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Features

26 » Adventure

ADVENTURE X How far would you go to explore a world unknown to all but a few? Story by Kyle Ellison

36 » Hawaiian Soul/ Island Business

AN APPETITE FOR CULTURE How Maui farmers are cultivating ancient wisdom to feed a population—and a hunger for culture. Story by Lehia Apana

44 » Maui Style

MADE ON MAUI Meet an avid bunch of DIYers who’d love to have you join them. Story by Ilima Loomis

About Our Cover

51 » At Home

A HOME BY THE SEA As a child, Deanna Ferguson was enchanted by a cottage in a romantic ghost story. In 2013, she found it. Story by Sarah Ruppenthal

64 » Great Finds

INTERIOR MOTIF Make your statement with accessories that shine. Compiled by Marluy Andrade

67 » Closet Rescue

SPACE: THE FINAL FRONTIER Turning a disaster area into a room for all reasons. Story by Rita Goldman

74 » Real Estate Trends

IN THE MARKET FOR LUXURY? If you want to know what’s happening in high-end homes, ask the expert. Story by Diane Haynes Woodburn -------------------------------This leaf belongs to the kalo (taro) plant, which once sustained the islands’ people and their culture. Today’s farmers are striving to restore the plant Hawaiians consider mankind’s older brother.

RODRIGO MORAES

Reis Shimabukuro, of Capturing Hawaii Photography, took this idyllic island image at Olowalu, on Maui’s southwest coast. It was part of a shoot for his friend Robert Jones, of Hangloose Hammocks Hawaii, and we’d say he perfectly captures the slogan “Relax, you’re in Hawai’i.”

« ISLAND LIVING»

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Departments

THIS ISSUE ONLINE

14 Contributors

Web-exclusive content at MauiMagazine.net (available beginning in March)

16 Publisher’s Note

« DINING »

DINNER AND A SHOW Catch a video of whales joining the party as our dining editor samples the fare on five catered sails. MauiMagazine.net/maui-dinner-cruise.

82 Dining Feature

OUTSTANDING IN HIS LO‘I Kalo farmer Bobby Pahia takes you into his fields to learn about the plant that fed an ancient people. MauiMagazine.net/kalo-farmer.

By Diane Haynes Woodburn

18 Talk Story

Fresh off the coconut wireless ~ by Ilima Loomis, Heidi Pool & Shannon Wianecki

106 Calendar

What’s happening where, when, and with whom

112 Who’s Who

Seen making the scene on Maui

114 A Perfect Day on Maui

CITIZEN CANINE Our local guide gets a new leash on life. Story by Lehia Apana

Stories by Becky Speere

ONE FOR THE ROAD Maui Craft Tours offers delectable tastes of the island.

UFO MY! Watch NASA’S animated film of a visitor from beyond our solar system at MauiMagazine.net/asteroid.

88 Chef ’s Kitchen

PŪPŪ CONTEST Calling all cooks, professional and amateur! Send us your original recipe for an island-inspired appetizer, and we’ll publish the winners in our May/June food issue. Did we mention there’ll be prizes? Details at MauiMagazine.net/maui-pupu-contest.

90 Dining Highlights

CITIZEN CANINE Lehia Apana shares a video of a day’s adventures with an on-loan, four-legged friend. MauiMagazine.net/beach-buddies.

AFTER-SCHOOL SPECIAL Ben Rachunas teaches kids how to cook—and a whole lot more. FARE SAILING Maui caterers hit the high seas to create cuisine du tour.

96 Dining Guide

A short list of our favorite places to eat all over the island

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Above: A chicken and white-bean chili so easy, kids could make it. And they do. Get the recipe on page 89.

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There’s a saying known throughout the Islands: Maui nō ka ‘oi, Hawaiian for “Maui is the best.” We hope you think so, too.

