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1. Susan Petril / Interiors Group of Southwest Florida 2. Natasha Pereira / Natasha Pereira Interior Design 3. Lisa Lovetto / Lisa Lovetto Designs 4. Edward Gary Shanabarger / Edward Gary Design 5. Lana Knapp / Collins and Dupont Design Group 6. Heather Serrano / Heather Serrano Design 7. Kira Krumm / Koastal Design Group 8. Minka McDonald / Jinx McDonald Interior Design 9. Troy Beasley / Beasley and Henley 10. Chrissy Howard / Jinx McDonald Interior Design 11. Alirio Pirela / Pirela Atelier 12. David Fruscione / Republic of Decor 13. Debra Yelner / DLY Design 14. April Schaurer / April Schaurer Interior Design 15. Laura Parsons / Pure Design

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NAPLES | BONITA SPRINGS | USVI ST. THOMAS | NEW YORK CITY

THE PLAYERS

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16. Carrie Brigham / Carrie Brigham Design 17. Lisa Davenport / Lisa Davenport Designs 18. Sherri Dupont / Collins and Dupont Design Group 19. Amy Andrews / Hilton Interiors 20. Faith Fix / Freestyle Interiors 21. Diane Torrisi / Diane Torrisi Designs 22. Robin McGarry / Dwayne Bergmann Interiors 23. Kevin Steffanni / Kevin Steffanni Design Group 24. Dwayne Bergmann / Dwayne Bergmann Interiors 25. Lou Shafran / Pacifica Interiors 26. Tina Anastasia / Mark Finlay Interiors 27. Shannon Gilkey / Montanna Design Associates Not Pictured: Emily Lyon Allen and Beth Field / Lyon Field Interiors

www.carriebrigham.com Follow us on Instagram @carriebrighamdesign 239 . 261 .1720

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Florida License #IB C0000363

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GULF

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DESIGN+DECOR FALL 2018 | ISSUE 4

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Island Life

A Polynesian Dream Home Indulges the Beauty and Majesty of the Outdoors Story by Pam Gersh Photography by Brantley Photography

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The Top 25

The 2018 Annual Top 25 Design Firms in Southwest Florida

Cover and Portrait Photography by Neil Landino

112 A Subtle Study in Contrasts

Two friends, two homes, same neighborhood. Freestyle Interiors’ designs helped two families fall in love with their homes all over again. Story by Anastasia Storer Photography by Lori Hamilton

DEPARTMENTS 22 30 40 128

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Editors Letter In The Field Design News

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Melange Ask The Experts Events

Profile

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

G U L F

C O A S T

DESIGN+DECOR FALL 2018

ISSUE 4

Editor-in-Chief Matthew J. Kolk mattkolk@me.com 203-820-1092

G U L F

C O A S T

DESIGN+DECOR Managing Editor James EagenS O U T H W E S T F L O R I D A

PREMIER ISSUE FALL 2017

Contributing Writers Deborah Brannon, Lisa Gant, Peg Gersh, Susan Heller, Lollie Mathews, Jennifer Jackson-Outlaw, Anastasia Storer Contributing Photographers Jane Beiles, Michael Biondo, Phillip Ennis, Tria Giovan, John Gruen, John Hannon, Paul Johnson, Lori Hamilton, Neil Landino, Mark La Rosa, Tim Lee, Daniel Milstein, Durston Saylor, Debra Somerville, Eric Striffler, Jonathan Wallen, Woodruff/Brown Photography

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Copy Editor Elena Serocki

e are so proud to present to you the 2018 “Top 25 Designers” Issue. It was extremely difficult for us to choose our top 25, you would think that after being in Luxury Shelter publishing for over 16 years, it would be easy, but it never is.

Graphic & Web Design East Coast Home Publishing

The Southwest Florida market is a chameleon. An onion with many, many layers. Where this market was demographically targeted towards the Midwest, now it is a global market, consisting of homeowners from all reaches of our planet, with incredibly different design aesthetics and wants and needs for their families.

