Page 1

Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

Never Forget; PTSD and Structure ​ In the Shadow of No Towers  When the first tower was hit on September 11th, 2001, cartoonist and writer Art Spiegelman  heard the blast from a few blocks away. When it actually fell, he was running through the  hallways of his daughter’s school at the base of the World Trade Center, desperately trying to  find her. Though he and his family were lucky enough to come out of the attack unscathed, the  resulting psychological trauma was immense for Spiegelman. In an effort to process his feelings  after the event, he created the graphic meta­autobiography ​ In the Shadow of No Towers. ​ Not  quite a straightforward autobiography, this book involves several aspects of Spiegelman’s  writing process as well, and provides more of a look in the writer’s mind than a serial retelling of  events. What becomes apparent is that the psychological damage Spiegelman suffered after the  attack was consistent with Post­Traumatic Stress Disorder, which made the resulting narrative a  disjointed series of original comic strips and drawings that don’t conform to any traditional  format. The original work is combined with a several pages of comic strips from the early 20th  century, which were Spiegelman’s one true solace from the mental anguish that plagued him  after 9/11. Upon finishing the book the reader feels inexplicably shaken up, but he/she also feels  a deeper understanding for those affected by the 9/11 attacks. Through the use of metafictional  autobiography, or the inclusion of the author’s thought process, the book goes from being a book  about​  a survivor of trauma, to being a book ​ for​  survivors of trauma. ​ No Towers ​ becomes a guide  through PTSD and despair, offering comfort to the afflicted and greater empathy to the curious.  Unable to effectively process his trauma, Spiegelman set out to write a book about the process  itself.  


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

The lasting effect that 9/11 had on Art Spiegelman is consistent with the symptoms of  post­traumatic stress disorder, a phenomenon that he directly references throughout the book. He  says “I insist the sky is falling, they roll their eyes and tell me it’s only my Post­Traumatic Stress  Disorder,” (2). Although Spiegelman and his loved ones were physically unharmed on that  fateful day, witnessing of the events from a few blocks away had a severe impact on his psyche  for several years. In Shoshana Ringel and Jerrold Brandell’s ​ Trauma: Contemporary Directions  in Theory, Practice, and Research, ​ the authors note that traumatic stress has become more  prevalent and complex in contemporary American life as a result of the mass trauma of 9/11 (7).  Statistically speaking, the numbers have gone up, but the fundamental basis for post­traumatic  stress has changed, as one doesn’t have to have fought in a war to experience it. ​ No Towers​  spans  the course of three years, as he published each newspaper­sized page individually, noting that  their construction was a time­consuming and difficult task. The trauma stuck with him for years,  which may seem somewhat exaggerated or excessive to the reader, but there is a body of  research supporting the persistence of PTSD. According to Ringel and Brandell, Persistent PTSD  occurs when “an individual processes a traumatic event in a manner that leads the person to  recall the event with the same sense of seriousness and danger felt at the same time of the  original trauma,” (17). In that sense, PTSD turns into an endless cycle wherein thinking about the  event in any capacity can trigger the stress caused by the original trauma. This persistence makes  the afflicted believe that the threat is ongoing, which maintains their disabling feelings of  anxiety. Additionally, the persistence of this anxiety is predicated on what are believed to be two  pre­existing conditions within the PTSD­susceptible: that the self is incompetent, and that the  world is a dangerous place. A traumatic event in effect cements these two beliefs, and turns 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

PTSD into a self­propagating phenomenon (18). These conditions are consistently found in  Spiegelman’s character, as he finds himself in a constant battle with the notion of moving on. He  feels as if he “keeps falling through the holes in his head, though he no longer knows which  holes were made by Arab terrorists way in back in 2001, and which ones were always there,” (6).  The attacks have made him feel helpless, but he also acknowledges that he was somewhat  debilitated before 9/11. He was already pessimistic, stating “I know I see glasses as half empty  rather than half full,” and the attacks have made things much worse: “But I can no longer  distinguish my own neurotic depression from well­founded despair,” (8). In that regard, his  feelings of helplessness have increased dramatically in the wake of 9/11. It is also key to note  that Spiegelman’s judaism adds to his overall feeling of inadequacy. In Kristiaan Versluys’ “Art  Spiegelman’s ​ In The Shadow Of No Towers: ​ 9/11 and the Representation of Trauma​ ,”  Spiegelman’s most famous work, a graphic retelling of his father’s experiences in the holocaust  entitled ​ Maus​ , is brought into the conversation. Though the Holocaust most directly impacted  Spiegelman’s father, it’s clear that the event had some effect on him as well: “It has undermined  his self­confidence and made him jumpy and angst­ridden, as well as artistically innovative and  politically committed,” (983). The persecution that his father faced made him see his own people  as targets, and the trauma of 9/11 only served to solidify that anxiety. To make matters worse,  certain Arab Americans openly claimed that the jews caused 9/11, which was a radical idea that  Spiegelman was forced to encounter in real life when an angry woman repeatedly harassed him  on the street (6). He also conforms to the second pre­existing condition for persistent PTSD, as  he views the world as a dangerous place, saying he “was sure we were going to die! [He’s]  always sorta suspected it, but that morning really convinced [him]” (1). This theme of 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