What’s your favorite room in your house? My favorite place isn’t in the house. It’s the patio where we all gather to eat, drink, and talk story. It’s like an outdoor great room (with more breeze than we get in the house), and is loaded with a sixty-inch television, games, full kitchen and lots of seating. —Shelby Lynch

PUBLISHER Diane Haynes Woodburn CREATIVE DIRECTOR John Giordani SENIOR EDITOR Rita Goldman MANAGING EDITOR Lehia Apana DINING EDITOR Becky Speere HOME & GARDEN EDITOR Sarah Ruppenthal WEBSITE MANAGER Adelle Lennox ASSISTANT DESIGNER Shelby Lynch GREAT FINDS EDITOR Marluy Andrade EVENT PHOTOGRAPHER Mieko Horikoshi CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Matt Foster CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Kyle Ellison, Ilima Loomis, Heidi Pool, Shannon Wianecki

A LOHA W H A L E R S V I L L AG E

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

The kitchen, because I love to eat! And right after pouring my morning coffee I can just walk out on the lānai and enjoy an amazing ocean view!—Chris Evans

Lehia Apana, Bryan Berkowitz, Jim Denny, Kyle Ellison, Chris Evans, John Giordani, Mieko Horikoshi, Rodrigo Moraes, Ed Robinson, Becky Speere, Forest & Kim Starr

My kitchen, because that’s where big, important decisions are made, like “What’s for dinner?” and “Should I have a second slice of cheesecake?” —Sarah Ruppenthal The kitchen. I love to eat and I love to cook. Entertaining friends in the kitchen, whether we’re making pizza or Korean BBQ, is always fun and inclusive.—Becky Speere

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Definitely the lānai—if I’m out there it means I’m either watching the sunset, eating dinner, or watching my son ride his bike.—Kyle Ellison

My bedroom. From there I can see shooting stars and the full moon.—Mieko Horikoshi

The kitchen, because creating delectable meals is one way I express my affection for friends and loved ones.—Heidi Pool

MOVING? Send address changes to Haynes Publishing Group, 90 Central Ave., Wailuku, HI 96793. Please note: If the post office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, Haynes Publishing has no further obligation, unless we receive a corrected address within one year of that notification.

My bedroom. Dancing in front of my mirror to loud music has to be one of my favorite activities. Plus, that’s where I witness the sunrise and wake to the chirping of lovebirds. This serenity kicks my day off right.—Marluy Andrade

Publishers of Maui Nō Ka ‘Oi, Kā‘anapali, Island Living, Eating & Drinking, and Queen Ka'ahumanu Center magazines. 90 Central Ave., Wailuku, HI 96793; 808-242-8331. ISSN 2473-5299 (print)| ISSN 2473-5469 (online) ©2018 Haynes Publishing Group, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reprinted and/or altered without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising matter. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs are welcome, but must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. The publisher assumes no responsibility for care and return of unsolicited material. Individual issues are available upon written request at $4.95 per issue plus postage. Yearly U.S. subscriptions $21; Canadian subscriptions $29; foreign subscriptions $40. Payable in U.S. currency. MauiMagazine.net Maui Nō Ka 'Oi Magazine is printed on acid- and chlorine-free paper from Sappi—an environmental leader in the industry whose paper products comply with the Forest Stewardship Council and Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

