M – ISSUE 2 [SPRING 2021]

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GOOD NEWS. COMMUNITY LIFE. FAMILY FUN.

PARISH NURSING Supporting the community mind, body and soul

GOING GREEN ON THE CHEAP WHY PEOPLE PRAY Hope for us all

MAYBRIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH

SURVIVING PANDEMIC PARENTING Tips for life at home with kids

EASTER TREATS

Good news, puzzles and a very special cheese scone recipe

SPRING 2021


MAYBRIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH We are a church family made up of people from all walks of life, but we share a love of Jesus and a desire to follow Him and show His love to our community. At our church building on The Strand, we run all kinds of Sunday services, community groups and sessions for children, young people, families and seniors. Some of these have now reopened, while others are still in the process of opening safely with government guidance in place. Whether you fancy coming along to our building or would rather find us online, there are plenty of ways to get to know MCC if you would like to – we can’t wait to meet you!

CHURCH AT HOME Try church from the comfort of your own home. Join us every Sunday at 10:30am online MAYBRIDGE.ONLINE.CHURCH

MaybridgeCommunityChurch MaybridgeCC

info@maybridge.org.uk

01903 700522 | 77 The Strand, Worthing, BN12 6DR | Charity Number: 1134489


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Contents COMMUNITY

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Good news

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Caring for your mind, body and soul LIFE

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Spend less, live well

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It's okay not to be okay JUSTICE

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Going green on the cheap FAITH

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Why do people pray? FAMILY

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Surviving pandemic parenting JOY

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Happy Easter from Maybridge Community Church! Let’s face it, the past 12 months haven’t exactly been great for a lot of people, but Easter is all about hope; the hope that comes from spring flowers bursting forth and banishing winter, the hope that comes from warmer days and lighter evenings and, most importantly of all, the hope that comes from the fact that Jesus came to this world to be with us, die for us and defeated death to bring new life to us. So this edition of M is all about bringing you hope for tomorrow. Whether it’s stories of good news from around our local community, or support, ideas and resources for everything from mental health to parenting – our hope is that you will read these pages and know things will get better, there is good in the world, and you are not alone.

Cheese scones & Easter fun

Do head to maybridge.org.uk for details of our Easter

Happy Easter,

Editor: Chloe Satchell-Cobbett Deputy Editor: Alice Stout Contributors: Linda Baker, Richard Greenhorn, Andrew Henderson, Piero Regnante, Jo Walraven, Julie Ward. Design: rogfog.co.uk

celebrations, or get in touch if you’d like to chat or you need a hand – we’d love to hear from you.

Matt Walmsley Senior Minister

WELCOME | 3


GOOD NEWS Our round-up of uplifting stories, fun facts and inspiration from the local community and beyond. Email us your stories to share at info@maybridge.org.uk

Stories from lockdown Throughout lockdown and the coronavirus pandemic restrictions, we’ve seen local communities come together and heroically support those in need. We think they’re stories worth sharing...

Maybridge Seniors Sharing the love ▲ As the UK entered lockdown 3.0 at the start of the new year, Maybridge volunteers put together special valentines-themed 'goodie' bags for seniors in isolation. Led by the Faith and Community Nurse, treats, quizzes and games, health advice and other news from the community were hand delivered. A great opportunity for socially-distant check-ins to bring smiles to those who continue shield at home.

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133 Food packages delivered! ▲ In 2020, we felt compelled to get stuck in and help those in the community for whom holiday hunger is a unjust and harsh reality. Since then, volunteers from the across the church family and local community have rallied together to donate food, pack and deliver boxes jam-packed full of food, cleaning materials and even activities for children to help defeat boredom over the holidays. More than £3,000 and countless food items have been donated to help provide over 2,316 meals so far! Find out about the Easter holiday Boxes of Hope at maybridge.org.uk/boxesofhope

Pancake fun ◀ Kids Club Competition Children & families worker, Ruth led Maybridge Kids in a pancake decorating competition over the half term holidays. Won by Ezri with a pancake of her sister.