Publisher Shelley E. McCormick smccormick@eastcoasthomepublishing.com 203-545-7091

As difficult as it was to choose our top 25, as there are so many very talented designers servicing the Southwest Florida market, from whom we saw so many beautiful projects, it came down to making the ultimate decision of who we were going to honor with this prestigious declaration, and it came down to one word: Change. Being a dynamic, multi-faceted publication is what has made our publishing company a success and a very well respected firm in the national spotlight for the past 16 years, we felt that we needed to stay true to our roots: working with innovators, educators and firms that are willing to be a part of a community of extremely talented individuals for the better good of the shelter community by sharing their knowledge within and with the consumer to better educate them on the home building and design process. This was the final criteria that helped us make our decisions. We hope that you all enjoy the issue and we look forward to sharing with you our next top 25 issue next year.

Shelley McCormick

Account Managers Alessandra Flanagan Teresa Mazzara Business Development John Oleynick East Coast Home Publishing 7485 Inspira Circle #1203 Naples, Florida 34113 Fax: 203-286-1850

GULF COAST DESIGN + DECOR is proud to be new members of the CBIA

Gulf Coast Design + Decor is published four issues per year. To subscribe: www.eastcoasthomepublishing.com; Subscriptions: one year, $28; two years, $50. Back issues can be purchased at www.eastcoasthomepublishing.com. For editorial inquiries: Editor, Gulf Coast Design + Decor 7485 Circle #1203 Florida 34113 e-mail: mattkolk@ To Inspira learn about aboutNaples, our fabulous newortitle, please contact Shelley me.com. For advertising inquiries: Partner Please call McCormick at 203-545-7091. McCormick, ofShelley East Coast Home Publishing Reproat: 203-545-7091 duction whole or in part without permission is prohibited. All projects described in this publicaor smccormick@eastcoasthomepublishing.com tion are for private, noncommercial use only. No rights for commercial use or exploitation are given or implied. The opinions expressed by writers for articles published by Gulf Coast Design + Decor are not necessarily those of the magazine.

Over 15 Years of Publishing Excellence

Enjoy,

Partner and Publisher

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PROUD MEMBERS

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MELANGE

PERFECTLY PLUM TINA ANASTASIA

MARKFINLAY.COM

Splinter Works “Hammock Bath Tub” Designed by XYZ Designers and Photo by Samar Al RawasStuck by the synergy between shapes of two compelling symbols of relaxation, a hammock and a bath tub. Suspended from the walls, it does not touch the floor, waste water flows directly into a floor drain underneath. markfinlay.com

Holly Hunt- “Lens Table” -Design by McCollin Bryan Plum glass top with black metal frame markfinlay.com

KitchenAid “Artisan Series 5 Quart Tilt-Head Mixer in Plum Berry with Glass Bowl” kitchenaid.com

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Marie Burgos Design – “Ballroom Molecular Chandelier” in Purple Rain Mouth blown purple glass with hand painted edge and polished gold base markfinlay.com

Jan-Kath -“Serapi Queensbury Double Sky” rug in the yellow / purple silk markfinlay.com

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Arteriors- designed by Celerie Kembel “Mystic Lamp.” Sultry, wine-colored hand blown iridescent glass Available through; Bay Design Store 326 13th Avenue South Naples

Mapleton Drive-“Sea Garden 2” Object Coral mixed with precious stones mapletondrive.com

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WELL-TRAVELED ECLECTIC Combining items of Coastal, Western, and European influence creates what we have deemed, “Well-Traveled Eclectic.” Each item tells a unique story from a different region, so together they embody a smart, warm, inviting, and conversational space. Bay Design Store 326 13th Avenue S Naples, FL 34102 239.649.0906 baydesignstore.com

Pure White Puka Shell Chandelier

Hand-made Terracotta Bowl Top Grain Leather Box Set

Venetian Chic Coffee Table Box

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Wild Horses Framed Photography

Cuban Gold Table Lamp

Turkish Konya Pattern Pillow

Tiger Marble End Table

Aqua Frosted Vases

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ORGANIC ELEMENTS JAMIE HERZLINGER

FREESTYLEINTERIORS.COM

In our ever increasingly well-traveled and media connected society, the world of interior design has become less scary to the end user, and much more readily available. Designers and homeowners alike are quickly getting the heads up on trends and styles as fast as they are emerging.

