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2021 MAUI CHAMBER LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES The County Most Impacted By COVID-19

PRESENTED BY:


CONTENTS

2

18

C O V I D

1 9

I M P A C T S

6

M A U I

V I S I T O R

I N D U S T R Y

22

M I N I M U M

W A G E

W H A T

W E

N E E D

7 C O S T

O F

L I V I N G

OUR MISSION: 9

To advance and promote a

E C O N O M I C

D I V E R S I T Y

healthy economic environment for business, advocating for a responsive government and

14 U I

quality education, while &

S A F E

H A R B O R

preserving Maui's unique community characteristics.


OUR MESSAGE To Dear Elected Officials & Chamber Members, Leading is always difficult with competing requests and limited funds, but this year is going to be particularly challenging as COVID-19 has highlighted broken systems; shut down our economic driver (visitor industry) and many other industries; created extreme hardships for businesses, families, visitors, and government; raised needs to extraordinary levels; and brought major funding deficits, sickness, and even death. Now, more than ever, we are called to prioritize spending on necessities, drive our economic recovery, fix antiquated technology, eliminate old and extraneous regulation and seize opportunities for success - not only for our survival, but for the future of our children, their children, and for generations to come. During this time, Maui County was and still is the most visitor industry dependent County in our state, which caused us to go from the lowest unemployment in the nation to the highest for multiple months in 2020. Given this and the resulting business struggles, we published this electronic booklet to illustrate our unique and shared positions with businesses statewide. While there are numerous urgent issues, we have pared down to five critical priorities this legislative session. They are essential to helping Maui County and statewide businesses survive and advance our economic development efforts for long-term growth and prosperity. This booklet also contains additional information to keep other high level concerns top of mind as we progress beyond the pandemic to future planning. For all who read this publication, we hope you take the time to read it in its entirety to understand the data that drives our recommendations and call or email us if you have any comments or questions. We appreciate the work of our elected officials and their staff who serve the people of Hawaii. We are here to serve you as you work to best meet the needs of our County and State. Please do not hesitate to call on us. Sincerely, Pamela Tumpap Maui Chamber of Commerce President

TOP 5 PRIORITIES 1. VISITOR INDUSTRY SUPPORT 2. HOLDING UI AT SCHEDULE C 3. REDUCING BUSINESS MANDATES THAT INCREASE THE COST OF. DOING BUSINESS (LIKE HEALTHCARE AND FAMILY LEAVE), ELIMINATING UNNECESSARY REGULATIONS AND STREAMLINING STATE PERMITTING PROCESSES 4. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 5. PREVENTING A MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE DURING THIS CRISIS *AFFORDABLE HOUSING & RENTALS WAS A CLOSE #6

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MAUI COUNTY COVID-19 IMPACTS Maui Island saw an increase in the unemployment rate from

to 35.7%

2.1% in March 2020

in April 2020.

However, we did not see the same recovery as the rest of the nation or state and had continued high unemployment rates through 2020.

"Kahului-WailukuLahaina metro area had the highest unemployment rate in the nation."

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Kahului-Wailuku-Lahaina metro area had ... The lowest unemployment rate in the nation in March at 2.1%

The highest unemployment rate in the nation in the months of April, May, September, October and November and the second highest in August. PAGE 2


APRIL

MAUI COUNTY BUSINESS DEVESTATION - APRIL The first Small Business Survey, conducted by UHERO in April, shows the initial devastation of Maui County businesses compared to the state, especially in the following areas:

57.19% of Maui County businesses were shut down, compared to 36.10% for the State of Hawaii.

47.67% of businesses who responded in Maui County said they did not believe their business would survive compared to 25.94% for the State of Hawaii. 61.46% of businesses reported their revenues were down 90-100% (No revenue coming in January-March) compared to 34.03% for the State of Hawaii.

57.19% of Maui County businesses were shut down, compared to 36.10% for the State of Hawaii.

JULY

35.51% of businesses in Maui County still reported being completely shut down, while only 13.48%reported being shut down for the State of Hawaii.

MAUI COUNTY BUSINESS DEVESTATION - JULY It is clear from the second survey, conducted in late July, that Maui County businesses were still facing more difficulties than the rest of the state in the following areas:

35.51% of businesses in Maui County still reported being completely shut down, while only 13.48% reported being shut down for the State of Hawaii.