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News from around the world

A ray of sunshine Before the pandemic, we would’ve never imagined not being able to enjoy nature, being outside and gardening. Linda Baker, one of our readers, highlighted a hidden gem at the heart of the Maybridge area – The Woodland Garden and Community Flower Farm at the Maybridge Keystone Centre. We got in touch with Lisa and Clare to ask about the garden (open to the public most days) and the opportunities they’re offering for local people to engage in supported gardening, work experience and volunteering. Lisa writes: "We started Breathing Spaces seven years ago because we know that gardening and being in nature are therapeutic but sometimes people need help to get started or to adapt when they are struggling. Prior to the pandemic, we were offering Garden Clubs for people living with dementia and other support needs, both in the community and in care homes." Due to lockdown, they were no longer able to offer services to clinically vulnerable people, so they tended the garden and flower farm alone. "We agreed that we could do this safely and that the flowers would bring a ray of sunshine to people during these challenging times. The gates to the Centre are open everyday when Covid restrictions permit, so people are welcome to visit and sit in the garden or walk around the field even if we are not there. We will gradually increase the number of opportunities as infection rates fall, so please get in touch if you are interested in joining us." For more information about Breathing Spaces please visit their website breathingspaces.co or call Lisa on 07827 924151.

Remote learning... via Camel In Ethiopia, where over 26 million are out of school due to lockdowns, the Camel Library Programme (run by Save the Children) is continuing to reach over 20,000 children. Camels, traditionally used to carry goods, can transport up to 200 books on their backs. Each one makes sure kids from remote villages can continue to read and learn while at home. The hills are alive A new green energy project by RheEnergise could see some of the UK’s hills turned into batteries. Underground water pipe systems will replicate hydropower technology to generate energy that will be stored to help when electricity demand is high. Upcycled laptops for London students The Restart Project, launched a lockdown campaign calling Londoners to donate the dusty old laptops stuck in cupboards and attics. The laptops are repaired to help disadvantaged children that don’t have access to computers at home.

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CARING FOR YOUR MIND, BODY AND SOUL by Alice Stout

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sn’t the NHS marvellous? We’re so grateful to have our health service. But we’re all aware of how thinly stretched it has become, especially in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic. Julie Ward is our lead Faith and Community (FCN) for Maybridge. I had a chat with her to find out what Parish Nursing involves, what a typical day looks like, and how her services could help someone you know in our community. AS: Hi, Julie! I’ve heard the term before, but can you tell me what Parish Nursing is? JW: To sum it up, it’s all about whole-person healthcare. When people hear ‘nursing’, most think about physical care. But it’s more than that. Our society often approaches the needs of our minds, bodies, and souls separately, focusing on one particular area or a single problem. But we forget it’s all interconnected. Parish Nursing is holistic – it’s all

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about physical, social, and spiritual care. AS: You mentioned physical, social, and spiritual… what does that look like in a practical sense? JW: It’s incredibly varied. I have a small team of volunteers. As the FCN, I do the assessments and then delegate the care required. If it’s more specialised, like taking people to hospital appointments, helping decipher medical jargon, or filling out forms for benefits, that’s my sphere.

Our volunteers step in for more general care, like helping people out with their shopping or befriending and checking in with people. You need to be prepared for anything! Physical combines health assessment and advice, helping to make sense of medical information, and partnering with the local health service. Social encompasses advocacy and befriending, support and practical help in times of illness and stress, as well as carer support. Spiritual includes prayer support, someone to listen, and the chance to talk about spiritual needs. It's a free service, and we want to serve in the best way we can.


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nursing is required, I can go into homes and provide the needed care. We’ve distributed little care packages too. AS: And how can people get in touch?

AS: I was going to ask what a typical day was, but it doesn’t sound like there is such a thing! JW: Not at all. We’re here to bridge the gaps our NHS struggles to cover. Nurses are so pressed to fit in so many appointments that they don’t have time to sit with people. But with Parish Nursing, we have time – it doesn’t have to be a ten-minute appointment. So whether it’s supporting someone struggling with grief, understanding a diagnosis, or needing some mental health support, we’re here and available. AS: That sounds great! So, how did you get involved in Parish Nursing? JW: You have to be a registered nurse to become a FCN. I’d been a registered nurse and health advisor for ten years before becoming a FCN in 2015. You do a bit of extra training and then

start working out from your church—everything you do under Parish Nursing counts towards keeping your nurse’s registration up to date. And we follow many of the same procedures when it comes to code of conduct, data production, and care standards.

