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HOME+DESIGN SEPTMEBER / OCTOBER 2015

ISSUE 76

FEATURES

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Somewhere in Time

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Travel by Design

Looking to restore their dream home to its former glory, homeowners turn to the architects at Pagliaro Bartels Sajda Architects to work their magic.

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Wadia Associates AMA Architecture BFein Interiors Tusk Home & Design Ralph Vuolo Interiors Stirling Design Christine Dahl Interior Design Kat Reece Design Jamie Herzlinger Interiors Parc Monseau Decor and You Axel Interiors Bespoke Residential Design Robin McGarry Interior Design Lions Paw Alisberg Parker Architects Lara Michelle Beautiful Interiors IH Design Studio Lynne Scalo Designs Linda Ruderman Interiors Jan Hiltz Interiors Homeworks

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HOME+DESIGN SEPTEMBER / OCTOBER 2015

ISSUE 76

Editor-in-Chief Matthew J. Kolk mattkolk@me.com 203-820-1092 Managing Editor James Eagen Contributing Writers Tracy Dwyer, Lisa Gant, Susan Heller, Lollie Mathews, Jennifer Jackson-Outlaw, Sarah Robertaon, Kait Shea Contributing Photographers Jane Beiles, Michael Biondo, Phillip Ennis, Tria Giovan, John Gruen, John Hannon, Paul Johnson, Neil Landino, Mark La Rosa, Tim Lee, Daniel Milstein, Janice Parker, Durston Saylor, Debra Somerville, Eric Striffler, Jonathan Wallen, Woodruff/Brown Photography Copy Editor Elena Serocki Graphic & Web Design East Coast Home Publishing

Publisher Shelley E. McCormick shelley_mccormick@yahoo.com 203-545-7091 Account Managers Lisa Dearborn Patrick Giddings Lollie Mathews Business Development Randi K. Lehrman, Esq. Marketing & Sales Advisor to the Gold Coast Distribution Man in Motion East Coast Home + Design 111 Forest Avenue, Fairfield, CT 06824 Fax: 203-286-1850 East Coast Home + Design is published six issues per year. To subscribe: www.eastcoasthomepublishing.com; Subscriptions: one year, $28; two years, $50. Back issues can be purchased at www.eastcoasthomepublishing.com. For editorial inquiries: Editor, East Coast Home + Design, 111 Forest Avenue, Fairfield, CT 06824 or e-mail: mattkolk@ me.com. For advertising inquiries: Please call Shelley McCormick at 203-545-7091. Reproduction whole or in part without permission is prohibited. All projects described in this publication are for private, noncommercial use only. No rights for commercial use or exploitation are given or implied. The opinions expressed by writers for articles published by East Coast Home + Design are not necessarily those of the magazine.

EAST COAST HOME PUBLISHING 111 FOREST AVENUE FAIRFIELD, CT 06824 EASTCOASTHOMEPUBLISHING.COM

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Travel by Design 2015 Annual Interior Design Issue

2015 Annual Interior Design Issue

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As a reader of this magazine, you know better than most: design is highly personal. When you choose a designer, you are welcoming an individual into your home and your lives. The impact of that interaction will affect you, your family and your friends for a long time to come. Our job is to utilize the most progressive technologies—like metallic inks, die cuts, double and even triple foldout covers—to provide the highest quality images for you, our readers, and to generate interest for our advertisers. The Printing Institute of America (think the Oscars for topechelon printers in America) likes our style. We took first and second prize in the category of highest quality architectural magazine in the country. And our sister magazine, W2W, won third place in its category. We’ve been winning awards for years, something we find easy to do because we combine our knowledge of how to produce the greatest product in the nation with photos that our partners provide of the greatest homes in the nation. There are so many ridiculously talented designers in our demographic that we wanted to showcase the best. So, for this issue, we reached into our printing bag of tricks and created two different covers, then we finessed the technology so every delivered bundle of 24 magazines will feature alternating covers. Our intention is to give you, our reader, the greatest opportunity to find the right individual to help you make your house…your home.

Matthew Kolk Editor-in-Chief mattkolk@me.com

A special thanks to Hamptons Antique Galleries of Stamford, Lions Paw of Fairfield and Parc Monseau for proving props for our cover shoot, which was shot of location at Southport Brewing Company in Southport.

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Melange

TREASURE TROVE A collection of metal, stone and glass

KENZA AGATE SCULPTURE The Kenza sculptures are made from agate surrounded by gold leafing and resting on an acrylic base. A natural material, agate will vary somewhat in size and color. curatedkravet.com

HECATE CRYSTAL SKULL Entirely encrusted with intricate high-quality quartz from Arkansas, each intriguing object is carefully created using sculptural techniques. Handmade to order by artisans in Northern California. curatedkravet.com

PEWTER STONEWARE 5-PIECE SETTING From our Pewter Collection - Uniting past romance with cool modernism, the polished style of our Pewter Stoneware looks like it is bathed in perpetual candlelight. juliska.com

ELECTRIC FASHION Written by Frederic Aranda, Text by Christine Suppes, Foreword by Ken Downing Three decades of fashion brought together in one Collection, worn as originally intended by the Collector herself, and developed over five years by established fashion and portrait photographer Frederic Aranda: this is Electric Fashion. rizzoli.com

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BERNARD COCKTAIL TABLE Travertine Stone and Antique Gold Leaf duralee.com

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LIANNE GOLD SCONCE Medium gold bronze Polished Nickel and Satin Nickel ralphpucci.com

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shi for len ext Sco to you ah tha roo to rar Lu des int We lead Ho for wh you ery tha Mi the I th how tio tra

MILL CEILING LIGHT circalighting.com

Story by Lisa Gant

MALACHITE STRIPE URN The Malachite Stripe Urn in purple is a softer color story for spring. The wide mouth is perfect for large scale arrangements. Made of high-fired porcelain with 24-karat gold accents jonathanadler.com

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shingle style facades on these projects because people want that comfort exterior that feels like home. But as architects, how are we challenging ourselves to translate the more modern interior to a different exterior, whatever that is? Scott Hobbs: People look at modern houses and think, it’s going to leak like a sieve, this is a nightmare, but that is no longer true. If you’re in New England, you’re designing for a snow load, and you have a heck of a flat roof, you’ve also got a heck of an infrastructure there that you don’t need most of the time. Whereas, if you have a pitched roof, you can shed the load, distribute it. So as the products continue to develop perhaps we’ll see more of a shift toward more contemporary and modern structures. Lucien Vita: We are pleased to find that clients who love modern design are feeling emboldened by the growing trend toward modern interiors, and in fact are looking for a fully modern exterior as well. We believe that the acceptance of our passion for modern interiors is leading to a growing confidence and acceptance of modern exteriors. Howard Lathrop: People want energy efficient houses, they don’t ask for contemporary or colonial, they want them energy efficient. So when you go through what it takes to make an energy efficient house, you end up with a contemporary vernacular on the outside and evLOVERS eryone wants contemporarySECRET on the inside, so I think it’s technology Secret Lovers is characterized by beautiful, artistic that’s driving a lot of this. mosaic and precious silk velvet. An original element Michael Black: go the opposite say I from don’tother thinkprodthe trend is that I’ll distinguishes Secretand Lovers there. I thinkucts we’rein fooling ourselves if we think we’re seeing the market is the use of platinum golden a trend. I think we’releaf talking themosaic difference stylepantry and form. It’s aboutinclude artistic (frombetween Sicis Murano Collection), Today’s accessories covering back of each with of thethe twoMillennial chairs. generahow we use spaces, the the trend is coming convenient pull-out shelves, racks and tion and going to explodesicis.com and change Forget Artistthat’s Julia Contacessi bins foreverything. placing cans andabout other foods traditional, contemporary, it’s going to change the entire house. withinWe’re easy reach.