24.32% of Maui County businesses did not believe their business would survive and 41.17% anticipated more staff cuts and other reductions, compared to 16.84% and 34.57% for the State of Hawaii respectively.

62.02% of Maui County businesses reported their revenues were down 90-100% (in revenue coming in January-July) compared to 18.78% for the State of Hawaii.

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WE HAVE A LONG ROAD AHEAD Maui County economic recovery is projected to take years. According to the UHERO 2020 Fourth Quarter Forecast, it could be years before Hawaii recovers.

The forecast for Maui County shows the unemployment rate decreasing from 19.3% in 2020 to 16.7% in 2021, 6.7% in 2022 and 5.2% in 2023. This forecast does not show when we will return to the pre-pandemic rate of 2.6%.

However, these statistics are from the baseline forecast scenario, meaning we could recover faster or slower (depending on the virus, vaccines, shutdowns/restrictions, etc.). Given this projected recovery period, businesses will continue to face significant struggles for the next several years.

Forecast for Maui County's Unemployment Rate 2020 - 2023

62.02% of Maui County businesses reported their revenues were down 90-100% (in revenue coming in January-July)

20%

15%

10%

5%

0% 2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

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MAUI EXODUS Residents are leaving, especially the younger generation. According to Hawaii

An alarming 45% of residents are choosing to leave Hawaii or considering doing so. Two-thirds of 18-34 year olds have considered leaving or have a member of their household who has considered leaving or left the state." Perspectives, "

WHY ARE RESIDENTS LEAVING OR CONSIDERING LEAVING?

47% COST OF LIVING

15% JOB OPPORTUNITIES

10% HOUSING IS TOO EXPENSIVE

We are experiencing a similar situation to what occured in the 1960's when Maui people realized they had to build a new industry to support residents.

WEALTHY PEOPLE ARE MOVING IN FROM THE MAINLAND & INTERNATIONALLY

RESIDENTS & YOUNGER GENERATIONS ARE MOVING AWAY

RECOMMENDATION : Continue to support the visitor industry now while new industries are built. Bring in new industries to support our residents. PAGE 5


STATE OF HAWAII MINIMUM WAGE WORKERS Prior to the pandemic, a DBEDT estimate based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the majority of workers are already paid above the minimum wage.

28% 28% Workers Paid At $15/hr

6%

66%

Workers Paid At The State Minimum Wage

Workers Paid Above $15/hr

LIVING WAGE VS. MINIMUM WAGE According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics for May 2019, the average hourly wage in Hawaii was $24.16 per

As you can see from the chart, employers care about their employees and those who can pay more are already doing so. Given the devastation businesses have faced, the current state of the economy, slow recovery period, the fact that 94% are making $15 or more per hour and a minimum wage increase is being considered at the federal level, the focus should be on helping businesses survive.

RECOMMENDATION: NOW IS NOT THE TIME FOR OUR STATE TO CONSIDER INCREASING THE MINIMUM WAGE AS IT WILL HURT BUSINESSES AND EQUATE TO REDUCED HOURS AND JOB LOSSES.

The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports a living wage. Increase investment in education and internship programs to raise skill levels. Employers pay more for skilled labor, which incentivizes valuable skills.

The Maui Chamber of Commerce opposes further minimum wage increases until an analysis is completed.

hour.

Increasings the minimum wage will Those making $13-$14 per hour include

cause a wage compression between

fast food workers, ushers, food

wage levels that results in wage

concession and personal care workers,

inflation across the board.

all of which are entry level positions.

Small businesses who are not already paying more than the minimum wage could suffer from a minimum wage increase at this time which could result in further layoffs (increasing the unemployment rate) and business closures.

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Government can make a BIG difference in lowering the Cost of Living for Hawaii's families.

COST OF LIVING In 2014, the

average total spending per household in Maui was

$65,197 and was made up of the following expenditures:

*Compared to $62,357 per year for Honolulu

Education 2.9%

Households.

Healthcare 6.7% Housing 38.1%

Personal Insurance & Pensions 6.7% 6.7%

Food 23.8% Transportation 15.2%

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WHAT EXPENDITURE AREAS CAN BE CHANGED BY GOVERNMENT?

1 HOUSING

Increasing the stock of affordable housing and rentals to lessen this extreme hardship and largest expenditure. Reducing the cost of household utilities.

