignition can be due to overheated conductors or 43 | P a g e


A.

Wiring Only licensed electricians are permitted to work on electrical wiring on electrical equipment, since high resistance connections being are one of the primary sources of ignition. High resistance connections occur where wires are improperly spliced or connected to other components such as receptacle outlets and switches.

B.

Extension Cords For the protection of Florida Atlantic University Housing community, the Department of Housing and Residential Life, the Environmental Health and Safety Department and the Florida Fire Marshal have established some extension cord guidelines. Residents are permitted to use only extension cords with the following restrictions: 1. UL approved three-pronged extension cords that are 14 gauge or heavier (NOTE: The lower the gauge number the heavier/thicker the cord). 2. Cords cannot exceed 10 feet in length. 3. Cords cannot impede safe traffic in the unit. 4. Cords must not be pinched in doors. 5. Only ONE appliance may be plugged into a multi-plug adapter. 6. Only UL approved multi-plug adapters with circuit breakers are permitted. 7. Under no circumstances are residents permitted to overload the electrical system.

Electrical extension cords are an acceptable means of providing TEMPORARY electrical power, however they cannot be used as a substitute for permanent electrical installation. Will be permitted when used: 1.

For temporary use only, not to exceed 90 days.

2.

On non-heat producing devices (i.e.: radios, computers, answering machines, etc)

3.

Make sure the electrical extension cords are UL approved and Factory Mutual listed, three-wire grounded cords.

4.

In one continuous length. Cords may not be connected or spliced together or

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piggy-backed.

C.

5.

When the entire length of cord is visible and protected from damage.

6.

As temporary wiring for holiday displays, artwork or vendors at special events provided they meet the requirements above.

7.

Energized from a permanent outlet

8.

For application where equipment is not routinely used

Extension Cords Will not be permitted when used:

D.

1.

As permanent wiring.

2.

For use on heat producing or high voltage devices such as heaters, coffee pots, high wattage lamps, refrigerators, microwave ovens, etc.

3.

When the use will cause a tripping hazard for normal traffic or emergency evacuation.

4.

When run through openings in walls, ceilings, or doorways When draped over light or electrical fixtures, ventilation ducts, or pipes. When ran under carpets or flooring

5.

When the cord shows signs of wear, defects, bulging, exposed wire or other damage.

6.

In corrosive areas or near any substance that would deteriorate the cord.

7.

Be plugged into a power strip

Electrical Panels Electrical Panels must: 1.

Be accessible to the occupants in an emergency.

2.

Not be obstructed for 36" in all directions around the panel and in front for access.

3.

Have the panel cover and panel door securely in place and closed.

4.

Have all breaker and main switches clearly marked as to the equipment area they control.

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5.

Be identifiable as an electrical panel. Do not cover or paint to match the wall, etc.

Electrical Panels must not:

E.

1.

Be locked.

2.

Have the breakers tapped or otherwise secured in the “on� position.

3.

Have any work performed on the panel by anyone who is not a licensed electrician.

Electrical Outlets/Switches Electrical outlets are quite often not thought of as being a fire hazard. It is possible that an overload on the electrical system can cause an outlet to spark. The following safety requirements must be complied with.

Outlets must: 1.

Have the cover plate securely fastened to the outlet box.

2.

Be replaced when broken.

3.

Have an approved cover.

4.

Have a ground fault circuit interrupter if within 6 feet of a water source.

5.

It is recommended that combustible items such as trashcans and boxes of paper etc., be kept at least one foot from outlets when possible.

6.

Multi-outlet assemblies (power strips) must be properly placed, equipped with fuse or circuit breaker, energized from a permanent outlet, must be grounded 3wire type and UL approved.

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CANDLE/OPEN FLAME SAFETY

PREVENTING CANDLE FIRES Candles and open flames not only create a serious fire hazard, but also create a serious personal injury hazard. Florida Atlantic Universityâ€&#x;s policy on candles (unless wicks are clipped to the wax), open flames, incense, hot plates or other heating units with an open flame or heating element are prohibited. It is for these reasons that Florida Atlantic Universityâ€&#x;s policy has been established. EXCEPTION: Lighted candles will be permitted for ceremonies and functions of religious, cultural, social, or honorary groups, as well as for catered events in designated areas only. This will be under direct supervision by a Housing Professional Staff Member. Lighted candles are not permitted in or with any decorations. Candles used by any religious, cultural, social, or honorary group, as well as for catered events in designated areas, must be extinguished immediately after the ceremony or function is complete. Candles must be securely fixed in sturdy, approved candleholders, enclosures, glass hurricane type lamps, etc. Approval for such candle holders and/or other fixtures can be obtained by contacting the Environmental Health & Safety, and Housing for Residential Life. Open flames of any type, including candles, shall not be used in any assembly occupancy (spaces holding >50 persons) without the approval of the Environmental Health & Safety, and Housing for Residential Life. Open flames used in assembly occupancies must comply with the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Life Safety Code 101/13.7.2. Food service operations (portable cooking equipment): food warmers must be placed on a noncombustible surface. Laboratories: excluded from this policy but precautions must be taken to ensure safe operation procedures. Sporting events: prohibited without approval from the Director of Environmental Health & Safety. Open flames fueled by propane tanks are prohibited. Bonfires: contact Director of Environmental Health & Safety for review/approval. Pyrotechnic and open flame devices for special effects: contact Director of Environmental Health & Safety for review/approval. These must comply with NFPA 1126 and/or NFPA 160. Individual departments reserve the right to implement additional guidelines. 47 | P a g e


Candle Statistics

Why are candles dangerous? Every candle is a potential fire hazard if care is not used when lighting, burning or extinguishing the flame. When used improperly, a candle can cause significant loss of life, injury and loss of property. How many fires are started by candles? In 2005, U.S. fire departments responded to 15,600 residential fires that were started by candles. The fires caused 150 deaths, 1,270 civilian fire injuries and $539 million in property damage (NFPA, 2007). Between 2002-2005, on average, 1 candle-related house fire was reported every 34 minutes. When do candle fires occur? According to the National Fire Protections Association (NFPA), December is the peak time of year for candle-related house fires (see Figure 1). The top five days for candle fire incidents are Christmas, Christmas Eve, New Yearâ€&#x;s Day, New Yearâ€&#x;s Eve, and Halloween. (Figure Courtesy of the NFPA, 2005)

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Where do candle fires start? Candle fire incidents occur most often in the bedroom, followed by the family room, bathroom, and kitchen (see Figure 2). The materials most often ignited by candles are cabinetry, bedding (blankets, sheets, comforters, etc.), curtains and drapery, and mattresses and pillows.

(Figure Courtesy of the NFPA, 2005) What are the main causes of candle fires? Nearly 85% of candle fire incidents are started because of consumer misuse of the product. The following are some of the categories of ignition factors cited by NFPA.

(Figure Courtesy of the NFPA, 2005)

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What other factors can start candles fires?  Candle burned down  Holder broke  Candle knocked or tipped over  Candle flared  Falling asleep  Wick was blown off candle  Child held candle  Inadequate control of open fire  Child playing How can you prevent candle fires? A study by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission suggests that 85 percent of candle fires could be avoided if consumers followed 3 basic safety rules:

NEVER LEAVE A BURNING CANDLE UNATTENDED NEVER PLACE A BURNING CANDLE NEAR SOMETHING THAT CAN CATCH FIRE KEEP BURNING CANDLES OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN OR PETS

Introducing the New Look In Candle Fire Safety These graphic safety symbols will soon be seen on more and more candle labels worldwide. Learn to recognize these important visual reminders of the candle fire-safety rules.

Burn within sight.

Keep away from combustibles.

Keep away from children.

Some additional tips that will help you use and enjoy candles safely are: Use sturdy, safe candleholders Trim wicks to ¼ inch prior to each use Avoid using candles in bedrooms and sleeping areas Always use a flashlight, not a candle, for emergency lighting 50 | P a g e


Consider using battery-operated flameless candles What are some alternatives to candles? Battery operated flameless candles can provide the home dĂŠcor, fragrance, and glow/flicker of real candlelight, without the risk of fire. In addition to protecting your home, flameless candles are more economical, last forever, and can run up to 250 hours on batteries. To see a selection of flameless candles click on www.GoFlameless.com

USE BATTERY OPERATED FLAMELESS CANDLES! FLAMELESS CANDLES ARE SAFE!

References and Additional Resources: Home Candle Fires, Marty Ahrens, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, September 2007. http://www.ihs.gov/MedicalPrograms/PortlandInjury/PDFs/HomeCandleFiresSept2007.pdf House Fires, Ahrens, Marty. National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, August 2005. http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files/PDF/Candlereport.pdf National Candle Association. (2008). Candle Safety Rules. http://www.candles.org/safety_rules.html National Fire Protection Association. (2008). Candles. http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID=638&itemID=19184&URL=Research% 20&%20Reports/Fact%20sheets/Safety%20in%20the%20home/Candles&cookie%5Ftest =1&cookie%5Ftest=1

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PORTABLE SPACE HEATER SAFETY

SPACE HEATERS IN FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FACILITIES Whether purchased by the University or the personal property of the user, two issues affect the use of space heaters in campus buildings Fire Safety and Energy Efficiency. The efficient use of energy by FAU is important, and electric space heaters are a very costly means of heating. If a member of the campus community feels that a space heater is necessary for adequate warmth, this may indicate that the building heating system needs to be adjusted or repaired. The physical plant should be notified through the department‟s director if the heating system is incapable of meeting comfort requirements. Physical plant should also be contacted through the department‟s director if a space heater is to be used to offset excessive air conditioning. ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prohibits simultaneous use of heating and cooling in the same space for the sole purpose of achieving comfort. Excessive cooling of a space should be reported to physical plant so that necessary adjustments may be made to the air-conditioning system. The use of portable space heaters is strictly prohibited in Florida Atlantic University’s residence halls. Space heaters are a potential source of fire if not used properly. Although both the Physical Plant and Environmental Health and Safety strongly discourage their use in all University buildings, guidelines have been established to reduce the risks associated with these devices. The requirements listed below, applicable code requirements, and manufacturers‟ recommendations must be followed to maintain a safe worker environment and to protect property.

All space heaters used on campus must be approved for fire safety, as defined by the National Fire Protection Association. EH&S reserves the right to inspect and declare "UNAPPROVED" any space heater that create a hazard or is in appropriate to a particular location based on specific circumstances, codes and/or legal requirements. Space heaters are permitted only in spaces monitored by smoke detectors connected to the fire alarm system.  No liquid fueled space heaters (e.g., kerosene heaters) shall be used in any residential, office, classroom or research, or shop building.  All space heaters must be Underwriters Listed or Factory Mutual (FM Global) approved for the intended use and must have been manufactured after the year 2000.  Users should read and follow manufacturers‟ operating instructions.  Heaters must not be used in areas where combustible atmospheres (flammable gasses or vapors) may be present.  Heaters must not be used in wet areas or areas likely to become wet. 52 | P a g e


 Heaters must have elements that have a guard or are otherwise protected from contact by the user or other personnel.  Each heater must be equipped with a safety switch that turns the unit off in the event that it is tilted or tipped over.  Each heater must have a thermostat to automatically shut down the unit when the desired temperature is achieved.  Each heater must be equipped with a shut-off timer.  Heaters must be kept at least 3 feet (36 inches) from all combustible materials, e.g. file cabinets, desks, trash-cans, paper boxes. Nothing may be placed on, over, above, or around a space heater.  Do not place heaters under desks or in other enclosed areas.  Heaters must be monitored at all times when in operation. Do not use heaters in rooms that will not be continually occupied.  When not in use, the space heater shall be unplugged from the wall electric outlet.  The use of extension cords with space heaters is prohibited.  Do not place cords under rugs or set anything on a cord.  Plugs should fit snugly into wall outlet.  Heaters must be inspected daily by the user. Those unit having missing guards, control knobs, feet, etc. must be taken out of service immediately.  Do not use portable space heaters if small children are present or expected in the area.  If any of these conditions cannot be met, contact Environmental Health and Safety (561297-3829) for advice or assistance.

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MICROWAVE OVEN SAFETY

All countertop microwave ovens must be placed at eye level or below, at least 3 ft from any combustible material, and away from all objects that prevent air circulation or block air vents. Microwaves can also be brought by residents as long as they do not exceed 1100 watts in power. Ovens must be plugged directly into an outlet; gang plugs or extension cords must not be used. Ovens used for laboratory operations cannot be used for food preparations. Call EH&S at 561297-3129 for further information.

Microwave Oven Operating Instructions Read any warning messages, instructions, operating procedures and safety precautions. Not all microwave ovens are alike. Never operate the unit when it is empty or use it for storage. Do not operate an oven if the door does not close firmly or is bent, or if the seal, hinges, or latch are worn or broken. Never tamper with the safety interlock switches or the fuse. Make sure the safety mechanisms are in good working condition and that the microwave automatically turns it off when the door is opened. Do not stand directly against or in front of an oven for long periods. Never leave an operating microwave unattended! Microwave Oven Cooking Instructions Use the microwave only for food or beverages, or other standardized uses. Do not use metal edged bowls, metal plates or cups, tin foil, or metal twist ties in the oven. The metal can spark, damage the unit, and lead to a fire. Use only microwave safe materials. Read the cooking instructions on the package. Puncture cooking pouches and foods that have tight skins to release steam as they cook. Never use a brown paper bag for popping popcorn, it can catch fire. Never put newspaper in the microwave, it will catch fire. Microwave Oven Cleaning Instructions Clean the door and oven cavity with water and mild detergent. Do not use abrasives such as scouring pads. Microwave Oven Fire If you have a fire in the microwave, unplug the unit, leave the door shut and call the University Police at 561-297-3500 or 911.

