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INTRO TO TEACHING PROFESSION [SPRING 2010] (EDF2005_2010S_COMBINED) > COURSE DOCUMENTS

Course Documents EDF 2005 FIRST 9 PAGES

Department of Teacher Education Florida Atlantic University

COURSE NUMBER: EDF 2005

COURSE TITLE: Introduction to the Teaching Profession SECTION: 14167 003 (9:30- 12) 409 Fleming Hall 14169 005 (1-3:50) Education Bldg. 337 DAYS: Thursday

PROFESSOR: (Whelan) Ariza

Dr. Eileen

N.

Office: ED 316 E-mail: eariza@fau.edu Office Hours: Tuesday 1-5 PM Thursday 4:-6:00 PM Secretary: 561-297-3564 / 6594 / 6588 Fax: 561-297-2925 CATALOG DESCRIPTION: Three (3) semester hours. This course requires 15 hours of field experience. This is a Web-assisted course using Blackboard and the Internet. Students study educational foundations components of the education profession including characteristics of effective teachers in theory and practice through class work and required field experience in public schools. This course provides a critical overview of historical, intellectual, philosophical,


political, and sociological foundations of education. Other issues explored include how schools are financed, how they are governed, and how laws impact teachers and students. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of differing views regarding the relationship between public schools and U.S.A. society. Current issues and controversies impacting public K-12 education in the U.S.A., including increasing diversity in schools and society, are integrated throughout the semester. REQUIRED TEXTS: Sadker and Sadker (2009). Teachers, Schools and Society (9th Ed., Florida Edition). McGraw-Hill. REQUIRED WEBSITE: http://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0073525901/information_center_view0/ (smple first few chapters) http://www.mhhe.com/sadker8e Update later. This site is for the Sadker text. Student resources available through this website include Online Learning Center, including news, articles, quizzes, learning objectives, focus questions, key terms, etc. REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS AND INFORMATION: DUE 3rd Week of Class. Students must learn how to use technology to obtain information. Paper copies of the following documents will be collected on the due date.

Documents must be submitted in a pocket folder. Failure to submit ALL of these on the due date will result in a loss of 5 points per week from the total semester class points until all the documents are submitted.

Label your folder with your name, course number, email, and your best telephone number. (Avoid putting your social security number.) FAU Mission Statement FAU College of Education Conceptual Framework FAU Teacher Education Mission Statement COE Field Experience Handbook [PDF / 27 pages] / COE Field Experience Website o Only first page and Table of Contents Florida Teachers Code of Ethics Florida Educators Accomplished Practices


****************************************** STUDENTS NOT IN ATTENDANCE AT ANY TIME DURING THE FIRST TWO WEEKS OF THE SEMESTER MUST MEET WITH INSTRUCTO TO REMAIN IN THE CLASS. NO WEB SURFING, FACEBOOK, CHECKING EMAIL, ETC. DURING CLASSTIME. NO DISTRACTING BEEPERS, RADIOS OR TELEPHONES, VISIBLE OR AUDIBLE, IN THE CLASSROOM. CASUAL-PROFESSIONAL DRESS IS ACCEPTABLE IN CLASS (NO HATS, FLIP-FLOPS, EXPOSED MIDRIFF, LOW-RIDERS, LOW-CUT OR HALTER TOPS, SPAGETTI STRAPS, CUT-OFF PANTS OR TOPS, BAGGY PANTS, OR BEACH ATTIRE).

****************************************** COURSE CONNECTION TO CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: (See Logo above) As a reflective decision-maker the student will make informed decisions, exhibit ethical behavior, and provide evidence of being a capable professional by documenting understanding and application of the Course Objectives. GUIDELINES USED IN DEVELOPING COURSE OBJECTIVES: Florida Subject Area Competencies = (FSAC) Florida Essential Generic Teaching Competencies = (EGTC) Educator Accomplished Practices = (EAP) National Council for the Accreditation of Colleges of Teacher Education = (NCATE) Association for Childhood Education International Elementary Education Guidelines = (ACEI) Each of the sections of EDF 2005 has the same objectives and requirements for successful completion. These objectives have been developed in accordance with the above guidelines established by our national and state accrediting agencies. While instructors bring to the class their own perspectives, reflecting unique styles and experiences, they all share the same philosophy of consistency, integrity, and rigor, emphasizing a combination of instructor-centered and studentcentered work. Students in education, unlike those in other professional career paths, such as law and medicine, are prepared to enter the profession during their undergraduate years, and thus students should not be surprised that education and teaching are actually "tough" and require much knowledge and preparation from the first class as a first year student or sophomore. Collaborative and interactive work is difficult and thus you will put into it into practice in the classroom now. It should be understood that students will see instructors model the skills and styles from which they can expect to develop their own. COURSE OBJECTIVES STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES


