Graphic Design and Typography

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GRAPHIC DESIGN The art or profession of visual communication that combines images, words, and ideas to convey information to an audience, especially to produce a specific effect. TYPOGRAPHY The art or process of printing with type.



GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY


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CONTENTS

© F.Melis Bagatır, RISD Summer 2014


GRAPHIC DESIGN

06

What is Graphic Design

09

What is a Glossary 13 GRA: Glossary

10

TYPOGRAPHY 18 What is Typograpy

20

Typesetting

22

The Typographic Scale

24

Glossary of Typography Terms

26

Colophon

32



“You can have an art experience in front of a Rembrandt… or in front of a piece of graphic design.” — Stefan Sagmeister


WHAT IS GRAPHIC DESIGN?

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Suppose you want to announce or sell something, amuse or persuade someone, explain a

is the art of communication, stylizing, and problem-solving through the use of type, space and image.

complicated system or demonstrate a process. In other words, you have a message you want to communicate. How do you “send” it? You could tell people one by one or broadcast by radio or loudspeaker. That's verbal communication. But if you use any visual medium at all-if you make a poster; type a letter; create a business logo, a magazine ad, or an album cover; even make a computer printout-you are using a form of visual communication called graphic design. The field is considered a subset of visual communication and communication design, but sometimes the term “graphic design” is used interchangeably with these due to overlapping skills involved. Graphic designers use various methods to create and combine words, symbols, and images to create a visual representation of ideas and messages. A graphic designer may use a combination of typography, visual arts and page layout techniques to produce a final result. Graphic design often refers to both the process (designing) by which the communication is created and the products (designs) which are generated. Common uses of graphic design include identity (logos and branding), publications (magazines, newspapers and books), print advertisements, posters, billboards, website graphics and elements, signs and product packaging. For example, a product package might include a logo or other artwork, organized text and pure design elements such as images, shapes and color which unify the piece. Composition is one of the most important features of graphic design, especially when using pre-existing materials or diverse elements.

Text © by AIGA


GRAPHIC DESIGN 9

A design by Shigeo Fukuda


WHAT IS A GLOSSARY?

A GLOSSARY, also known as a vocabulary, or clavis, is an alphabetical list of terms in a particular domain of knowledge with the definitions for those terms.

Traditionally, a glossary appears at the end of a book and includes terms within that book that are either newly introduced, uncommon, or specialized. While glossaries are most-commonly associated with non-fiction books, in some cases, fiction novels may come with a glossary for unfamiliar terms. A bilingual glossary is a list of terms in one language defined in a second language or glossed by synonyms (or at least near-synonyms) in another language. In a general sense, a glossary contains explanations of concepts relevant to a certain field of study or action. In this sense, the term is related to the notion of ontology. Automatic methods have been also provided that transform a glossary into an ontology* or a computational lexicon.**

*R. Navigli, P. Velardi. From Glossaries to Ontologies: Extracting Semantic Structure from Textual Definitions, Ontology Learning and Population: Bridging the Gap between Text and Knowledge (P. Buitelaar and P. Cimiano, Eds.), Series information for Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence and Applications, IOS Press, 2008, pp. 71-87. **R. Navigli. Using Cycles and Quasi-Cycles to Disambiguate Dictionary Glosses, Proc. of 12th Conference of the European Association for Computational Linguistics (EACL 2009), Athens, Greece, March 30-April 3rd, 2009, pp. 594-602.


GRAPHIC DESIGN 11

An example for a glossary page


GLOSSARY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN ALIASING

BLEED

In computer graphics, an undesirable effect – also known

A printed image that extends beyond one or more of the

as “jaggies” – in which the edge of the image or letter is

finished page margins and is later trimmed so that the image

characterized by a stair-step appearance.

“bleeds” off the edge of the sheet.

ALL RIGHTS

BYLINE

In publishing, the purchase of all subsidiary rights to a

In magazine and newspaper publishing, a line added to

publication, illustration, or photograph, including North

an article identifying the author (and other contributors)

American and international rights, serials rights, etc.

of the article.