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HOLIDAY DECORATIONS AND TREE SAFETY Environmental Health and Safety is providing the following information on holiday decorations so that faculty, staff and students, who want to decorate, can do so safely. The use of natural trees (cut or alive), natural wreaths, boughs or greenery is prohibited except as approved by EH&S because of fire potential and rapid flame spread. If you require clarification or additional information, call EH&S at 561-297-3129. Resident students should also consult their Area Office and the Department of Housing and Residential Life 2001-2002 Guidebook. Decorations: Use only non-combustible or flame retardant decorations. Decorations in hallways, on walls and doors are not to exceed 30% of the surface. Do not secure decorations to sprinkler piping, smoke detectors, exit signs or any other life safety items. Do not obstruct doors, corridors, stairs, landings or spaces providing normal egress. Remember to remove decorations promptly after the holiday season. Lights: Use only electric decorative lights and associated wiring for decorative lights that are UL or FM listed. Flame producing devices such as, but not limited to candles, may not be used. Mixing and matching lights can create a fire hazard. Keep outside lights outside and inside lights inside. Check the light bulbs, sockets, wires and plugs to make sure nothing is cracked, broken or exposed. Discard any defective light strands. Keep lights away from flammable and/or combustible materials. Extension cords used for temporary holiday decorations must be UL listed. Do not connect more than three sets of lights to an extension cord. Keep all cords out of high-traffic areas where they could create a tripping hazard. Do not run cords through, under or behind a door, furniture or carpet. Such practice could lead to a fire. Electrical outlets should not be overloaded. All lights should be turned off before leaving the area.

Artificial Trees Artificial trees should be labeled (UL, FM, etc.) or otherwise certified by the manufacturer as flame retardant or flame resistant. Metallic trees are prohibited except as approved by EH&S. EXITS, EXIT LIGHTS, FIRE ALARM PULL BOXES, FIRE HOSE CABINETS, FIRE EXTINGUISHERS, SPRINKLER HEADS, SMOKE DETECTORS OR OTHER FIRE RELATED ITEMS shall not be concealed or obstructed, in whole or part by any decorative material.

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Fire Safety Storage Storage in itself does not constitute a fire hazard. The problem starts when items are stored in an improper manner, in a hazardous location, when other fire hazards are present, or when storage affects the safe evacuation of occupants.

A.

General Storage This section pertains to any room or building used for the general storage of ordinary combustibles for either temporary or long-term storage.

B.

1.

Combustible materials will be separated from other hazardous materials such as flammables, corrosives, explosives, oxidizers etc. EH&S will determine the requirements.

2.

Any storage area will be separated from other areas by a 1-hour fire barrier, with a fire rated, self-closing door. The area will also be protected by fire detection and/or suppression systems.

3.

Stored materials will be kept at least 36" from any heat source.

4.

Aisles in any room used for storage will have a minimum 24" width to allow for evacuation and for firefighters to gain access to the most remote area of the room.

5.

Storage will not block fire extinguishers, fire alarm pull stations, emergency or EXIT lighting, access to evacuation routes or the exit door, emergency equipment or prevent entry of emergency personnel.

6.

Unused materials or materials which are no longer needed should be properly disposed of through the Property Management Department.

7.

Storage under stairs is not permitted unless the area is enclosed and protected with a one-hour fire rated enclosure and protected by a detection and/or suppression system.

8.

Doors to storage rooms will not be "propped" open at any time.

9.

Smoking will not be permitted in any storage area under any conditions.

Flammable Storage It is critical that flammables are used properly and stored safely.

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C.

1.

A "daily use" amount of flammable liquids may be stored on open shelves. "Daily use" refers to a small amount of consumable flammables that are expected to be used in a repetitive nature and the amount used would not constitute more of a hazard than other ordinary combustibles in the room.

2.

Flammables required to be stored away from combustibles will be stored in approved flammable storage cabinet. This cabinet will be labeled and incorporate self-closing doors.

3.

Flammable storage will be kept at least 50 feet from open flames or other heat sources.

4.

Ordinary combustibles will not be stored in flammable storage.

5.

Oily or grease laden rags will be kept at least 50 feet from open flames or other heat sources.

6.

Rooms used for storage will be constructed to meet the requirements for one-hour separation, ventilation, heating, electrical systems and fire detection and/or suppression systems.

7.

Flammables generally are not permitted to be stored in basements of buildings. Exceptions will be determined by EH&S and must be authorized in writing.

High Stack Storage This type of storage has become increasingly popular for space saving purposes for records and commodities. This also presents a different type of hazard for fire safety and fire fighting.

D.

1.

It is highly recommended that non-combustible materials be used in the construction of storage racks. This is to reduce the amount of fire spread should a fire occur.

2.

Under no circumstances will storage of materials be closer than 18" of sprinkler heads.

3.

Aisle widths in high rack storage, which also requires the use of mechanical devices such as forklifts or carts, will be of sufficient width to allow personnel evacuation if a cart is in the aisle.

Storage of Hazardous Materials Hazardous products may produce a substantial amount of toxic vapors as well as react

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with the fire to create a fast moving or explosive situation. Storage of such materials must be strictly controlled. 1.

Proper storage and handling of these materials will be determined by EH&S.

2.

Hazardous materials will not be stored within 50 feet of any open flame or heat source.

3.

Hazardous materials will not obstruct evacuation routes or be stored under stairs.

4.

Smoking is not permitted within 50 feet of hazardous materials storage.

1.

Hazardous materials will be stored in separate cabinets or rooms according to their reactive properties.

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EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND EVACUATION PROCEDURES

Emergency Evacuation Procedures Emergency Evacuation Procedures and Responsibilities of Building Wardens I.

Scope

The purpose of the Emergency Evacuation Plan is to establish minimum requirements that will provide a reasonable degree of life safety from fire and similar emergencies in Florida Atlantic University (FAU) buildings and structures.

II.

General

This plan endeavors to avoid requirements that might involve unreasonable hardships, unnecessary inconveniences or interference with the normal use and occupancy of a building(s) but insists upon compliance with a minimum standard for safety consistent with the public interest. A fire emergency exists whenever:    

A building fire evacuation alarm is sounding. An uncontrolled fire or imminent fire hazard occurs in any building or area of the campus. There is presence of smoke, or the odor of burning. There is a spontaneous or abnormal heating of any material, an uncontrolled release of combustible or toxic gas or other material, or a flammable liquid spill.  Campus Buildings shall be immediately and totally evacuated whenever the building fire alarm is sounding. Upon discovery of evidence that a fire emergency exists, an individual shall accomplish, or attempt to accomplish, the following actions:    

Activate fire alarm system located along exit routes. Evacuate the building. Do not use elevators. Call 911 or 3500 from a safe area and give name, location and nature of emergency. Remain at safe location until you are told to re-enter the building.

A Fire Warden system shall be utilized for the safe evacuation of occupants in all buildings on campus. The Chief Fire Warden (Building Supervisor) is appointed by the Vice Presidents, Deans or Directors. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety will maintain the assignment of these Fire Wardens and their training using the Emergency Evacuation Procedures. Fire exit drills shall be held in accordance with Section VI. For high-rise buildings, the Emergency Evacuation Plan shall also include:

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 the instructions of Chief Fire Wardens on the use of the voice communication system where such systems are installed;  the action to be taken by designed persons in initiating any smoke control or other fire emergency systems installed in a building in the event of fire until the fire department arrives; and  the procedures established to facilitate fire department access to the building and other utilities located within the building.

III.

Emergency evacuation procedures

Application The Emergency Evacuation procedures shall be utilized to evacuate all occupants regardless of the type of emergency. Adequately trained Wardens can be of great value in directing an orderly movement of people in the event of an emergency until emergency personnel arrive. FAU will utilize a Fire Warden system to achieve effective emergency evacuation from any building(s) on campus. The Wardens referred to in this division are mainly volunteers with their assignments and responsibilities outlined in Sections V. It is not intended that Wardens should necessarily be in the building(s) on a continuous basis, but when available and on notification of an emergency is able to fulfill their obligations as described herein. The emergency evacuation procedures require all Wardens to:     

instruct all persons to leave the building(s) once the building alarm activates; direct the flow of people to the nearest and safest exit; advise the evacuees not to use the elevators (See Section VIII-“Elevators”); when possible, remove all non-ambulatory occupants to areas of refuge or to ground level exits; report the location of any trapped or seriously injured occupant(s) to the Chief Fire Warden (Building Supervisor);  ensure all persons have evacuated the building(s) to designated outside areas. (Note the names of individuals and/or room numbers when a problem is encountered.); and  close all doors opening into corridors. Fire Wardens assigned to pre-designated grade level exits shall prevent unauthorized persons from reentering the building(s) until the emergency is declared over by the Boca Raton Fire Department or other emergency personnel. After the evacuation, crowd control is the responsibility of emergency personnel and the Wardens may provide assistance as required. It is of critical importance that the crowd that has just exited the building does not impede emergency personnel access.

IV.

Duties and responsibilities of chief wardens (Building Supervisor)

When the Fire Alarm sounds: Proceed to pre-designated areas Commence the emergency evacuation procedures described in Section III, 1-6;

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Check with the assigned Warden conducting the outside building inspection for:    

the progress of the evacuation; the location of injured or trapped occupants and evacuees needing assistance; the location and extent of the emergency; and the names and/or room numbers of individuals who caused problems for the Fire Wardens.

When the Boca Raton Fire Department or other emergency personnel arrive:  liaison with the emergency personnel upon their arrival;  explain nature of the emergency, the location and extent of the emergency;  explain the progress of the evacuation, the location of injured or trapped occupants and of evacuees needing assistance; inform emergency personnel regarding any individuals with special knowledge about the emergency, such as the person who received a bomb call threat;  provide floor plans if requested;  provide information on the elevators and elevator controls, standpipe, hose cabinets and fire extinguisher locations, and smoke consideration by the emergency personnel during rescue operations. General responsibilities:  Understand the Emergency Evacuation Procedures, its objectives and basic concepts that augment and promote the safety awareness of the building occupants;  The Chief Warden shall instruct Wardens in the Emergency Evacuation Procedure described in Section III, 1-6, before they are given any responsibility for emergency evacuation;  The Chief Warden shall delegate responsibility to the Warden to assign a person or persons to take charge of non-ambulatory persons for evacuation purposes (See Section VII, 1-3 – “NonAmbulatory Persons”);  Maintain close liaison with all Wardens; and  Be aware of:  Safety procedures and practices;  Fire and safety notices and information bulletins;  The responsibilities to the building occupants and visitors, assistant Wardens, Fire Safety Officer, Boca Raton Fire Departments, other emergency personnel, and property being protected;  The location of fire extinguishing equipment and areas of refuge within the building(s). Chief Warden Responsibilities also include attending; Training sessions; Meetings requested by building Wardens, emergency personnel, Police Department or the FAU Fire Safety Officer; and Any seminars, courses, or meetings on safety supported and recommended by the FAU Safety and Security Officers.

V.

Duties of floor warden

When the fire alarm sounds: 1.

Proceed to the designated area.

2.

Direct the flow of people to the nearest & safest exit stair and advise them not to use elevators.

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3.

Arrange for the safe removal of all non-ambulatory occupants in the area (may be moved to safe zone - i.e. stairwell).

4.

Close all doors opening into corridor.

5.

Instruct all persons to leave the building and go to designated area (NOTE: names and/or room numbers when you encounter a problem). In case of inclement weather, direct occupants to adjacent buildings.

6.

Note fire location and any problems with the fire alarm system.

7.

Report any problems or comments to Chief Fire Warden.

8.

Remain at designated grade level exit to prevent people from re-entering. (Campus Security will be available for assistance.) Return into the building and instruct others to do so only when a clear signal has been given by the Boca Raton Fire Department, FAU Safety Officer, Chief Warden or other emergency personnel.

9.

What conditions may warrant evacuation of a building? There are numerous reasons to evacuate a building but, here are a few examples: Fire, Bomb Threat, Hazardous Material Spill, Hostile Intruder, Utility Failure, etc. What should I know about the building evacuation plan? KNOW the evacuation plan of the building and where to find it. (Consult Building Safety Personnel) KNOW the location of all exits for the building.

KNOW the locations of emergency equipment (i.e., fire extinguishers, pull stations, emergency telephones, etc.). KNOW the location of the assembly area outside the building. ASSIST and participate in fire drills. What should I do if the fire alarm has not been already activated due to smoke, heat or fire, or there is no evidence of fire or explosion threat in the building, but I discover an event or condition that may warrant building evacuation? NOTIFY University Police before activating the fire alarm. INFORM Building Safety Personnel of the event or conditions if possible. What should I do when I hear a fire alarm, or get an order to evacuate without an activated alarm?

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TURN OFF ALL HAZARDOUS EXPERIMENTS or procedures before evacuating. If possible, take or secure all valuables, wallets, purses, keys, etc. EVACUATE the building using the nearest exit or stairway. DO NOT USE ELEVATORS. CALL 911 from a safe area and provide name, location, and nature of emergency. PROCEED to pre-determined assembly area of building and remain there until you are told to re-enter by the emergency personnel in charge. DO NOT IMPEDE access of emergency personnel to the area. INFORM Building Safety Personnel or Emergency Personnel of the event, conditions and location of individuals who require assistance and have not been evacuated. What should I do to initiate a fire alarm to evacuate a building?