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Before

Chuck Hilton

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EXHAUSTIBILITE Crafted in seamless hand-beaten copper, this piece creates a circle of continuous movement. christopherguy.com

ALISON BERGER GLASS STOOL hollyhunt.com

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Gypset Travel assouline.com

PUZZLE CHANDELIER Inspired by a house of cards, our Puzzle Chandelier is made of sheets of solid brass layered into a dynamic composition. The Architectural Modernist warmed up the luminous Design by Sara Baldwin forfeel NewisRavenna, Theby Aurelia from metal. your isPuzzle Chandelier above a circularoftable, DelftHang Collection a modern American interpretation a cen-like our Nixon, or in a here fabulous turies old familiar craft, . Shown is a foyer. hand cut jewel glass jonathanadler.com mosia shown in Lapis, Lazuli, Lolite, Mica, Absolute White and Blue Spinel. jamieshop.com Ibiza Lounge Collection restorationhardware.com

The Jenning Brutalist Ribbon Table Lamp will dazzle in the modern home with striking illumination, simple geometric designs and bold metal done BIZET TABLE in a gold leaf finish. Azincdoor.com stunning hand-wrought base is topped with circular tempered glass. Distinctively individual and suitable for a range of Before period and contemporary settings. christopherguy.com Zanzibar Ticking Woven Cotton Rug dashandalbert.annieselke.com

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AURORA Artist: Julia Contacessi (2015) Acrylic and graphite sorellegallery.com

NOLAN COCKTAIL TABLE Gold Finish with Travertine Top duralee.com

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ALPINE CHANDELIER Icy crystal prisms glisten across the Alpine collection. This striking design stacks Hollywood glamour on a rigidly geometric frame, creating an unexpected cubist masterpiece. Subtly staggered clusters of candelabra lamps cast a sparkling glow along Alpine’s ethereal frame, extending a brilliant light pattern into any room. Polished Nickel preserves the fixture’s winter chill, while Aged Brass accents add warming contrast. hudsonvalleylighting.com

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In the Field

Duralee Designer The John Robshaw II Collection Story by Shannon Doepke

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uralee is one of the interior design industry’s most exciting fabric brands. Founded in 1952 and headquartered in Bay Shore, NY, the company strives to create designs that are current and innovative while remaining timeless and versatile. Its textiles are known for their authenticity and comfort. Unpretentious yet sophisticated, Duralee is constantly creating new products to meet the ever-evolving needs of designers and individuals alike. Duralee is known for tapping and developing hot new design talent. Each season, through its “Duralee Designer” series, it partners with the latest and greatest designers to create exciting, limited-edition fabrics that can be used for a variety of interior design needs. This season, Duralee announced its newest artist collection by a man who is changing the design community, John Robshaw.

Story by Jennifer Jackson-Outlaw

local artisans and ancient textile production traditions. He learned block printing in China, indigo printing in India and vegetable dyeing in Thailand. These experiences, coupled with his training as a painter, create the basis of his unique design aesthetic. “I want all the colors, processes and designs from each culture to blend,” he says. “I redesign them and mix up the processes in ways that no one has ever done before. I try to edit them, learn from them and make them my own, but retain their essence. In piggybacking these designs and techniques with one another or my own ideas, what emerges is new and fresh, and yet retains that sense of tradition, of the handmade.” Some of Robshaw’s design inspirations have come from his travels as a consultant for Aid to Artisans, a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating economic opportunities for craftspeople in developing nations. In this role, he has traveled to Vietnam, Cambodia, Zimbabwe and, most recently, Bolivia, to support textile artisans.

Robshaw has travelled throughout the world and been inspired by 22

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Throughout his travels, Robshaw’s favorite textiles are those that show the imperfection of being handmade. “When I need to hire an artisan to help, I pick the old printers,” he explains. “Their hands are shaky and their eyesight is poor, so the pattern comes out slightly off. I want to feel that human touch.” Some of the patterns in his Duralee collection, inspired by block printing, reflect this handmade feel. The Duralee Designer: John Robshaw II collection is divided into three distinct color books— peacock/graphite, alizarin/cinnabar, and chambray/cobalt—which both depart from and complement Robshaw’s signature earth tones. The chambray/cobalt book features patterns of varying shades of blue mixed with splashes of celadon for a calming, yet energetic feel. The patterns and textures in this book vary from small prints to larger, Ikat-inspired designs. The alizarin/cinnabar series combines a warm blend of bold patterns of coral and cayenne, paired with soft, neutral linens. Finally, the exciting peacock/ graphite book features aqua and navy on a stone-gray base with surprising pops of coral. The textiles in this series are designed in such a way that the colors flow effortlessly together, creating a bold yet approachable narrative for any home. The Duralee Designer: John Robshaw II collection can be used for a wide assortment of interior designs, including upholstery, curtains, accent pieces and more. The design of the fabrics, while vibrant, is surprisingly versatile and will complement a variety of aesthetics. Both traditional and modern homes can benefit from the narrative of global exploration that is told through Robshaw’s designs. The collection features many instances of his unique block-printed textile aspects, solids, small prints and coordinating chenille. It is an evolution of Robshaw’s traditional neutral color palate, and includes pops of color that can complement any design narrative. This new collection is an expansion of Robshaw’s very popular first partnership with the com-

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The alizarin/cinnabar series

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The peacock/graphite series

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pany. The Duralee Designer: John Robshaw collection explores a slightly different take on the designer’s transcontinental exploration aesthetic. This previous collection features designs composed of monochrome and earth tones. It explores artistic renderings of many patterns found in nature, including animal prints, wood grain, floral shapes and others. These patterns pair excellently with the more abstract, jewel-toned textiles in his second collection. With its rich textures, artisanal feel and exotic yet approachable designs, Robshaw’s collection is a prime example of what Duralee prides itself on: products that are innovative, reliable and lasting. “I enjoyed working with the great ladies at Duralee,” said Robshaw of his partnership with the company. “It was fun watching them try to steer me down different aesthetic paths, with all of their experiences with prints over the ages.” The combination of Duralee’s history of value and ingenuity paired with Robshaw’s worldly artisan designs creates an exciting and innovative product line for any designer looking to add a touch of a global narrative to a design project. Resouces: Duralee Fabrics 1775 5th Avenue Bay Shore, NY 11706 631.273.8800 duralee.com

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Home Tech

FADE TO BLACK Motorized shades allow homeowners to darken a room without leaving their seat Story by Lollie Mathews

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iving on the East Coast, we have light coming into our lutions in Yonkers, NY, explains, “We design shade systems with homes at many different angles, ever-changing with each black-out materials that are used to provide privacy, for bedrooms, and light control, for home theaters and season. This abundance of light media rooms. Shades with sheer materials can do harm to our interior rooms, whether are used mostly in public areas like living giving them too much heat; fading our fabrooms, dining rooms, home offices, librarrics, furniture, floors and artwork; or just ies, etc., where it’s necessary to preserve simply providing too much glare. beautiful exterior views and protect expensive furniture from UV light.” Imagine with the touch of a finger being able to adjust your shades to the everIn addition, many newer houses have an changing light anywhere in the house—all from a sitting position. This is now possiabundance of windows, with a number of ble with in-home motorized window treatthem being larger and not easy to access. ments. Whether you want roller shades, say “These motorized shades make it easy Roman shades, pleated shades, venetian to control them,” according to Gina Mele, blinds, skylight shades or drapery shades, all can be incorporated co-owner, with Stuart Sheppard, of Greenwich Window Treatments into this system. Dean Valencic from Integrated Electronic So- in Greenwich, CT.

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All three photos by Integrated Electronic Solutions

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Greenwich Window Treatments

Greenwich Window Treatments

The benefits of motorized shades clearly outweigh any negatives, as homeowners can save energy while also protecting their interior. Dean says that clients are beyond pleased with “how these shades and drapery transform harsh glare into soft, pleasing light, enhance privacy while preserving exterior views, reduce solar heat gain, furnish UV protection of expensive furnishings and artwork and provide the ability to change daytime into nighttime for restful sleep.” Also, a pleather of window treatment fabrics and color options are available to complement clients’ homes. Stuart brings up another valid point about these shades: “They are a natural fit within a smart home system, and in the last two years, it has become the rule and not the exception to have them, especially in new builds. Almost all new builds incorporate them into their game plan.” He and Gina sell these window treatments with Eco-friendly sun sensors and timers. Greenwich Window Treatments is a distributor for Hunter Douglas, and this allows the store to showcase the most up-to-date versions of motorized window treatments, accounting for about 60% of their business. Effortless for the homeowner, this system is something we will be seeing much more of in the near future. Indeed, Dean of Electronic Solutions has noticed a “significant increase in motorized window treatments, due mostly to size and advancing technology, and the product being more affordable and readily available.”

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And Gina at Greenwich Window Treatments has more good news about the system: “As the product technology improves, the price tends to go down.” Resources Dean Valencic Integrated Electronic Solutions 1053 Saw Mill River Road Yonkers, NY 10710 914.422.0071 iesav.net Gina Mele & Stuart Sheppard Greenwich Window Treatments 79 E. Putnam Ave
 Greenwich, CT 06830 203.992.1000 
greenwichwindowtreatments.com

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Somewhere in Time Story by Jennifer Jackson-Outlaw Photography by Neil Landino

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Looking to restore their dream home to its former glory, homeowners turn to the architects at Pagliaro Bartels Sajda Architects to work their magic.