2 TRANSPORTATION

Reducing the gas tax. Increasing public transportation.

3 FOOD/ HEALTHCARE

Creating a sales tax instead of GET and exempting food and medications from this tax.

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UNDERSTANDING SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MAUI COUNTY AND NEIGHBOR ISLANDS.

ECONOMIC DIVERSITY MAUI COUNTY

VS.

STATE OF HAWAII

Only 1 commercial harbor.

At least 2 commercial

This is critical for fuel, food

harbors on the other islands.

storage, etc.

Military installations add to

No military installations =

the economy on the other

takes away from our

islands.

economic diversity.

University presence with

UH Maui College doesn't have

specialized schools and

the same level of

classes for entrepreneurial

entrepreneurial services.

services on Oahu and Big

The ag industry struggled

Island.

after the closing of HC & S

Thriving and well-

and relied on small farmers.

established ag industry

Mahi Pono is now only getting

elsewhere with specialized

started so the ag industry is

ag products.

new again and not well established. The company is bringing in foreign labor vs. using local labor.

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SMALL BUSINESS SUPPORT HAWAII SUPPORT

OTHER STATES SUPPORT Other states like North Carolina, Virginia and

Hawaii was ranked #49 on CNBC's list of

Texas are constantly rated in the top states to

Worst States To Do Business and #47 for

do business.

Forbes.

There are fewer mandated employee benefits

99.3% of Hawaii businesses are small

in these states, lessening employer costs and

businesses and they employ 52.1 % of Hawaii's

giving employers flexibility. This is especially

total workforce (SBA Hawaii 2019).

prevalent when it comes to healthcare

Hawaii is ranked last for its Cost of Living and

coverage.

has a low ranking for access to capital,

Because of the lower cost of living (of which

business friendliness, infrastructure and the

many factors are under the government's

cost of doing business.

control), they have a stronger labor market.

Hawaii has a very high regulatory

All three states offer incentives for companies

environment, which makes doing business

to move their headquarters or open a location

difficult.

there, spurring employment and investment in

Hawaii's labor costs are high due to

their state.

healthcare costs and other mandated

North Carolina has multiple small business

benefits.

grants, including funds for building and

There are significant permitting issues that

expanding a location.

affect numerous industries at County and

Texas has a small business incubator fund to

State levels.

aid in the development, production and

General Excise Tax instead of a Sales Tax.

commercialization of new or improved

Hawaii has higher transportation costs,

products.

shipping costs, and fuel costs due to our

Virginia has a financial assistance grant to

location.

provide small businesses with resources.

Utilities and commercial rents are more expensive and building new infrastructure is especially difficult. There is little investment and access to capital to support startups. Investors see an instable business environment where government and court approvals don't hold the same weight.

OTHER STATES VALUE AND INCENTIVIZE BUSINESS, GROWING THEIR ECONOMIES.

>

HAWAII IS NOT A DESIRABLE PLACE TO DO BUSINESS AND THAT IS STUNTING OUR ECONOMY. WE MUST DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY TO MAKE AN IMPACT ON OUR FUTURE.

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IMUA MOVING MAUI FORWARD

First, we must continue to support the visitor industry and protect the County's share of TAT.

The pandemic has made it abundantly clear that Maui is too dependent on

Previously we estimated the trickle down from the visitor industry at 75%, but today it appears to be closer to 85-90%. the visitor industry.

However, we must continue to fund and preserve the visitor industry as new economic drivers are established and grow to be successful, which can take many years.

IDEAS ON HOW TO MOVE MAUI FORWARD There is a big push in the community for STEM education, but education alone does not solve the problem. Without STEM jobs, students who focused on STEM here will leave. We must start thinking outside of the box and look at new industries like robotics, AI and bio-tech. For example, if a piece of equipment is too expensive to manufacture in Hawaii, can it be programmed in Hawaii? How can we bring higher paying jobs here? We must also focus on expanding 5G in Hawaii. This is critically important given the new dependence on technology and to move Maui forward.

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MAKING OUR ECO The Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Plan recognized that historically, tourism, defense, construction and agriculture have been key to the state's economy and we must continue to support these industries.

In addition, they recognized that wages for high technology and knowledge-based industries are higher and "industries such as diversified agriculture, fisheries and aquaculture, knowledge- and innovation-based industries such as high tech, health care, biotechnology, film and digital media are important components of building a sustainable economy."