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Welcome to our spring issue! Reflecting on the season, Alfred Lord Tennyson once wrote, “In the Spring, a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.” What he could have added: “which often leads to diapers.” I went shopping for diapers a few days ago. (No, not for myself, not yet). Our young neighbors Kaili and Jeff Scheer are expecting their first. Becky Speere (MNKO’s dining editor) and I decided to host a small brunch at my house in honor of the expectant parents (and baby). I couldn’t wait to go shopping. Who can resist those adorable tiny clothes, cuddly stuffed animals, cozy blankets? “What do you need?” Becky and I asked. “We really have everything,” our friends replied. “The nursery is stocked; all we need now is diapers.” Diapers? My heart sank. No toys, no blankets with silk ribbons, no frilly rompers that only a grandma would love. Buck up, I told myself. For once in your life, purchase something practical. How hard can that be? Holy cow. Have you perused the diaper aisle lately? I felt as though I’d fallen down the rabbit hole. There are dozens of absolutely unrecognizable brands. Some diapers are earth friendly, some are contoured, some look like blue jeans. You can choose organic cotton, Egyptian cotton, bleach free, extra absorbent, ultra comfy, polka dot or plain. There is even a brand that has a wet alert—the pattern turns a different color when the diaper needs changing. Imagine that. Suddenly, and without filters, I do. I imagine our friends walking around in pants that light up when the wearer sneezes unexpectedly. The grocery store would look like a Vegas showroom. “Oops,” some sweet old lady might giggle, “I’m a little lit.” But I digress. Perhaps I need to do some research before I make this purchase. No diapering experience for more than thirty years can put one at a distinct disadvantage. But I’m intelligent. I know how to Google “diapers.” Oh dear. Did you know there is a store devoted to adult baby-diaper lovers (ABDL)? I’m not kidding. There is an actual brick-and-mortar store just for adults who enjoy dressing in diapers. The store brags a full line of snappies bodysuits; they even have a seven-and-a-half-foot crib and an oversized rocking horse. Who knew? But again, I digress. I choose a link to the most recommended brands. Unfortunately, I find the brand names way more fun than the information. Some of my favorites: Bottombumpers, Mamy Poko, Econobum (this one cracks me up), and Fuzzi Bunz. (I imagine this to be big in the ABDL world). Also Happy Heinys, Bumgenius (now there’s an image), and my absolute favorite, Tiny Tush. There are some seriously fun folks in the diaper business. Clearly, I will have to call on an expert. The brunch is tomorrow, and I am completely undone in the diaper world. I send an emergency text to my niece Rebecca, who has the most adorable three-year-old in the world (since mine grew up), and whom I trust implicitly. Rebecca sets me straight on which PC organic brand to buy; she even recommends a box or two of the ones that change color—just to give the new parents a leg up, so to speak. I head to Target, where normally I would be lost in a labyrinth of consumer overload. But today, armed with information, I am a Diaper Diva. Deftly, and with purpose, I pass by those wannabe brands and head straight to the right stuff, filling my cart with close to 1,000 diapers —this baby is covered! The next morning, Becky and her husband, Chris, arrive to help host our brunch. The table is laden with cheeses, fruits, homemade bread, Becky’s breakfast casserole with farm-fresh eggs, and a liliko‘i meringue pie. Our guests arrive: a glowing couple awash in the excitement of the new life they are about to experience. “Did you get the diapers?” Becky asks in a whisper when it is clearly time to bring out the big box of baby loot. “Yep,” I answered. “You wouldn’t believe how much fun I had!” “Life goes on,” my father would say. Wishing you a spring filled with sunshine, new beginnings, and people you love.

Diane Haynes Woodburn Publisher

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The Visitor Karen Meech had just returned to Honolulu from a conference and was looking forward to some downtime when the phone rang. It was Richard Wainscott, head of the PanSTARRS telescope. The asteroid-scanning observatory on Haleakalā had just detected something unprecedented—a strange object hurtling toward our solar system. “Something was a little odd about this one,” recalls Meech, a planetary astronomer and astrobiologist at the University of Hawai‘i Institute for Astronomy.

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Story by Ilima Loomis

The object careening toward us was an asteroid from another star system—the first known object to enter our solar system from interstellar space. “My thought was, we need to get all the telescope time we possibly can, immediately,” Meech says. The object was coming in fast, and would leave just as quickly. Since it only shines with reflected sunlight, each time it doubled its distance from the sun, it would get 10,000 times fainter. “In the end, we had less than two weeks when the object would be


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The artist’s rendering on page 18 depicts NASA’s best guess as to what the asteroid looks like. The illustration at the top of this page shows the object’s probable trajectory through our solar system. Above: The Pan-STARR telescope at the summit of Haleakalā was first to detect the asteroid, which—at least on Earth—now bears a Hawaiian name.

bright enough to characterize it,” she says. To get a closer look at this strange object and “characterize” it—learn its size, shape, spin, density, and, if possible, what it might be made of—Meech and her team of scientists would need to look at it with some of the world’s most powerful telescopes, and fast. It can take as long as six months to get access to a major telescope, but observatory directors typically set aside discretionary time for last-minute events like this. The team ended up getting time on telescopes on both Mauna Kea, on Hawai‘i Island, and in Chile, and then raced to study it, compressing the usual weeks of analysis into a few days. “Between learning about it and submitting the paper to [the journal] Nature was nine days,” Meech says. Just one thing was missing: the aster-