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ike most great tales about a home, this one was driv- be neat to design a ‘Wright meets Bartels Pagliaro’ house.” en by passion. During the construction of the Wright-inspired home, the couple deJim and Susan Ozanne were already recognized as cided to rent a home in Ring’s End Landing. Although they only inactive residents of Darien—people who were as ar- tended it to be a short stay while they wanted for the larger house to dent about preserving the town’s storied history as be completed, they were taken aback by how much they enjoyed living they were about architecture. Since moving to the area more than 30 in the town’s historic district. Honestly, we fell in love with the area,” years ago, they had purchased several homes in the area with a desire to explained Susan. “We are history buffs, so it was amazing to be in a return them to their former glory. place that is such a big part of Darien’s growth.” Indeed, it was their shared love of architecture that led the Ozannes to The home measured just over 900 square feet—making the space parthe architect team at Pagliaro Bartels Sajda. ticularly tight when the Ozannes welcomed their son home from college. Still, the property made enough of an impression that when it “They were from Oak Park, Illinois, as is my partner, Roger Bartels,” went up for sale, they elected to buy it rather than relocate before the explained firm partner Christopher Pagliaro. “Oak Park was the birth- original project was complete. We figured we would simply invest in place of Frank Lloyds Wright’s Prairie style, and they thought it would the house rather than sell it when we were ready to move into the other

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Most of the home’s original wooden frame was greatly affected by the rising waters of Hurricane Sandy.

property,” said Susan. “But we eventually had to admit that even with the limited space, we wanted to stay.” It was during this time of transition that Jim and Susan first encountered what was commonly known in the Webb House. Love at First Sight Built in the late 1700s, the Webb House was part of Darien’s original main street. According to area historian Louise H. McLean, the area was largely seen as the town’s first shopping center due to its convenient location near the Long Island Sound. Originally, the home was a general store—one of only four shopping choices for the community. East Coast Home + Design

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The family room has multiple focal points and includes two Wood that could be salvaged was repurposed into custom separate, well-defined sitting areas: one by the fireplace furnishings within the home, such as the bookshelves and and another in the entertainment area of the space. tables. The wood planks also adorn the raised ceiling.

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I was friends with the daughter of the previous owner, and told her to call me if her parents ever wanted to sell the house, said Susan with a laugh. At the time, she said her parents would never consider it because they wanted to keep it in the family. Each store was connected to a wharf to better accommodate the large influx of fishermen who travelled up the Good Wife’s River. Ownership of the store changed hands several times before being purchased by local businessman Charles Web in 1845. Once the Webb family took control, the store continued to operate as a popular provider for dry goods and groceries, until it was eventually converted to a private residence. Today it remains the only original building standing in Ring’s End Landing.

Over the years, the home has undergone several small renovations, leaving it with both building code and zoning regulation issues. The structure failed to meet building standards for walls along the north wall. The first floor had ceiling heights less than seven feet. And the home sat below the flood zone evolution guidelines established by FEMA. “I was friends with the daughter of the previous owner, and told her to call me if her parents ever wanted to sell the house,” said Susan East Coast Home + Design

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The staircase was also created with repurposed wood.

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with a laugh. “At the time, she said her parents would never consider it because they wanted to keep it in the family.” Despite the house’s multiple issues, Susan found herself drawn to it. Long after completion of the Wright project, she dreamt of purchasing the home to restore it to its former glory. So, when the opportunity arose, she and her husband felt comfortable reconnecting with Christopher’s team to guide them through the difficult project. A Tricky Proposal “When Jim and Sue got us involved, we were asked to look at three options,” Christopher explained. “They wanted to consider a ‘cleanup’type of renovation, a substantial renovation or a new house. The truth is they didn’t know which was best, or what to do with it when it was completed.”

In exploring their options, the team exposed the underlying frame only to discover that rot had set into much of the structure due to decades of neglect. To make matters worse, what had not been affected by the ravages of time was pummeled by Hurricane Sandy. The storm had unfortunately hit the area a mere two months after the Ozannes purchased the home. And as for new construction? The group decided against it due to their fears about changing the neighborhood’s dynamic. “A new house would have been out of character with that small community, mostly because zoning would have squeezed a design toward the center of the narrow lot,” Christopher explained. “It would have been at the expense of having any usable yard. “ “Quite frankly, we did investigate the option of doing a clean-up project,” he continued. “However, I realized early on that this wasn’t a realistic option. A lot of what existed would be problematic to restore, East Coast Home + Design

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The open floor plan leads to beautiful inverted bay windows, while the interiors were painted white throughout to match the original layout.

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such as the electric and plumbing.” Christopher had reviewed several alternatives—studying not only a useful residential design, but a scale that would work with the neighbors’ homes. In the end, everyone came to the conclusion that attempting a full renovation was their only choice. This meant crafting a layout that would not only meet the community’s standards, but save the historical appeal of the property. “When we were satisfied with a direction, we all decided to meet with Darien Planning & Zoning,” said Christopher. “The goal was for the town to clearly see our firm’s approach as well as the client’s passion to get this right.” “During this meeting,” he continued, “we were introduced to a clause in the zoning regulations described as a ‘Protected Town Landmark,’ which is a special approval, requiring several criteria and a planning and zoning vote. The concept is to preserve the cultural heritage of the town. Only a few had ever been approved. If granted, the Planning & Zoning Commission can determine the appropriate setbacks and bulk regulations without necessarily following those set forth in the zoning regulations.“ The Courtship Begins Feeling positive after the meeting, Christopher and the clients began their quest to obtain protective status. The firm began to research the property’s long-storied history, utilizing old photography to help them determine materials and scale that said “Webb” on Ring’s End Road. Jim and Susan also reached out to both the Darien Historic Society and the town Architectural Review Board for their blessing. Finally, Christopher asked Sara O. Nelson to serve as a historical consultant on the project. “An architect who specialized in the preservation of historic buildings, Sara served as a critic for us,” he says. “And her ultimate blessing of the project that we brought before the town was a vital part of the approval.” East Coast Home + Design

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Their hard work eventually paid off, as the presentation to the Planning & Zoning Commission was unanimously approved.

enhance the sense of timelessness, both the wood floors and cabinets were constructed with limed oak.

“To me, this was the ultimate compliment for a job well done!” said Christopher. “Well done because creativity, responsibility and passion proved to be the perfect balance of the owners’ request for a house that worked and the preservation of an important town structure.”

Like many homes affected by Hurricane Sandy, the house had sustained a sizeable amount of water damage. Therefore, much of the wood was unable to be salvaged as part of the renovation. The pieces that were left, however, were creatively repurposed throughout the home.

Happier Endings With the town’s support firmly in place, construction began immediately on the Webb House. Because the homeowners were insistent about preserving the look and feel of the original home, much of the home’s new materials (primarily wood, steel, glass and concrete) were carefully selected because they were available in the 1800s. To better 44

Because of the restrictions on expanding the house beyond its existing layout, the team cleverly found ways to add space. They removed a gas tank outside the home and turned that area into an added room; they hid utilities inside closets, the attic and even a carved void inside the roof.