JW: You can contact me on 07946 116226 or at parishnurse@maybridge. org.uk Don’t hesitate to get in touch if you some support – Nothing is too big or too small. Try us and see that even if it’s the simplest thing, we can try and have a volunteer give some support as safely as possible. Remember that we are here for you.

AS: Who do you support? JW: Our catchment area is the Maybridge Estate, Durrington, and Goring. Due to Covid-19, we haven’t been able to host as many support activities as we usually do. Previously, we’d be having our weekly Ladies’ Fellowship, monthly Mind-Body-Soul lunches, and Holiday at Home (a summer holiday club for our seniors). During lockdown, we’ve been regularly calling people and supporting them over the phone. We've also been doing doorstep visits as guidelines permit. Of course, if physical

Julie is the lead Maybridge Faith and Community Nurse, supporting individuals in the community in a variety of ways. Julie also oversees our events and support for seniors in the church and community. She is affectionately known as 'Dame Julie'.

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SPEND LESS, LIVE WELL by Richard Greenhorn

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hen money is tight, budgeting to keep track of your resources is key; but there’s more to managing money than just understanding a budget. Vital skills like how to live healthily and cook low-cost meals can make a huge difference to your finances, as well as your quality of life, but if you’ve tried to eat healthily on a low budget, you’ll know how hard it can be. Fresh meat, fruit and vegetables are expensive options in the supermarket, whilst cheap carbs and ready meals have less nutritional value. And there are essential life skills that, for whatever reason, many of us miss

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out on from an early age. But these skills can give us the confidence and tools we need to make good decisions, live well and lift the pressure of money worries. That’s why, as a church, we have partnered with UK charity Christians Against Poverty (CAP) to run a Life Skills course. CAP Life Skills draws together people from your local community to restore hope; empowering people with practical skills to solve their own

problems, make positive decisions and build good relationships. Every day, the news is full of stories about how household budgets are feeling the squeeze, and this free eight-week course is designed to help. Whether it’s learning to create a simple budget or cook low cost family meals,

" I learnt how to be in total control of every penny spent and found it so exciting to save money "


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this course is designed to help normal people save time, money and hassle. We’ve run several Cap Life Skills courses already, and everyone who attends – no matter their financial situation – discovers invaluable tips, advice and support. As one of our mums shared: “ My daughter and I attended the CAP course in 2017 and it was a total eye opener. We both learnt so much which changed the way we managed our finances. To be honest, we thought we were doing okay on our limited income and had been budgeting well. Not so; we were shown so many money saving tips. We came every week and in between sessions would talk about how it was going. At 70 years old

I learnt how to be in total control of every penny spent and found it so exciting to save money on my shopping each week. Even now I find myself so much more disciplined in supermarkets and never spend more than the cash in my purse. If you follow the advice it will make a difference.” Martin Lewis, founder of MoneySavingExpert.com, adds, “I’m a huge fan of CAP. Why not invest in learning how to budget and put in place a simple system? There’s nothing better to start you on the path to having more money in your pocket.” The course is fun, relaxed and completely confidential – why not give it a go and learn something new? Register your interest at maybridge.org.uk/cap

Richard is married to Lisa and has been a partner at Maybridge since 2008. As well as running the CAP Life Skills course, he and a small team of church volunteers offer friendly advice on budget planning and can point you in the direction of further help with finances. The information in this article is for general information and should not be construed as financial or other professional advice. Always obtain independent, professional advice for your own particular situation.

A few tips to get you started: Price checker

Fakeaways

Save on bills

Supermarkets change up their prices all the time, across a range of items, so how do you know you’re getting your weekly shop from the cheapest place? Compare prices using Which? price comparison analysis at which.co.uk

We’re all spending a lot of time at home ordering takeaways, but why not try a fakeaway instead? You can make cheap takeaway alternatives at skintdad. co.uk/tag/fakeaway

From reducing household bills to getting the best shopping deals, moneysavingexpert.com has hundreds of articles and ideas to help you save.