oid needed a name—something with a little more gravitas than “1I/2017/U1,” its technical designation. Ka‘iu Kimura, director of the Imi Loa Astronomy Center in Hilo, and her uncle, UH–Hilo Hawaiianlanguage professor Larry Kimura, came up with ‘Oumuamua. “It means a messenger or scout,” Ka‘iu explains. Meech asked for expedited approval of the name from the International Astronomical Union—and got it in time for publication in Nature on November 20. Meech says the name is perfect. “This really is a voyager from somewhere else, and this may be its first passage close to a star since it left its home star system,” she says. “It’s just like the voyagers from Polynesia who set out from home, not knowing if they would make landfall.”

BOTTOM: FOREST & KIM STARR

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TALK STORY day in the life

Shelf Life NAME Holoholo | TITLE Bookmobile THE NAME SPEAKS VOLUMES Actually, my name is Hawaiian, and translates as “to go traveling for pleasure,” but I do carry a lot of volumes—about 3,000 books, periodicals and DVDs—everywhere I go. And I go to about forty locations every three weeks. I’m easy to find, thanks to Maui designer Saedene Yee-Ota, who created my eyecatching look: a table of my contents as a row of books behind an artistic interpretation of ‘Īao Valley, which is close to my home, the carport at Wailuku Public Library. Because I have a rollout canopy that shades my student friends while they wait to come aboard, people sometimes mistake me for a food truck, but I can assure you that I’m 100 percent bookmobile! THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS ARE FOR My Cummins hybrid engine first roared to life in

2016. I don’t mean to toot my own horn, but I came with a hefty $300,000 price tag. In addition to all those volumes I carry, I have an onboard computer system, Wi-Fi with booster, solar panels, air conditioning, and a built-in sound system—paid for entirely with funds the Maui Friends of the Library raised, over three years, by selling thousands of used books. With most books going for less than a dollar, that’s a lot of books! I like all the Friends, but one of my favorites is Michael Tinker. Besides being my driver, he takes excellent care of me, washing me by hand every couple of weeks, and taking me to Steve at Truck Shop Maui when I need extra attention. My other best friend is librarian Jessica Gleason. She helps hundreds of my other friends—who range from preschoolers, to school-age keiki, to kūpuna (senior citizens) select items to borrow. I’m especially proud of being able to bring reading materials and audiobooks to folks who can’t easily get around. I even have a wheelchair lift. It positively makes my engine purr to

see the smiles on the faces of my youngest borrowers as they climb aboard, clutching their bright-red library cards. “Holoholo has a huge fan club, [from] seventeen-yearold Raven, who wishes she could live on the bookmobile, to ninety-nine-year-old Esther, who regularly checks out advanced astronomy books,” Jessica says. THEY’RE PLAYING MY SONG I may be the only bookmobile around with its own theme song. “Uncle Wayne” Watkins, who heads up the Howling Dog Band, composed the catchy ditty just for me. The chorus goes: “Hey now, people, gather around, Holoholo Bookmobile is comin’ to town, bringin’ everybody somethin’ good to read.” Yeah! PAGING HOLOHOLO The Hawai‘i State Library System (my boss) has a website with my schedule: LibrariesHawaii.org/ wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Spring2018- Bookmobile-Schedule-FINAL.pdf. If that’s too much to type, you can call Wailuku Public Library at 2435766 for information. Story by Heidi Pool

Maui Nō Ka ‘Oi Mar–Apr 2018

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TALK STORY in season

Spring Serenade

Story by Shannon Wianecki Photograph by Jim Denny

It’s springtime, which means the night sky above Haleakalā is filled with wondrous sounds. Hawaiian petrels, or ‘ua‘u, return after many months, sometimes years, at sea to their underground nests atop Maui’s 10,023-foot-tall volcano. As the slate-grey seabirds fly home, they sing, chirp, and yap like excited puppies. These longdistance fliers once ruled the islands from shore to summit. Petrels were likely the archipelago’s most numerous avian species. Their nutrient-rich droppings helped build Hawaiian forests. The massive seabird colonies of Hawai‘i’s past disappeared with the arrival of humans. Introduced cats, rats, and mongooses zeroed in on petrel burrows and preyed on chicks and eggs. Now ‘ua‘u mainly nest on Haleakalā’s frigid summit, where their tunnels into the cinderscape are monitored by National Park staff. A second large petrel colony exists on Lāna‘i and possibly another on West Maui. Early Hawaiians named the birds after their call, the signature “ooo-ahhh-ooo” sung while heading home to feed their chicks regur-