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Perhaps the biggest challenge of the renovation was making the house compliant with FEMA’s strict flood guidelines while maintaining the space’s linear, horizontal platform. This proved particularly difficult given the fact that the Ozannes didn’t want to dramatically change the home’s original footprint. Eventually, Christopher found a way to raise the home while constructing fullwidth steps leading up to the landing. Jim and Susan were so pleased with the results that they decided to live in the completed space full time. Doing so gave them the opportunity to downsize to a comfortable home they love and preserve a piece of Darien’s rich heritage for generations to come. Resources Pagliaro Bartels Sajda 3 Pine Sreet Norwalk, CT 06854 203.838.5517 pbs-archs.com

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DINYAR WADIA WADIAASSOCIATES.COM

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have always paid homage to historical influence, so I was intrigued when I toured the Villandry Gardens in France. Started by an American woman and her French botanist husband, the gardens were designed using colorful vegetables instead of flowers, and have evolved throughout the 30 years I have visited them. The vibrancy, the life, the passion—all come through with the most inviting and magnetic feel, even as the style and details have changed over time. The meticulous sectioned gardens provide an exquisite landscape for the modest château, and envelope it with a magical feel. It would require many days of observation to truly appreciate the breadth of their beauty and composition. It is with the same care and commitment that my associates and I design our homes and their landscapes: with special attention to details, which we consider some of the most important elements of our projects. From architecture to interior design, to landscape design, to construction, we strive to deliver a seamless and enchanting retreat for our clients to enjoy for decades, and to pass

on to their loved ones. Capri, Italy, is one of my favorite destinations for its fabled beauty and historical charm. Its eclectic-style architecture and natural, colorful landscapes provide an absolutely extraordinaryvisual experience. This island has long inspired me in my design work and approach to life in general. Capri’s sun-bleached backdrops are varied due to occupation by several cultures. Somehow, however, these periods work together flawlessly, to create an overlying tranquility. The visual mélange of colors, white Moorish structures, ochre stone, million different textures and zest all inspire my creative senses. What an amazing springboard! We know our clients love that feeling of being away at an exquisite destination, so we bring it home to them. They want their residence to be a place where they shake off the feeling of the outside world. It’s all about the soul of the home—and we create homes with soul and passion. East Coast Home + Design

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ANTHONY MINICHETTI AMARCHITECTLLC.COM

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nthony Minichetti’s opportunity to gather inspiration through travel began when he was just a child. On annual trips to visit family in France and Italy, Anthony never tired of peeking into the numerous cathedrals tucked away on remote streets. “I was exposed to treasures of art and architecture at a very young age,” he recalls. He touched every surface, analyzed every icon and experienced all the texture and proportion that are evident in much of his current work. In this project, Anthony brings that sense of texture and proportion together in perfect harmony with pieces from the client’s art collection. “In our projects, sometimes we are lucky enough to create a destination place so that our clients feel they are transported when entering a space within their own home,” he says. “Clients usually mention luxurious locales they visited in the past as reference to how they want to live; we incorporate the art and sculptures they acquired from those travels into the architectural design.” A wood-carved Buddha rests on a pedestal ensconced by custom radial

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staircases, with a decorative oil-rubbed bronze balustrade leading to the sunken bathing-pool room. The room also includes adjacent steam and sauna rooms enclosed in frosted glass, an alabaster bowl sink mounted on dark walnut cabinetry, and leaf-laminated wallcovering that provides the perfect backdrop for the carved wooden panel, also from the client’s collection. The luxury feel extends to the secret garden housing another Buddha—this one of stone and weighing two tons—which was the core of the contemporary, Balistyle beach house project. “I enjoy creating architecture and backgrounds of rooms that support figures of art,” Anthony says. “The serene niche, subtlety illuminated by rays of sunlight, can be viewed while travelling through spaces within the property.” As for his own future travels, Anthony finds it challenging to carve the time and space out of his schedule to get away. Instead, he collects fresh inspiration from around the world by visiting local museums and antique shops. “All these eclectic objects have a history and have been gathered from around the globe,” he says. “Noticing beauty of craftsmanship in objects always triggers inspiration.”

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BARBARA FEINSTEIN BFEININTERIORS.COM

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arbara Feinstein sees color with a new set of eyes. It’s all the country,” and “the colors of the spice markets and the bright blue thanks to her travels to Morocco, she says, and “its inter- sky were the source of the color palette for this interior.” esting combination of Arab, European and African cultural influences, forming a kaleidoscope of inspiration.” A more modern, large, circular gold chandelier hangs high above, with attached various-sized circles, directing attention to the high ceiling. Barbara chose to visit Morocco for its shopping and to learn more about The chairs’ vibrant color is echoed in the next room’s striped drapery, its culture. She had always wanted to ride a camel across the Sahara which frames the large windows. to gaze at the sunset and see the enormous dunes touch the brilliant blue sky. She was in awe, she recalls, of “the ancient medinas with their Barbara again plays up the use of magenta in another space on the secnarrow, maze-like streets that hid the surprise of interiors filled with ond-floor landing, which resembles a sitting room with a masculine yet intricate mosaic patterns.” While she was there, much of her inspira- eclectic vibe. She notes that the “intricate pattern of the window treattion came from the markets, which were filled with great rugs, textiles, ment is like the beautiful Moroccan mosaic tile work.” leather, metal work and piles of beautiful, colorful spices. The mahogany, built-in bookcase has a space carved out for a well-apFor this project, Barbara chose the living room colors to resemble the pointed couch with bright turquoise and magenta pillows. dazzling array of hues at the spice markets. A set of four deep-burgundy, curved club chairs with a subtle, darker purple basket-weave running The intense turquoise of the bench/cocktail table—like the brilliant through them sits atop a rug that has the “texture and color of the an- Moroccan sky—ties together the room. Barbara says she loves how “the cient kasbah walls,” she says. The center point of this room is the golden curves of the Saharan sand dunes are reflected in the smooth curved brown plush ottoman set in the middle of the chairs. Barbara found that lines of the furniture. “ “the fabrics are deeply saturated with color—like the intense energy of East Coast Home + Design

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SARAH WEILAND

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arah Weiland was deeply inspired on a trip to Turkey, where a knowledgeable local guide took her to great antique shops. Among the treasures she discovered were richly toned rugs and intricate wood carvings. The trip also included a stop in Cappadocia, where ancient architecture is juxtaposed with colorful modern doors. Sarah also had the opportunity to visit textile houses and watch locals hand loom custom silk rugs. Rather than feeling compelled to bring this experience into her designs, however, Sarah sees travel as an opportunity to broaden her perspective in general. “It opens your eyes to so many different ways to approach a room or design,” she says. For example, she now has the foresight to include a piece or color she might not otherwise have considered before she experienced it firsthand. It’s that bit of the unexpected that makes a space unique. While memories of the Turkey trip continue to inspire her, Sarah brings the ocean to life in this project. “ The colors of the sea are different every time you experience it!” she exclaims. The launching point for this space is a palette based on the turquoise waters of Mexico, the variety of blues in South Africa and the deep navy of the ocean off Maine. The tones of the sand and stone surrounding those waters complete the effect and add textural interest as well. Sarah continues to seek inspiration in her travels. During visits to Paris, she’s fallen in love with the Louis XV period and the colors and material used in French furniture. And, while she’ll return to Paris later this month, she hopes to add a stamp from Morocco to her passport in the future. “I would love to experience the markets and bazaars there,” she says. The colors, metals, textiles and artifacts that come out of Morocco are fabulous!” Sarah welcomes the chance to incorporate items her clients have found on their trips into her design. “I think it is important to display mementos and treasures collected from your travels,” she says. “Not only will it remind you of the experience, it is also a one-of-a-kind piece just for you!” Renovations: Koala Residential Lifestyle Room photographs courtesy of Dan Murdoch Photography East Coast Home + Design

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RALPH VUOLO

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alph Vuolo’s favorite travel destinations from a design perspective include England, France and Italy. He appreciates the way architecture and design in those nations have been preserved over the centuries in such a way that creates a layered effect. Throughout the passage of time, from Baroque to Modern, everything works so well side by side, he says, that “it’s as though they have been curated to co-exist.”

lines to surround them. “My own esthetic is a combination of old and new to create a fresh look,” he explains. “The red wall for a pop of color, and an Art Deco sofa paired with a Christopher Guy sofa.” Milo Baughman chairs and a mid-century modern Knoll table complete the effect. In the traditional room, the three paintings surrounding the mantle sparked the design. Found in Paris, Rome and London, the pieces are among other treasures found at local antique centers or such far-flung locales as China (and everywhere in between).

Ralph’s travel experiences have also opened his eyes to the limitless possibilities in combinations of different cultures and designs. That appreciation for a wide variety Ralph plans to spend more time in of styles is demonstrated in these rooms, one a traditional space in Greenwich, CT, and the other a the Far East in his future adventures. He is impressed with the simplicity in design that stretches back through the centuries. modern apartment on New York’s Upper East Side. Discussing the impact his experiences have on his work, he says, The inspiration for the modern room stems from two pieces, “Through travel I’m always inspired in a new way, from somethe French Art Deco sofa and the dance poster. In an effort to thing old or even ancient!” accentuate their soft curves, Ralph brought in strong modern East Coast Home + Design

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JULIANNE STIRLING STIRLINGDESIGNASSOCIATES.COM

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hile Julianne Stirling appreciates the beautiful architecture in all of Europe, she finds something extra special about France. The historic battlefields of Normandy, the cultural pride of Parisians and the same je ne sais quoi in the light that captivated Van Gogh and Cezanne all resonate with her. She vividly remembers the farmhouse she stayed in during a language immersion course many years ago. “ The simplicity of the stone architecture and the welcoming warmth of the interiors are memories I return to often when I think of favorite places,” she says.

three inches into the wall to ensure the necessary depth for storing items.