Global Influence If you’ve recently seen fall clothing in the store, or shopped for home furnishings, you’ve been exposed to global influence. If patterns seem myan or tribal in spirit, this is the latest trend that crosses all industries. This fabric from Pierre Frey, in Paris, does tribal, beautifully

Stylized Organic In our world right now, everything seems to have gone Organic. Even home furnishings! Have a look at Milling Road, Fold Round Dining Table

Gold is good! Gold is a major influence and “player” in today’s design scene and is not your grandma’s bracelt As seen with this stunning table Bracelet. Cocktail Table by Baker

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Luxurious Lighting The statement-making chandelier has never gone out of style! Luxurious chandelier are one of those design elements that have staying power. Have a look at this gorgeous chandelier by Zia Priven, This is called H2O

Terrazzo Reinvented Terrazzo has been in use for over 500 years. In Venice Italy terrazzo was used to save money, as its materials are small chips of marble. The beauty of terrazzo has been seen to influence the rug industry. Have a look at Starks, Mystique navy rug

Caning is the way to go! Canning in furniture is experiencing a major comeback. When you think of caning you think of the turn of the last century and bistro chairs. Baker furniture has re-interpreted caning into a stunning chair

Plaster is not just for arm casts Plaster lighting is the perfect organic element in the latest designer bags of tricks! This stunning lamp by Pagani for Baker The Anneu Table Lamp

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IN THE FIELD

NAVIGATING

THE BUILDING PROCESS With Jim Solomos, President, Tanglewood Consultant Group Story by Anastasia Storer

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uilding or remodeling a home is one of the most daunting projects an individual will ever undertake—and it’s also a profoundly personal one. Our home is our most intimate space, our sanctuary, the place where we are most able to be ourselves. Little wonder, then, that when it comes to our home, we want everything to be perfect. However, with a project of this scope, perfection is possible only with precise, meticulous planning. Even a relatively “simple” remodel of a single room is a significant enterprise, requiring dozens if not hundreds of decisions, any one of which could have a substantial impact on the success of the project. That’s why one of the most critical decisions—one that determines how smoothly a project will fulfill your dreams—is the choice of a builder. The architect and interior designer create the vision, but it is the builder who takes that vision and makes it a reality. Jim Solomos, president of Tanglewood Consulting Group, Inc., recommends taking the time to interview builders and cautions against relying solely on price to make a choice. “Price is, of course, important—a client needs to know and trust that their builder is going to be fiscally responsible with their money,” says Jim. “But be careful of the ‘quick’ bid. While those estimates look great on paper, they are rarely complete or accurate, and that means change orders, timeline extensions, and more money later on.” Project Planning Process Jim’s 40 years of experience in luxury home building and remodeling is behind the extensive, rigorous design-build process that Tanglewood uses for every project, no matter how large or small. “Our design-build process is Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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Waterside Builders the best way I’ve found to make sure we’re giving the client the absolute best, most complete proposal we possibly can,” he explains. “The one thing we will never do is prepare a quick quote where we end up with price and budget increases, change orders, and project delays. In our opinion, a change order should only happen if the client asks for something different or addition to the original concept. We pride ourselves on our level of transparency to our clients. Often, this means we’re not the lowest bid—but our bids are solid, and that’s our goal.” From the client’s first meeting with Tanglewood through to the project’s completion, Tanglewood’s process leaves no detail to chance. “Brad Neidigh is our Vice President of Operations, and he is in charge of our estimating and pricing,” says Jim. “We start with a free initial consultation, where we talk about the project with the client, learning about their requirements and expectations. We assess the job site and start preliminary discussions about realistic budgeting and scheduling.” Then clients sign an initial service agreement, and that’s when the real work begins. Tanglewood’s knowledge and expertise are there for the client every step of the way. They recommend and provide architectural services if the clients haven’t retained their architect. The culmination of the design phase is a detailed scope of work review and a meticulous completion schedule in collaboration with the client, architect, designer, and subcontractors. Tanglewood even has all the subcontractors do a walkthrough of every project once the plans are finalized to make sure they understand their role within the greater timeline of the overall project. 32