gitated squid. In fact, ‘ua‘u have a diverse repertoire of chitters and squeaks. “One night on Lāna‘i I made a list of seventeen different sounds the birds were making as they flew at high speed over the breeding colony,” says Jay Penniman, Maui Nui Seabird Recovery Project manager. He and his team survey native seabird populations and restore nesting habitat. They were the first to discover a large colony of ‘ua‘u on Lāna‘i. The nighttime music tipped them off. Penniman’s team also responds to reports of grounded or injured petrels. The birds primarily feed at night on bioluminescent jellyfish and squid. Penniman theorizes that inexperienced fledglings mistake bluish electric lights on land for their favorite snacks. Disoriented birds circle the lights until dropping of exhaustion. Light pollution is an under-acknowledged health concern—both for wildlife and humans. Do yourself a favor: get away from the city lights. Visit Haleakalā after sundown. Tilt your head up to the dark, velvet sky and delight in the starlight and the seabirds’ serenade. Maui Nō Ka ‘Oi Mar–Apr 2018

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ADVENTURE

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ADVENTURE How far would you go to explore a world unknown to all but a few? STORY BY KYLE ELLISON PHOTOGRAPHY BY ED ROBINSON

More than 200 species of marine life inhabit Molokini crater. Some, like the blackand-white ‘alo‘ilo‘i (Hawaiian damselfish) are endemic to these islands; others, like bright red ‘ū‘ū (soldierfish) are found in waters around the globe. Whether endemic, indigenous, or introduced, all combine to create an aquatic kaleidoscope out on the reef. Maui Nō Ka ‘Oi Mar–Apr 2018

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ADVENTURE

Above: An avid diver for forty-five years, Ed Robinson still acts as one of the guides on his weekly Adventure X trip. He’s had his own company since 1982, and when he isn’t exploring South Maui’s waters, he’s leading dive trips around the world, from Indonesia to Fiji. Top: Robinson’s boat, Sea Spirit, isn’t fancy; it just takes experienced divers on adventures that would knock your fins off.

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I’ve been on scuba trips from Nicaragua to New Zealand, and I’ve never once had the dive instructor ask where I wanted to go. Then again, I’ve never been on a dive charter that’s quite like Adventure X—a weekly trip that’s specifically for advanced divers and photographers. Offered by Ed Robinson’s Diving Adventures, the experience is much more hands-off than you’d find on standard dive charters— ones in which you’re assigned a guide and are told to stay right behind them. Adventure X puts a couple of guides in the water—and you can hang with them if you want—but you’re also free to explore on your own. As Ed says, addressing our group of twelve, “We aren’t going to be looking over your shoulder down there—so keep an eye on your air—and we aren’t going to slap your hand if you decide to wander away from the group.” Our democratic decision-making has led us to Molokini crater, where we prepare to dive the “back wall,” one of Hawai‘i’s best dive sites. Considering that we’ll be down pretty deep—between eighty and one hundred feet—I decide to stay pretty close to the guides. Some other divers have underwater cameras, and are planning to seek out some colorful marine life on their own. All Ed asks is they stay close enough to the group that they can see other divers’ bubbles, which at Molokini’s back wall can be upwards of a hundred feet. That amount of space is great for photography, since critters can sometimes be spooked by large groups, and other divers might stir up sand or get in the way of the photo. While the back wall doesn’t have any sand (just an awesomely vertical cliff), our second dive site, Marty’s Reef, is sixty feet deep with a sandy bottom, so being able to swim off on your own is a

BOTTOM: KYLE ELLISON

“Well,” asks Ed. “Any vetoes on where we go?”