AQUEOUS COATING

CAMERA-READY

Water-based coating applied by a printing press to protect

To-be-printed copy and/or artwork that requires no

and enhance the printed surface.

additional layout, positioning, redrawing, or typesetting or, in other words, is prepared to be photographed for

BACK MATTER

a negative or printing plate. Synonymous terms are

All the material that follows the main text of the book such

camera-ready copy and camera-ready art.

as appendix, bibliography, and glossary. CAMERA-READY ART BINDING AND FINISHING

Alternate term for camera-ready. See Camera-Ready.

Activities performed on printed material after printing. Binding involves fastening individual sheets together, while

CAMERA-READY COPY

finishing involves additional decorative actions such as

Alternate term for camera-ready. See Camera-Ready.

die-stamping and embossing. CAST COATED PAPER BITMAP (BITMAPPED)

Paper dried under pressure against a heated, polished

In computer graphics, the collection of individual dots--

cylinder to produce a high-gloss enamel finish.

or pixels–that make up a screen image. CLIP ART BLANKET

Ready made artwork sold or distributed for clipping and

A synthetic rubber mat used in offset lithography to

pasting into publications. Available in hard-copy books,

transfer – or “offset” – an image from a metal plate

and in electronic form, as files on a disk.

to the paper.


GRAPHIC DESIGN 13

CMYK

COLOR WHEEL

Abbreviation for cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black).

Primary Colors = red, blue and yellow. (In printing; cyan,

The four process colors.

magenta, and yellow). Secondary Colors = Orange, Violet, and Green.

COATED PAPER

Tertiary Colors = Colors produced by mixing two or

Paper with a coating of clay or other substances that improve

more secondary colors, as in Green-Violet, Orange-Green,

reflectivity and ink holdout.

Violet-Orange, etc.

COLOR CHART

COMPLEMENTARY COLORS

A set of color swatches, or samples of printed color that are

On a color wheel, the colors opposite of each other as in

used to accurately mix, match, choose, and communicate a

Blue and Orange, Yellow and Violet, Red and Green.

particular color. COMPREHENSIVE LAYOUT COLOR MATCHING SYSTEM

Commonly referred to as a “comp” is a stage in the page

A set of color charts and/or swatches – either in printed

layout and design process consisting of a detailed dummy

form or as computer-generated samples – used to compare,

or layout of the page to be reproduced, showing the exact

match, and specify different colors.

placement of page elements (text, illustrations, etc.) in a form comparable to that of the final print.

COLOR SEPARATION A means of dividing a full-color photograph into four

CONTINUOUS TONE

separate components, corresponding to the four primary

Essentially, a photographic image that is not composed of

colors used in process color printing – cyan, magenta,

halftone dots or, in other words, an image that consists of

yellow, and black.

tone values ranging from some minimum density (such as white) to a maximum density (such as black).

COLOR SWATCH A sample of a specific color – either printed or stored

COPY

digitally – used to describe a particular printing ink or

Any material that is to be typeset, be it a manuscript or

combination of printing ink colors.

typescript, or a typewritten document with handwritten changes and edits. Copy is also used to refer generally to any other page elements – including illustrations, photographs, etc – that will need to be prepared and assembled.


CROP MARKS

ENGRAVING

Lines drawn or printed on a photograph, overlay, or printed

Printing method using a plate, also called a die, with an

product to indicate the proper cropping of the image or print.

image cut into its surface.

CROPPING

FACING PAGES

Cutting off an undesired portion of a printed piece,

In a double-sided document, the two pages that appear as a

photograph or other image.

spread when the publication is opened.

DIE

FIXED SPACE

In binding and finishing, as metal plate or block etched

In typography, a blank space of a fixed increment, used

with a design, lettering, or other pattern.

where a constant-width blank space is required, since typographic word spaces vary in width according to the

DIECUTTING

justification needs of a line.

In binding and finishing, a finishing operation involving the use of sharp steel blades to cut a specific pattern into

FOIL STAMPING

asubstrate or to cut the substrate itself into a specific pattern.