This process means that by the time the client signs the final proposal, Tanglewood has perfectly planned out every aspect of the project down to the minutest detail, with a detailed schedule to ensure everything happens precisely when and how it needs to. Impeccable Reputation The other important aspect of choosing a builder is credibility. “You have to be able to trust your builder,” Jim says. “You’re giving us a great deal of money and trusting us to build or remodel a home for you that is beautiful, functional and safe.” Jim knows it can be difficult to know whom to trust when a business relationship is just beginning, which is why Tanglewood encourages prospective clients to speak with the firm’s previous clients. “We’re proud of our work, and our clients have always been happy to not only provide us with written testimonials but to speak with prospective clients about the work we’ve done for them,” he says. The vast majority of Tanglewood’s clients come as referrals, many from interior designers. “We enjoy working with designers,” he says, “and we appreciate that they trust us to bring their visions to life for the client.” One of the reasons Tanglewood receives so many referrals is that it can do what many builders cannot: provide a detailed schedule that clearly states the actual date when the project will be completed. Advice for Homeowners Jim has two pieces of advice for anyone thinking about beginning a new build or a remodel project. First, decide on the realistic

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budget. “This is one of the most important factors for a successful project,” he says. “You want to have that budget before the design begins. Design the project within the constraints of that budget.” Second, build a design team as early as possible. “The sooner your architect, interior designer and builder can begin working together, the better,” says Jim. “Not only will this make the project run smoothly, but the sooner we’re all at the table, the sooner the builder will be able to give the client a proposal with a budget, timeline and final number.” Tanglewood Consulting Group, Inc., gives all its projects the same careful attention to detail and the same level of personalized service. The firm’s design-build process is one of the most complete in the industry: every project has thorough planning, continual oversight, and client updates during both the design and build phases, ensuring that every client walks into the finished home thrilled with the results. Resources: Jim Solomos, President Tanglewood Consultant Group, Inc. 4600 Summerlin Road, Suite C-246 Ft. Myers, FL 33919 239.677.5878 buildwithtanglewood.com

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ASK THE EXPERTS

Building IS a Science! BCB Homes and Innovative Building Solutions explains how new technologies are intergrated into the modern home building process.

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Story by Pam Gersh

en Franklin once famously said, “a small leak can sink a big ship.” That’s a message that BCB Homes has taken to heart and that has become the philosophy of their custom homebuilding and remodeling work. Over the last 25 years, building and remodeling homes in Southwest Florida, where mother nature brutally assaults homes daily with extremes in sun, heat, moisture and salt, BCB developed a Build Science Department to conquer the challenges of the environment using the most advanced construction techniques available. The department quickly established a reputation for innovation that allowed their clients and design team members to build custom homes with unique details without sacrificing quality or performance.

This included installing the critical components (windows and waterproofing) on new construction, and to fix faulty construction on existing homes. “We got so good at diagnosing and fixing problems that others in our industry started asking for our advice and out of that was born a division called Innovative Construction Solutions (ICS),” said Travis Brown, president of ICS.

When the company started doing major renovation projects, they often found defects such as mold, water leaks, and efflorescence, that also needed the attention of their Building Science Department. As the new construction and renovation departments grew, so too did the demands on the Building Science Department, and it became obvious to Joe Smallwood, CEO of BCB that the marketplace had a desperate need for a company that could offer the techniques and theories that they had developed over the years.

BCB Homes and ICS, now offers not only custom home building services, but remodeling, estate management services as well as other construction and remediation services. BCB Homes and ISC build some of the most complex homes in Southwest Florida and collaborate with architects and engineers to help identify conflicts within the systems of homes before they are built and diagnose problems in existing homes. They have built and remodeled 350 homes throughout Southwest Florida.

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The new company has been quickly and widely accepted by homeowners and even other builders as the right choice to find solutions to the problems found so often in the climate of Southwest Florida. “We offer a thorough scientific diagnosis of problems, not quick fixes or band-aids, and that’s important to our clients and customers alike,” said Travis.

