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PROGRESSIVE PEDAGOGY THE TRADITIONAL METHOD OF GRADING AND ASSESSING TENDS TO MAKE STUDENTS FEEL BAD, AND MOTIVATE THEM FOR THE WRONG REASONS

"In the 1980s and '90s, educational psychologists systematically studied the effects of grades.

1. Grades tend to diminish students' interest in whatever they're learning. 2. Grades create a preference for the easiest possible task. 3. Grades tend to reduce the quality of students' thinking.

No recent research has contradicted the earlier "big three" findings, so those conclusions still stand" (Kohn, 2011).


"There is a slight but important difference to me between grading and assessing. Grading is the process of documenting and symbolically representing what students know. Assessing is determining what students currently know and taking action based on that information to help them grow" (Bedell, 2010).

As teachers, we need to take action to help the student in the learning process窶馬ot just judge them for what they cannot produce.

"I can solve a problem without needing to show kindness. I can think without having to solve a problem. But kindness, thinking, and problem solving all rely upon and are related by communication. Without communication, none of the other aspects of curriculum could exist, or if they did, they would be isolated phenomena. We are social animals, and unless we can communicate our ideas, then we cease to be a community and become a collection of unconnected entities" (Heller, 2006).


WHAT EXACTLY IS PROGRESSIVE PEDAGOGY?

"It reflects self-consciously about teaching methods and the teacher-student relationship.

It encourages disagreement and celebrates difference--and treats the classroom as a place where differences can be articulated and analyzed.

It treats students as participants and not as spectators.

It emphasized praxis: active inquiry and investigation.

It seeks to develop a critical awareness of problems, power, and inequalities.

(Columbia, 2012)


REFERENCES Bedell, J. (n.d.). Grading Moratorium. In For the Love of Learning. Retrieved May 23, 2010 Columbia University. (2012). Progressive Pedagogy. In Columbia University Teaching Program. Retrieved May 12, 2012 Heller, Daniel. Curriculum on the Edge of Survival: How Schools Fail to Prepare Students for Membership in Democracy. N.p.: Rowman & Littlefield Education, n.d. 122. Print. Kohn, Alphie. "The Case Against Grades." Educational Leadership Nov. (2011). Web. 12 May 2012.


Progressive Pedagogy