This is just one example of how Julianne sought authenticity in creating the space for her client. Like that much-loved kitchen in her past, this design included rough plaster walls and a spin on the exposed beam ceiling. While the ceiling was too low to use actual beams, very shallow coffers were created to add that feel in a subtle way. Other practical touches that also add authenticity are the bell-jar light fixtures (hung upside down to allow for easy care) and the cement countertops stained to resemble the aged copper. “It is a bit more sophistiNaturally, Julianne was thrilled when a client came to her cated than my memory of the kitchen in the mas in Provence,” wanting to renovate her kitchen in the French fashion. They she says, “but it has all or more of the same warmth that makes spotted an antique country breakfront they knew was the per- it a perfect gathering place for friends and family.” fect style for the breakfast area, but ran into two problems: it wasn’t for sale and, even if it were, it likely wouldn’t have fit As much as Julianne loves Europe, she hopes to explore the in the kitchen. Undaunted, Julianne enlisted a cabinetmaker to Pacific next. She has never been to Japan or China and is inreplicate it—right down to the aged look and slightly crooked trigued by the Pacific Islands. “ They ’re so ancient and many doors—but in dimensions that would work for the space. To of them are not yet modernized,” she notes. “ That simple isadd additional function to this form, the recessed the piece land architecture interests me.” East Coast Home + Design

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hristine Dahl has been immersed in other cultures most of her life, having grown up as an expat in Hong Kong and Venezuela. “ Travel is part of my DNA!” she says. In fact, she and her husband lived overseas for eight years in Singapore and Sydney before Christine decided to return to school for her Interior Design degree. From a design perspective, Christine cites her time in Asia—particularly Bangkok and Vietnam—as having a heavy influence on her work. “It’s a true artisan culture,” she says. “Expression through art, furniture, building and clothing is really appreciated.” She finds Vietnam interesting because of the lingering influence of French colonization during the early 1900s. With that background, Christine was particularly excited to approach this project in Bedford, NY. The owners of this traditional center-hall Colonial have a passion for travel, and they have collected amazing artifacts along the way. Christine’s task: incorporate their unique finds into a traditional home—without making it feel like a museum! “I integrated the rooms so that they flow from place 60

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CHRISTINE DAHL

CHRISTINEDAHLINTERIORDESIGN.COM to place and showcase their beautiful findings in a way that is comfortable and pleasing to the eye,” she said. Evidence of this effort is found in the kitchen, which was completely renovated for better flow. Bronze and natural stone elements create a clean yet subtle feel and allow for the integration of more unusual items, such as pendant lights etched with a Chinese motif and the curtain of beaded Indian linen. Christine is sure to collect additional inspiration for future projects during her upcoming trip to Paris. She’ll be travelling with friends who used to live in the city, and is eager to get a glimpse of what it would be like to live there. “I most look forward to visiting the markets and all the neighborhoods that the normal tourist wouldn’t know about,” she says. No matter how her travels may inspire her, Christine holds true to her core belief that homes should tell a story about the people who live there. “Otherwise, what’s the point?” she says. “ That’s what good design is all about.” Kitchen cabinetry: True North Cabinets Photographs courtesy of Andrea Chalon Photography East Coast Home + Design

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ANDREA ROMEO KATEREECE.COM

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ndrea Romeo finds inspiration in very different types of places. “ There is something about the pulse of a city—and nothing like the vibe of a U.S. city,” she explains. “A city ’s people, art, shopping, local designers, food, colors and architecture fuel and inspire me.” As deep as her appreciation for cities may run, she also enjoys island settings like Bermuda and the Bahamas. There, she revels in the sense of tranquility found in the natural colors of native flora, breath-taking sunsets and blue water against white sand.

ing rustic elements to her designs, including this one. Andrea seeks inspiration in her everyday life as well. “I am aesthetically driven, and I see beauty in sunsets, restaurants, fashion, quaint shops, nature and people—everywhere I am constantly observing,” she says. She preserves those bits of beauty with photographs, capturing a charmingly decorated hotel room, a garden or a store window display so she can refer to it later. Next on Andrea’s travel wish list is a trip to Italy. Her grandmother immigrated from Abruzzo, and Andrea would love to explore her ethnic roots and visit the town. “She had a home and garden that boasted of Old World Italianstyle,” she remembers of her grandmother. “I feel like much of that beauty and culture were creatively inspiring to me, even as a child.”

Andrea has lived in three very different areas of the U.S.—the Northeast (Connecticut and Massachusetts), North Carolina and Texas. “You learn that every region of our country has its own unique culture and style,” she says. Of all the places she’s lived, however, Texas will always hold a special place in Andrea’s heart. She loves the uniqueness of its major cities “ To me,” she continues, “travel is spiritual. To feel the hustle and also appreciates its open pastures, beautiful sky and rustic and bustle of a city or the calmness of a tropical island makes décor. Andrea often pays homage to her time in Texas by add- us who we are and how we design.” East Coast Home + Design

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JAMIE HERZLINGER JAMIEHERZLINGER.COM

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think my travels in Europe have been the biggest influence on my work,” says Jamie Herzlinger of Jamie Herzlinger Interior Design. “I love international style.”

Over the years, she has spent much time in Milan, Paris and England—and each has a special place in her heart. “I relate to all those places for different reasons,” she notes. “Each city has a rich history, which, as a history buff, I love. Plus, each has a unique style that can serve as a great backdrop for almost any project.”

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When it comes to Parisian design, Jamie often borrows from their romantic flair—especially the way classic furnishings and modern accessories come together freely to create a space that evokes a sensual feeling. When visiting the city, she often finds herself at local markets, peering through the colorful art and classic antiques to find inspiration. Her interest in Milan lies largely in its Stalinist architecture. Audacious structures loom larger than life, while remnants of the period, complete with spires and elegantly curved buildings, dot the city. But, for all her experiences, she most connects with England’s formal sense of design. I’ve always been influenced by English architecture,” Jamie states with a smile. “I love how it’s very sharp, with

very crisp lines. For some reason, I’ve always loved it.” Her adoration for the diverging styles is evident in her projects, which effortlessly mix textures and lines to create unique spaces. Colorful modernist couches pair beautifully with carefully organized squares on the walls in the living room, while the kitchen exhibits the best of both French and English influences, with stark white walls and Provençal-style cabinetry. Of course, not every client embraces the chance to add a global perspective to his or her home décor. But for those who dare, Jamie encourages them to meet the challenge. “It’s important that I make it relatable, ” she says, “My customer’s personality and vibe should shine through but, at the same time, be expressed in fun and unexpected ways throughout the home. It’s like design therapy.” East Coast Home + Design

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TRACY DWYER

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hen it comes to travel, interior designer and Parc Monseau owner Tracy Dwyer can be considered a seasoned pro. In addition to her many domestic treks, Tracy has also lived in France for six years with her family. “All I do is travel,” explains Tracy with a laugh. “So most of my designs have definitely taken their cue from my various journeys.”

“Sand is the color that serves as a base for what I do a lot of the time,” Tracy says. “It’s a wonderful color. It doesn’t turn yellow. It rarely fades. It doesn’t turn creamy. It’s a true neutral in every sense of the word. Plus, it allows other colors in the room to pop.” This design philosophy was evident in a recent project where she redesigned an existing home on the Long Island Sound. The client wanted to bring the feeling of the beautiful beachfront into her space without it becoming too kitschy. She also wanted to showcase touches of her favorite hue, coral, throughout the home.