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“Building large custom homes in this climate is complicated and over the years we’ve learned that the devil is in the details. Homes are ecosystems of various complex assemblies that require significant attention to detail to make sure all the pieces work together to create a complete and properly functioning system. From waterproofing to air conditioning to roofing and water management systems, using the right tools is not enough, how they are installed is the tricky and most important part,” said Travis. A good example in the kind of problems they find are roof leaks. ICS finds that very few roof leaks come from the field (main) areas of the roof, instead most leaks come from how a penetration through the roof was created. So, choosing material (tile, metal or slate) isn’t nearly as important as who you hire to install the roof because the performance of that roofing system will depend more on the details used by the installer than the material chosen. Recently, BCB Homes also purchased a roofing company, continuing their effort to build and service their clients’ needs and providing support for other builders.

R.G. Designs

“Building Science is based on a methodical evaluation process that thoroughly analyzes the problem at hand, develops a system to solve it, and finally tests the finished product to ensure the intended purpose was achieved. We use this Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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process in every application of our services whether it’s for new construction, renovations or restorations,” said Travis. ICS’s focus concentrates on the performance of the home’s interior spaces and exterior Building envelope. The Building Envelope is the barrier that separates the indoor environment from the outdoor Environment and involves the interaction of roofs and exterior systems. When poorly designed; installed incorrectly, or damaged, these barriers can compromise the function and efficiency of the entire structure. The BCB Homes and ICS staff are trained and go through continuing education annually to employ state-of-the-art technological tools to test and evaluate systems such as the water and air infiltration, moisture mapping, temperature and humidity readings, roof surveys, evaluation of mechanical systems and investigating construction defects.

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“In new and existing homes, we are constantly asked to address new details and use new techniques which was the impetus to train our staff in Building Science and to have continuing education classes annually. It’s a developing science.,” said Brown. BCB Homes embraced the Building Science method before the term was coined. They hired Dr. Joseph Lstiburek, Ph. D, the founder of Building Science Corporation and a forensic engineer, to come in and evaluate their work and train them in the field. He’s the world’s foremost leader in the Building Science field and continues to work with and train BCB Homes and ICS staff. One of the most common problems in the tropical climate of Southwest Florida is water leaks which can be the result of many different types of defects or deficiencies. “We always approach a water intrusion problem with a scientific approach and try not to jump to conclusions. Just because it’s wet near a window in your garage doesn’t mean there is a failure in the window, it could be that the walls have cracks, or the garage needs waterproofing

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installed behind the stucco at and below grade. This is necessary because often the grade outside of a garage is above the garage floor and that is the cause rather than the window. Testing is the only way to know for sure,” said Travis. “Our passion is to get things right and build the best homes possible and understand how to make homes sustainable. Building Science allows us to never stop learning how do to things better because our clients depend on us,” concluded Travis. Resources: Joe Smallwood BCB Homes 3696 Enterprise Avenue Suite 100 Naples, FL 34104 239.643.1004 bcbhomes.com Travis Brown Innovative Construction Solutions 3696 Enterprise Avenue Suite 203 Naples, FL 34104 239.384.5890 innovativellc.com

18 N. Union St, Lambertville NJ 08530 P: 609.773.0224 www.pirelaatelier.com New Jersey | New York | Florida

Interior, Commercial & Landscape Design New Construction & Renovations

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ASK THE EXPERTS

The Luxury of Real Wood Flooring with Gabby Saad of Real Wood Floors

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here’s just something special about a wood floor. Who among us doesn’t appreciate the look and feel of old, polished wood with its unique whorls, knots, striations and grains? Who doesn’t love that wonderful sound it makes when we walk across it? It was the flooring material of choice for many of our country’s oldest, most beautiful homes. Wood appeals to all of our senses, and it immediately adds warmth and earthy authenticity to any room in which it is used. “Wood is like bringing a little bit of nature into your home,” says Gaby Saad of the Real Wood Floors Gallery in Naples, FL. “Wood always has a story to tell—about its origins, its age and the craftsmanship and skills involved in the making and installation of each plank.” The solid wood floors of old, however, required a great deal of maintenance and care—and even then, there were issues with staining, warping and cracking. That’s why builders of homes made since the 1940s began to eschew wood and turned instead to linoleum, carpet, vinyl and tile for flooring. Fortunately, new technologies with engineered wood have brought back our ability to have all the beauty of solid wood floors with-