AFTER THE COMPLETION OF THE COURSE, THE STUDENT WILL BE ABLE TO: 1. Students will identify current and Understand and apply the historical trends, issues, and historical knowledge to today’s individuals who have influences current practices. school curricula and the development of the school system in the United States. 2. Students will research and Identify key factors associated discuss characteristics of effective with effective schools. schools. 3. Students will compare and Identify the legal aspects of contrast various governance education and understand how structures and will be able to governance laws and policies are identify the laws and crucial court enacted at the local, state and cases that influence educations federal level. practices and programs. 4. Students will assess the Compare and contrast key relationships between key educational philosophies and their educational philosophies and the influences on education. development of educational practices in the Unites States. (FSAC 3.4) 5. Students will review and Identify local, state, and federal recognize the economic issues that sources of funding and how each affect schools including sources of affects education. funding, funding formulas, school choice initiatives, tuition tax credit and vouchers. 6. Students will research and Identify major rights and discuss the legal and civil rights and responsibilities of students and responsibilities of students and teachers. teachers. 7. Students will examine and Describe the attributes of a discuss the attributes and ethical professional educator. standards of a professional Identify characteristics of ethical educator. behavior in teaching and how they relate to appropriate decision making. 8. Students will describe the Identify key social factors that responses that schools use in impact learning. addressing social issues that affect


the learner in today’s society. 9. Students will describe how multiculturism impacts schools and learners. 10. Students will research and identify career options in education. 11.Students will examine the multiple models of teaching, teacher roles and guidelines for professional practice in the field of education (FSAC 4.1, 4.3) (EAP 6).

12. Students will examine issues salient to the education of diverse ethnic and linguistic groups, women and students with special needs (FSAC 2.4) (EGTC 2) (NCATE I.B.2) ACEI 6.2, 6.4).

13. Develop a personal philosophy of education and identify related curricular and instructional practice. (FSAC 3.5) 14. Observe and reflect upon teacher roles, instructional practice and student interactions.(ACEI 1.1, 3.0)4. 15. Examine ethics in the teaching Profession and legal implications of schooling. (EAP 6)

Identify key cultural factors that impact learning. Discuss career education

options

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16. Students conduct research with the use of professional libraries and professional electronic databases (EAP 12).

. TEACHING METHODOLOGY: This course will involve the following methods at various points in the term: A) small and large group discussions, B) lectures, C) formal and informal presentations, D) individual and team projects, E) visits to schools, F) viewing of videotapes, G) use of the Internet H) use of FAU Library, and I) personal consultation with the professor.

The instructor reserves the right to penalize any additional facets of unprofessional and irresponsible work attitudes or conduct, if the need arises.

EXPECTATIONS: This course is designed to be an introduction to the teaching profession. In keeping with the norms of professional conduct, all students are expected to be responsible learners. You are about to enter a profession that could affect generations of people. It is your responsibility to make the best of this learning opportunity.

Each of the sections of EDF 2005 has the same objectives and requirements for successful completion. These objectives have been developed in accordance with the above guidelines established by our national and state accrediting agencies. While instructors bring to the class their own perspectives, reflecting unique styles and experiences, they all share the same philosophy of consistency, integrity, and rigor, emphasizing a combination of instructor-centered and studentcentered work. Students in education, unlike those in other professional career paths, such as law and medicine, are prepared to enter the profession during their undergraduate years, and thus


students should not be surprised that education and teaching are actually "tough" and require much knowledge and preparation from the first class as a first year student or sophomore.