In binding and finishing, a finishing operation in which a design or other image is pressed onto a substrate. In foil

DIE-STAMPING

stamping, a heated die containing a relief (raised) image

In binding and finishing, a finishing operation similar to

presses down on a roll of foil passing above the substrate to

embossing in which hard metal dies are used to stamp or

be decorated.

press images or patterns into a surface, such as a cloth book cover.

FOR POSITION ONLY (FPO) On a mechanical, a written designation applied to a

DITHER

low-resolution or inferior-quality image (such as a xerox

In digital imaging, to use the colors of two pixels to

of a photograph or line art) to indicate that the image

determine the color of a pixel lying between them. This

(as seen) has only been added to the mechanical to indicate

new pixel thus has a value that is the average of the two

its position on the layout and thus is not indicative of the

pixels on either side of it. Dithering is often used to

appearance of the final printed image.

eliminate unwanted jaggies. FOUR-COLOR PROCESS DPI

In multi-color printing, the printing of process color by

(Dots per inch) is a unit of measurement used to describe

means of color separations corresponding to the four

the resolution of printed output. The most common desktop

process colors: cyan, magenta, yellow and black.

laser printers output at 300 dpi. Medium-resolution printers output at 600 dpi, and Image setters output at 1270-2540 dpi.

GALLEY PROOF A printout of text used for proofreading before final

EMBOSSING In binding and finishing, a process in which images, patterns, or text are stamped or pressed into a substrate.

page assembly.


GRAPHIC DESIGN 15

GREEKING

LAMINATE

In computing, a means of speeding up the display redraw rate

To bond a plastic film by heat and pressure to a printed

of a computer monitor by representing text characters below

sheet for protection and appearance.

a certain size as gray lines, boxes, or illegible dummy type. LANDSCAPE HALFTONE

A page format in which the correct reading or viewing

Any image – such as a photograph – that exists as a series of

orientation is horizontal; the width of the page is greater

small dots of varying size and color density, which serve to

than its height. See also Portrait.

simulate the appearance of continuous gradations of tone. Halftones are necessary in the reproduction of photographic

LEAF

images; most printing presses cannot print continuous tones,

Term for a sheet of paper in a book or other publication.

so photographic images must first be converted to a series of

Each side of a leaf is one page.

dots in order to be effectively printed. LETTERPRESS HARD COPY

The oldest of the major printing processes distinguished

Any page, document, publication, or other data that exists as

by its use of raised metal type. The type can be either

some kind of output, be it on paper, film, etc., rather than as

individual characters or plates made with raised type.

an item on a computer display or soft copy. LINE ART HICKEY

Any illustration material that contains no halftone,

Any printing defect caused by a particle either of paper or

continuous tone, or tinted images. Pen-and-ink drawings

other source of debris attaching itself to the printing plate.

are line art.

INK HOLDOUT

LITHOGRAPHY

The ability of paper to prevent ink from penetrating into

A term describing a printing process in which the image

its surface.

area and the non-image area coexist on the same plane, in contract to letterpress (printing from raised type).

JAGGIES Alternate term for the results of aliasing. See Aliasing.

LOGOTYPE

Also known as stairsteps.

In typography, a symbol representing a company or product.

KNOCKOUT A space left in a document for the later insertion of some

LOW-RESOLUTION

form of graphic image. The term knockout is also used to

Descriptive of an image – either on a computer display or

refer to “white type” or, in other words, type that prints as a

in printed form--that has a low number of dots – pixels –

reverse, or, in fact, does not really print at all, allowing the

per square inch.

color of the page to show through a background in the shape of type.





“Typography is the craft of endowing human language with a durable visual form.” — Robert Bringhurst


WHAT IS TYPOGRAPHY?

TYPOGRAPHY

The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, leading

(from the Greek wordsο“form” and graphein “to write”) is the art and technique of arranging type in order to make the language it forms most appealing to transparent learning and recognition.