GROWING NEW INDUSTRIES The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports industry development. Build upon existing industries (Ag, Construction, Energy, Film, Healthcare, High-Tech, IP, Manufacturing, Military, Tourism, etc.) and pursue growth opportunities. Offer tax credits that spur industry growth. Determine new industries to target that are appropriate for Hawaii, include higher paying and STEM jobs, support other existing industries and create leveraged opportunities. Create a long-range plan to attract these industries. Consider appropriate incentives to not only entice them to come, but to stay in Hawaii after they have grown and incentives have ended.

ACCORDING TO DBEDT’S 2018 STUDY “TOP 20 OCCUPATIONS IN HAWAII”: The largest occupations in Hawaii include the following categories: retail sales, food and beverage servers, cleaning and pest control, cooks and food preparers; all of which are related to the visitor industry and are relatively lower paying jobs. The fastest growing occupations in Hawaii include nursing, psychiatric and home health aides, construction trade workers, occupational therapy and physical therapist assistants. This illustrates the growth of the construction and healthcare industries. When examining the highest-paying occupations in Hawaii, industries such as healthcare, STEM and construction have the highest paying jobs.

TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN THESE AREAS, RESEARCH SHOWS WE NEED MORE AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND RENTALS AND A BUSINESS-FRIENDLY REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT. PAGE 12


NOMY STRONGER INFRASTRUCTURE

Infrastructure is key for business and the economy.

As noted in the Hawaii 2050 Sustainability Plan, "without basic infrastructure, the economy will be inefficient. Infrastructure such as roads, harbors, water and sewer systems are currently overburdened.

RECOMMENDATION: Provide State funding is needed to address aging infrastructure and modernize our systems to help improve our economy.

AGRICULTURE

The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports agriculture. Protect needed agricultural practices to keep and grow the industry. The State Department of Ag should educate the public on: farming, different farming methodologies, best farming practices, FDA regulations, market and labeling opportunities, scientific research regarding genetically modified organisms and pesticide use. Require scientific consensus before banning genetically modified organisms and needed pesticides. Create additional ag parks and co-ops to reduce farming costs and barriers. Provide additional funding for ag inspectors in the budget.

RECOMMENDATION: Proactively address challenges facing farmers, such as water availability, the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act, invasive species, Rat Lungworm Disease, etc.

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UI & SAFE HARBOR LEGISLATION

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE RATES According to the Director of the Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, Anne PerreiraEustaquio, the state is estimated to borrow $1.2 billion to cover payments to unemployed individuals by the end of 2020. The tax rate schedule is now slated to be a Schedule H, versus the Schedule C rate from the past 5 years. This will result in dramatic increases for businesses who are already facing extreme struggles due to the pandemic.

*ON AVERAGE, UI RATES WILL GO FROM $600 PER EMPLOYEE TO $2,600 PER EMPLOYEE Most businesses are already facing extreme difficulties and if legislation adjusting this is not passed, it will be devastating.

RECOMMENDATION: Keep at Schedule C for at least 1 year. Then, look at staggered approach based on our economic recovery and what business can afford.

Safe Harbor/Civil Liability COVID-19 Legislation

Not only are businesses facing a devastating economic climate as a result of the pandemic, but they are also at risk of facing COVID-19-related lawsuits. According to the American Tort Reform Association’s list (updated on December 17, 2020), states that have enacted legislation or used executive/administrative orders to address premise liability/exposure include: Alabama Arkansas Georgia Idaho

Iowa Kansas Louisiana Michigan

Mississippi Nevada North Carolina Oklahoma

Pennsylvania Tennessee Utah Wyoming

Many of these states include language that the liability protection does not apply to willful, reckless or intentional misconduct. Arkansas’ executive order, for example, details that there is a presumption that a person/business has not committed willful, reckless, or intentional misconduct if the person and its agents are complying with health and safety directors or guidelines issued by the Governor or Department of Health.

RECOMMENDATION:

Enacting safe harbor legislation is important in helping businesses, who are complying with state rules and guidelines, avoid costly litigation and impacts on their commercial insurance while also affording business owners security in being transparent if a case is linked to their business.

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INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS Statewide, non-employer businesses are on the rise, which means more and more are choosing to operate as independent contractors. State of Hawaii Non-Employer Establishments

Maui County Non-Employer Establishments

Our antiquated state employment law has not been updated to reflect this growing trend and the DLIR has a history of erroneous rulings determining independent contractors to be employees in uncontested cases.