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out any of the drawbacks—even in humid, coastal environments like Naples. “People tend to think that because we live in Florida, wood floors are not an ideal surface. Our Real Wood Floors eliminate those concerns, however, allowing the homeowner to relax and enjoy the beauty of wood flooring,” explains Gaby. “Our special finishes safeguard our floors from any wet or oily accidents. The pores of the lumber are closed and protected so our clients don’t have to worry about absorption at all. And our floors will never need to be re-oiled. We offer a 50-year residential warranty because we are that confident in our floors and finishes.” There’s more beauty to Real Wood Floors than just its products, however. At the heart of the company is a greater purpose and passion. The company’s focus is on what it sees as its true mission: to help every orphan around the world find a home. “We come to work every day with that purpose in mind,” Gaby says. “We live our mission, and it gives our daily tasks a higher, more powerful meaning.” The company’s philanthropic efforts began when it was introduced to Shepherd’s Field Children’s Village in China in 2006, an orphanage focused on children with special needs. Since then, the company’s support of orphanages and organizations that assist orphans has ex-

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Gabby Saad

panded to Indonesia and Zambia as well. “We provide funding for the children’s basic needs,” Gaby continues. “We also help to build schools, and we give stipends and scholarships to those who want to go on to higher education.” With nearly 40 years of experience in the lumber business, Real Wood Floors owns one of the oldest continuously operating mills in the U.S. Its customers are not only guaranteed beautifully finished wood floors that will last a lifetime, their purchase helps Real Wood Floors assist some of the world’s most vulnerable children. Resources: Resources: Gaby Saad Real Wood Floors – Naples Gallery 2013 Trade Center Way Naples, FL 34109 239.470.5827 | 877.215.1831 realwoodfloors.com

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DESIGN NEWS

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GCD+D EXPLORES THE NAPLES DESIGN DISTRICT

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Story by Pam Gersh | Photography by Caronchi Photography

he city of Naples is home to some of Southwest Florida’s most beautiful and precious tropical environments. The surrounding landscape encompasses the splendor of Naples Beach, Naples Bay and numerous waterways, parks and greenways. The town is also home to exclusive residential neighborhoods with some of the most stunning houses in the U.S. Naples is in the midst of a period of tremendous growth and expansion, and as part of that growth, it’s now home to the Naples Design District (NDD).

What is the NDD? The NDD is a creative neighborhood that offers visitors a vibrant, eclectic location where they can shop at a diverse array of businesses and boutiques and enjoy many wonderful restaurants and coffee shops. The NDD is bordered on the north and east of the town’s Old Naples neighborhood, and is anchored to the south by the Historic Naples Train Depot. “Historically, the district was home to a significant trading post; it was the last stop on the train line that brought goods to the town,” explains Chad Jensen of Thomas Riley Studio, a founding member of the NDD. “That history lends a unique flavor to the neighborhood and differentiates it from Fifth Avenue or Old Naples.” According to David Fruscione of the Republic of Décor, who curR.G. Designs rently serves as the vice president of the NDD’s Board of Direc-