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GOING GREEN ON THE CHEAP by Chloe Satchell-Cobbett

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t first glance, making “conscious” choices can seem like a rich man’s game. Whether it’s installing solar panels on your roof, driving a hybrid or paying fifty quid for a t-shirt that’s organic, recycled, carbonneutral etc. most of us on a budget have come to believe the immortal words of Kermit the Frog: It’s not easy being green. But the truth is, there are plenty of cheap, free or even money-saving choices we can all make to do our bit for the planet.

" making “conscious” choices can seem like a rich man’s game. "

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Not only is meat super expensive, it’s one of the major causes of climate change so consider eating more vegetarian or vegan meals (get online for recipe ideas – you haven’t lived until you’ve tried cauliflower tacos). To support your new vegetarian vibe, try growing your own veg at home (you can even re-grow a lot of vegetables from old scraps) and buy in-season produce to enjoy food at its tastiest, cheapest and most ecofriendly.

Instead of buying new stuff and then ditching it when you’re bored or it breaks, love what you have and learn how to repair or upcycle your worn-out or broken items. The iFixit app has a whole catalogue of repairing how-tos from clothes to appliances, or a quick search on YouTube will bring up an endless series of instructional videos.

Maximise mealtimes

Planning meals and cooking from scratch also saves money, and reduces food waste and plastic packaging. Make sure you don’t let leftovers go to waste, and try composting as much as possible (if you don’t have a compost bin of your own, ask a friend if you can pop your scraps in theirs).

Love your stuff

With items that you can’t love but others might, consider selling or giving it away online. If that fails, head to a charity shop or recycling centre (but try the other stuff first – charity shops and textile recyclers are often unable to shift the sheer amount of donations they receive, so the majority ends up getting shipped overseas and filling landfills in other countries anyway).


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When you need something new, don’t buy it new! For things you won’t use regularly, like a lawn mower, tools or an outfit for fancy occasions, consider borrowing from a friend or going in on a purchase together. Speaking of borrowing, who remembers libraries? How is it that there’s a magical place that lets you borrow books for free, and we’ve all forgotten about it?

There are lots of home habits that you can make cleaner and greener. Making your own natural cleaning products reduces chemicals and saves a tonne of money (Pinterest is great for ideas – it’s amazing what you can do with a bit of baking powder, lemon juice and vinegar). Try washing clothes on a colder setting, and reduce how many baths your take or the length of time you spend in the shower.

Second is best

If you need to buy something for keeps, go second-hand. Check out places like Gumtree, eBay or Oxfam online for secondhand finds (buying from charity shops helps with the overstock issue) or head to freecycle to see if someone is just giving it away.

Bring it home

Chloe is part of the Maybridge staff team, looking after our communications and special events. She loves social justice, raising up women and, of course, caramel doughnuts.

It’s a myth that green energy providers are more expensive – they often save you money – so investigate switching to companies like Octopus, Ecotricity or Bulb. And if you’re going to buy anything new, invest in rechargeable batteries and energy saving light bulbs – they’ll save you money in the long-run.

" It’s a myth that green energy providers are more expensive... "

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WHY DO PEOPLE PRAY? by Piero Regnante

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s a kid, I remember being asked in the playground "what you giving up for lent this year?". For a while that’s what Lent meant to me; giving something up (usually chocolate) and moaning about it for 40 days. And a lot of us still see Lent that way – one day of delicious pancakes followed by 40 days of going without – and then making up for lost time come Easter Sunday with an indecent amount of mini eggs. Lent is a time of ‘less,’ the original Dry January or a New Years’ resolution you only have to keep for a month-anda-half. But, increasingly, Christians around the world are choosing to ‘take-up’ good habits for Lent rather than pausing bad ones; enriching their lives rather than limiting themselves. As a church, we’re doing just that – choosing to spend each day in the run up to Easter by praying more, and praying in new ways. At first glance, choosing to take up prayer for Lent seems no different to dieting or giving up Netflix