(line spacing), adjusting the spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and adjusting the space between pairs of letters (kerning). Type design is a closely related craft, which some consider distinct and others a part of typography; most typographers do not design typefaces, and some type designers do not consider themselves typographers*. In modern times, typography has been put into motion—in film, television and online broadcasts—to add emotion to mass communication. Typography is performed by typesetters, compositors, typographers, graphic designers, art directors, manga artists, comic book artists, graffiti artists, clerical workers, and anyone else who arranges type for a product. Until the Digital Age, typography was a specialized occupation. Digitization opened up typography to new generations of visual designers and lay users, and David Jury, Head of Graphic Design at Colchester Institute in England, states that “typography is now something everybody does.”** In contemporary use, the practice and study of typography is very broad, covering all aspects of letter design and application, both mechanical (typesetting and type design) and manual (handwriting and calligraphy). Typography can appear in a wide variety of situations, including: Documents Presentations Display typography Clothing Maps and labels Vehicle instrument panels As a component of industrial design As a component in modern poetry

Since digitization, typography has spread to a wider ranger of applications, appearing on web pages, LCD mobile phone screens, and hand-held video games.

*Berry, John, Being a Typographer, Creative pro. **Jury, David (2006). What is Typography?. Mies, Switzerland: Rotovision. p. 63. ISBN 2-88046-822-1


TYPOGRAPHY 21

A typeface design by Miles Newlyn, Rubrik Family


TYPESETTING

TYPESETTING is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types* or the digital equivalents.

Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language’s orthography for visual display. Typesetting requires the prior process of designing a font. There is a lot more to typesetting (and its sister, typography) than you would think. Both have their origins in the Gutenberg revolution and each, in their different ways, were concerned with the presentation of textual material in type format ready for printing. In earlier times there was a big difference between them. Typography was the art of designing, setting and arranging type whereas typesetting was the process (or craft) of actually setting the type. Together, typography and typesetting combine an art and process that only really succeeds when invisible. In many respects, the layout of your book is comparable to the background music added to a film. Its primary duty is to make your text clear and accessible, but ideally it should also enhance the meaning with mood and style. Though stylish, the layout must also be durable (indeed timeless), transcending fashion. Much creative energy goes into this art, which is the subject of passionate debate among its practitioners.

*Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. 23 December 2009. Dictionary.reference.com Photography Š Willi Heidelbach



THE TYPOGRAPHIC SCALE

The typographic scale has been used for centuries as a means of creating balanced and harmonious font sizing. It is the bedrock of modern typography.

The classic typographic scale is a harmonious progression of font sizes, the sizes 6 pt, 12 pt, 24 pt, and 48 pt are all present in the typographic scale. Consequently, the ratio of the classic typographic scale is two. The classic musical scales also have a ratio of two. Each C note on a piano, for example, vibrates twice as quickly as the previous C note. The classic typographic scale is very much like a musical scale. he second defining property of a scale is the number of notes, n, in the scale. There are five sizes in each interval of the classic typographic scale. As a result, the classic typographic scale is a pentatonic scale—like Jazz and much of the world’s traditional music. The third, and final, property of a scale is its fundamental frequency, f_0. On a piano, this is the frequency of the “middle C” note. In the classic typographic scale, the fundamental frequency is the pica. This value, 1 pica = 12 pt, is the baseline font size used in print typography. The intuition of the human typographers was extremely close! However, there are a few discrepancies: First, there are four lost notes: the 28 pt, 32 pt, 42 pt, and 55 pt font sizes. These lost notes were not listed in the original typographic charts, despite being perfectly in tune with the rest of the scale. These notes are necessary to complete other notes that were listed in the original typographic charts. For example, the 16 pt font size is completed by the 32 pt font size— which is one of the lost notes. The second issue is that two of the notes are flat. The 60 pt and 72 pt sizes are off by a total of 4 pt. These two font sizes were rounded down to the nearest multiple of the pica, so this may have been a practical concession for early printing processes, rather than a true error. However, the result is that modern typographers have inherited two notes that are not quite in tune. The final discrepancy is that there is an extra note: Every interval of the classic typographic scale has five notes, but the original typographic charts have six notes in the first interval. The 11 pt font size doesn’t belong in the scale. It would sound sharp or flat if played by a musical instrument.