The instructors have constructed the program you are about to enter with the understanding that our responsibility is to prepare you for that task. For example, short weekly quizzes are scheduled for the purpose of establishing the discipline of reading on a weekly basis in preparation for class. Regular periodic reading is much more effective than reading crammed just prior to a major exam. Instructors furthermore are available to assist and mentor you at every turn. Do not hesitate to ask for assistance, as you need it. Ask other students and ask your teachers. Do not wait until after an exam. We are all here to help you succeed. Points will be deducted for tardiness and late work. PROFESSIONAL DISPOSITIONS: This course is designed to be an introduction to the teaching profession. In keeping with the norms of professional conduct, all students are expected to be responsible learners. Part of your course grade will be based on professional dispositions demonstrated during both class sessions and field experience assignment.

You are about to enter a profession that could affect generations of people. It is your responsibility to make the best of this learning opportunity. To successfully complete this course, your work must be of college caliber. Active and meaningful participation is expected in class and group discussions of content and challenge sheet assignments. Discussion questions may relate to weekly chapter readings and/or relevant personal experiences and knowledge. Sheer attendance is not sufficient: tardiness and absences will count against you.

As a reflective decision-maker the student chooses to practice ethical behavior during class, in the university community, and when engaging in field experiences. (INTASC: 9 ) (TESOL: 23) (EAP-FAU:6.1, 6.2)

Professional Dispositions include individual characteristics that are not


measurable in objective tests: (1) Attendance and punctuality to class and field experience assignment. (2) Demonstrate knowledge of and adherence to the Florida Teachers Code of Ethics. (3) Respectful and timely communication with course instructor and classmates. (4) Professional attire and behavior (5) Preparation for class (6) Class participation (7) Demonstrated openness, respect, and sensitivity toward diversity and multiculturalism, (8) Enthusiasm for the field of education. (7) Willingness to become fully involved in the educational process of all students in urban schools. (8) Understands and demonstrates a commitment to the goals and objectives of the course. (9) Demonstrates ethical behaviors regarding other student’s efforts in the course (e.g.: cooperation and commitment to group projects). (10) Exhibits work beyond the required minimum expectations set for the course.

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Standards of academic conduct are set forth in the university’s and College of Education Policies and Procedures Manual. By registering, you have acknowledged your awareness of these rules and regulations. You are obliged to become familiar with your rights and responsibilities. Violations of academic integrity and your responsibilities as a student will not be treated lightly. Disciplinary actions will be taken should violations occur. Please see the course instructor if you have any questions about the “Academic Irregularities” and “Non-Academic Irregularities” described in the manual in general or as they relate to particular requirements for this course. STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES / WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSE: In Compliance with The Americans with Disabilities Act (A.D.A.) Students requiring special accommodations due to a disability to properly execute coursework must register with the Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) located in Boca – SU 133 (561-297-3880), in Davie MOD I (954-236-1222), in Jupiter SR 117 (561-799-8585) and follow all OSD procedures.


Reasonable accommodations will be made for students with disabilities, including having a student aide provide lecture notes for class meetings. The purpose of the Office for Students with Disabilities “is to provide reasonable accommodations to students with disabilities.” Students who require assistance should notify the professor immediately so that we may collaborate in order to make the appropriate accommodations. You will have to bring a letter from the Disabilities Office to show your need of specific assistance. To withdraw from a course, it is not sufficient simply to stop attending class or to inform the instructor of your intention to withdraw, though that is expected. In accordance with university policy, students wishing to withdraw from a course must do so formally through the Registrar’s office. Check schedule booklet or academic calendar for withdrawal dates ATTENDANCE: The course instructor must approve any exception to this policy before the limit is exceeded. According to University policy, “Students are expected to attend all of their scheduled university classes and satisfy all academic objectives as outlined by the instructor.” Attendance includes meaningful, active involvement in all class sessions, class discussions, and class activities as well as professional, ethical, conduct in class.

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ALL COURSE MEETINGS COUNT, INCLUDING THE FIRST TWO CLASS SESSIONS. STUDENTS NOT PRESENT AT ANY TIME DURING THE FIRST TWO CLASS SESSIONS WILL BE MARKED ABSENT REGARDLESS. STUDENTS NOT IN ATTENDANCE AT ANY TIME DURING THE FIRST TWO CLASS SESSIONS OF THE SEMESTER MUST MEET WITH INSTRUCTOR TO REMAIN IN THE CLASS. Attendance and punctuality are mandatory for all class meetings, particularly in a class where some testable material will not be found in the textbook. Absences will be recorded beginning with the first class meeting of the term, even for students registering late.