ACTIVATE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM LOCATED ALONG EXIT ROUTES. What should I know as an individual requiring assistance? It is recommended individuals requiring assistance prepare for emergencies ahead of time by: LEARN the locations of exit corridors and exit stairways. PLAN an escape route. SHOW a co-worker or instructor how to assist you in case of emergency. What should I do, as an individual requiring assistance, during a building evacuation? SEEK REFUGE near the closest stairway and request assistance from others. What should I know in order to help individuals requiring assistance? BE FAMILIAR with the people requiring assistance who are routinely in your work area. TO REDUCE THE RISK OF PERSONAL INJURY, attempts to carry immobilized persons are discouraged. Wherever stairs are a part of the evacuation route, the following procedures are to be applied: BLIND, BUT MOBILE PERSONS, should first be moved out of the rush of traffic, and then promptly assisted to the nearest exit. DEAF, BUT MOBILE PERSONS, may be unaware of the need to evacuate, and should be calmly advised and guided to the nearest available exit. TEMPORARILY IMMOBILIZED PERSONS, including those wearing casts and/or using canes or crutches, should be given assistance based solely upon their ability to maneuver through doorways and up/down stairs. If they cannot easily move up and down stairs, temporarily immobilized persons must be assisted in the same manner as those who are permanently impaired (see below). PERMANENTLY IMMOBILIZED PERSONS are those who have either limited or no use of legs, and must rely upon crutches, wheelchairs, or walkers for transport in and through buildings. 64 | P a g e


What should I do to help individuals requiring assistance? MOVE THE PHYSICALLY IMPAIRED person quickly to reasonable safety, preferably to an enclosed room or space that smoke or flames cannot easily enter as soon as a fire alarm sounds or the order to evacuate is received by emergency or Building Safety personnel. ELEVATORS CANNOT BE USED ACCOMPANY this by a verbal explanation so that the person being assisted understands what is happening and why these actions are being taken. CONTACT CAMPUS POLICE immediately if a telephone is available, and provide the following: The individualâ€&#x;s name and location within the building The phone number from which the call is being made. If left alone, the disabled person may wish to remain on the phone with Campus Police. IF AVAILABLE, A COMPANION, OR OTHER RESPONSIBLE PERSON may stand by to remain with and assist the physically-challenged individual. INFORM the Building Safety Supervisor or emergency personnel of the exact location of the immobilized person(s). If it becomes necessary for removal from the building, trained, equipped, emergency personnel will then carry out the removal.

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EVACUATION PROCEDURES Become familiar with several means of exiting each of the campus facilities that you use or reside in. When responding to a fire emergency, remember: "Remain calm. Panic kills." Follow these procedures when evacuating a building on campus: If feasible, alert anyone else in the immediate area who may not have heard the alarm. Proceed immediately to the nearest exit; do not attempt to locate the emergency. Make a mental picture of the route you intend to follow to reach the exit. If possible, join with others who are heading toward the same exit. Do not use the elevators. Move quickly, but remember: "Stay calm. Panic kills." If cooking, turn off all cooking appliances. Once outside, move away from the building, and go directly to the evacuation assembly area. Remain there until you receive instructions from Housing Staff, the Police or Fire Department.

Do not ignore fire alarms! Do not wait to see fire or smoke! Do not worry about grabbing your stuff!

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Fire Safety education and training program Fires are one of the deadlier perils that threaten studentsâ€&#x; safety. A fire in a student facility can quickly rage out of control if appropriate safe guards are not set in place to stop the fire. While fatal fires in student housing are not an everyday occurrence, they do happen, perhaps more frequently than we recognize.

In order to establish a uniform, system-wide program for fire safety in student facilities, Florida Atlantic University has the following procedures and guidelines. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide and maintain an appropriate level of fire safety for occupants of student housing and for the protection of state property through training and the implementation of safety applications. Fire safety programs in housing facilities must include the following:

I. II. III. IV. V. VI.

Fire Safety Awareness and Training Student Room Inspection Student Compliance Detection and Suppression Systems Fire Drills Correction of Fire Code Violations

I.

Fire Safety Awareness and Training

In order to establish and maintain fire prevention activities and response preparedness in student housing facilities, EH&S will provide fire safety training for Housing and Residential Life staff, faculty and RAâ€&#x;s. Training will include an introduction to fire safety and its importance, emergency evacuation, what to do in case of fire, fire alarm systems malfunctions, and familiarization with common housing facility fire hazards, such as excessive storage of flammables, electric outlet overload, etc. At least one training session will be presented to all housing facility staff, faculty and RAâ€&#x;s annually prior to the opening of the residence halls at the start of each school year. Additional workshops may be held during the year as deemed necessary. Local fire response and fire prevention personnel will be encouraged to participate in the training. In addition to the training workshops, Environmental Health and Safety and the Housing staff will distribute fire safety information to students.

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There are two aspects of Fire Safety Training:

Fire Prevention Fire prevention training includes instructions on what should be done to reduce the potential for ignition. The prevention of fire requires that one or more of the elements of the fire triangle be removed. Students will be trained to recognize potentially hazardous situations such as smoking in bed, careless use of candles and cooking, excessive use of flammable decorations, poor housekeeping practices and blockage of exits and paths.

Fire Response This training includes clear instructions on what residents should do in the event of a fire. The first decision a resident must make is whether to fight the fire, notify other residents or evacuate immediately. Relatively small fires can be fought successfully with portable fire extinguishers. If residents are expected to fight small fires, however, they need to be trained in the location and operation of portable fire extinguishers, as well as how to recognize when a fire is too large to attack. Contact EH&S for Fire Safety and Extinguisher training Evacuation behavior should be rehearsed. Residents should know at least two ways out of the building; a primary path and a secondary path. Paths should be checked for safety before proceeding. Doors should be felt for heat before opening them, and then they should be carefully cracked open to check conditions on the other side. People should stay low, where the air is generally less smoky, and proceed with deliberate speed to the exit and out the building. Once outside, residents should not re-enter the building until told by emergency personnel. These rules for safe evacuation behavior should be practiced periodically. Residents also need to understand the fire features of the building. Do rooms have self-closing doors? What is the purpose of the self-closing doors? What are the primary and secondary egress paths? Does the building have fire detection and suppression systems? Does the alarm system automatically notify the Police Department, Fire Department or Monitoring Company? These features and issues need to be discussed with the residents in a way to educate without overwhelming. Residents should be instructed not to tamper with the building fire protection features, either intentionally or accidentally. Smoke detectors should not be covered or have the batteries removed. Sprinklers should not be heated or subjected to physical abuse. Objects should not be stored in exit ways, including hallways, corridors and stairways, where they could obstruct egress path or serve as potential fuel for a fire. Doors to rooms and exits should not be blocked open. In the event of fire, doors should be shut to hinder the progress of the fire and spread of smoke. Severe sanctions should be imposed on students who violate these rules.

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II.

Student Room Inspections Housing and Residential Life will conduct a detailed inspection of the rooms at least once a semester (in addition to student checkout) in each occupied student housing unit for the purpose of determining compliance with fire safety regulations. Scheduled inspection dates will be posted in appropriate locations to notify occupants in advance. Housing and Residential Life, assisted by the University Fire Safety Officer, will develop a list of unapproved items and practices to be considered as fire safety violations and will insure that occupants are informed of the violations. If unapproved items or practices are discovered during inspection, immediate action will be taken to remove the item from the facility or discontinue the practice.

III.

Student Compliance Housing and Residential Life will take proactive measures to foster student cooperation and compliance with fire safety requirements. Fire safety should be a central theme appearing on bulletin boards, in the student housing guidebook, etc., and should be emphasized at hall meetings, orientation sessions and staff training. Fire safety violations will be dealt with in a serious manner. Tampering with fire safety equipment, intentional false alarms, and setting fires are criminal offenses that will be immediately reported as prescribed by campus procedures. Severity of disciplinary action will depend on the seriousness of the infraction.

IV.

Correction of Fire Code Violations Environmental Health and Safety and Housing and Residential Life will insure that student housing facilities meet the safety requirements of the Uniform Fire Safety Standards by developing a uniform and systematic method of correcting deficiencies cited in the State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s Annual Inspection Reports. Housing and Residential Life officials will develop a financial plan to correct fire code violations within the time frames specified in the Fire Code Corrective Action Plans received from the Fire Marshal. The Fire Safety Officer shall assist with the development of the corrective action and financial plans, as well as serve as a technical liaison with Housing and Residential Life, Facilities Planning, and the State Fire Marshal. The Fire Safety Officer will monitor the progress made in correcting fire code violations.

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V.

Fire Drills

Housing and Residential Life shall establish an evacuation plan for each residence hall and ensure that fire drills are conducted according to the procedure mentioned in the Fire Safety Manual, Fire Safety Education section at www.fau.edu/ehs.

VI.

Detection and Suppression Systems

A. Detection and Alarm The other element of fire safety in Student Housing is detection and alarm. Automatic fire detection is a key fire safety feature in any residential building; from single-family houses to modern high rise apartments or dormitories. In particular, smoke alarms installed throughout a building allow early detection and notification of incipient fires, particularly while residents sleep. Fire detection and alarm systems are an essential element of a fire protection program for a residential building. These systems provide early notification of fire. In cases of relatively slow developing fires, these systems usually provide sufficient warning to permit effective intervention and evacuation. In cases of relatively fast developing fires, and in cases where people may not hear or react to an alarm signal, fire alarm systems have limited value. Unfortunately, many fires develop too fast for effective suppression by the fire department before they become hazardous, even with prompt detection and notification. In these cases, fire suppression is desirable.

B.

Suppression System

The best weapon of controlling a fire in its early stages is the automatic sprinkler system. It is an integrated system of underground and overhead piping connecting one or more automatic water supplies, such as a city water main with automatic sprinklers. Sprinkler systems do not activate when somebody pulls the fire alarm or when a smoke detector activates. Nor do all sprinklers open simultaneously when the first one activates. Each sprinkler has its own heat sensitive element that must be heated to its activation temperature of about 165oF before the sprinkler will operate. Once activated, a sprinkler discharges water at a rate of approximately 20 gallons per minute in a fairly uniform pattern throughout the area. This water spray cools the fire environment while wetting fuels surrounding the fire source to prevent or retard their ignition. In this way the fire is held in check until the fire department can respond and complete extinguishments of the fire. Compared with the 150 to 250 gallons per minute discharged by a single fire department hose stream, concerns about water damage from a sprinkler operation during a fire are put into proper perspective. Sprinklers respond much earlier than the fire department possibly can and they concentrate water delivery where it is needed. Fires remain much smaller with sprinkler protection, such that the combined effects of fire and 70 | P a g e


water damage are generally much lower than the unsprinkled buildings. It is very important to note that either the detection or suppression systems will work as expected if they get the proper inspection, testing and maintenance according to the manufacturerâ€&#x;s manual and the respective fire code. Fire safety in student housing does not just happen; it requires careful planning, coordination, implementation, and diligence on the part of campus housing, students and safety administrators. Finally, observe the following safety precautions: Provide students with a program for fire safety and prevention. Teach students what to do in case of fire. Install smoke alarms in every dormitory room and every level of housing facilities. Maintain and regularly test smoke alarms and fire alarm systems as well as suppression systems. Replace smoke alarm batteries every semester. Regularly inspect rooms and buildings for fire hazards. Ask EH&S for assistance. Inspect exit doors and other means egress and make sure they are working properly. Create and update detailed floor plans of buildings, and make them available to emergency personnel, resident advisors and students. Conduct fire drills and practice escape routes and evacuation plans. Urge students to take each alarm seriously. Do not overload electrical outlets and make sure extension cords are used properly. Learn how to properly use and maintain heating and cooking appliances.

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VI.

Fire drill

The primary concern in the event of a fire is to get everyone out of the building as quickly as possible. To do this, occupants must be prepared in advance for quick and orderly evacuation. A trained group will act more calmly under emergency situations, thereby dispelling panic, which has caused more casualties than fire itself. Slow evacuation and panic account for the large majority of all fatalities in fires. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety, conducts Fire Drills in all university buildings as required by state law. The following are also monitored during the process of the drill. 1. Emergency Evacuation Drills are an intricate part of our Emergency Preparedness Planning, and shall be monitored for time and effectiveness. 2. It allows occupants to familiarize themselves with drill procedures, location of fire exits, and the sound of the fire alarm. 3.

The drills allow us to identify technical problems with the Fire Alarm Equipment.

4.

They allow us to gauge whether or not persons evacuate the building as legally required.

5. They allow us to check to see if fire protection equipment, such as fire doors, is being used properly. 6. used.

They allow us to gauge how long it takes to evacuate each building and which exits are generally

General Drill Procedures The conducting of fire drills is arranged and supervised by the University Fire Safety Officer or his representative with the cooperation of the Building Supervisor and the Police Department. The date and time shall be scheduled when most occupants will be in the building. The coordinator should inform Campus Police of the exact times the alarm will be pulled for the drill. The coordinator shall activate the fire alarm. WHEN THE EVACUATION ALARM SOUNDS, “EVERYONE MUST LEAVE THE BUILDING.� It is a violation of the State law for failure to leave the building when the fire alarm is sounding. After evacuation occupants shall proceed to a pre-determined location and wait for the instruction of emergency personnel to re-enter. The drill coordinator shall silence and reset the panel when everyone has evacuated the building. Fire drills will be monitored for effectiveness and documented.

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The Building Supervisor shall receive a completed copy of the drill report from the Fire Safety Officer after the completion of every drill. Fire exit drill shall be held at least: Once per semester in residential occupancies; and Annually in all other buildings. 10 times a year at the University School and Childcare Center.

VII.

Non-ambulatory persons

The Chief Warden shall delegate responsibility to the Wardens to assign a person or persons to take charge of non-ambulatory persons for evacuation. The Fire wardens shall keep records of persons in the building and the designated persons responsible for their evacuation. Non-ambulatory persons within a building should be made aware of the procedures as outlined above, to ensure their own personal safety.

VIII.

Elevators

In the event of a fire or similar emergency, elevators shall not be used to evacuate the building. Elevators, in most university buildings, are automatically recalled to the street, floor or transfer level upon the actuation of the buildings’ fire alarm system and therefore are not reliable. Only authorized persons including the Boca Raton Fire Department and Fire safety personnel shall be permitted to use the elevators during fire emergencies.

IX.