Spiegelman being lost in his own despair is sustained throughout the book, and the metafictional  format helps the reader explore this motif on a more comprehensive level. The reader is able to  see the pictures and read the words of the writer, but they are also given access to the writer’s  contemplation of his own creative struggle. This metafictional insight forces the reader to get lost  in the writer’s thoughts along with him. According to Versluys, the book “records  [Spiegelman’s] fear and panic and stages the see­saw between melancholia or acting­out, on the  one hand, and mourning or working­through, on the other. In that sense, it ​ is ​ a book about 9/11.  It is the record of a psychologically wounded survivor, trying to make sense of an event that  overwhelmed and destroyed all his normal psychic defenses,” (982).  If one thinks of  Spiegelman’s reaction as being stifled by post­traumatic stress, some light can be shed on the  apparent difficult process of constructing the work, and how that process impacted the format of  the work itself. He could barely begin to organize his thoughts, so it’s nothing short of a miracle  that he was able to put together the graphic meta­autobiography that exists today. It was only by  working these events out on the page that Spiegelman was able to begin processing the events.  The PTSD was so impactful that he had no choice but to let the working­through of that stress  become the main subject of his book. As a result, ​ No Towers ​ becomes a guide book for anyone  working through PTSD or any sort of trauma. Even if the reader has not personally suffered a  deep trauma, they are able to see inside of the head of someone who has been afflicted in such a  way, and then gone on to work through that affliction in a constructive manner. Spiegelman  offers his story as an exercise in empathy, and an offering of hope to those in trouble.    Without the metafictional component, the end result of providing the reader with a  guiding text through PTSD would not have been achieved. The metafictional format is a break 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

from the traditional method of storytelling, and it will be useful to provide the reader with a  working understanding of metafiction in order to understand its implications. According to  Rüdiger Imhof’s book ​ Contemporary Metafiction​ , the conventional novel is in balance with two  equal­value forces fields: reality and the reader. Whereas with the metafictional novel “the main  difference lies in the suspension of one of the force­fields. The effects of the reality on the work  as well as the readers have, as it were, been cut off,” (17). In that sense, there is no longer a  balance; reality no longer directly informs the narrative. Similarly, while the conventional novels  aims to mirror reality directly, the metafictional novel aims to create a world of its own. One of  the keys ways in which a narrative creates this alternate reality is by including the author in the  work itself. In​  Shadow of No Towers​  the reader both sees the writer/artist in​  ​ the panels, and has  access to his words and thoughts. Spiegelman wonders “Don’t they know the world is ending???  Or...maybe they’re right! Maybe the world stopped ending!” (9). Though this inclusion may  seem obvious given that the work is autobiographical, there is an important distinction to be  made. The graphic novel in this case is not pure autobiography, as it mixes in several fictional  characters and situations, resulting in the creation of a separate genre; the fictional  autobiography. The self­reflexivity of the novel, or the inclusion of the author in the fiction of  the novel, is what takes the genre a step further, offering a sort of meta­fictional autobiography.  In this genre, the reader is steeped in an alternate reality, where real events are used as the  backdrop for the ramblings of Spiegelman’s mind. Unable to discern fact from fiction, the reader  resigns to absorbing the information and getting lost in Spiegelman’s thought process. The  reading experience is thus a challenging, and ultimately immersive experience, through which  the readers gains a greater empathy for Spiegelman. The adoption of this empathy was not 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

necessarily a conscious effort by Spiegelman, but more of a by­product of the format in which  Spiegelman chose to organize his book. By allowing the use of internal monologue and writing  about the process of writing, Spiegelman is able to say exactly what he wants to say, without  worrying about adhering to a traditional format. In ​ Making Things Present: Tim O'Brien's  Autobiographical Metafiction​ , Robin Silbergleid touches on the value of the meta­fictional  autobiography: “It is precisely this liminal space, between fiction and nonfiction, that allows the  text to do its critical work” (130). Having the work lie in between fiction and nonfiction opens up  new possibilities for the author, as this loose definition allows him/her to comment on their own  craft. He is able to relay the events of 9/11, but also overlay his thoughts, feelings, anxieties, and  musings onto the page. For example, when he’s telling the story of rushing into his daughter’s  school to find her, he frames the story by first stating “Our hero is trapped reliving the traumas of  Sept.11, 2001...” (4). So in that sense, he’s telling a simple story, but hinting at the fact that he’d  rather not be telling that story in the first place. With this added perspective, the reader is able to  think more critically about the creative process that went into what they are reading, as opposed  to just absorbing the information. In addition, Silbergleid writes that the technique of using the  author as the main character “provides a means of engaging the ethical problems involved in  writing about traumatic material, material for which the issue of “true” or the “real” necessarily  remains in question,” (152). Including himself as the main character gives trauma an everyday  face, in effect keeping the story grounded. Spiegelman doesn’t claim that everything he’s  relaying is one hundred percent accurate, instead he’s offering his interpretation to the reader;  attempting to convey not precisely what happened, but how he personally experienced the  events, which includes the aspect of his emotional response. In other words, the technique 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

