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114 either P Little effort has been done to solve the problem. J Little effort has been made to solve the problem. P Sometimes I have to do a great effort not to cry. J Sometimes Ihave to make a great effort not to cry. make an effort (NOT do): 'The manager would like to see the whole team making more of an effort.' See Language Note at DO

either 1

P I shall either go home to Brazil or my family will come to England. J Either I shall go home to Brazil or my family will come to England. P We either can go by bus or by car. J We can go either by bus or by car. The position of either should be the same as the position of or (i.e. immediately before a subject, immediately before a main verb, immediately after a verb, etc): 'Either stay or go.' 'You should either stay or go.' 'You should stay either here or at home.' 'You should stay with either me or your uncle.' Note that this rule applies mainly in formal styles. In everyday conversation, either often goes immediately before the main verb: 'We can either go by bus or by car.'

P In fact, a motorway wouldn't either disturb the animals because they are used to cars. J In fact, a motorway wouldn't disturb the animals either because they are used to cars. When either is used after notlnever etc, it goes at the end of the clause: 'John isn't going to the party, and Ray doesn't want to go either.'

elder 1

% The restaurant seems to be more popular with elder people. J The restaurant seems to be more popular with older people. P The young man was unhurt but the elder one was taken to hospital in an ambulance. J The young man was unhurt but the older one was taken to hospital in an ambulance. Do not use elder unless you are talking about the members of a family: 'her elder brother', 'my elder son'. /i , I( My sister is just two years elder than me. J My sister is just two years older than me. Someonelsomething is older (than someone/something el@: 'Their children are older than ours.' 'Her husband is five years older.' Elder is mainly used in front of a noun ('my elder sister') and as a pronoun ('Which of the two sisters is the elder?')

2

elderly

P John, her elderly son, is still at university? J

elect

John, her elder son, is still at university. elderly = old: 'an elderly man with white hair and a stick' elder = (of brothers, daughters etc) older: 'our elder daughter'

I( Some people elect marriage'partners who are totally unsuitable. J Some people choose marriage partners who are totally unsuitable.

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Longman Dictionary of Common Errors  
Longman Dictionary of Common Errors  
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