Nature is perhaps one of the most dominant influences in her work. It is an observation she first made during her time in France, where she noticed how closely the French connect with the land in terms of their lifestyle “Everything is tied to the earth,” she says. “From the foods they eat to their use of space. It’s very purposeful. And while I don’t design particu- To accomplish this, Tracy used sand as the base color for the larly with a French influence per se, it’s definitely important furnishings and window treatments. To add a splash of color, she selected pillows and accessories in the client’s requested that I try to connect with natural themes when I work.” shade. In the bedroom, she added pieces with shades of cobalt Tracy ’s time in France also led her to the beach, a love that blue to create a more restful environment. serves as the main guide for many of her favorite color palettes. The rich blues of the ocean and cascading orange of The clients were thrilled with how calming the space became. the setting sun often find their way into her work. And she This, according to Tracy, should be a main focus of any suchas much to say about the neutral tone that serves as base for cessful design work. “ That’s why I love working with coastal many of her projects.. Instead of going for a more common colors,” she says. “ They ’re gentle on the eyes and soothing to color like taupe or white, she opts for a very specific tone. the soul. And, when you think of home, that’s just what you want it to be.” Sand. East Coast Home + Design

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KAREN POWELL DECORANDYOU.COM

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aren Powell often draws inspiration from artwork, but cites the beach as one of her favorite travel destinations. “I love the Cayman Islands and the Caribbean for the beautiful water and colors,” she says. “Key West is great, too! The water ’s gorgeous, there’s lots of great food and it’s pretty. Very artsy.”

measured the fireplace opening and sketched a design; Karen approved it and selected the glass for it. The result is the oneof-a-kind piece shown here. Another unique item is the jellyfish chandelier hanging over the dining room table. Karen procured this piece from one of her firm’s key product partners. “I’m always encouraging people to use color,” she explains, “but it’s important to know She brings both these passions together in this project—her how and where to use it, too. That’s an art and a science.” own second home along the Jersey Shore. It all started with the “Happy Dog” piece hanging over the living room couch. “I With Karen’s fondness for both art and the beach, it’s no surbought it before I had any place to put it!” she quips. “But I prise that both locations are in her future travel plans. She love dogs, I love the colors and I love that it’s fun and funky. would love to experience Paris—particularly the Louvre MuIt made me smile!” The vivid colors of the artwork inspired seum—and visit more coastal cities here in the U.S., such as Charleston, Savannah and the Outer Banks. She also hopes to the pallet for the design, which incorporates a beach theme. take an Alaskan cruise and visit Los Cabos on the Baja CaliAs the space came together, Karen was momentarily stumped fornia Peninsula. by the fireplace. She wanted to hide the fireplace opening, but struggled to find the right screen. Then, when she hired Above all, Karen believes that experiences are priceless. “Being a local artisan to obscure the view of the neighboring house with people, celebrating, sharing and living life—that’s what’s through the dining room window (and the window to the left important. And your environment should support your life. of the fireplace), Karen was struck with inspiration. The artist It’s the stage on which you live it.” East Coast Home + Design

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ANDREA CROSS AXELINTERIORS.COM

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or Andrea Cross of Axel Designs, travelling is more than simply a chance to get away. Andrea sees it as a master class in human behavior.

long-time clients. The homeowners and I have worked together for years, renovating one room at a time,” she explains. “They are an active family with young children, and they love to entertain.”

More importantly, the couple had acquired a number of antique furnishings from time spent living abroad in the U.K. The couple was looking for something that was fresher and more youthful because they have young children,” she says. “They felt that the furnishings were, in fact, too stuffy for them.” So it was important for them to get some modern pieces to Driven by this simple philosophy, Andrea has pursued some unique travel experiences over the years. One of breathe new life into their home.” the most memorable? Taking a cooking class in someone’s home while in travelling in Italy. Andrea loved the opportunity to not To accommodate their wishes, Andrea decided to incorporate color. only indulge in homestyle Italian cooking, but to peek at how the Together with the client, she selected an antique rug that served as homeowners made purposeful use of every area in the home. It a guide for the other tones in the room. From there she matched was amazing,” she recalls with a laugh. “I had front-row seats to the room’s neutral hue with a beautiful celadon sofa. Finally, she watch how the host entertained guests. It definitely gave me a lot brought in two pieces of contemporary art, including a large painting that offered a sophisticated contrast to the classic mahogany of insight.” dining room set. This same passion for understanding people and spaces was unmistakable in the project she recently completed for one of her Photography by Mary Ellen Hendricks “One thing I try to do when I travel is to observe how people live in their personal space,” she explains. “For all my projects, the challenge is making a space that works well for the people who live there. So paying attention to this sort of thing is really important.”

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PHILLIP JAMES DODD

BESPOKE RESIDENTIAL DESIGN PHILLIP@PJD-ARCHITECT.COM

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uch of Phillip Dodd’s personal design philosophy can be traced to his childhood growing up abroad. A native of Manchester, England, Dodd spent most of his youth in the area before attending the celebrated Prince of Wales’s Institute of Architecture in London. Today, Phillip regularly draws from his time in England—not only with clients but in his personal space as well. Nowhere is this more on display than in his dining room, where he has carefully pulled together different European elements to create a space that reminds him of his childhood home. The room, which doubles as a library, was painted in subtle hues reminiscent of a traditional English color palette. The space also boasts a beautiful custom-designed, built-in bookcase that he installed soon after his family moved in. It stores not only his collection of architecture and design books, but also a variety of prints that remind him of his lifetime of travels. Among the pictures are images of the chapel at Cambridge’s Emmanuel College, where his brother was married. There are also etchings of a market square near where his parents currently reside, in Cartmel, Cumbria. Phillip was sure to add some statement pieces that further cement his ties to the region. Pillows bearing the historic Union Jack symbol and a globe strategically placed on the table were curated specifically to immerse visitors in his rich heritage. “Even the table reminds me of home,” he notes, “as it was made from reclaimed railroad track sleepers.” The table serves another purpose as well: it honors his great-uncle Alfred, who proudly drove a steam locomotive for years. He’s 85 years old and still kicking,” says Phillip with a laugh. Phillip is currently working on projects in Greenwich and Palm Beach - where he specializes in designing secondary/vacation homes on the Island for clients based in Connecticut and New York. Photography by Jon Wallen East Coast Home + Design

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ROBIN MCGARRY ROBINMCGARRY.COM

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hether traveling abroad or within the United States, I am always inspired by the diversity of architecture, design styles and art I encounter,” explains Robin McGarry, owner of Robin McGarry Interior Design. “So when working with clients, I try to get them to step out of their comfort box. And I find that clients who travel more have an easier time with this concept.” So when Robin was recently asked to design a space that reflects a couple’s extensive travel experiences, she jumped at the opportunity. The client, an international executive and his wife, was looking for a way to redesign their home while incorporating their eclectic tastes in art and culture. And, because of their well-traveled background, they felt comfortable experimenting with color. “Ultimately, they were looking for something that felt fresh and new,” says Robin. “And, honestly, that can be a challenge if the client isn’t willing to take chances. Luckily, this client had no such reservations. She wasn’t trying to stick to a formula that is safe.” In redesigning the home, Robin took her cues from the client’s extensive art collection. The team selected a vibrant green tone for the walls to better pair with the painting above the fireplace and the neutral furnishings. The hand-knotted rug in the sitting room was selected to blend perfectly with the beautiful painting perched above the sofa. Robin also dared to mix patterns on both the window treatments and pillows to create a more modern look. The clients were extremely happy with the results. But, more importantly, they were thrilled to have found in Robin a kindred spirit who shares their love of innovative design. And, for Robin, that serves as the greatest compliment. “Meeting a sophisticated and well-traveled client’s expectations is a true test of a designer’s professionalism,” she says. “Together we worked to create a space that harmonizes centuries of great design and art, creating something that’s more than a decorated room. It is truly a space that is exudes timeless beauty.” Photography by Neil Landino East Coast Home + Design

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ANNA NOWAK LIONSPAW.CO

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nna Nowalk’s design is particularly influenced by her travels in Europe and the southwestern U.S. In London and Paris, she has a deep appreciation for how architecture is lovingly restored. She has also discovered some great antique markets in both locations, and enjoys bringing special treasures home to her clients. She’s similarly impressed with the passionate approach to craftsmanship shown by the Native American population in Taos, Santa Fe and Albuquerque, New Mexico. “They have a way of incorporating energy and spirit in what they do,” she says. This project was particularly inspired by travels to New Mexico, where Anna discovered many of the unique items used, such as the peacock mirror and Swati post. These special finds are paired with a brown zebra hide rug, a brown faux hide throw blanket and an Oskar Huber crushed velvet sofa. “I’m an animal lover, so I have to consider where things are made,” she explains. “If I can find faux hides that have a natural look, I like to incorporate them as well.” The resulting effect of these warm colors and soft textures is a welcoming place to read a 76

good book or take a Sunday afternoon nap. Anna will continue to visit her favorite locations in Europe and New Mexico, and also travel to Italy, where she has been numerous times. Before returning there, however, she hopes to explore Turkey and Greece. “My husband and I went to Italy and Greece on our honeymoon, and I had a fantastic time, but we spent only a fraction of the time I’d really like to spend there,” she says of Greece. Spain is another destination on her bucket list Anna encourages clients to surround themselves with things they most enjoy. “In our culture of ‘more,’ we need to edit things so that we only have what we really, really love,” she says. She also discourages clients from feeling pressured to get a space done on a certain timeline. “Remember that it’s a process and it takes time to create the look. Relax and enjoy the process!” Photography by John Khachadoorian

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SUSAN ALISBERG ALISBERGPARKER.COM

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hen I travel, I am drawn to places that are rich in both aesthetics and history,” says Susan Alisberg, founding partner of Alisberg Parker. “Whether on an estancia in Argentina, at a bazaar in Istanbul or visiting a trendy hotel in Berlin, I discover and absorb design elements that inspire me.”

are a crisp white to better set off the playful black stripes on the floor. Strategically placed flowers add the perfect pop of color to complete the look.