tors, plans for a neighborhood organization had been discussed for a number of years. “When I first opened my business in the neighborhood, I was told there had been some conversations between local business owners about coming together and working as a group, but they hadn’t gone very far,” he says. “A number of us got together, and two years ago we restarted the conversation. We began raising awareness, expanding our network and working to rekindle the idea.” For Laura Burns, executive director of the United Arts Council of Collier County and the current president of the NDD’s Board, getting her organization involved in the formation of the NDD just made sense. “We’d moved into the neighborhood and, like David, we’d heard from a number of our art business connections that conversations had been ongoing about forming a nonprofit association to talk about community-building and enhancing the neighborhood through arts and culture, and how the arts tied into many creative businesses in the neighborhood. It was a natural fit for us to be involved, given our core mission of strengthening our community and enriching the lives of residents through the power of the arts.” In 2017, the district held its first Holiday Stroll, and on March 15, 2018, the NDD was officially incorporated by its founding directors, Chad Jensen, Daniel Summers, Laura Burns and Rufino Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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Hernandez, along with a Steering Committee made up of member businesses from the area. What makes the NDD unique? “It’s an eclectic neighborhood,” David says. “We have an intriguing blend of both old and new, high-end and affordable. We’ve got consignment shops, vintage and antique stores, and new, modern boutiques and art galleries. There are some national brands, of course, but it’s primarily small, local businesses, and with the added layer of architects, designers and design firms, it just makes it an interesting place to explore.” Visitors never know what treasures they ’ll find while wandering the district—and because of the diversity of businesses, they can explore and be inspired by an incredible variety of visual design styles. The NDD currently has 35 members with a diverse array of businesses, including local entrepreneurs, artisans and designers, and is always looking to expand its membership. Karen Abell, owner and curator of Patina Collection, is proud that her business is a member of the NDD. “The NDD lends a sense of community and like-mindedness that you don’t find everywhere,” she says. “All the businesses are unique and make the district a destination for a multitude of needs. It’s also extremely important for a growing area like this to have a united voice—and what better way to achieve that than to be part of the association and act as a group?” Ferguson Enterprises joined the NDD soon after it moved its gallery into the district. “We chose to become a member early on, as we were already working collaboratively with many of the businesses in the area,” says Lindsay Cieloha, Ferguson’s head of business development. We wanted to be a part of jumpstarting an organization that we truly believe in. The NDD has so much to offer, and we see its potential.” The NDD’s mission and purpose connected with Randy Kurtz, who is heading up The Collective, which is currently under development. It will be a collection of showrooms, shops, office spaces and restaurants, all under one roof. “We want The Collective to be a destination within the district for design, shopping and socializing,” says Randy. “We joined the NDD because we feel that as a business and an architectural asset, we’ll be a great addition to the association, and we look forward to adding to the creative vitality and appeal of the neighborhood.” The NDD businesses are all supportive of one another. “We Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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don’t think of the other businesses as competition,” Karen says. “We don’t carry the same things; we have different styles and creative visions. We’re not afraid to refer customers walking in our door to other members if we don’t have what they are looking for, and we know other businesses are referring customers to us as well.” David agrees. “We don’t see ourselves as competitors,” he says. “We complement each other, and we like that our district is a place where people can come for creative inspiration.” What’s in the future of the NDD? Right now the district is planning and preparing for its 2018 Holiday Stroll. “Last year was successful, and we’re looking forward to expanding this year,” says David. “A number of businesses will be open in the evening, and we’ll have a map that people can follow from business to business. We also pair with a charity, so there is a philanthropic element as well, and we hold raffles and giveaways.” More long-term plans include “continuing to work to make the district a walkable, livable neighborhood that offers locals, seasonal residents and tourists an eclectic mix of art, design, style, food and culture,” Chad says. And more events can be expected. “We’re building a calendar of events all throughout the year, and

finding more ways to encourage people to come to the neighborhood and explore,” says David. “We’re also involved with our local government,” adds Laura. “We’ve sent representatives to public meetings to speak on what we felt was important in terms of the town’s development and capital projects, and we were pleased to find that the town was very enthusiastic about hearing our opinions and working with the association. We want to leverage the power of all the businesses into a unified voice that can speak to ways our community can develop and grow that are beneficial to all.” The future plans of the district sound good to Karen. “The more people come to the area,” she says, “the more they window shop and explore, and the more people will hear about us and the district.” Shopping in the Naples Design District is certainly a way to support local small businesses and artisans, but in the end, it’s really about building a stronger community with neighbors and friends. “Anything we can do to build community is good,” says David. “We want to help people be exposed to new things, new ideas, new styles and experiences. It’s not just about shopping; we want visitors to learn something and walk away with new information they didn’t have before.” Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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There’s nothing quite like the experience of slowing down and taking the time to relax and explore the district. Take a stroll, enjoy a meal or a coffee at one of the district’s restaurants, and experience things in person. The members of NDD are waiting to welcome you! Resources: Naples Design District naplesdesigndistrict.com David Fruscione Republic of Décor 950 1st Avenue North Suite 130 Naples, FL 34102 239.529.3813 republicofdecor.com Laura Burns United Arts Council of Collier County 953 4th Avenue North Naples, FL 34102 239.254.8242 uaccollier.com Chad Jensen Thomas Riley Studio 26 10th Street South Naples, FL 34102239.529.2633 thomasrileystudio.com Karen Abell Patina Collection 944 5th Avenue North Naples, FL 34102 239.300.0092 patinacollection.com Lindsay Cieloha Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery 38 Goodlette-Frank Rd South Naples, FL 34102 239.963.0087 fergusonshowrooms.com Randy Kurtz Kurtz Homes 870 111th Avenue North Naples, FL 34108 239.594.1501 kurtzhomes.com