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– something you have to make yourself do, but no one actually likes it. But prayer isn’t just a thing you have to do on your “Good Christian To-Do list”; it’s communicating with God. As Christians, we believe God loves us because He made us and longs for us to know Him, to speak to him. We believe that God wants to know us so much that, on Good Friday, he even sent his only Son to die and make a way for us to be with Him. It may sound confusing, and even a bit cruel, but we call it “Good” Friday because in His death – and rising from the dead – Jesus gave the great and unshakeable hope for us all; a relationship with the Creator of the Universe, eternal life with Him and, ultimately, an end to our suffering.

Piero is our Creative & Digital Media Coordinator, helping the church do life together online. He is a Graphic designer and leads the Worship team. He loves cooking, music and is fuelled by coffee.

Try praying It’s not too late to try some of the ideas in our Lent prayer resource at maybridge.org.uk/lent There are all kinds of styles of praying that you can try at any time, not just over Lent. You’ll find more help with prayer at trypraying.org


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" For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. John 3:16 | The Bible

" Right now, as life begins to open up again and we begin to face a new reality in the aftermath of the pandemic, there may be several real and justified reasons to despair or be anxious about the future. But we believe in a God who wants to know you, who cares what happens to you, and has created this marvellous thing called prayer so you can give your fears and worries over to Him. A year or so ago, I went along with a friend to a prayer vigil held for a young girl from Worthing who tragically died whilst abroad travelling. My friend turned to me during the service and said, “Am I a hypocrite? I don’t go to church or really believe in God so is it ok to pray?” In a hushed tone I quickly replied, “No, it’s what church is for.” What I wish I had the time and words to say is this:

You don’t have to have it all together or know fancy words or parts of the Bible to talk to God – many Christians don’t. Prayer isn’t a special Zoom call that only Christians get the link to. God just wants to know you and for you to know Him and, through Jesus, He’s dealt with everything that gets in the way of that. So you can come to Him in confidence, knowing that whoever you are, whatever you’ve done, whatever your life looks like, the simple truth is that He loves you.

So how do you give it a go?

Maybe you’ve never prayed before, or only as a one-off at a difficult time. Maybe you’ve tried praying lots of times but could never quite find a way of doing it that worked for you. As we journey through Lent and look ahead to Easter, maybe you’d like to give it a go and join with us as a church as we focus on prayer? We hope that by doing so you can discover God’s love for you, and the hope he holds out to us all in Jesus.

If anything comes to mind, or there’s something that is troubling you at the moment, bring it to God. Write it down, say it out loud, or place your hand on your heart as you think about it. Keep it simple, and keep it real - even if you think it’s something God wouldn’t want to hear. We promise, He does.

Easter Celebrations We'd love for you to join us online over Easter weekend as we explore and celebrate Jesus - the Hope for us all - all the details are on the back cover.

You can pray on your own or with others. It can be out loud or in your head. You can listen to music, write, draw or read - there are tonnes of ways to pray. Let’s keep it simple for now, and try giving it a go on your own first. These words might help as you start: “God, if you’re there – and I’m not sure you are – I want to know you. Please show me more about who you are and be with me.”

You can say Amen and the end, which basically just means ‘let it be so’.

– If you’ve started giving prayer a go, or have questions about prayer or faith, we’d love hear from you and how you’re getting on. Get in touch at info@maybridge.org.uk

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IT’S OK NOT TO BE OK by Alice Stout

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re you into apocalyptic films? Is the Walking Dead your thing? Or maybe you like being utterly consumed by a Margaret Atwood novel.

We have hundreds of movies and tv series about zombie outbreaks, climate disasters and alien invasions. I couldn’t quite believe the premise of Snowpiercer that’s just come out on Netflix, where civilisation is stuck on a perpetually moving train after the earth has frozen over – sounds like an average winter’s day on Southern Rail to me!