Fighting fires and rescue

Search and rescue is the responsibility of emergency personnel. If the emergency is fire and it is small or in its earliest stages and can be fought effectively with the available extinguishers, then trained persons may attempt to extinguish such fires providing there is no life safety hazard to the user and such action will not endanger others. The selection of the proper fire extinguisher and knowledge of its operation are critical to prevent injury to the user and to contain or extinguish the fire. Fire fighting procedures for university buildings have been pre-planned by the Boca Raton Fire Department and FAU Fire Protection Officer.

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Fires and Fire Safety

What should I do if I discover a fire? ACTIVATE THE FIRE ALARM SYSTEM by pulling one of the pull stations that re located along the exit routes, IF the alarm is not already sounding. FOLLOW YOUR EVACUATION ROUTE and evacuate the building through the nearest exit If the alarm is sounding. DO NOT USE ELEVATORS. PROCEED to the pre-determined outdoor assembly area for the building. CALL 911 to report the fire. REMAIN OUTSIDE in the assembly area until you have been told to re-enter the building by the emergency personnel in charge.

What do I need to know about portable fire extinguishers? Portable fire extinguishers are installed throughout FAU buildings. Familiarize yourself with the locations of the fire extinguishers and receive hands-on training. Fire extinguishers can only be used for small fires that can be easily contained. ABC fire extinguishers are used to fight Class “A”, “B” and “C” fires: Class “A”: Fires caused by ordinary combustibles, such as wood, paper or textiles. Class “B”: Fires caused by flammable and combustible liquids, such as cooking oil, gasoline, and other solvents. Class “C”: Fires caused by electrically-energized equipment or appliances, etc.

When should I use a portable fire extinguisher? Attempt to use fire extinguishers ONLY if the following apply: The building is being evacuated. The fire department is being called. The fire is small, contained, and not spreading beyond its starting point. The exit is cleared and there is no imminent peril. The proper extinguisher is readily available. You are trained on how to use the fire extinguisher.

How do I use a fire extinguisher? To operate your extinguisher, remember the word PASS. P - Pull the pin A - Aim low S – Squeeze S – Sweep Contact EH&S to immediately replace the used fire extinguisher at (561)297-3129.

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How do I prevent fires from occurring? Check for the following fire hazards at all times and report to EH&S: Improper disposal of smoking materials. Exits not clearly marked. Means of egress blocked by storage. Trash and other combustibles have not been disposed of regularly. Improper storage of flammable and combustible liquids. Electrical hazards, such as overloaded outlets, unapproved types of extension cords, exposed wires and power cords that are in poor condition. Use of open flames / candles.

Fire Extinguishers Fire extinguishers are special pressurized devices that release chemicals or water to aid in putting out a fire. They keep small fires from spreading, assist in fighting fires until the Fire Department arrives and may help provide an escape route for you. REMEMBER: A fire extinguisher is no substitute for the Fire Department. Always call the Fire Department first no matter how small you think the fire is.

How Do Fire Extinguishers Work? Fire is a chemical reaction called combustion. Fire needs fuel, oxygen and heat in order to burn. Portable fire extinguishers apply an agent that will cool burning fuel that restricts or removes oxygen, so that fire cannot continue to burn. Small household fires can quickly be controlled by a fire extinguisher. One third of all people injured by fire are hurt while trying to control or extinguish a fire. One needs the right type of extinguisher and to be knowledgeable of when and how to use it. The number of recorded disastrous fires has been reduced over the years due to the increased awareness, knowledge, and the use of fire extinguishers. A fire extinguished at its earliest stage will lessen the chance of injury to people and damage to property.

Responsibility Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for the installation, tracking and maintenance of fire extinguishers in all FAU owned buildings. Extinguishers in leased property are the responsibility of the landlord.

TYPES The type of extinguishers are determined by EH&S using the following factors. 75 | P a g e


1.

The type of hazard (combustibles, flammables, electrical hazards, chemicals, etc).

2.

The amount of combustibles and/or flammable in the area.

3.

The best agent to be used on the hazard(s) (water, dry chemical, carbon dioxide, etc.).

Choosing Fire Extinguisher SELECT ONLY fire extinguishers that have been tested by an independent laboratory and labeled for the type and size of fire it can extinguish. Use these labels as a guide to purchase the kind of extinguisher that suits your needs.

Classes of fires There are five classes of fires. All fire extinguishers are labeled using symbols for the classes of fires they can put out. A red slash through any of the symbols tells you the extinguisher cannot be used on that class of fire. A missing symbol tells you only that the extinguisher has not been tested for that class of fire. Class A fires involve paper, wood, and other ordinary combustibles. Class B fires involve flammable liquids, such as gasoline, oil, and some paints and solvents. Class C fires involve energized electrical equipment such as power tools, wiring, fuse boxes, appliances, TVs, computers, electric motors, etc. Class D fires involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, potassium, and sodium. Class K fires involve grease in commercial cooking equipment.

Extinguishing Agents Extinguishers differ by the “extinguishing agent� they expel on to a fire. The label on the extinguisher must match what is burning. Class A: Pressurized water extinguishes fires by cooling the fuel. This should not be used for electrical fires.

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Class B-C: Dry chemical extinguisher that blankets fuels with sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, or monoammonium phosphate. Carbon dioxide models contain liquid CO2 under pressure, which turns to a gas when expelled. Class A-B-C: Multi-purpose dry chemical extinguisher that expels ammonium phosphate. Halogenated extinguishers can be used on class A, B, and C fires. Class D:

Extinguisher that applies dry powder to burning metals.

Class K:

Extinguisher coats the fuel with a wet or a dry based chemical.

The extinguisher must be appropriate for the type of fire being fought. Multi-purpose fire extinguishers, labeled ABC, may be used on all three classes of fires. Using the wrong type of extinguisher can cause harm to a person and make the fire worse. In some cases, it may be dangerous to use a fire extinguisher, regardless of the type. An extinguishing agent released under pressure could, for example, spread a grease fire in a frying pan rather than put it out.

Portable Extinguishers Portable extinguishers are also rated for the size of fire they can handle. This rating will appear on the label, for example, 2A: 10B: C. The larger the number, the larger the fire that the extinguisher can put out, but higher rated models are often heavier. Make sure you can hold and operate an extinguisher before you buy it.

Location (Distribution) The location of the extinguisher will be determined by EH&S. 1.

The extinguisher will be located at or near the exits in the normal path of travel to the exit.

2.

The travel distance required to reach an extinguisher is normally between 30-75 feet.

3.

The extinguisher will normally be clearly visible and identifiable. When this is not possible, appropriate signage will be posted directing the occupant to the location.

4.

The extinguisher must be located in a designated location. This means not removing the extinguisher for use as a doorstop or covering a welding operation for a barbecue etc.

5.

The extinguisher will not be hung higher than 5 ft. from the floor.

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Most extinguishers are mounted on walls or columns by securely fastened hangers so that they are supported adequately, although some extinguishers are mounted in cabinets or wall recesses. In any case, the operating instructions must face outward, and the extinguisher should be placed so that it can be removed easily. Cabinets should be kept clean and dry.

Inspection and Maintenance Visual Inspections A visual inspection is a quick check to see if the fire extinguisher is in its proper location, it is not blocked, it is fully charged, and it appears to be in good working order. This inspection generally consists of walking to the extinguisher and doing the following:

Confirming that the extinguisher is in its proper place. Confirming that access to, and visibility of, the extinguisher is not obstructed. Confirming that the extinguisher operating instructions face outward. Confirming that seals or tamper indications are intact. Confirming that the pressure gauge is in the normal range. Noting any obvious physical damage. Maintenance Maintenance should include a thorough examination of the extinguisherâ€&#x;s mechanical parts, the extinguishing agent and the expelling means. The purpose of the maintenance program is to make sure that the extinguisher will operate properly and will not pose a potential hazard to the operator or people nearby. Maintenance shall be performed once every year as per NFPA 10 by certified personnel.

Types of Fire Extinguishers used on Campus There are two types of fire extinguishers that are primarily used at Florida Atlantic University. Carbon dioxide fire extinguishers Dry chemical fire extinguishers

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a)

Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishers

They are available in sizes from 2.5-20 pounds. They are mainly distributed in laboratories, computer rooms and mechanical rooms. These types of fire extinguishers are filled with carbon dioxide in the liquid state, under its own vapor pressure of approximately 800psi. The agent is discharged as a gas. The discharge time for a portable CO2 fire extinguisher range from 8 to 30 seconds and their discharge rate is 3 to 8 feet. There are no pressure gauges on the CO2 fire extinguishers. As long as there is any liquid CO2 in the cylinder, the internal pressure will remain the same. These cylinders must be weighed to determine the quantity of liquid CO2 in the cylinder.

b)

Dry Chemical Fire Extinguishers

Dry chemical fire extinguishers are available in two operating types. They differ in the method of expelling the extinguishing agent, either through stored pressure or cartridge. The ones that are at FAU are stored pressure type and are distributed in hallways, offices and residential areas. Dry chemical extinguishers are available in a variety of sizes and have a discharge time 8-25 seconds and discharge range from 5 to 20 feet. Several agents are used in dry chemical extinguishers, such as sodium, potassium bicarbonate or ammonium phosphate base.

Fighting A Small Fire To meet OSHA requirements, employers who provide portable fire extinguishers in the work place must familiarize some of their employees with their use and educate them about the hazards of fighting a fire.

Environmental Health and Safety gives hands-on-training to FAU employees and students on a regular basis. The most important thing to remember when fighting a small fire is to keep your back to a clear exit and stand 6 to 8 feet away from the fire. If the fire does not go out quickly, leave the area. Before you fight a fire, make sure: Everyone is leaving the area and someone has sounded the alarm and called the FAU police department. You have an unobstructed escape route at your back. The fire is small, confined and not spreading. There are not any highly flammable materials near the fire site. You know what is burning and your extinguisher is right for the fire.

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You know how to use the extinguisher. Never try to fight a fire if:  The fire is no longer contained and starts spreading beyond where it started.  You cannot fight a fire with your back towards an open escape route.  The fire could spread and block your only escape route.  You do not have the right type of extinguisher.  You do not know how to use the fire extinguisher. To operate the fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS: P – Pull the pin that unlocks the operating lever A – Aim low. Point the extinguisher nozzle or hose at the base of the fire S – Squeeze the lever above the handle to discharge the extinguisher agent. To stop the discharge, release the lever S – Sweep the nozzle or hose from side to side. If the fire is going out, move carefully towards the flames, keep the extinguisher aimed at the base of the fire, and sweep back and forth

Tampering/Vandalism Tampering or vandalizing a fire extinguisher consists of the following: 1. Discharging the extinguisher for any other reason than to extinguish a fire. 2. Relocating an extinguisher without approval. 3. Damaging any part of the extinguisher intentionally or accidentally through carelessness.

Reporting Damaged or Discharged Extinguisher Never put an extinguisher back in its place after extinguishing a fire. If an extinguisher is discharged, even for a few seconds or if it is damaged in any way, report the fire extinguisher and its location to Environmental Health and Safety by calling 7-3129.

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Plans for Future Improvements

In an effort to promote safety, new campus buildings will continue to be constructed in full compliance with building and fire codes. We continue to improve fire safety features in older buildings as we request funds and they become available, e.g., fire sprinklers are continuously installed in many older buildings, stairwells are being enclosed, etc. These actions will greatly increase student and staff safety, and in the regrettable event of a fire, will reduce the extent and severity of the emergency.

Plans for future improvement include posting Emergency Evacuation Signs inside dorm rooms and inside buildings. Training Resident Assistants on how to properly use fire extinguishers, emergency evacuation. Working on new ideas to help improve upon our fire safety program and evacuations from the buildings.

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III. Life Safety Planning and Management Guide

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Public Assembly Events For general information on event planning and event management, contact the space utilization office.

FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY All persons planning public assembly events are encouraged to contact the Environmental Health and Safety office for information and assistance. Consultation is available by telephone, e-mail, meeting, and at the event site. In order to comply with the requirements of the Fire Prevention Code, it is necessary for the State Fire Marshall or the Boca Raton Fire Department to make certain approvals as noted in these guidelines. Required approvals and inspections should be requested as far in advance as possible. The State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office and the Boca Raton Fire Department are required to be present for certain events, such as indoor and outdoor pyrotechnics, fireworks and large scale events.

Definition of Public Assembly Public assembly events involve various risk factors associated with having large numbers of people in one location. The primary risk factors are the high occupant density and occupants that are not familiar with the building. This risk can be managed through proper event planning and management. The Fire Prevention Code defines a public assembly occupancy as follows: Assembly occupancies include, but are not limited to, all buildings or portions of buildings used for gathering together 50 or more persons for such purposes as deliberation, worship, entertainment, eating, drinking, amusement, or awaiting transportation (NFPA Life Safety Code). Examples of assemblage occupancies found on FAU campuses include large meeting rooms and classrooms, auditoriums with fixed or loose chair seating, multi-purpose rooms, concert halls, theaters, sport arenas, field houses, restaurants, bars and libraries.

Tents Are Considered Buildings Tents must meet most of the same requirements as buildings. Please see the section on Tents and the FAU Tent Use Guidelines.

Outdoor Spaces Enclosed open areas such as the stadium must meet the same requirements as buildings. Fenced open area must have at least two exits. A registered professional engineer must certify bleachers, grandstands and platforms as structurally sound.

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Large Scale Events All events intended to, or that have the potential to, attract large crowds must be coordinated through a number of University departments and divisions.

