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english@osu

english@osu

Volume 4, No. 1

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Newsletter of the Ohio State University Department of English

Spring 2010

This Year’s Theme: The Changing Face of English Studies

Photo: andyi@flickr

Inside this Issue: New Directions 1 Tim Jensen, Melanie Yergeau Chair’s Message 4 Richard Dutton Asian American Studies 6 Martin Joseph Ponce New Look at Henry VIII 10 Chris Highley Faculty Publications 14 Sexuality Studies 16 Debra Moddelmog Digital Literary Studies 19 Elizabeth Hewitt Postcolonial Studies 22 Pranav Jani Study Abroad 26 Mark Conroy, Ray Cashman Awards and Honors 29 Thank You 32 Margo Wolanin

Editors: Erin McGraw and Les Tannenbaum, with the gracious help of Brenda Jo Brueggemann and Julia Voss

New Directions in English Pedagogy: Using Digital Media Tim Jensen and Melanie Yergeau, Graduate Students in Digital Media

The average undergraduate entering a college classroom spends over 50 hours a week “media multitasking,” according to the most recent Kaiser Family Foundation survey. Whether you view this as exciting news about access to information or a terrifying indication of a generation addicted to screens of all sorts (or, if you’re like us, somewhere in between), the challenge is the same: how can we best teach them? The community of educators here in the English department is responding to this question in unique and diverse ways, pioneering new pedagogies with the aid of digital tools, teaching students with technology—and also about their use of technology. But, according to a recent and highly unscientific Facebook poll among eight biased individuals, for every English instructor who sings the praises of digital technologies, there are at least seven who worry that every shiny metal object with a text-pad contributes to the mounting grammar and mechanics apocalypse. “So, why do we worry about teaching students how to write and communicate in digital environments?” asks Cynthia Selfe, Humanities Distinguished Professor and Co-Editor of Computers and Composition. “Increasingly, the world is bound together by digital networks and those citizens who function as effective communicators are going to have to be able to operate within such environments.”

Take the First-Year Writing Program, for instance, which, for the past three years under the direction of Professor Scott Lloyd DeWitt, has expanded pedagogical possibilities by introducing hybrid scheduling: one day a week ENG 110 classes meet in a traditional classroom and the other in a room equipped with enough computers for each student. Curtis Vickers, who arrived here this year as an MFA student, was thrilled (and relieved) by the set-up: “It’s a little like taking a painting class without any canvases in the room—it never made any sense to me, at my old school, that we would talk about writing and then not do it in the classroom.” Having technology in the classroom allows instructors to seize teachable moments in ways not otherwise available, like being able to instantly retrieve materials that are spontaneously referenced during discussion, displaying them on the screen for all to see. For many, the opportunities for collaboration are central to their use of digital technology. Alexis Martina, a Ph.D.candidate in Victorian

Profile for Maura Heaphy

English@OSU: Newsletter of the OSU Departmetn of English  

Newsletter of the OSU Departmetn of English

English@OSU: Newsletter of the OSU Departmetn of English  

Newsletter of the OSU Departmetn of English

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