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All of these stories seem a bit far-fetched and unrelatable. They’re always focused on the drama or finding the hero amid the seemingly lost cause. What these narratives often fail to capture is the long-term mental toll the event has on its characters. I don’t know about you, but I was not prepared for this pandemic. I can’t think back to a particular point in

my life that I can single out and go, “Oh, that’s going to come in handy when the world shuts down!” While we’ve all been stuck at home, there has been an onslaught of media advising

" ... how do we strike a balance between validating how we feel, yet not being consumed by gloom? "


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" In the middle of a crisis, you don’t have to be a hero. " us on how to be our most productive selves in lockdown. I have seen countless lists on social media and news sites telling me to learn a new language, take a course to improve my prospects, crochet everything (and I mean EVERYTHING). And while these things are all a great use of the time we have on our hands, now is not the time to be a hero or pile on the pressure of expectations. Experiencing anxiousness, sadness, frustration and grief are very basic, normal human reactions. We live in a culture that insists we must move on from things, have a stiff upper lip, and not let anything get the better of us because, somehow, we must always be above whatever comes our way. But nothing prepared us for Covid-19, especially living over a year isolated from our loved ones. We’re creatures of community (yes, even us introverts). In the middle of a crisis,

you don’t have to be a hero. It’s ok not to be ok. But how do we strike a balance between validating how we feel, yet not being consumed by gloom? A friend of mine recently gave me an analogy. When faced with a problem, people often have one of two reactions: focusing on it entirely and allowing it to consume their whole beings, or shutting it completely out of sight, never to see the light of day. What if there was a third option, a compromise to these extreme reactions? How about we keep things in our peripheral – not allowing it to take up all of our vision, but not letting it fester under the carpet either? This metaphor has helped me acknowledge my feelings and move through them, rather than around them. I am no mental health expert by any means, but

Alice is a freelance Multimedia Content Creator. She is one of our church partners, helping on the digital church team and working on M Magazine. Alice is passionate about equality, human rights and community development, as well as proper cups of coffee.

I hope this resonates with you. Productivity is great, new hobbies are great, but please know that if you’re not ok, that’s completely ok. Allow yourself some space and grace during this time.

Some professional resources to check out Mind UK: www.mind.org.uk/informationsupport/coronavirus/coping-with-mentalhealth-problems-during-coronavirus Scope: www.scope.org.uk/advice-and-support/ mental-health-and-coronavirus NHS: www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/ coronavirus-covid-19-staying-at-home-tips

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SURVIVING PANDEMIC PARENTING by Andrew Henderson

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arenting is hard. According to a recent news item, a wanted man rang the Burgess Hill police to hand himself in because he was so fed up of spending time with the people he lived with and wanted some ‘peace and quiet’ – I’m not saying I’m at that point, but I can relate. At the time I’m writing this, we’re moving towards the anniversary of the first national Lockdown and, hopefully, the end of Lockdown 3 – and a roadmap has been announced for the reopening of schools and meeting together in person. But if the past 12 months have taught us anything, plans change, and we know we’re not exactly snapping back into “normal life” anytime soon. So I’ve pulled out the best tips I can find for surviving pandemic life with kids:

Plan your day Planning the night before can make a huge difference to how you feel waking up, but don’t worry if you don’t end up following the plan exactly. This is real life, not a TV show, and no one is marking your performance.

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Keep a routine If you have a regular routine, especially if you’re still home schooling, it makes planning easier and helps kids feel less anxious. Agree a timetable with the kids but remember to be realistic – younger kids won’t sit for an hour without supervision. If it needs to be 5 minutes, then a break so you can get something else done (like work or the laundry), then another 5 minutes, go with what works – that’s what should shape your plan.

Exercise As much as kids want to slump in front of the TV or play hours of Fortnite and Roblox, they need to move. Go for a daily walk or cycle, or get them to create their own obstacle course round the room or even the whole house. A favourite in our

house is ‘keep it up’ with a balloon, where it’s not allowed to touch the floor. It’s good for you to exercise too, and if you exercise regularly it demonstrates how important it is to your kids.

Set up virtual playdates Our son recently turned 10 and had a zoom call with his friends for around four hours (they just kept restarting when the 40 minute limit cut them off). Being boys, they didn’t really talk just played with all the filter settings, but much hilarity ensued.