Room Capacity Information on room capacities may be obtained from the Campus Space Utilization Office. The State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s Office determines the legal capacities. Be aware that the occupant load is the maximum capacity based on the net clear floor area. Stages and other obstructions, seating arrangements and use of tables will decrease the capacity. The type of event is also a determining factor when planning. When planning an event, consider the following: USE Concentrated (concerts, dances, events) Less conc. (dining room, exhibit room) Fixed seats Stage (persons on stage) Kitchen Library (stack area) Library (reading) Swimming Pool (water surface) Swimming pool (deck area)

Min. area / person 7 sq ft / person 15 sq ft / person No. of fixed seats 15 sq ft / person 100 sq ft gross 100 sq ft gross 50 sq ft gross 50 sq ft gross 30 sq ft gross

Exits Requirements The number of exits required is based on the capacity of the room. Min. No. of Exits Number of Persons 500-600 601-999 1000 or more

2 remote 3 remote 4 remote

Exits must remain unobstructed and provide clear access to the outside at all times. Wires or cables are not permitted to be placed in front of exits or on steps. All wires or cables on floors must be properly taped down or covered to avoid tripping hazards.

Set-up Plans The placement of stages, seats, equipment (including wiring) and security arrangements affect the exit and access to exits.

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Standard set-up plans exist for the gym, Live Oak pavilion and the dining halls. These plans are maintained by Management of Physical Plant and the respective facilities. Set-up plans for other spaces, those not routinely used for public assembly (including lobbies and atriums), or any plans that are different from existing standard plans must be revised in advance by the State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office for conformance with life safety regulations. Temporary seats must be secured together. Temporary bleachers and platforms must be certified as structurally sound.

Tents Tent materials must be properly certified as flame retardant. Some tents have attached labels. When labels are not attached, sponsors, promoters, or other production personnel must have documentation that certifies the tent material is flame retardant. Certification must be based on NFPA 701, Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textiles and Films. Flooring for tents must be non-combustible. Straw, hay, wood chips, mulch, or other similar materials are prohibited from use as flooring in tents. Use of open flames (including those used for cooking or warming food) and heaters must be approved in advance by EH&S. Tent suppliers must be able to certify that tents have been erected in accordance with manufacturer recommendations, industry standards, and code requirements.

Expositions Expositions of products or other displays have a number of special requirements. Contact the State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office for consultation and event planning.

Homecoming Parades One of the highlights of many homecoming weekends is the parade. There are special hazards associated with parades that must be addressed. Strictly prohibit the use of open flames on floats. Vehicles, both for towing and trailers used in construction of floats should be currently registered and in good operating condition. All occupants should be able to easily exit the vehicle in the event of a fire. Often we see floats that have literally been built around a vehicle. Some standards and Fire Prevention Codes require fire extinguishers on all vehicles in parades.

Indoor Events 85 | P a g e


1. The host must assign an on-site person that will call 911, supervise evacuation of the building, and pull the fire alarms in the event of an emergency. 2. The host will make sure not to exceed the maximum allowable occupant load numbers that are posted inside the assembly area. 3. The host will make sure that all exits are maintained clear and unobstructed at all times during the events. 4. Decorations must be according to guidelines.

Outdoor Events 1. The host must provide a site plan to EH&S indicating locations of activities, of tents and canopies, propane heaters, booths, etc. to verify that proper clearances and access are maintained. 2. The host must assign an on-site person to be responsible in the event of an emergency. 3. The host must provide fire extinguishers throughout the site. Consult with EH&S for the number and locations of these fire extinguishers.

Open Burning Open burning is defined as any open / exposed flame whether indoors or outdoors, which could cause a potential fire hazard. Examples are bonfires, campfires, leaf burning, artwork involving flames, pyrotechnics of any kind, etc. Open burning on any FAU property must be approved in writing by EH&S after consultation with the Fire Marshal and the Fire Department.

Open Burning (Indoors) Open burning indoors (particularly when such burning will activate any type fire alarm detection/suppression system) is normally prohibited. Special exceptions may be authorized under the following conditions. 1. A written request is sent to EH&S two weeks in advance prior to the event or operation. 2. The proposed burning will not endanger the occupants of the facility. 3. The burn location will not block any emergency device or access to any EXIT. 4. The host will be responsible for providing a "Fire Watch" of the entire building during the time of the open burning if any safety system must be shut down. 86 | P a g e


5. The host will contact EH&S, Campus Police, and the occupants of the building 24 hours in advance of the event or operation for final coordination. 6. The host will be responsible for providing Fire Guards in the area of the open burn. 7. The host will be responsible for complete extinguishing and removal of all materials. 8. A 5-30 minute watch will be made of the area to ensure there is no residual heat left in the material burned.

Open Burning (outdoors) Open burning outdoors is to be authorized under the following conditions. 1. A written request is sent to EH&S two weeks in advance of the event of operation. 2. The proposed burning will not endanger any adjacent building, vehicles or vegetation. 3. The burn location will not block access for emergency vehicles to any building, street or emergency device. 4. Open flame fires will not be within 50 feet of any flammable storage. The distance may vary according to the size of the event or 25 feet of any building, vehicle or vegetation. 5. The host is responsible for providing a "Fire Guard" as required by EH&S. 6. The host will contact EH&S, Campus Police, and occupants of adjacent buildings 24 hours in advance prior to the event or operation for final coordination. 7. The host will be responsible for complete extinguishing and removal of all materials used in the open burning. 8. A 5-30 minute watch will be made of the area to ensure there is no residual heat left in the material.

Fire Works Fire Works displays will be coordinated through EH&S and authorized under the following conditions: 1. A written request is sent to EH&S two weeks in advance of the event. 2. The individual handling the pyrotechnics must be a licensed handler of the material to be 87 | P a g e


used and shall be responsible for the proper storage, handling, transportation, use and disposal of them, and must obtain a permit from the State Fire Marshal. 3. The individual handling the pyrotechnics must submit a written proposal to the host and EH&S on the type of display, type and amount of materials to be used, current certification by a recognized agency, proof of insurance and method of transportation and storage, two weeks in advance of the event for review. 4. Individuals providing pyrotechnic displays will meet the requirements of any and all applicable state, county, and city laws or safety standards pertaining to licensure and permits, certificates of competency, and display methods. 5. The sponsor of the pyrotechnics event or the contractor is required to furnish a certificate of liability insurance in the amount of $1,000,000, naming the University and the Board of Regents as additional insures. 6. The Display contractor is required to conduct an on-site safety assessment prior to and at the termination or the end of the display. 7. The handling and launching of pyrotechnics is only done by the contractor. The contractor and/or sponsor is to provide adequate personnel to monitor the perimeter of the discharge and landing site before the exhibit begins, and continue the monitoring until the site has been inspected after the display and the "all clear" signal has been given. 8. The use of remote ignition systems that are not under the direct control of an on-site operator is not allowed. All displays should be set up using methods for interrupting firing in the event any unforeseen safety problem arises. 9. The discharge site is to be positioned at a distance meeting current National Fire Protection Association criteria. 10. The maximum number of serial displays shall be 800 shells. Free floating devices or shells less than four inches in diameter are not permitted unless specifically approved by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety. 11. The host of the event will provide a Fire Guard for the length of time the material is being handled.

Bonfires From both a fire safety aspect and environmental laws, bonfires are having a greater number of requirements placed upon them. Only when atmospheric conditions are good should a bonfire be permitted. The size of the fuel pile cannot exceed 5 feet by 5 feet and all material must be seasoned and dry. The fuel to ignite the fire must be paper and limited in quantity. Hydrocarbon fuel as kindling is prohibited. 88 | P a g e


A barrier should be constructed around the bonfire to keep spectators back during the lighting of the fire. On cool evenings, the tendency of the crowd is to move towards the pile of wood prior to lighting in anticipation of the warmth that will be produced. As the fire starts, the radiant heat will cause those closest to the fire to want to move back. People standing behind them may prevent them from moving quickly and may result in injuries. The host of the event will provide a Fire Guard for length of time of the bonfire. A 30-minute watch will be made to make sure there is no residual fire left in the material burned.

Fire Safety Regulations for Indoor Display of Evergreen Trees: Anyone wishing to display an evergreen tree during the holiday season must be aware of the following fire safety regulations. These regulations apply to all University facilities.

Fire Safety Requirements for Egress Routes (Doors & Corridors) & Fire Lanes: Looking at the typical causes of fire deaths, blocked exits are probably the most preventable and most likely to result in criminal negligence charges. Florida Atlantic University has a responsibility to provide a safe environment to anyone working, learning or attending events within a building. It is therefore essential that there is access for quick evacuation during an emergency. The following fire safety requirements must be strictly observed with regard to means of egresses.

Doors Two of the most important functions of doors in terms of life safety are  To act as a barrier for fire and smoke.  To serve as components in a means of egress. In addition, the following fire safety requirements must be followed:  Fire and smoke rated doors shall not be blocked open.  The self-closing devices shall not be disconnected or rendered inoperable.  For special situations that the door must be held open for movement of furniture, equipment or other large size items, the person responsible for the move will provide an individual at the door to ensure the door is not left open, if the building needs to be evacuated.  Door chocks or foot stops may not be installed on any fire rated door. 89 | P a g e


 Doors that must be left open for high traffic areas or for visual security, need to be authorized by Environmental Health & Safety. If authorized, the door will require an automatic magnetic release device installed which will release the door when any emergency alarm device is activated.  Obstructions that will prohibit fire and smoke rated doors from closing and latching without human intervention are not permitted.

Corridors/Hallways/Exits In an emergency, one of the most important requirements is to ensure that all occupants can leave the building safely. To accommodate this, corridors, hallways and exits are designed and constructed to allow people to leave the building by the safest and quickest method possible devoid of any obstructions or protrusions.

Minimum Widths  Minimum widths (which increase according to the number of people) range from, 18 " between desks, to 44" for corridors.  Furniture, artwork, wall hangings, statues etc., which protrude from the walls may not obstruct the minimum width, nor present a tripping, injury or other safety hazard.  Minimum aisle widths must be maintained at all times.

Obstructions and Protrusions  No corridor, aisle way or component of a means of egress may be obstructed.  Non-combustible furniture in lobbies must not obstruct the minimum width of egress and must be arranged so there is a direct path through the lobby to the EXIT.  Wires, cables or extension cords may not be laid across corridors, aisles or pathways.  EXIT doors must remain unlocked during hours in which the building is occupied. Special locking devices must be approved by the State Fire Marshal's office.  Minimum ceiling height in exit passageways is 7'6". Lights, decorations, signs or any other items hung from the ceiling may not be lower than 6'8".  Wires or cables hung from the ceiling must not present a safety hazard such as snagging 90 | P a g e


equipment being transported through the corridor.

Items Not Permitted in Corridors/Hallways  Any combustible Flammable storage cabinets of any size.  Compressed gas bottles of any size.  Carts, cabinets, shelves or other items on which combustibles or flammables are likely to be stored.  Chemicals, munitions, pyrotechnics or any other hazardous material.  Any item that will impede the normal or emergency flow of traffic or will obstruct any emergency device.  Portable heaters, coffee pots, food warmers or other devices that may present a hazard.  Unprotected high voltage, electrical or gas powered equipment of any sort, material and overstuffed furniture boxes, etc.

Atriums and Large Corridors The open spaces at the base of atriums and large corridors must be left clear at all times. If there is a need to use these open spaces temporarily for any kind of function, it must be done in a way that is not obstructing passage. Environmental Health & Safety must be consulted in advance for proper safety precautions.

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IV. Fire Safety and Protection Systems

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On-Campus Student Housing Facilities Protection Systems

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Fire Detection and Alarm Systems The key elements among the fire protective features of any facility are fire detection devices and alarm systems. Properly specified, designed, manufactured, installed, maintained, tested and used, fire alarm systems can help limit property losses in buildings regardless of the type of occupancy. And, since many of the fire deaths in the United States result from buildings fires, the use of detection and alarm systems in buildings can also help to significantly reduce the loss of life from fire. The University‟s goal is to provide a level of life safety and property protection that will meet the needs of the people occupying the building and the safety requirements of the local building code and local authority having jurisdiction. An approach that relies on the fact that the protection provided by the sum of the individual components of the fire protection system will always be much greater than if one was to rely on each individual component alone. Thus, effective protection is a combination of interlocking, interrelated fire protection systems designed to function in concert with each other, providing the desired level of protection. This is the goal that FAU is attempting to attain through the process of improving the fire detection, alarm and fire suppression systems of its buildings and facilities.

Fire Detection, and Suppression Systems They include the following:  Fire Alarm Systems  Sprinkler/Standpipe Systems  Fire Pumps  Fire Suppression Systems  Standby Generators  Hydrants

Fire Alarm Systems The early detection of a fire and the signaling of an appropriate alarm remain the most significant factors in preventing large losses from occurring. History has proven that delay in fire detection and alarm transmission will result in increased injuries, deaths and property losses. Modern fire detection and signaling systems are a reliable method for reducing the risk of a large-loss 96 | P a g e


incident. In order to ensure operational readiness and proper performance, inspection of fire detection and signaling equipment should be conducted on a routine basis. The inspection should be conducted both by the State Fire Marshal‟s Office and Environmental Health and Safety. The Department of Physical Plant is responsible for maintaining the systems in accordance with NFPA72 and documenting the results. NFPA72, the National Fire Alarm Code, deals with the application, installation, performance and maintenance of fire alarm systems and their components. The basic components of the fire alarm system are:     

Control Panel Alarm initiating Devices Signaling Devices Power Sources Auxiliary Devices

The Control Panel is the central nervous system of the fire alarm system and serves many purposes. A building fire alarm system provides audible and/or visible alarm signals on the result of the manual operation of a fire alarm station, the automatic annunciation of a fire detector, such as smoke or heat detector, or the automatic operation of protective equipment such as a sprinkler system. Audible and/or visible alarm signal devices are commonly known as notification appliances. Manual Stations, water flow switches, pressure switches and fire detectors are commonly known as alarm initiating appliances and are connected to the control panel by electrical wiring. Usually the system consists of fire alarm manual stations, located at stairs or exits, with notification appliances, such as horns and strobes, in corridors and large rooms so that all occupants can hear the alarm signal when the system is activated. Smoke detectors are devices provided on fire alarm initiating circuits to automatically detect fire by sensing smoke particles.

Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Fire Alarm Systems Inspection An inspection is a visual examination of the fire detection and alarm systems to verify that it appears to be in good operating condition and free of physical damage. The visual inspection is generally done from floor level by walking through the protected premises.

Testing It is a hands-on process, which usually includes PASS/FAIL criteria. The purpose of a test is to ensure the system will function properly and also to compare results from previous tests. 97 | P a g e


Maintenance

Maintenance is the repairs that take place as a result of an inspection, indicating a problem of failure of a test. It is also necessary to keep the alarm equipment operable. Repair of the equipment must be made immediately to ensure that the system will operate properly when needed. Only properly trained, certified and licensed individuals can perform the maintenance. and is carried in accordance with the National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 72) and manufacturerâ€&#x;s manual. The NFPA codes require that all inspection, testing and maintenance done by authorized personnel must be documented by means of a properly placed logbook that should be readily available for fire inspectors to see. All sounding devices such as bells, gongs and buzzers must be free from paint and dirt, which may interfere with the operation of the devices. Control panels, annunciator boxes, and other devices should not have anything stored in them and shall not be obstructed by storage. Wherever batteries are used as an emergency power source, they should be checked for clean contacts, and must be kept free from dust and other materials. Detectors are a vital part of the alarm system. The reliability of the detector is the main factor in the reliability of the alarm system. For this reason detectors require testing when they are first installed, at specific intervals and after fires as per NFPA 72.

The Alarms Most fire alarms are not activated by fire, but by some other cause. Such causes can be considered as: Accidental (somebody bumping into a fire alarm device, a worker spray painting, or welding to close to a detector) a) Unintentional (dust or insects in the detector, a smoke detector too close to a kitchen area, or water that leaks into a detector) b) Mechanical (a malfunctioning system- usually from the installation of the system, a faulty wire, or lack of proper maintenance as per NFPA 72.) c) Malicious (intentionally setting off the alarm, vandalism) When an alarm is activated on Campus, the signal is received by the Police Department. Within 90 seconds, the Police Department will call the Boca Raton Fire Department, which will respond

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immediately. The fire fighter at the scene of the activated alarm system, after investigation, shall determine whether the response was required or if it was just a false alarm.

False Alarms and Alarm Responses A false alarm is a situation that does not require the response of a law enforcement agency or the fire department. The majority of false alarms are system malfunctions caused from improper installation or maintenance. False alarms create apathy towards real fire alarms, causing occupants not to take an alarm seriously. Many fire alarm systems on campus are connected to a central receiving dialer monitored 24 hours a day by the FAU Police department. When a fire alarm goes off in a campus building, the dispatcher will be automatically signaled by the dialer. Within 90 seconds, the dispatcher will make a call to the Boca Raton Fire Department and they will respond within 5-10 minutes. It is a violation for an alarm system to generate a false alarm. For each false alarm a code enforcement inspector may issue a citation to the alarm user as authorized by Section 162.21, Florida Statutes. Florida Atlantic University is responsible for the installation, maintenance, operation, repair or effectiveness of the alarm systems on campus. Additionally it shall be solely the responsibility of FAU to reset and maintain an activated alarm. However any alarm activation that necessitates a response by the Fire Department shall not be silenced and/or otherwise deactivated or rest until the Fire Department responds and the officer on the scene officially declares the emergency terminated or gives an all clear order to do so. The number of fire alarms on campus could be greatly reduced if we just pay more attention to our surroundings and what we are doing. Fire alarms disrupt campus life, classes, labs, special activities, office activity, sleep, etc. It is the goal of EH&S and Physical Plant to reduce the number of false fire alarm on campus through education, maintenance of alarm systems.

Inspections, Testing and Maintenance-Fire Alarm System

Weekly ďƒ˜ Check electrolyte level and connection for lead acid batteries. Monthly Fire Alarm Systems-General: ďƒ˜ Check all fire alarm equipment to make sure it is not damaged or inoperative. ďƒ˜ Check power supply for normal indication. 99 | P a g e


 Illuminate lamps and light emitting diodes (LEDs) on fire alarm and annunciator panels.  Conduct operational test of engine generator, if connected to generator.  Check water level of rechargeable batteries if wet cell batteries are used. Voice Alarm Systems:  Check speakers for damage.  Check pre-amplifier and its controls for normal indication.  Check amplifier and its controls for normal indication.  Check voice tape (if the system requires one) for normal indication. Manual Stations:  Check all manual stations for damage or obstruction. Detectors:  Check all detectors for damage or obstruction. Obstruction means that the detector is located in a dead air pocket; is to close to an air handling unit discharge outlet, covers too large a space, or is blocked by storage. TESTING CAUTION: Before beginning tests, all parties which may receive an alarm signal should be notified so that there will not be an unnecessary response. At the conclusion if testing, all parties should again be notified. All equipment should be returned to normal condition and control panels locked. Tests are required at various frequencies. Use the Test Forms at the end of this chapter to record all test results. Maintenance should be performed promptly on equipment that fails to perform as desired when tested. MONTHLY  Test the primary power supply for initiating and notification appliance circuits. The primary power supply is usually a 120-V AC circuit controlled either by a fused safety switch or by a circuit breaker. Disconnect the primary power and make sure the fire alarm system switches normally to use the secondary source of power.  Test the two-way communications system either by removing the telephone receiver from its cradle or by inserting a plug-in, two-way communications device in its jack. This should sound a signal in the central control center and allow two-way communications. Record the specific device tested on the two-way communications circuit so that different devices are used in subsequent tests. Quarterly  Test the supervisory device circuit by disconnecting a conductor from its terminal in the control panel. Once a trouble signal is received, reconnect the wire to its terminal and reset the control panel. Repeat the test for all supervised circuits.

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Fire Alarm Control Panels

Monthly  Activate one device on each initiating device circuit.  Activate notification appliance circuits and confirm proper operation of all audible and visual alarms.  Test Sprinkler water flow circuits by activating a flow switch on each circuit. ________________________________________________________________________

Semi-Annually Fire Alarm Systems-General:  Test each manual station.  Activate extinguishing system alarm switches.  Activate supervisory signal initiating devices (e.g., gate valve switches, high air pressure switches, low air pressure switches, temperature sensors, water level.).  Test 10% of rate-of-rise heat detectors. (Test a different 10% every 6 months so that all detectors are tested in 5 years.)  Test 10% of rate compensation heat detectors. (Test a different 10% every 6 months so that all detectors are tested in 5 years.)  Test each smoke detector. _______________________________________________________________________

Annually Fire Alarm Systems-General:  Test supervisory device circuits.  Verify primary power supply. (Disconnect all secondary (standby) power and test under maximum load, including all alarm appliances operating for 5 minutes. Be sure to reconnect all power supplies at end of tests.)  Disconnect primary power supply to test secondary power supply. (Disconnect primary power. Verify that the control panel operates properly from secondary power. Verify that trouble indicator comes on upon primary power loss. Measure standby current using manufacturer‟s data. Test system under maximum load, including all alarm appliances operating for 5 minutes. Be sure to reconnect all power supplies at end of tests.)  Activate alarm notification appliances.  Test voice alarm system functions.  Test operation of speakers.  Verify that annunicators accurately report all alarm and trouble signals.  Test all control unit functions.  Test each alarm initiating and signaling circuit for trouble signals.  Calibrate and test of smoke detectors. All smoke detectors, regardless of type, are tested in the same manner. This operating test consists either of spraying a smoke detector test aerosol into the detector chamber. Each detector has a self-contained light, which illuminates, flashes or loses illumination when the detector operates.  Test operation of two-way communications.  Confirm operation of all audible and visible alarm notification appliances. 101 | P a g e


 Remove fuses and verify ratings and supervision. MAINTENANCE Maintenance is the work necessary to keep fire alarm equipment operable and to make repairs. Repair of fire detection and alarm equipment must be made immediately to assure that the system will operate properly when needed.

Smoke Detectors All smoke detectors must be recalibrated annually. This requires that the specific detector manufacturer's sensitivity instrument be used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Record the operating sensitivity and serial number for each detector. If sensitivities are stable from those recorded the previous year , conduct the recalibration test every second year thereafter instead of annually. Recent innovations by some manufacturers allow them to calibrate smoke detectors from their control panel, but even detectors calibrated this way must have operating tests performed annually. Smoke detectors require periodic cleaning to remove accumulated dust or dirt. The frequency of cleaning depends upon the atmosphere in which the detector operates. When the detector is removed annually for calibration, it should be visually inspected for dust and dirt accumulation. If needed, clean the detector in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Quarterly  Measure open circuit voltage.  Clean and inspect battery connection. Semi-Annually  Measure open circuit voltage.  Measure specific gravity.  Clean and inspect battery connections. Annually  Measure open -circuit voltage.  Measure battery voltage under full load with battery charger disconnected.  Check operation of battery charger.  Nickel-cadmium batteries-discharge for 2 hours. (Let battery carry load for 2 hours)

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FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FIRE DETECTION AND ALARM SYSTEMS Monthly Tests and Maintenance YES = SATISFACTORY SYSTEM____________ NO = UNSATISFACTORY (EXPLAIN ON REVERSE) DATE____________ N/A = NOT APPLICABLE INSPECTOR_______________

FORM 10

YES The recorded message was tested and is operational. All engine-driven generators for fire alarm systems are tested weekly and a log of the tests is kept. Radio fire alarm signal receiving equipment was tested hourly and a log of the tests is kept. All radio, fire alarm boxes transmit a test alarm daily and a log of the tests is kept. Telegraphic fire alarm signal receiving equipment was tested daily and a log of the tests is kept. All telegraphic fire alarm boxes are tested bi-monthly and are operational. One initiating device on each circuit was tested and all circuits are operational:

Each indicating appliance circuit was tested and all circuits are operational:

Each speaker circuit was tested and all circuits are operational:

One device on each two-way communication circuit was tested and each circuit is operational. Test each supervisory device circuit by removing a wire from its terminal.

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NO

N/A


FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FIRE DETECTION AND ALARM SYSTEMS Monthly Inspection YES = SATISFACTORY SYSTEM____________ NO = UNSATISFACTORY (EXPLAIN ON REVERSE) DATE____________ N/A = NOT APPLICABLE INSPECTOR_______________

FORM 1-A

YES Fire alarm panel appears operational. Lights and LEDs on fire alarm and annunciator panels are operational. Battery electrolyte level is satisfactory. All heat detectors appear operational. All smoke detectors appear operational. All flame detectors appear operational. All manual stations appear operational. All bells or horns appear operational. All speakers appear operational. Pre-amplifier appears operational. Amplifier appears operational. Voice tape appears operational. Power supplies appear operational. All radio fire alarm transmitting equipment appears operational. All radio fire alarm receiving equipment appears operational. All telegraphic fire alarm transmitting equipment appears operational. All telegraphic fire alarm receiving equipment appears operational.

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NO

N/A


FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY FIRE DETECTION AND ALARM SYSTEMS Annual Tests and Maintenance YES = SATISFACTORY SYSTEM____________ NO = UNSATISFACTORY (EXPLAIN ON REVERSE) YEAR ____________ N/A = NOT APPLICABLE

DATE

INSPECTOR

FORM 1-B

YE S

N O

Alarm indicating appliances (visual and audible) were tested and are operational. The primary power supply was tested and is operational. The secondary power supply was tested and is operational. The lamp and LED circuits were tested and are satisfactory. Smoke detectors were recalibrated and operate satisfactory. Batteries were discharged for two hours and remain operational. Battery charging devices were tested for proper operation. Battery voltage was measured under full load with charger disconnected. Batteries had the float voltage measured in each cell and are satisfactory. Bell or horns were tested and are operational. Annunciators were tested and are operational. Control units were tested and all functions are operational. Voice alarm system components were tested and are operational. Each initiating and signaling circuit was tested for trouble signals. Two fixed temperature heat detectors for every 100 present were removed and satisfactory tested by a testing laboratory. The two fixed temperature detectors were replaced with new fixed temperature heat detectors. DATE THE SYSTEM WAS INSTALLED: DATE THE FIXED TEMPERATURE HEAT DETECTORS WERE TESTED: NOTE: If the tested fixed temperature heat detectors fail, all fixed temperature heat detectors in the building must be replaced.

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N/ A


Automatic Sprinkler and other Water-Based Fire Protection Systems In 1992, NFPA adopted the new standard, NFPA 25, Standard For the Inspection, Testing and Maintenance of Water-Based Fire Protection Systems, which discusses Water Supply Systems, Sprinkler Systems, Standpipes, Fire Pumps, Water Storage Tanks, Water Spray Systems and Foam Water Sprinkler Systems. Because water is efficient and almost universally available and acceptable, the use of water-based fire protection systems is continually increasing. Sprinkler systems are becoming more practical and newer. Additionally, more effective systems are being designed depending on the hazards of a particular building. These sprinkler systems are designed and installed in accordance with the requirements of NFPA 13.

Sprinkler System Water Supplies When a sprinkler system fails to control a fire, generally there are two primary reasons for the failure: The water supply was insufficient for the particular hazard or a valve on the supply side was closed. Therefore one of our main tasks is to inspect and verify that there is enough water available to the sprinkler system. Each valve needs to be operated in order to verify that it performs well. The Fire Department Connection is considered an auxiliary water supply source. Outlet caps must be removed to examine the threads, and interior for any debris. The conditions of fire hydrants and post indicator valves must be checked to make sure they operate.

The Sprinkler Systems Regardless of the type of system, all automatic fire sprinklers must remain clean at all times. They must not be caked with dust, grease, or paint, particularly on the heat –responsive element. They must be provided with guards if located in areas prone to damage. Sprinklers should not be obstructed by light fixtures, HVAC equipment, cables, stored materials or the movement of overhead doors or windows. NFPA 25 requires this type of evaluation to be performed once a year. Sprinklers must be free from corrosion. Make sure that a sufficient supply of spare sprinklers of each type and ratings used by the system is stored on the premises in a cabinet with special wrenches needed to replace the sprinklers. Piping must be checked once a year when the sprinklers are being inspected to make sure it is in good condition, free from mechanical damage, and not being used to support fixtures, ladders or 106 | P a g e


any other loads. NFPA 25 requires that pressure gauge of wet-pipe systems be read monthly. The reading must be recorded.