Text © 2011 by Spencer Mortensen


TYPOGRAPHY 25

a

6pt

a

a

a

a

a

a a

8pt 9pt 10pt 11pt 12pt 14pt 16pt

a a

a

18pt 21pt 24pt

a 36pt

a a a 48pt

60pt

The classic typographic scale, as recorded by Mr. Bringhust in The Elements of Typographic Style

72pt


GLOSSARY OF TYPOGRAPHY TERMS ASCENDER

CALLOUT

The part of a lowercase letter which rises above the main

In typography, any of several different typographic

body, as in the letters “b”, “d”, “h”, and “k”.

elements that are, in essence, “called-out” of the main body text, such as text pasted onto an illustration to

ALIGNMENT

identify specific portions of it.

A term used to refer to the proper positioning of all typefaces and size variations along an imaginary

CAPTION

reference line.

In typography and page layout, any strictly descriptive text accompanying an illustration, located beneath it,

BANNER

alongside it, or above it.

In typography, any large headline, especially one that spans the width of a page.

CHARACTER Any letter, figure, punctuation, symbol or space.

BASELINE An invisible horizontal line on which the feet of all

COLUMN GUTTER

characters on a line of type are set, used for proper

The space between columns of type.

alignment of type. CONDENSED FONT (ALSO CONDENSED TYPE) BLOCK TEXT OR BLOCK TYPE

A font in which the set widths of the characters is

In typography, paragraphs set without indents.

narrower than in the standard typeface. Often used when large amounts of copy need to fit into a small space.

BODY TEXT The main portion of a book or other document,

CONTOUR

excluding front matter and back matter.

In typography, the setting of type in a shape in order to create the appearance of an object.

BOOK TYPOGRAPHY The setting and arrangement of the various parts of a book.

COPYFITTING In typography, the process of estimating the point size and

CAP HEIGHT

leading in which a particular piece of copy will need to be set

In typography, the distance from the baseline to the top

to fit in a (usually) predetermined amount of space.

of the capital letters.


TYPOGRAPHY 27

COUNTER

EN

In typography, the space in a letter or other character

In typography, a unit of measurement exactly

enclosed – either fully or partially – by the strokes of the

one-half as wide as, and as high as, the point

character, as in the center of the letter “o”.

size being set.

DESCENDER

EN DASH

In typography, the portion of lowercase letters that extends

In typography, a dash one en long, used to represent

below the character’s baseline as in “g”, “j”, “p”, “q”, and “y”.

the words to or through, or function in lieu of a colon.

DISPLAY TYPE

EXTENDED TYPE

In typography, type set in a larger point size than the text

Typefaces that are wide horizontally – an example is

(commonly greater than 14 point), such as in headlines.

Microgramma Extended.

DROP FOLIO

FLUSH RIGHT

In book typography, page number, or folio, that is printed

In typography, a paragraph or lines of text are aligned on the

at the bottom of a page. Also known as a foot folio.

right side. Synonymous with the term Right Justified.

EM

FLUSH LEFT

In typography, a fixed space having a height and a width

In typography, a paragraph or lines of text are aligned on

equal to that of the point size.

the left side. Synonymous with the term Left Justified.

EM DASH

FOLIO

In typography, a dash one em long, used to set off

In typography, a page number, commonly placed outside

parenthetical text, replace missing text matter, or

the running head at the top of the page. Folios are also

function in lieu of a colon.

commonly set flush left on verso pages and flush right on recto pages. They can also be centered at the top of the

EM SPACE

page. A folio that appears at the bottom of a page is called

In typography, a fixed space one em in length.

a drop folio.


FONT

HEADER

In typography, a set of all characters in a typeface.