The first absence will not be counted but all subsequent absences will result in a loss of THIRTY (30) points per class unless otherwise approved by the instructor. Absences from lecture or field placement MAY BE excused only with timely notification and prior approval by instructor or clinical educator. Unexcused absence during others’ presentations will result in 50 points lost for one’s own presentation.


Students missing 4 or more class sessions are subject to receiving a failing grade and must meet with the instructor before continuing with the semester. Students arriving late and/or leaving class early will be penalized in proportion to class time missed unless otherwise preapproved by the instructor. Students are expected to demonstrate professionalism in planning ahead. Students must schedule office visits, school visits, appointments (e.g. medical office visits), or other activities during times that do not interfere with class. Additionally, students using the one excused absence for religious observances must inform the course instructor in writing within the first three weeks of the course.

Students absent for any reason are responsible, as are those absent for religious requirements, for the assigned readings of that day as well as for asking a classmate to take notes and collect handouts.

All of us experience emergencies and unforeseen situations and occasionally, absences are unavoidable. Absences may be excused at the discretion of the instructor and include only documented medical and legal requirements, or other documented unforeseen situations. These do not include court appearances for parking tickets, moving infractions, etc. but mandated appearances such as jury duty and subpoenas. Proof of requirement and attendance must be presented. Medical absences must also be documented with a formal letter from the attending doctor stating that the student was under their care and unable to attend class. A receipt for a doctor’s office visit will not be acceptable. Other situations must be discussed directly with and approved by the instructor.

Attendance during all end-of-semester individual and group project presentation sessions is required. Unexcused absences will result in a loss of 50 points from the course total whether the student has had a previous absence or has presented their project or not. FIELD EXPERIENCE: SCHOOLS REPORT STUDENTS’ ATTENDANCE AND PUNCTUALITY TO THE COE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES AND ACADEMIC AFFAIRS. ALSO INSTRUCTORS VERIFY TIMELY INITIAL CONTACT WITH THE SCHOOL TO BEGIN VISITATIONS. FAILURE TO ATTEND THE FIELD EXPERIENCE AS SCHEDULED AND AGREED UPON WILL RESULT IN LOWERING THE COURSE


FINAL GRADE BY ONE COMPLETE LETTER. The Field Experience component for this course requires a minimum 15 hours [minimum of 4 visits required] at a local school. Students are responsible for completing all application requirements to request a placement and security clearance on a timely basis. Students must go to the OASS website. There is a wealth of information there including the placement applications, security clearance information, etc.

Students must document hours and have supervisors sign a “Record of Hours Log,� which must be submitted to the course instructor. The highest grade a student can receive in the course if they are not placed for the semester and/or fail to complete the Field Experience component is a C- (C minus). This grade means that the student must retake the entire course, including the field experience.

Transfer students and students employed with the school district must visit the website regarding security clearance. The university does not have a record of students’ security clearance if they have not completed the appropriate security clearance paperwork and are registered as a university student applying for clearance.


LEARNING OBJECTIVES

REQUIRED MATERIALS

Powerpoint chapter 1 sadker8_ppt_ch01.ppt (827 Kb) Please open and read Powerpoint on Chapter 2 sadker8_ppt_ch02.ppt (379 Kb) Open and read Powerpoint on Chapter 3 sadker8_ppt_ch03.ppt (639 Kb) Open and read Powerpoint on chapter 4 sadker8_ppt_ch04.ppt (863 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on Chapter 5 sadker8_ppt_ch05.ppt (456.5 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on Chapter 6 sadker8_ppt_ch06.ppt (861 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 7 sadker8_ppt_ch07.ppt (316.5 Kb) open and read


Powerpoint on chapter 8 sadker8_ppt_ch08.ppt (112 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 9 sadker8_ppt_ch09.ppt (1.053 Mb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 10 sadker8_ppt_ch10.ppt (267.5 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 11 sadker8_ppt_ch11.ppt (442 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 12 sadker8_ppt_ch12.ppt (536.5 Kb) open and read Powerpoint on chapter 13 sadker8_ppt_ch13.ppt (137.5 Kb) open and read


edf20005 SYLLABUS