Testing a Sprinkler System

Sprinkler System must be maintained in accordance with NFPA 25. The water supply pressure indicated by the gauge above the indicator valve should be observed. If the system does not rely on a pump, than the readings should be at least 30psi for a one story building and 5psi for each additional story. A main drain test should be conducted quarterly using the procedure established in NFPA 25.

Summary of Minimum Inspection, Testing and Maintenance Item Gauges (dry, pre-action deluge systems) Control Valves Alarm Devices Gauges (wet pipe systems) Hydraulic Nameplate Buildings Hanger/Science Bracing Piping Sprinklers Fire Department Connections Valves (all types) Alarm Devices Main Drain Antifreeze Solution Gauges Sprinklers-High Temp. Sprinklers-Fast Response

Activity Inspection

Frequency Weekly/Monthly

Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Inspection Test Test Test Test Test Test

Weekly/Monthly Monthly Monthly Quarterly Annually (prior to freezing weather) Annually Annually Annually

Sprinkler

Test

Valves (all types) Obstruction Investigation

Maintenance Maintenance

Quarterly Quarterly Annually 5 years 5 years 20 years and every 10 years thereafter 50 years and every 10 years thereafter Annually or as needed 5 years or as needed

Source: Table 2-1, NFPA 25, Standard for the Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance of WaterBased Fire Protection Systems, NFPA, Quincy, MA, 1992.

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Standpipe Systems Standpipe systems provide a means of manually applying water to fires in buildings. However they do not take the place of automatic fire protection systems. They are usually needed where automatic protection is not provided.

Inspection and Tests Periodic inspection of all portions of standpipe systems is essential. We need to ensure that the valves in the automatic sources of water are open and also test the supervisory means of such valves. Examine the threads at the fire department connection and make sure the waterway is not clogged with any foreign material.

Inspecting Fire Department Connections Fire Department connections must be inspected monthly to verify that they are visible and accessible, that the couplings and the swivels have not been damaged and rotate smoothly, and that plugs and caps are in place and undamaged.

Fire Hydrants Wet hydrants must be inspected at least annually. In addition to ensuring that hydrants are accessible, we need to confirm that the outlets are tight and the nozzle threads and hydrantâ€&#x;s nuts are not worn. The following checklist can be used when inspecting hydrants. Check that the hydrant is set up with outlets approximately 18â€? above the ground, unobstructed and easily accessible Open and close the hydrant to verify that it is working properly Check that the hydrant drains properly Check for leaks

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Fire Pumps Fire pumps are required where an existing water supply does not have adequate pressure to supply the required pressure or volume or both for the proper operation of the installed waterbased fire protection system. A fire pump consists of a fire pump, driver, controller, piping and power supply. A fire pump assembly is inspected weekly to verify that it is in proper condition. This is done in conjunction with a weekly run for no less than 30 minutes. The tests are conducted with an automatic start but without flowing water. They have to be checked for signs of leakage, overheating, and irregular performance. All alarms and relief valves must operate satisfactorily. Fire pumps are also tested annually and the purpose of the annual test is to compare the performance of the pump assembly against the performance recorded in earlier tests.

Summary of Fire Pump Inspection, Testing, and Maintenance Item Pump house, heating ventilating louvers Fire pump system Pump operation, no-flow condition flow condition Hydraulic Mechanical transmission Electrical system Controller, various components Motor Diesel engine system, various components

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Activity

Frequency

Reference to NFPA 25 (1995 edition)

Inspection Inspection Inspection

Weekly Weekly Weekly

Table 5-2.2 Table 5-2.2 Table 5-2.2

Test Test Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance Maintenance

Weekly Annually Annually Annually Varies Varies Annually Varies

5-3.2.1, 5-3.2.2 5-3.3.1 5-5.1 5-5.1 5-5.1 5-5.1 5-5.1 5-5.1


INSPECTION AND TESTING OF FIRE PROTECTION AND LIFE-SAFETY EQUIPMENT

FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEMS Specially designed equipment which is either alone or as a system, Provided to assist in the extinguishment of fire, and to limit the spread of fire and smoke, either by automatic, semiautomatic or manual means. This includes, but is not limited to: portable fire extinguishers; fire hoses; fire pumps; wet and dry standpipe systems; automatic sprinkler systems; Halon systems and other special extinguishing systems; fire doors and dampers; and other fire protection systems and appurtenances. Fire protection and life-safety equipment and systems shall be inspected, tested and maintained in all occupancies and locations where required or installed as set forth in NFPA Codes, Federal, State, local standards, and as may be required by the Fire Marshal. The provisions of this Standard apply to the inspection, maintenance, and testing of both fire protection and life-safety systems and equipment. The requirements presented in this Standard are to be considered as a MINIMUM.

SERVICING, TESTING, AND MAINTENANCE Qualified, certified and/or licensed personnel shall conduct all servicing, testing, repair, maintenance and tagging of fire protection and life-safety equipment. Personnel not licensed, certified, or approved by City of Boca Raton or State of Florida, may be required to provide documentation of licensing or certification by similar approved agencies or authorities, or identification as manufacturerâ€&#x;s representative or authorized service personnel.

SERVICE TAGS After installation or service, an approval service tag shall be completed in detail indicating all work that has been done and then attached to the equipment or system in such a position as to permit convenient inspection and not hamper its actuation or operation. A new service tag must be attached each time service is performed. If impairments to the system constitute emergency impairments as defined in applicable NFPA Standards, then a completed tag shall be attached indicating the nature of the impairment or what corrective action is necessary. The State Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office and/or the Boca Raton Fire Department shall be notified, as soon as possible, whenever fire protection or life-safety equipment is TAGGED.

NEW INSTALLATION

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All new installations of fire protection equipment and fire alarms systems shall have installation acceptance tags affixed to them.

UPGRADE OF EQUIPMENT All fire protection and life-safety equipment shall be maintained in accordance with requirements of the manufacturer, and local, state, federal or nationally recognized standards in effect at the time of original installation and acceptance, unless otherwise required by the State Fire Marshall or other regulatory agencies.

INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE RECORDS All logs or records of inspection, testing, maintenance and major repairs of fire protection and life-safety equipment and systems shall be maintained on file for not less than 3 years, and made available to the State Fire Marshal or fire inspector upon request.

NOTIFICATION OF SYSTEMS OUT OF SERVICE The Fire Department shall be immediately notified whenever a required fire protection or lifesafety system is placed out of service for emergency or non-scheduled repairs, replacement, or service. The Fire Department shall again be notified when the system is restored to normal operational status. The Fire Marshalâ€&#x;s office shall be notified, in writing, not less than 7 days prior to any lengthy routine or scheduled repairs, or replacement time period. Notification shall be prior to, where possible, placing the system out of service. Certification and documentation of repairs and operational readiness of the system shall be provided to the State Fire Marshal or fir inspector upon request. No fire protection or life-safety system shall be placed permanently out of service unless prior to written approval is obtained from the State Fire Marshal.

LIFE-SAFETY SYSTEMS FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS Fire alarm systems shall be tested, and service tagged at the main alarm panel, not less than annually. Testing shall include all smoke detectors, manual pull devices, annunicators, visual indicators and strobes, control units, voice/alarm communications systems and other devices that may be part of the fire alarm system. 111 | P a g e


TEST OF SYSTEMS An approved fire alarm service company shall test the fire alarm system. All testing and maintenance shall be in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 72 and this Standard. Test operation of all auxiliary functions of alarm system including, but not limited to: electronic locking devices, automatic fire and smoke door and damper function, elevator recall, stair pressurization operation and HVAC shutdown.

EMERGENCY LIGHTING SYSTEMS Provide for the testing of emergency lighting systems that are part of an approved exit system and shall include, but is not limited to: lighted exit signs, stairway lighting, and egress lighting, where required both inside and outside of a building or structure.

GENERATOR SYSTEMS A „run check‟ of the generator unit shall be performed at least monthly, for a period of at least 30 minutes, under load conditions. System shall be checked for proper fuel, oil and coolant levels prior to starting test. Authorized building or contract personnel may perform „Run Tests‟ and maintenance. All testing should be done in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 110. A written record of monthly test shall be maintained.

BATTERY SYSTEMS Battery units shall be inspected quarterly. Authorized building or contract personnel may perform inspections, using procedures in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 110. A written record of inspections hall be maintained.

EMERGENCY POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS (EPSS) These systems provide emergency power for continuous operation of, but are not limited to: exit lighting systems, fire alarm system, fire pump, stair pressurization and smoke removal systems, elevators, and associated electrical transfer switch gear. ENGINE DRIVEN GENERATOR SYSTEMS

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An authorized generator company shall conduct an annual „Load Test‟. Load test shall be performed under temperature conditions and at a capacity not less than 50 percent of the total connected emergency power supply load manufacturer‟s nameplate rating for the unit, for a continuous period of not less than 90 minutes. Load test shall include building load with all required equipment on the emergency circuit(s) operational for the duration of the test. Elevator recall and firefighter control operations shall be checked, but need not be continuous for the test period.

TEST OF AUTOMATIC FANS AND DAMPERS Operational test of all automatic fans and dampers connected to building fire alarm system shall be tested annually, in conjunction with fire alarm systems tests. Results shall be included with the fire alarm system inspection test reports.

WATER BASED FIRE PROTECTION

AUTOMATIC WET-PIPE SPRINKLER SYSTEMS ROUTINE INSPECTION Approved contract personnel or building personnel, fully trained to perform such inspections or checks may perform routine visual inspections and equipment checks in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 25. A written record of weekly and monthly inspections of system components shall be maintained.

TEST OF SYSTEMS All automatic dry-pipe sprinkler systems shall be tested annually in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 25 and state requirements, and service tagged by an approved fire protection sprinkler company.

WET STANDPIPE SYSTEM Standpipe systems should contain water in the piping at all times. A flow test shall be conducted for each zone of the standpipe system every 5 years. An approved service company shall conduct flow tests with required volume of water at the system‟s design pressure and provide required service tagging of the system at the main control valves and risers. Testing shall be conducted in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 25.

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DRY STANDPIPE SYSTEM Standpipe systems do not normally contain water in the piping and have to be supplied with water from an outside source. An approved service company performing such testing shall conduct hydrostatic test on the standpipe system every 5 years. Regardless of the type of system, all automatic fire sprinklers must remain clean at all times. They must not be caked with dust, grease, or paint, particularly on the heat-responsive element. They must be provided with guards if located in the areas prone to damage. Light fixtures, HVAC equipment, cables, stored materials, or movement of overhead doors and windows should not obstruct sprinklers. NFPA 25 requires this type of evaluation to be performed once a year. Sprinklers must be free from corrosion. A sufficient supply of spare sprinkler heads of each type and ratings used by the system and the special wrench needed to replace them, must be available on the premises. Piping must be checked once a year when the sprinklers are being inspected to make sure it is in good condition, free from mechanical damage, and not being used to support fixtures, ladders, or any other loads. NFPA 25 requires that the pressure gauge of a wet pipe system be read monthly. The reading must be recorded.

Fire Department Connections INSPECTION Fire department connections (FDCs) shall be inspected quarterly by building personnel. Inspections should check for: missing protective caps or covers, damaged hose couplings, couplings not operating freely, the presence of foreign material that might interfere with operation of system, water in the piping that could indicate possible check valve leaks, and missing standpipe or sprinkler connection identification signs. TEST OF SYSTEM An approved service company shall conduct flow and pressure tests of all fire department connections, piping and check valve assemblies, not less than every 5 years. Testing should be conducted as a part of the standpipe system 5-year test when possible, and in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 25.

Fire Pumps

DIESEL DRIVEN PUMPS

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Operating test of diesel engine driven fire pumps shall be conducted weekly without water flowing. This test shall be conducted by allowing automatic starting of the pump to occur, and the pump shall be run a minimum of 30 minutes. Run test may be performed by authorized building or contract personnel and shall be in accordance with the manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 25. A written record of all weekly tests shall be maintained. ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN PUMPS Operating test of electrical motor driven fire pumps shall be conducted weekly without water flowing. This test shall be conducted by allowing automatic starting of the pump to occur, and the pump shall be run a minimum of 10 minutes. May be performed by authorized building or contract personnel and shall be in accordance with the manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 25. A written record of all weekly tests shall be maintained. PUMP TESTS A flow test at pressure shall be conducted on fire pump(s) annually. Flow tests shall be performed by an approved service company, and shall be conducted and service tags provided in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 25. PRIVATE FIRE SERVICE MAINS Private dry barrel and wet barrel fire hydrants, and wall hydrants, installed for fire department use shall be inspected and flow tested by an approved service company annually. Testing shall be conducted in accordance with NFPA Standard No. 25, and a written report of the test findings shall be provided. FIRE DOORS AND DAMPERS

FIRE DOOR INSPECTION Fire doors, shutters and windows shall be inspected at least quarterly. Inspections should include the following: Guides and bearing should be well lubricated. Doors normally held open by automatic closing devised should be operated to assure their proper operation. Closing devices and coordinators should be adjusted to assure that the doors close and latch properly. Chains and cables should be regularly inspected for excessive wear and stretching. Ropes or other non-approved chain or cable replacements shall not be installed or used on fire doors. Check fusible links for paint or other non-approved coating materials. Replace any painted or coated links. 115 | P a g e


Check door rollers for paint, dirt or grime buildup. Remove paint or buildu0p as necessary to assure that rollers will not bind. Check doors for holes or other damage that would violate their fire rating. Inspections may be performed by authorized building or contract personnel and shall be in accordance with the manufacturer‟s guidelines and NFPA Standard No. 80. A written record of all inspections shall be maintained.