In the same home, Susan installed an elegant stairwell that mirrors one she found in Morocco, with the lighting suspended above at different levels. White walls serve as the perfect backdrop for the zigzag designs Wanting to get the most from her explorations, Susan regularly im- on each step, thereby connecting the stairway to the vibrant patterns merses herself in the character of each location, visiting art galleries, throughout the house. local shops and design firms that define the spirit of each community Doing so not only opens her up to new experiences, but also helps The clients fell in love with the bold designs, which they felt struck shape her approach to working with clients. the perfect balance of modern shapes and playful lines. This continental look brings a sense of elegance to the home. This philosophy is evident in the two projects she shares with our readers. In both cases, the homeowners were well traveled and appre- The success of these projects reinforces Susan’s belief that designers ciated great design, freeing Susan to create truly memorable spaces should encourage their clients to try design elements they encounter drawn from recent trips she made to Europe and Africa on the road. “When one travels, one is usually seeking a rich aesthetic experience,” Susan concludes. “It’s great when we give clients the posThe elegant bathroom, inspired by one she encountered in Europe, is sibility of bringing that experience home.” notable because it features stone and sleek metal cabinets. The walls East Coast Home + Design

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LARA MICHELLE LARAMICHELLE.COM

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herever I go directly influences my work,” says Lara Texture also plays a major role in the project, with the plush carpet ofMichelle of Lara Michelle Beautiful Interiors. “Es- fering a perfect foil to the smooth wooden tables and desk. The look pecially if I see something unique.” is completed with the lively pillows strategically placed throughout the room. “Pillows are like jewelry,” says Lara with a laugh. “They are fun In fact, Lara’s love of all things unique led her customers to seek her and really add the finishing touch.” out for a recent redesign of their home. In the dining room, the client wanted a buffet table, and yet was havThe clients, a young family of Indian descent, were looking to create ing difficulty finding something to fit the space designated for it. So, a place that celebrated their love of color. They were seasoned travel- working alongside her carpenter, Lara custom-created a beautiful piece ers with a great passion for art. More importantly, they were open to for them. taking design risks—so open, in fact, that they only made one real request: that Lara would find a way to showcase their favorite painting. The customers were overjoyed with the changes, which gave them a youthful place that radiates with the same vibrant energy that they do. “The family absolutely loved color,” she says. “So I thought we could use this painting as a guide for the other colors in the room.” “Working with the clients was so much fun,” says Lara, “especially since they were willing to mix things up. And that, to me, is what In the living room, the walls are painted gray to serve as the perfect design is all about.” backdrop for the piece, which hangs above the couch. Taking cues from the artwork, the team accessorized with mauve throw rugs and otto- Photographs by Chaun Bing man chairs under the desk, while the painting’s more subtle golden tones influence the color of the furnishings and window treatments. East Coast Home + Design

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aul Guzzeta credits his travels to Asia with having a significant impact on his work. He finds the creative use of local materials particularly inspiring, and also appreciates any locale where he can experience the traditional handiwork of ancient cultures. “Wherever you can see the mosaics or tile patterns of native people—those would be my favorite places to go,” he says. Shortly after a trip to Australia, Paul’s hosted an art event. (There he added an element of youthful fun by turning surf trunks into throw pillows to evoke a beach house or cabana.) It was at that event that a client purchased the art shown here in the living room space. These pieces, by a St. Bart’s artist, were the inspiration for the room. “We mixed it up and combined city pieces with artwork from St. Bart’s,” Paul explains. The side tables and cubes done in raffia bring in the beach element, while mink-covered dining room chairs are all city chic. Paul will continue to seek inspiration through travel, although it’s hard for him to decide where to go next. “No matter how

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PAUL GUZZETA PHILIP SHORTT IHDESIGNSTUDIO.COM

much you travel, you never see it all!” he observes. “I’m very interested in East Berlin. I’ve not been there since the wall came down, and I’m sure it’s screaming with creativity and newness.” He’d also like to visit Costa Rica, but Cuba will probably be his next destination. While Paul makes purchases during his travels, he’s also keen on building his list of resources. For example, he might ask the concierge at a fine hotel who designed the furniture and, in his exploration of the area, seek out the source. He often has custom pieces made for clients by companies or individuals he discovers in his travels. Paul truly appreciates the opportunity travel provides him. Through his experiences, he has developed the ability to relate to clients with different backgrounds and beliefs. He can also recall the feeling of being in a fine resort in an exotic locale, and evoke that feeling in a client’s home. “ Travel opens your eyes to the world,” he says. East Coast Home + Design

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LYNNE SCALO LYNNESCALO.COM

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rom a design perspective, Lynne Scalo’s favorite place is Paris. “I love walking around in the gardens, seeing the architecture and learning what’s new in the art and furniture worlds,” she says. Of particular interest to Lynne are the Paris museums, which always have a wonderful mix of objects from different eras and styles right alongside the new and fashionable. “ They really know how to incorporate all sorts of different but well-made pieces,” she adds.

abstract expressionism made popular in 1940s New York by Robert Motherwell. The paintings were actually created by his daughter, Jeannie Motherwell. And, of course, the custom-designed chair covered in a luxurious Belgian linen is the perfect place to take it all in.

Lynne’s work has afforded her the opportunity for some recent travel to Palm Beach and the Hamptons, and she has upcoming trips to Paris, London, Mexico and possibly Prague on the horizon. However, one of her favorite destinations is the nearby Lynne certainly brings that concept into this space, a bit of Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.[for clarity] a “ window into her soul” designed for a charity event. “ This She eloquently refers to her visits there as “a wonderful rewould be my perfect space to relax because just about every freshment for the soul.” single continent and time period is reflected,” she explains. She also enjoys being surrounded by things she loves, with It isn’t just her own travel that influences her design, however. Lynne says, “One of the first questions I always ask clients each piece having a relevance and meaning in her life. is, ‘If you could live anywhere in the world, even if it doesn’t Take, for example, the early African piece in the corner. Not make sense at all, where would it be?’” She wants to underonly does it add both a primitive and a modern feel, but it stand how people live and how they see themselves, and this also evokes memories of her mother, an artist who kept the question helps inform her design as she attempts to capture family surrounded by beautiful artifacts. The sculpture is an those nuances about her clients. “ That’s my approach to deinteresting contrast to the 16th-century French mirror on the sign,” she says. “As an artist, not an object-getter.” opposite wall. On the back wall is artwork inspired by the East Coast Home + Design

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JAN HILTZ

JANHILTZINTERIORSLLC.COM

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t’s safe to say that Janet Hiltz’s personal photo collection that the home in many respects seemed similar to spaces she is larger than most people’s. had encountered while in Paris. So she decided to incorporate many elements of her favorite Parisian hangouts. As the owner of Jan Hiltz Interiors, she has traveled extensively to work with clients seeking her unique style To provide the perfect backdrop, Jan selected a rich off-white vision. And she meticulously documents every step along the as the neutral tone to be repeated throughout the residence. way. “ Traveling always heightens my design sensibility!” she Doing so added a touch of elegance and gave an almost blank says. “I photograph everything from fabrics to flooring to ar- canvas feel to the home, allowing brightly colored accessochitectural detail. I keep every photo on my iPad. So when I ries to stand out. She also picked furnishings that were modam having a quiet moment, I will go through my travel photos ern but distinctly designed for comfort. Finally, she carefully chose unique art and accessories to give the home an air of and always feel inspired.” playfulness. Jan’s unique global perspective helped her recently when she worked with a client who was seeking to incorporate a bit of The client truly loves the finished project, savoring the surwhimsy into her home. “ The client was an interior designer prising elements Jan added to make the space come alive. And with a young family, who was open to new ideas and color,” she Jan knows it was the cultural knowledge obtained through her says. “ That was great because she understood my perspective many journeys that guided her. “Exposure to different cultures definitely gives me the edge I need when perfecting the and appreciated my attention to detail.” look of eclectic design,” she notes. “I’m always keen on injectAs Jan looked for clues for decorating the space, she observed ing the unexpected in my rooms.” East Coast Home + Design

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LINDA RUDERMAN LINDARUDERMAN.COM

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ravelling around the world to meet the needs of Although she worked with her contacts to find many of the her clients is an everyday occurrence for interior furnishings domestically, she ultimately decided to go to Marrakesh, Morocco, herself. designer Linda Ruderman.