RECOMMENDATIONS: Recognize and protecting legitimate independent contractors in uncontested cases and those who hire them by codifying into law: 1. Creating an Independent Contractor Certification to provide additional safeguards in place for independent contractors and companies; and 2. Removing the master/servant language in the state's current employment law. The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports legitimate independent contractors and the companies that hire them.

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INCREASING AFFORDABLE HOUSING & RENTALS According to the Hawaii Housing Planning Study, 2019, it is projected that the State of Hawaii needs to create approximately

36,155 units by 2030. While this

new study shows a significant decrease in the number from the previous study,

they cite a decline in Hawaii’s population as the reason for the decrease. In 2019, more households wanted to move away from Hawaii. Over 24% of all movers wanted to leave the State on their next move — the highest rate since 1997.

Statewide, about 22% of respondents who planned to leave Hawaii said the high cost and limited availability of housing was one of the problems causing them to move.

With the significant rise in the median price for homes and extreme shortage of affordable housing and rentals, it is necessary to look at ways the state can help fast-track affordable housing developments.

RECOMMENDATIONS: Fewer regulations—regulations drive up the cost to build housing, which either makes them not pencil out for the builder or gets passed on to the buyer/renter.

Streamline the process and eliminate redundancies—longer, more complicated processes further drive up the cost to build affordable housing and rentals. Strong decision-making now—the longer it takes to get legislation passed to spur affordable housing and rentals, the more expensive it will be.

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MAUI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SUPPORTS AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND RENTALS Maui continues to hit record median home prices, even in 2020. In October 2020, the median home price hit a new record high at

$867,500!

If we project out the next several years with a modest 4% growth each year from August 2019,

Maui’s median home price is on track to be over :

$1 Million in 2024, $1.5 Million in 2037, $2 Million in 2042,

impacting our children and grandchildren. When this was presented to a group with developers and housing advocates in the audience, they scoffed at only a 4% growth because they expected the prices to be even higher.

Maui County’s median home price exceeded the State’s in 2016 and has continued to rise since. This contributes to Maui’s high cost of living and need for affordable housing.

MEDIAN SALES PRICE OF SINGLE FAMILE HOME

HAWAII

MAUI COUNTY

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LEVERAGING OUR VISITOR INDUSTRY AIRPORTS Honolulu Airport is ranked #26 among 27

AIRPORT ADVERTISING

other airports in the large airport category.

While airport advertising has been contracted out,

Kahului Airport had the lowest satisfaction

we feel it is important to reserve advertising

rating on a list of 16 medium airports

space at Hawaii airports for visitor industry

throughout the country.

messaging, government announcements and

According to JD Power Ranking:

non-profit programs. Airports must reflect our brand, deliver quality experiences and promote Hawaii, not hold us back. Hawaii Airports Corporation will save airport improvement time and costs, allow additional investment, improve flyer experience, and not burden local taxpayers as it will be funded by user fees, not public tax dollars.

While we understand that this bill may not come up this year, we need more ideas like this.

AIRPORT CONCESSIONS

The Maui Chamber of Commerce and State of Hawaii support buying local products, yet there are mainland businesses occupying restaurant and retail spaces at our airports.

TAT DISTRIBUTION The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports equitable distribution of the TAT. In a time when many counties have high needs, the Maui Chamber of Commerce supports an equitable system for sharing resources among the counties.

For funds not returned to the counties, consider spending this revenue in ways that benefit the visitor industry, local community, and shared state priorities such as addressing homelessness, affordable/workforce housing, improving

Airport concessions should be reserved for

infrastructure, etc.

local businesses. Instead of selling Starbucks coffee at airport locations, we should support local coffee purveyors to further promote our local brands and products.