FIRE DOOR TESTING At least annually all sliding and rolling fire doors, shutters and windows shall be allowed to close completely to check operations of the guides and rollers, and to make sure the doors have adequate clearance to close completely. Chains and cables should be adjusted as needed. An approved service company shall perform any required repairs of fire doors or assemblies. A written record of all inspections and repairs shall be maintained.

FIRE DAMPER INSPECTIONS All accessible fire damper assemblies in mechanical, electrical or air handler rooms and spaces, in firewalls or rated occupancy separation walls, or in floors, shall be visually inspected at least quarterly to verify that their operations are not obstructed or impaired. Authorized building or contract personnel may perform visual inspections. A written record of inspections shall be maintained.

SPECIAL FIRE SUPPRESSION

COMMERCIAL KITCHEN HOOD SYSTEMS All vent hood fire suppression systems installed in commercial kitchens shall be inspected and service tagged not less than every 6 months, and after any activation of the system, by an approved fire protection equipment company. Inspections shall be in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines. Additionally, all commercial kitchen vent hoods, exhaust ducts, exhaust fans and appurtenances shall be cleaned and inspected by approved personnel and in accordance with manufacturer‟s guideline, as often as necessary to insure against excess grease accumulations. „Type K‟ extinguishing systems and portable fire extinguishers

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„Type K‟ extinguishing systems and portable fire extinguishers, installed for use in the protection of cooking areas within commercial kitchens, shall be inspected, tested, service tagged and maintained in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines and new NFPA 10.

FIXED DRY CHEMICAL EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS Fixed dry chemical extinguishing systems where installed for protection of, but not limited to, the following: dip tanks or process hazards as spray booths, chemical hood systems or laboratory hood systems; shall have an actuating test of the system performed (discharge of the agent is not required) and service tags affixed every 6 months by an approved fire protection equipment company.

FIXED WET CHEMICAL EXTINGUISHING SYSTEMS Fixed wet chemical extinguishing systems where installed for protection of, but not limited to, the following: dip tanks or process hazards as spray booths, chemical hood systems or laboratory hood systems; shall have an actuating test of the system performed (discharge of the agent is not required) and service tags affixed every 6 months by an approved fire protection equipment company. Inspections shall be in accordance with manufacturer‟s guidelines.

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BOCA CAMPUS STUDENT HOUSING GENERATOR SYSTEM

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2009 FIRE SAFETY SURVEY REPORT

Information provided should be for the latest 12 month period for which data is available 1. What percentages of your student housing sleeping rooms are protected by an automatic fire sprinkler system with a fire sprinkler head located in the individual sleeping rooms?

%

NOTE: A student housing sleeping room is defined as the actual room in which the occupants live and sleep. Student housing can include typical residence halls, graduate student housing, married student housing or any housing that is under the control or affiliated with the school, such as private, third-party residence halls built under contract with the school. This does not include Greek housing. 2. What percentages of your student housing sleeping rooms are equipped with a smoke detector that is connected to a supervised fire alarm system? NOTE: When the smoke alarm/detector is activated it must transmit a signal to a supervised location, initiating an immediate response by a staff member to investigate. This alarm does not necessarily activate the building fire alarm system. 3. How many malicious fire alarms occur in student housing each year? NOTE: A malicious fire alarm would be defined as one where a buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm system is activated even though it is known that there is no emergency condition. For example, someone blows smoke into a smoke detector or a manual pull station is activated. 4. How many unwanted fire alarms occur in student housing per year?

%

%

%

NOTE: An unwanted fire alarm would be defined as one where a buildingâ€&#x;s fire alarm system is activated by non-emergency conditions, yet the fire alarm system responds appropriately to stimuli that it interprets as a fire condition. For example, a smoke alarm that is located too close to a shower and is activated by steam, or is adjacent to a cooking area. 5. What percentage of student housing building fire alarm systems, if % activated, result in a signal being transmitted to a monitored location, and security investigates before notifying the fire department? Alarm reports directly to FAU Police who immediately contact fire department for every 120 | P a g e


residence hall fire alarm.

6. What percentage of student housing building fire alarm systems, if activated, result in a signal being transmitted immediately to the fire department so they can begin responding?

7. How many students are trained in fire safety in campus provided housing each semester?

% Alarm reports directly to FAU Police who immediately contact fire department for every residence hall fire alarm. All Training is conducted by RAs & Coordinators.

8. What percentage of RAs and housing directors receive fire safety training? NOTE: For purposes of this question, housing staff include only personnel such as resident assistants and/or resident directors who live in student housing. 9. How many contact hours of fire safety training is provided to students not living in student housing (i.e., off-campus, including Greek)? NOTE: This will not include fire safety training provided to specialties such as laboratory assistants. This must be actual training with contact time and not include simply handing out brochures, fire safety articles in the student newspaper, etc. An example of contact hours would include fire extinguisher training that is provided to 30 students in one hour which would equal 30 contact hours. 10. How many regularly scheduled supervised exit drills are held per year in student housing?

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%

# hours

1/semester


11. How many fires did your school experience last year in student housing?

#

NOTE: A fire must result in damage to the structure or contents.

12. What is the dollar loss related to fire that has occurred on your campus in residential housing?

$

NOTE: Dollar loss is direct property damage to the structure and contents and does not include costs such as alternative housing, staff response, etc. 13. How many students have been injured by fires in student housing?

#

14. How many students have been killed by fires in student housing?

#

15. Does your school ban any of the following items or activities in student housing sleeping rooms? NOTE: The “cooking� option excludes cooking done with schoolapproved/supplied appliances or in school-approved areas, such as kitchens.

Candles Halogen Lamps Smoking Cooking Live Christmas Trees Ceiling Tapestries

16. Does your school require fire-resistance ratings on furniture (including, but not limited to, beds, mattresses, desks, and chairs) in student housing sleeping rooms?

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Other (please specify) Yes No


17. Does your school require that furnishings brought in by the students have fire-resistance ratings?

Yes No

18. How often are fire safety rules-compliance inspections conducted in your schoolâ€&#x;s student housing? NOTE: This refers to regularly scheduled, in-room inspections conducted by an inspector or training individual who is knowledgeable about fire safety issues. It does not refer to a security officer making regular rounds. ALL of the rooms must be inspected during these inspections and checked for hazards.

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# times per year


V. Fire Drill Program

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FIRE Drill Program FIRE DRILL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ON-CAMPUS STUDENT HOUSING FACILITIES

TITLE:

FAU FIRE DRILL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE:

The main purpose of fire drill is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of fire or other emergency. Drills are an intricate part of our emergency preparedness planning. Fire drills insure orderly egress without undue panic, should a building evacuation become necessary. Fire drills will be used as an avenue to systematically identify various fire safety issues such as, Allows occupants to familiarize themselves with drill procedures, location of fire exits, and the sound of the fire alarm. Enable us to identify problems with the fire alarm components. Allow us to gauge whether additional equipment in certain areas of the building. Allow us to monitor whether or not people evacuate the building as legally as required. Drills will help us to time and note how long it takes to evacuate each building and which exits are generally used.

RESPONSIBILITY:

ACTION GENERAL PROCEDURES

To insure that Florida Atlantic University complies with fire drills as mandated by the State of Florida laws and regulations fire drills shall be conducted as follows. The drill coordinator (Fire Safety Officer) shall pick a date and time when most occupants will be in the building to schedule the drills. The coordinator shall inform campus police, maintenance, and the building supervisor the exact time the alarm will be pulled for the drill. The coordinator shall activate the fire alarm. All building occupants shall evacuate the building when the fire alarm sounds.

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It is a violation of the state law for failure not to leave the building and to prevent another person from leaving when the alarm is off. Elevators shall not be used during evacuation. An outside location shall be designated for occupants to assemble following the evacuation. Prior arrangements shall be made to assist handicapped occupants. Primary and secondary (backup) personnel shall be designated for this purpose. When the coordinator is certain that all occupants have evacuated, the fire alarm will be silenced and reset and the occupants may be permitted to re-enter the building. Fire drills shall be monitored for effectiveness and shall be documented on file for Fire Marshal Inspections. Fire drills shall be conducted in the following category: A.D. Henderson University School and the Karen R. Slattery Educational Research Center for Child Development will have a minimum of ten drills per academic year. Residence halls will have a minimum of one fire drill a semester. The Department of Housing and Residential Life shall conduct fire drills and forward all reports to Environmental Health and Safety within three working days. The drill will be supervised by the university Fire - Safety Coordinator as needed. Every other University building will have one fire drill annually. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

Coordinates and conducts every fire drill and monitors the effectiveness of the drill. Monitors fire drills in all dormitories as needed. Maintains records of all drills Notes any deficiencies and take appropriate actions to correct them. EH&S will notify the location and time of the drill to FAU Maintenance three days in advance and the University Police at least one hour before the drill.

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BUILDING SUPERVISORS

EH&S will notify the building supervisors the date and time of the drill. Notify the Deans and Directors of the fire drill schedule and the time the alarm will be activated. If the schedule timing is not right because of a certain activity that cannot be rescheduled the building supervisor upon consultation with the appropriate Deans and/or Directors shall notify EH&S that the drill would be impossible to execute. An alternate date and time will be arranged after the noticed have been received. Maintain a list of the people who will need special assistance during fire drill evacuation.

UNIVERSITY POLICE

The university police shall notify the Boca Raton Fire Department of the scheduled fire drill. Search the building to make certain that all occupants have evacuated as required.

REFERENCE: ATTACHMENTS:

(List Attachments)

Issued By:

Date Issued: 1/2000

Date Revised:

Effective Date: 1/2000

APPROVED:

Vice President

Associate Vice President

Director

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FIRE DRILL RESPONSE FORM

Note: This form should be completed for any scheduled fire drill and any false alarm which results in a building evacuation. If you require help or have questions regarding this form, call EH&S at 7-3129. Section 1: General Information Date/Time Fire Drill conducted: Building Name and No: Person Supervising the Fire Drill: Section 2: Alarm Information Time Alarm Set-Off: Time Alarm Silenced: Alarm Signal Received by Dispatcher

Yes

No

Reset Signal Received by Dispatcher

Yes

No

Did Alarm Devices Activate? Was there any trouble with the alarm panel, or initiating devices? Section 3: Evacuation Information Did everyone in the building evacuate? Evacuation time: Was the evacuation orderly? Did everyone proceed to the predetermined assembly area? Any comments or recommendation on the evacuation:

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RECORDS OF MANDATORY SUPERVISED FIRE DRILLS

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STUDENT HOUSING EVACUATION POINTS BLDG. #

BLDG. CODE

BLDG. NAME

ASSEMBLY AREA

BOCA RATON CAMPUS 6

DM

RESIDENCE HALL - ALGONQUIN

EAST SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

56

SA

STUDENT APTS. - ADMINISTRATION

LOT 60

57A

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 57A

LOT 60

57B

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 57B

LOT 60

57C

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 57C

LOT 60

58A

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 58A

LOT 60

58B

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 58B

LOT 60

58C

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 58C

LOT 60

58D

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 58D

LOT 60

58E

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 58E

LOT 60

59A

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 59A

LOT 60

59B

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 59B

LOT 60

59C

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 59C

LOT 60

59D

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 59D

LOT 60

59E

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 59E

LOT 60

60A

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 60A

LOT 60

60B

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 60B

LOT 60

60C

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 60C

LOT 60

60D

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 60D

LOT 60

60E

SA

STUDENT APTS. - BLDG. 60E

LOT 60

61

SA

STUDENT VILLAGE APTS.

LOT 60

62

SH

BPW SCHOLARSHIP HOUSE

LOT 60

70

DM

INDIAN RIVER TOWERS - COMMONS BLDG.

NORTH SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

70A

DM

INDIAN RIVER TOWERS - UTILITY BLDG.

LOT 22 (SOUTH SIDE OF BLDG.)

70E

DM

INDIAN RIVER TOWERS - EAST TOWER

WEST SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

70W

DM

INDIAN RIVER TOWERS - WEST TOWER

NORTH SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

89

HP

HERITAGE PARK TOWERS - COMM. BLDG.

WEST SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

89N

DM

HERITAGE PARK NORTH TOWER

WEST SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

89S

DM

HERITAGE PARK SOUTH TOWER

WEST SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

92

BR

GLADES PARK TOWERS

NORTH SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

92N

DM

GLADES PARK NORTH TOWER

NORTH SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

92S

DM

GLADES PARK SOUTH TOWER

NORTH SIDE OF BLDG. IN GRASS AREA

MACARTHUR CAMPUS MC-6

RH

MACARTHUR RESIDENCE HALL 1

SOUTH OF BUILDING ON GRASS

MC-9

RH

MACARTHUR RESIDENCE HALL 2

SOUTH OF BUILDING ON GRASS

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VI. Fire Safety Statistics and Reporting

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FIRE SAFETY STATISTICS

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ACCIDENTAL ALARMS FROM 2007 - 2009

Definition of Accidental Alarm: is any alarm activation that is a result of the fire alarm system operating as it was designed to do, though the ultimate alarm was false. Example, dust entering a smoke detector or a student burning food while cooking.

ACCIDENTAL ALARMS

2007

STUDENT HOUSING FACILITY

Alarms

Algonquin Residence Hall BPW Scholarship House Glades Park Towers Heritage Park Towers Indian River Towers University Village Student Apartment MacArthur Residence Hall 1 MacArthur Residence Hall 2 Total Unwanted Alarms:

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2008

2009

Alarms

Alarms

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0

0 0 1 1 1

0

1

2

0

1

0

0 0

0 3

0 5


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CAMPUS FIRE LOG 2007 - 2009

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VII. Other Information

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BOCA RATON HOUSING CAMPUS MAP

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MACARTHUR HOUSING CAMPUS MAP

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FAU HEOA Manual