In typography, any text that appears at the top of a page but is not part of the body text, such as a tile, author,

FOOT FOLIO

chapter title, etc. A header appearing on every page is

In book typography, page number that appears at the bottom

called a running head.

of a page. Also known as a drop folio. HEADING FOOT MARGIN

In typography, display type used to emphasize copy, act as

In typography, the amount of blank space allowed between

a book, chapter, or section title, or otherwise introduce or

the bottom of the last line of text (or other bottommost page

separate text. More commonly referred to as simply a head.

element) and the bottom edge of the sheet. HYPHENATION ZONE FOOTNOTE

In typography, a “zone” established by a typesetting device

In typography, a reference relating to the main body of text

or software toward the end of a line, within which the system

positioned at the bottom of the page.

can hyphenate words. A hyphenation zone is commonly used in ragged right copy. The setting of the hyphenation

FRONT MATTER

zone is a way of controlling the number of hyphens that will

In book typography and production, the pages of a book that

appear in the set copy.

precede the main text. IN-LINE GUTTER

In typography, a style of type that has a chiseled effect, as if

In typography, the term refers to the space between columns

chipped out of stone. Although classic in appearance, their

of type, usually determined by the number and width of

use in small doses is most effective, and they are often used

columns and the overall width of the area to be filled.

in display type and are especially well-suited to dropping out from a dark background.

HANGING INDENT In typography, a form of indention in which the first line

JUSTIFICATION

or first few lines of a paragraph are set flush with the left

In typography, setting lines of text so that they line up on the

margin, while the rest of the lines of that paragraph are

left and right, as opposed to ragged right, in which the lines

indented a specified distance.

do not line up on the right.

HARD HYPHEN

JUSTIFIED

In typography, a hyphen that is always typeset, regardless

Type that aligns on both the left and right side. Alternate

of where on the line it falls. Such a hyphen would be one

term for justified text, justified type, and justified

of those in the word “mother-in-law”.

composition.

HEAD The top of a book, page, or column. In typography, the term head is also an abbreviation for the term heading.


TYPOGRAPHY 29

KERNING

MAGENTA

In typography, the reduction of letterspacing between

A term for one of the four process color inks used in

certain character combinations in order to reduce the space

multicolor printing. Also incorrectly referred to as “red”

between them, performed for aesthetic reasons.

(or process red), it is the red component used in many types of color mixing.

LEADER In typography, dots (called dot leaders) or dashes (called

MAJUSCULE

dash leaders) that lead the eye from one side of a line to

An alternate term for a capital letter.

the other. MANUSCRIPT LEAD-IN

Any original handwritten or typed (typescript) copy from

In typography, the first two or three words of a block of text

which type will be set.

set in a different, contrasting typeface or style (such as small caps or boldface).

MARGIN Any deliberately unprinted space on a page, especially

LEADING

surrounding a block of text. Margins are used not only to

(pronounced “led-ding”)

aid in the aesthetics and the readability of a page, but also

In typography, an alternate and more popularly used term

to provide allowances for trimming, binding, and other

for line spacing.

post-press operations.

LEFT JUSTIFIED

MEASURE

Alternate term for flush left. See Flush Left.

In typography, measure is synonymous with line length.

LETTERFORMS

MINISCULE

General term referring to all typographic characters

Alternate term for a lowercase letter.

and symbols. MONOSPACED LETTERSPACING

In typography, descriptive of characters of a typeface

In typography, the space between typeset letters or other

all having the same width. The lowercase “i” and “m” –

characters.

which would have different widths in proportional width typefaces--are identical in monospaced typefaces.

LIGATURE In typography, two or more characters designed as a

MARGINS

distinct unit and commonly available as a single character.

In typography, a form of indention in which each

Examples are ae, ce, etc.

subsequent indent is set relative to the previous indent, rather than from the left (or right) margin.

LINE LENGTH In typography, the overall width of a typeset line, usually the area between two margins.


GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGR TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIG DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAP GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGR TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIG DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAP GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGR TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIG DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAPHIC DESIGN & TYPOGRAPHY GRAP GRAPHIC DESIGN & 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COLOPHON

BOOK DESIGN: F. Melis Bagatır RISD, Summer 2014 The main text is set in Using

Minion Pro 10pt with 16pt leading.

Trade Gothic as the headers.



© F.Melis Bagatır, RISD Summer 2014