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ADDRESSING ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS RISING SEA LEVELS Estimated sea level rise of 3.2 ft over the next 30-70 years, resulting in: $19B in loss of land and structures 38 Miles of major roads flooded 6,500 structures flooded 19,800 displaced people 25,800 acres flooded

There are approximately 88,000 cesspools in Hawaii With over 12,000 on Maui 43,000 cesspools pose a risk to our water resources Releasing approximately 53 million gallons of untreated sewage into the ground each day

CESSPOOLS

INVASIVE SPECIES With intrastate commerce and transportation of plants, there are concerns about: Coqui Frogs Little Fire Ants Coffee Borer Beetles Rhinoceros Beetles Rat Lungworm Disease PAGE 19 Axis Deer


KEEPING IMPORTANT ST ECONOMIC ANLYSIS FOR BILLS The Maui Chamber of Commerce encourages understanding the economic, fiscal and business impacts of bills. If economic analysis is written into bill briefs, this information is not shared with the public. We support a more transparent system where government provides the economic, fiscal and business impacts of bills (in or attached to the bill), so the public can review the impacts and ring in on them before bills are passed.

RECOMMENDATION: Enact legislation to require an economic analysis for bills.

INDEPENDENT AUDITS The Maui Chamber of Commerce supports independent audits of the following: Department of Education (DOE)-because the public has strong concerns about the funding breakdowns between the administrative and classroom levels and

LIQUOR ENFORCEMENT We understand most Liquor Department’s in our State operate appropriately and follow the rules as intended. However, the Maui Liquor Department has been an issue for years and continues to be an issue, despite attempts to work with them to correct the situation and correct it at the county level.

RECOMMENDATION: A State Legislative fix to address overly strict interpretations of state rules or further clarity in state rules.

feels not enough money is getting to the classroom. Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR)-who appears to be acting like a special interest group when it comes to worker compensation and not recognizing legitimate independent contractors. Employee Retirement System

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ATE ISSUES TOP OF MIND UNFUNDED LIABILITIES The Maui Chamber of Commerce urges the legislature to address our state’s unfunded liabilities. An October 2018 report from J.P. Morgan has ranked Hawaii as one of the most financially stressed states because of the unfunded liabilities. Given the pandemic and loss of tax revenue, the state is even more stressed going into 2021.

FINANCIAL STATE OF HAWAII According to Truth in Accounting’s State

Hawaii had $31,700 in taxpayer burden in 2020 and has been ranked #47 in the nation, with an “F” for its financial grade. Data Lab,

Truth in Accounting also shows that Hawaii only has $6.8 billion in assets available to pay bills totaling $22.9 billion. Government needs to operate like a business and learn to operate within their means.

A January, 2020 report by UHERO for the Hawaii Executive Conference sites $25.7 billion in unfunded liabilities (public employee pension and retiree health obligations).

Making up the shortfall in tax revenue should not be placed on businesses. They have also struggled this year and cannot take on this burden. The for-profit sector are personally responsible and their loss is

We believe that an audit of the Employee Retirement System would be helpful in identifying and addressing problems and creating better solutions moving forward.

RECOMMENDATION: It is imperative that the state create a reasonable payback plan for our unfunded liabilities to reduce the taxpayer burden.

at their own personal risk.

OPIOIDS The Maui Chamber of Commerce is concerned about the national opioid crisis and its effects upon our community and businesses in Hawaii. According to a study from Castlight Health in 2016, opioid-abusing employees cost employers up to $8 billion a year and companies paid almost twice as much in health care costs for opioid abusers than non-abusers. We support legislation that encourages the responsible prescribing of opioids.

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WHAT WE NEED? LEADERSHIP FOR OUR COMMUNITY & OUR ECONOMY

diversified economic base and support Hawaii's existing industries and small businesses. It is time for real leadership that will create a

This will spur small business growth to help provide higher paying jobs and give our children opportunities to come home.

BILLS TO INTRODUCE AND SUPPORT OUR COUNTY& STATE In addition to our top priorities, here are additional measures we would like to see lawmakers introduce: More understanding about a minimum wage versus a living wage Explore options for reducing our cost of living Support existing industries and small businesses Legislation to certify legitimate independent contractors Increase funding to stimulate the agriculture industry Provide subsidies for farmers Increase funding to attract manufacturing Streamline the building & management of Affordable Housing & Rentals Support the Small Business Regulatory Review Board Support a strong military presence in Hawaii Reduce State & County regulatory redundancies Provide funding for infrastructure improvements Address rising sea level issues Fund upfront payments for cesspool conversions Increase funding for invasive species issues Conduct needed state audits for DOE, DLIR and the Employment Retirement System

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62 NORTH MARKET ST. #302 WAILUKU, HI 96793 (808) 244-0081 LEGISLATION@MAUICHAMBER.COM

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