Above: Easily mistaken for sponges or rocks, frogfish are masters of disguise who camouflage themselves to adapt to their surroundings. Their color and texture help them blend with the background, where they’ll sit for days or weeks, waving a fin in front of their mouths in hopes of attracting prey. A frogfish can open its mouth to an astonishing twelve times its normal size. When prey is in range, the fish opens that flexible mouth and inhales its meal in six to ten milliseconds—one of nature’s quickest attacks. Right: Despite being distant cousins to sharks, hāhālua (manta rays) are gentle giants that don’t have barbs, stingers—or teeth. They feed by filtering water through their gills. Besides being exceptionally agile, manta rays have the largest brain of any fish. Maui Nō Ka ‘Oi Mar–Apr 2018

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ADVENTURE huge plus for photographers. The reef is off the Mākena coast, and within minutes of dropping to the bottom, I’m surrounded by schools of weke (goatfish) who patrol a cluster of coral heads as if they’re guarding a fort. Minutes later, as I hover weightlessly over the sand and remember how much I love the silence and serenity of being underwater, a huge pair of dark wings go flapping off into the blue. A few of the divers around me quickly reach for their cameras, as a massive manta ray calmly glides by. At seventy, Ed seems as spry and enthusiastic as I imagine he was in 1971, when he first began diving in Maui waters. He is also an accomplished photographer himself, so it makes sense he offers a trip that’s geared toward getting the shot. So what are Ed’s tips for great underwater photos? “Try to separate the subject from the bottom, shoot up, and aim for good contrast. That, and just take a lot of pictures,” he says. “And then don’t show anyone the bad ones.” For more information on Adventure X, contact Ed Robinson’s Diving Adventures at 808-879-3584, or visit MauiScuba.com.

A diver explores the crystalline waters of Molokini’s back wall. Opposite: In the 1950s, the bluestripe snapper (better known as ta‘ape) was introduced to Hawai‘i from French Polynesia in hopes of creating a commercial fishery. But its taste never really caught on, and these reef predators have decimated native fish populations.

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Above: A mere one to two inches long, harlequin shrimp are ornamental darlings of Maui’s reefs. In Hawaiian waters, the monogamous shrimp (who are often seen in pairs) have spots the color of red wine, while harlequin shrimp found elsewhere in the world are bedecked in royal blue. All of them, however, dine exclusively on starfish, which they flip upside down to keep them from escaping—and then proceed to eat live. Left: Puhi paka, the yellowmargin moray, is only threatening to divers if provoked. Hawaiians feared their aggressive, toothy behavior, and prized their flesh as a delicacy that was reserved for ali‘i, or chiefs.

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Above: Like tako (octopus), ‘ū‘ū (soldierfish) are best known in Hawai‘i by their Japanese name: menpachi. Sought for their soft, flavorful meat, these distinctive red fish, with dark, oversized eyes, are rarely seen by day, preferring to hide in caves and small crevices in the reef. The silvery fish swimming above the menpachi are weke, or goatfish. Unlike their nocturnal neighbors, weke are commonly spotted in Hawaiian waters, their large schools hovering above Maui’s shallow reefs. Although prized by fishermen, weke have a toxin inside their heads that can cause hallucinations and terrible nightmares; local wisdom warns that when eating weke, one should avoid the meat near the head. Hawaiian legend tells of Pahulu, the god of nightmares, who is forced to flee Lāna‘i when a young prince, Kaululā‘au, rids the island of spirits. In his escape, Pahulu hides inside a weke, where he remains.


ADVENTURE

Right: On Molokini’s back wall, divers explore a vertical cliff that’s full of striated layers of rock formed by volcanic eruptions. From December through April, it’s common for divers to swim to the soundtrack of humpback whales singing in the distance.

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ADVENTURE

Schools of goatfish patrol coral heads as if guarding a fort. 34

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Above: Since frogfish rarely move from their perch, they’re easy for dive guides to locate—the fish are usually sitting in the same spot as where they were seen on the previous dive. Top: When traveling in schools, weke are known to engulf a diver in a swarm of wriggling bodies. Bottom: Along Molokini’s back wall, moano kea (blue goatfish) share a coral head with two ‘ōmilu (bluefin trevally) and a nūnū (trumpetfish).


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Maui No Ka 'Oi Magazine Mar-Apr 2018  

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Maui No Ka 'Oi Magazine Mar-Apr 2018  

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