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Matt Lo o s l ey Architecture International BA (Hons)

2-3 John Peel Centre for Creative Arts, Stowmarket 4-10 The Royal Press Melaka, Malaysia 11-16 Place Invader, Manchester

image: The Royal Press 1:100 model


Left: Extract from RIBA Journal In 2011 I won a RIBA competition to design the John Peel centre for Creative Arts. I worked with Martindales Architects of Cambridge to modify the original design to meet fire regulations and the changing brief from the client. Continued input has allowed the original concepts to remain at the core of the scheme despite the challenges faced by the design team. Final phase of construction begins on site in July 2012.


Above left: the John Peel Centre in June 2011 Above: brickwork detail Left: Impression of completed scheme The scheme is a mezzanine to be inserted into 2 bays within the hall, designed to contain all of the services and facilities required for an arts centre, with the smallest footprint possible, to maximise usable performance and seating area.


The Royal Press Melaka, Malaysia

The Royal Press, in the heart of historic Melaka, enables traditional printing to survive in the face of modernisation. A living museum that engages tourists to participate in printing becomes a socially and economically responsible alternative to the kitsch gift shops engulfing the area. Through reinterpreting the architectural language of Melaka and using passive methods of cooling, arises a building inspired by the work of Geoffrey Bawa, well suited to the climate of monsoon Asia. The Royal Press strives to be contextual yet modern, responding to the needs of locals and visitors alike. Above: View from the bridge Far left: Jonker St. Facade Left: Site Plan


Left: 1:100 model of the Royal Press

Top right: Section in perspective

Lower right: First floor, overlooking courtyard


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Section S - 01

Structure

Circulation

Views

Private : Public

Sun Path

Solid : Void

Balance and Symmetry

Analytical Diagrams Daylighting

Section S - 02


Left: 1:20 detail model of louvered door and window

Top right: 1:100 model, courtyard from above

Lower right: Courtyard render


Above left: Construction Section Left, Above: 1:20 Construction model The Royal Press was designed through an exploration of modelmaking, with different scales to explore different levels of thought and detail. The 1:20 construction model was used to explore the techtonics of a single bay and the size and position of the structure within it. The relationship between the brick arches and the timber framed structure was also considered through this process, combined with sketches, diagrams and computer modelling.


Place Invader

Manchester

Inserted between the Palace Theatre and Bridgewater House in Manchester, hovers a corten steel box. Steel chain suspended from its underside cascades down, not quite touching the ground. The box is a place for exhibiting X I X, a white plaster face, inspired by paintings of Ophelia from Shakespeare's Hamlet. In my email correspondence with the artist, Felix Von Der Weppen, he tells me of his intentions for the work, about how it should be experienced, and my brief builds upon this. My own interpretation of the play forms the architectural narrative - the experience is rich in metaphor and reference to the scene in the play, where Ophelia drowns.


Main image: exploded perspective of steel frame and corten cladding Top left: Passing through the threshold - Brushing past the chains, they sway in motion like willow branches. Light reflecting from them dances on the waters surface. Middle left: The ascent begins - two flights of floating stairs lead you to the box, the wall of chains giving the feelings of both enclosure and lightness. Lower left: A slice of light - The first thing you see, dividing the space exactly in two. At midday you can watch the shaft of sunlight make its daily journey through the space, tracing over the burnt red of the corten steel.


Ground floor plan The concrete slab (dark blue) reaches out across the path, enticing people to walk down it, surrounded by still water (light blue) and stairs that beg to be climbed.


Stair Plan Cantilevered stairs are surrounded by steel chain. A viewing point on the landing gives a new perspective on the street below.

Corten box plan Stairs lead to an antechamber, which precedes the exhibition space. X I X is exhibited in the far end of the space, floating on the waters surface. The experience is designed to be dramatic, tactile and unnerving.


Section A

Section B


Cantilevered Stairs Welded adjacent stiffness, and riser

steel treads, with bolted connections into brick wall. Triangulated for strength and with chain balustrade (not structural). Tread height are co-ordinated with brick dimensions.

Internal Steel Frame 100mm x 50mm x 3mm box section, with welded connections and cross bracing for additional stability 6mm Corten steel skin on inner and outer leaf, with vertical weld lines Rear

Side elevation

Rear elevation

Front elevation

Plan / Structural diagram

Front


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