For more than 25 years, Linda has traveled extensively in Europe and Africa to find just the perfect piece to complete a space. So, when she was approached by a client to complete an extensive redesign of her home, Linda seized the opportunity to take on a new adventure in Morocco. “ The house’s design was heavily influenced by Moorish architecture,” she offers. “So crafting a space that was inspired by Moroccan art and design would be a perfect fit. “

When Linda arrived, she was greeted by a guide who worked specifically with interior designers. She visited many area markets to personally select the fabrics and pieces she would use for her customers. She also had an opportunity to witness some local artisans hard at work on their next masterpieces.

Stateside, Linda and her team worked in stages to complete the nearly three-year project. Along the way, they were able to transform the space using the stunning vintage furniture The customer loved the suggestions, but had two require- and artwork they had obtained from their international conments for the project to proceed. First, the entire home had to tacts. They even were able to source the antique tile that ran be furnished with antiques. And second, any work on the home throughout the home. had to be done when the family was not present. The clients were most impressed with Linda’s dedication to “ The couple travelled a lot, sometimes at months at a time,” the project—especially her willingness to go abroad to curate says Linda. “So the real challenge was being prepared to move some truly one-of-a-kind pieces. And even though Linda conin and work on a room when they were not present. Since we siders herself a seasoned globetrotter, the trip to Marrakesh had to be in and out before they returned, it took a lot of plan- was an almost magical experience for her. “Marrakesh was truly ning to coordinate our efforts. But I’m proud to say we were amazing,” she recalls. “It was my first time there, and I was blown away by the sights and sounds. And the people were so successful in meeting that request.” warm to me, I felt right at home.” Further complicating those efforts was the distance that Linda had to go to obtain antiques suitable for the homeowners. East Coast Home + Design

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ANGELA KOSINSKI HOMEWORKSNY.COM

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ngelas design inspirations come from the worlds she has traveled to. The one piece that has been a part of her inspiration is a box that she brought home from India. It is carved wood with intricate details of brass accents that have held personal treasures she hold dear to her heart for the better part of 18 years. A strong sense of style and design brings life to the wood and the hand forged brass along with a tassel accented key that makes this a treasure. Angela brings this same sense of simplicity and worldly style into every project she designs so that there is a little sense of treasure in every space she touches.�

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SHAWN DIAZ HOMEWORKSNY.COM

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hen Shawn Diaz from Home Works in Port Chester, NewYork was approached to work on a project for a client from Naples, Italy, she jumped at the chance. She was eager to utilize what she’d learned from her travels to one of her favorite places. Her journeys to the nation she wished she called home include the Amalfi Coast, Venice, Florence, Rome and Tuscany. Shawn was impressed with the Italians, “who are so at ease with their surroundings, blending the old and the new simultaneously.” She incorporated the warm Italian colors with the terra-cotta tiles, iron with the Venetian plaster, and stone masonry with marvelous carvings. The bathroom is ornate with its decorative tile and high-end finishes that cast a golden hue. The dry stack stone on the two-story mantle was inspired by Pompeii ruins, where there was no mortar left though ruins were still standing. Above is an impressive tray ceiling, from which hangs an intricate chandelier. Shawn blended tapestries and silk burlaps with rich chocolate leathers, she says, using “every imaginable choice of fabric to combine the old and the new.” East Coast Home + Design

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PETER J SINNOTT IV HOMEWORKSNY.COM

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eter J. Sinnott from HomeWorks in Post Chester, New York believes that travel takes you to new and exotic locales—even if it is just around the corner. It’s how you see it differently through your own eyes.” 
For Peter, a home library in general terms is “a contemplative environment where the homeowner is surrounded by a wealth of visual objects from his or her travels: the antique map; the various sculptures representing ancient Athens, Rome and the Cyclades; the hide rug from Tanzania; and the treebranch floor lamp from the Berkshires.” As evident in this design of a client’s library, he pulled together his many travel inspirations and blended them for an eclectic mix of scale and textures. He chose the fabrics for their durability and with the realization that “the library is a relaxing place to read alone or as a family.” Peter included his signature pops of color to give a vibrant hue among the dark, rich mahogany walls and tray ceiling. Games are hidden away in the cabinets, while children’s books are on the lower shelves. With a convenient wet bar in the corner, the library also serves as an intimate space to entertain. Peter incorporated objects from both exotic trips to far-off places and quick weekend getaways, all of which serve as memories for the homeowners. He also made sure that all the homeowners’ souvenirs are within arm’s reach and prominently displayed for the whole family to enjoy. With his carefully thought-out design, Peter fully succeeded in reflecting his client’s diverse interests.

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Hidden Treasures

Torlini Decor

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While living in Umbria, Italy, Marina and Pierre Torlini always had a vision of moving to America to fulfill their dream of sharing their love of Italian furniture and décor. They already had a strong connection to the Connecticut area, as Marina’s family has a thriving truffle business called Sabatino in West Haven. With their network of family here, all they needed was to make the all-important move.

ing on the most exquisite pieces. Pierre’s mother, an antique expert, also gave her son a deep appreciation and understanding for design and furniture. When you enter the couple’s new store, you are greeted by an airy, sunlit room full of artisan Italian furniture. These imported pieces can be customized for any client’s taste, and the turnaround is very efficient and the delivery prompt. All of the store’s pieces are considered new and the quality is beyond expectation, with most pieces made of walnut, chestnut or pine. The ornate inlaid pieces reflect a high level of craftsmanship, as do the rustic carving and pure gold-leaf application.

Their move proved to be a huge milestone in their life. In July 2015 they opened their store, Torlini Décor, in Fairfield, CT, optimistic that Hanging on the showroom’s walls, which exude their own presence, are area residents will be pleased. maps made in Florence, Italy, and beautiful paintings by Italian artists. Also displayed are vividly painted ceramic pieces from Deruta, Italy. An appreciation for furniture and art comes from their family. Pierre’s Some of the store’s hand-painted Italian furnishings can be customgrandfather was a well-known craftsman and art designer in Italy, work- made to fit perfectly into the living room or bedroom. 94

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If you don’t see what you’re looking for, you can sit down on the stunning, made-to-order Italian upholstered couch and browse through a plethora of catalogs. Come spring, Torlini Décor will be showcasing its striking outdoor furniture with ceramic tables made with lavic stone. Also featured will be out-of-the-ordinary painted ceramic Italian smokers/barbecues. And, if you can’t make it to the store, Pierre and Marina will visit you at home, discussing options while you browse through their catalogs. Even if you just have an idea for a piece you like, they will work with you to find something similar. Bravissimo! Torlini Décor Furniture and Design 1177 Post Road
 Fairfield, CT 06824 203.292.6036 torlinidecor.com East Coast Home + Design

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Hidden Treasures

Häcker Kitchens

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Häcker Kitchens has just opened its flagship U.S. showroom in Greenwich, CT. These beautiful German custom kitchens are at the cutting edge of kitchen technology, and feature a wide range of styles, contemporary, transitional, and traditional.

A family-run business since 1898, Häcker offers a charming aesthetic carefully tailored to each customer’s preference and needs. The newly opened Greenwich showroom also showcases stunning and high-tech Miele appliances and Julien fixtures. Maya Nair and her world-class team of designers are already putting their excellent taste to work. Häcker Kitchens 388 West Putnam Avenue Greenwich, CT 06830 203.622.9200 hackergreenwich.com 96

Maya Nair

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Profile for East Coast Home Publishing

The 2015 Annual Interior Designers Issue  

East Coast Home Publishing

The 2015 Annual Interior Designers Issue  

East Coast Home Publishing

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