Use your support network Calls or texts can make all the difference, and not just asking for help; reaching out to check on others can boost your own wellbeing.


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" If all else fails, remember to tell your kids you love them every day " Sending cards and letters is old school, but shows you’re thinking of them (and who doesn’t love a good bit of post?)

Parenting is hard, but it’s worth the effort and you should be proud that, as a family, you’ve already coped with almost a year of lockdowns and restrictions, home schooling, furlough, working from home, isolation, and living on top of each other. If all else fails, remember to tell your kids you love them every day, and also give them, space and time alone every day – you need it and so do they.

USEFUL WEBSITES careforthefamily.org.uk/family-life/parentsupport nspcc.org.uk/keeping-children-safe/supportfor-parents/ bbc.co.uk/bitesize

Andrew works for HMRC part time and is training to become an osteopath. He is part of our Breakfast Church family, and is married to Cat with two children aged 10 and 11. His passions are karate, good food and he's always wearing shorts – whatever the weather.

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Method

1 2 3 Ann’s Cheese Scones Ann has been part of the Maybridge Community Church family for over a decade, and she’s been part of the local community for even longer! This legendary cheese scone recipe was her mum’s; Margaret Blake, who lived on the Maybridge estate for 60 years. And this photo of Ann was taken on their family memorial bench in Field Place. Prep Time: 15 Minutes Cooking Time: 10 – 15 Minutes Ingredients 1lb/500g self-raising flour 1 desert spoon baking powder 4oz/125g butter or margarine 6oz/190g strong mature cheese, grated ½ pint/275ml milk

THE VOTES ARE IN: We asked our Instagram followers how you should pronounce ‘Scone’ – a whopping 67% said it rhymes with “gone” rather than “cone”.

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Preheat your oven to 200c/180c fan/ Gas Mark 6. Sieve the flour and baking powder together. ub in the butter with your fingers, R or if you have a food processor you can speed this part up by using the “pulse” setting. dd in 4oz/125g of the cheese and A most of the milk (you’ll need a little bit to brush the tops of the scones). Mix to form a soft dough. O NOT roll with a rolling pin. Instead, D divide your dough into 12 and pat into shape. They should be about 3/4 inch thick. rush the tops with your leftover milk B and sprinkle your remaining cheese on top. ake for 10-15 minutes on the top shelf B of the oven, using a standard baking tray, until golden brown. ongratulations... you will now be the C proud owners of delicious scones. Try them on their own, with butter, or with a slice of cheese and dollop of chutney.


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EASTER FUN! Enjoy our collection of Easter puzzles and activities to keep you going between walks and picnics. E

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Daffodil

Jesus

Sunday

Chick

Easter

Lamb

Tomb

Chocolate

Egg

Lent

Cross

Flowers

Spring

Hot Cross Bun

ACT OF KINDNESS CHALLENGE To turn your scones into an eco-friendly Easter gift: wrap a few up in some baking paper and tie with a ribbon or string. Share some joy leaving parcels on doorsteps for your friends, family and neighbours.

OBLIGATORY EASTER YOLKS Why shouldn’t you tell an Easter egg a joke? It might crack up! Where does Easter take place every year? Where eggs marks the spot!

ODD EASTER FACTS • The Easter Bunny legend began hundreds of years ago, in Germany. • More than 1.5 million Cadbury Crème Eggs are produced every day! • The world’s largest Easter egg can be found in Vegreville, Canada and weighs over 2000kg!

Email us your good news, community stories and fun facts to share at info@maybridge.org.uk

JOY | 19


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EASTER AT MAYBRIDGE

Join us this Easter Holy Week Online

STARTS PALM SUNDAY 28TH MARCH

Good Friday Ref lection

FRIDAY 2ND APRIL 10AM

Easter Sunday Celebration

Follow our Holy Week series on social media leading up to Jesus' death and resurrection

A guided reflection through Matthew's Gospel as we remember Jesus on the cross

Join the celebration of Jesus’s rising with our unique service on Easter Sunday morning

SUNDAY 4TH APRIL 10:30AM

MAYBRIDGE.ORG.UK/EASTER