“addresses the postmodern challenge of the ‘loss of knowledge ­ and establishes the credibility  that more traditional readers desire,” (152). If the reader is unable to relate to the author, then  metafiction has essentially failed as the book might as well just be fiction, but when the  credibility is effectively established, a deeper relationship can develop between author and  audience. Though the relationship becomes a circular, ouroboros­like exchange, it brings the  reader and author closer together by acknowledging the difficulty of the process. Spiegelman  wants to explain that processing trauma is not an easy task, so he allows his PTSD to make the  reading experience difficult; he doesn’t ignore his trauma to tell the story, as doing so would  have presented an inaccurate representation of the event. Versluys writes that “trauma is not  transmissible through words or images, except if the representation has a built­in reference to its  own inadequacy, self­reflexively meditates on its own problematic status, and/or incorporates  traumatic experiences not so much thematically as stylistically,” (988). By embracing his trauma,  he presents a more accurate portrayal of his experience. In effect, offering the reader a realistic,  detailed guide through trauma.   To give an example of how PTSD and metafiction interact on the physical page, the  composition of page 7 is the ideal synthesis of key ideas (fig.1). At the top of the page, the image  of the burning tower is present, as it is on all of the other pages. This image is the representation  of the original trauma, the event that caused all of the trouble in the first place. By placing the  crumbling tower at the top of the page, he is facing the trauma head­on, which turns the rest of  the page into a visual representation of his PTSD. He’s triggering his stress, and then shaping the  resulting paranoia into a creative product. The next panel shows Spiegelman running for cover  under his bed, on top of which happens to be an american flag. He says “I should feel safer under 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

here, but damn it, I can’t see a thing.” There are obvious political implications to this message,  but the important aspect to note is that he still feels unsafe. The next panels show images of a  world divided between republicans and democrats, with Spiegelman in the center meekly  holding up a peace flag. Again, putting the political implications aside, the reader is presented  with the image of a scared and helpless man who feels extremely out of place. The pages finishes  with a short comic strip entitled “An Upside Down World,” wherein Spiegelman mopes around  on the bottom half of the frame, while an ambiguous army marches back and forth on the top  half. He writes “I began this page just as my unelected government began its war to begin all  wars...” The metafictional element becomes more overt with this line of dialogue, as what was  only shown before is now explicitly stated. The reader is now thinking about the process that  went into creating the page, instead of just following the storyline. With the author’s thoughts  expressed on the page in that manner, the reader is able to gain insight into the writer’s  intentions, and get a little bit closer to understanding the strange, disjointed format of the page.  Then the PTSD comes into play, and everything falls into place. The moping Spiegelman says  “Despair slows me down, so I worry whether NYC or I will still be around to see if my page was  well­printed.” It’s the despair that’s slowing down and mixing up his creative process, so he has  decided to make that despair the subject of the work itself. The page has to represent the process,  so it should not be easily understood.   With all of these elements thrown together, ​ No Towers​  can seem like a muddled  landscape of despair and anxiety. However, if the reader factors in Spiegelman’s Post­Traumatic  Stress Disorder, the neurosis of both the subject matter and the format itself can be interpreted  more precisely. The process of working through the stress was so arduous, that whether 


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

Spiegelman realized it or not, it became the main focus of the work. In the end, providing the  reader with an insight into the working­through of trauma. This notion is supported by  Spiegelman’s decision to include a selection of comics from the early 20th century in the later  half of the book. He writes that “The only cultural artifacts that could get past my defenses to  flood my eyes and brain with something other than images of burning towers were old comic  strips; vital, unpretentious ephemera from the optimist dawn of the 20th century,” (10). These  simple images were his only solace from the insanity of processing trauma. By pairing these  comics with his own original work, Spiegelman presents his new narrative as a companion piece,  suggesting that it will provide solace in the same way the old comics did for him. He thus  provides both the source material and the essay on the processing of trauma, ultimately creating  the source of relief he wished he could have had in the wake of 9/11.              

         


Max Friedman 12/09/2015 E324C Doherty  

Bibliography:   ­

Spiegelman, Art. ​ In the Shadow of No Towers.​  New York: Random House. 2004.  

­

Silberglied, Robin. “Making Things Present: Tim O'Brien's Autobiographical  Metafiction.” ​ Contemporary Literature​ . Vol. 50, No. 1 (Spring, 2009), pp. 129­155.  

­

Ringel, Shoshana S.; Brandell, Jerrold R. ​ Trauma :​  ​ Contemporary Directions in Theory,  Practice, and Research. ​ Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications, 2011.  

­

Imhof, Rüdinger. ​ Contemporary Metafiction.​  Heidelberg, Germany: Universitatsverlag.  1986.  

­

Versluys, Kristiaan. “Art Spiegelman’s ​ In The Shadow of No Towers: 9/11 and the  Representation of Trauma.”​  ​ MFS Modern Fiction Studies. ​ Vol 52, No 4 (2006), pp.  980­1003 

   

Never Forget: PTSD and Structure in Art Spiegelman's "In the Shadow of No Towers"  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you