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C O A S T

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ISLAND LIFE A Polynesian Dream Home Indulges the Beauty and Majesty of the Outdoors Story by Pam Gersh | Photography by Brantley Photography

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he history of life in the South Pacific is one of isolation. For centuries, no one could reach the islands and people lived outdoors year-round, building only small structures as weather shelters. When they did start building homes and moving inside, the emphasis was on respecting nature and bringing as much of the outdoors in by opening up the space, letting the air flow through, and working with warm colors and plants, considered essential elements of living in what is known as the “Ocean of Islands.”

Polynesian Design is by Nature of Nature The developer who built this house in Southwest Florida had traveled the world and fallen in love with the Polynesian style of architecture, yet he had a much more sophisticated take on the theme of island living. He wanted a more contemporary home that would have a timeless look and use as many natural materials as possible. “Polynesian design is composed of all-natural materials such as mahogany, large tropical plants and natural stone, so we used these elements to help create a one-of-a-kind dream home for the client,” said Carrie Brigham of Carrie Brigham Design in Naples, Florida, who was sought out to do the interior design.

The Polynesian architecture of this home in Southwest Florida provides two levels of expansive space on the upper floors facing the gulf, offering year-round outdoor living.

One of the most important goals for the homeowners was that the home fit its environment with rich, natural colors and a pure form. To help create the architectural masterpiece that the owners desired, Carrie curated the exterior finishes using mahogany tones and different textures of materials, including stained concrete louvered shutters—a collaboration between her and the owners. The split-face stone façade at the base of the home adds more texture and warmth, and as your eye moves up from the ground floor, the home gets a lighter feeling. Its exterior looks as beautiful and natural in Southwest Florida as it would on a Hawaiian island. Inspired by the vernacular architecture of the Polynesian Islands and houses Before

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built on poles to keep them from flooding, most living spaces are on the upper floors, giving the family a view of the water from every living space. Custom floor-to-ceiling windows let the family open up every room to a seating area on each level. Intertwined Luxury and Durability was the Designer’s Vision The main living space is on the second floor, and it includes the living room, dining area and kitchen. Rich, warm tones of bronze create a luxurious feel in the great room. The textured columns framing the opening to the living room are cladded with a wood mosaic tile in a woven pattern—a design inspired by columns that Carrie had found during a tour of Thailand. Tucked discreetly into a wall is an impressive built-in that displays decorative accessories and an oversized flat-screen television. The room is anchored by a made-to-order sofa by Kravet Furniture, custom pillows fashioned with Gastón y Daniela fabric, and a Ralph Lauren cocktail table. Comfort and durability were key factors in the overall design of the sofa, which has a high seatback and stain-repellent finish built into the fabric. McGuire lounge chairs look out to the bay, while underfoot is a custom-sized wool-and-silk area rug from Designer’s Rug Center. Legno Bastone wide plank wood floors—expertly installed by Naples Flooring—were used throughout the house except for in the foyer, which features travertine stone floors. All the cabi52

Entering the lounge area between the master bedrooms on the third floor, guests find a comfortable space to enjoy the expansiveness of the home and its views. A custom sectional created by Century Furniture frames the room, while Kravet chairs, covered in a durable woven fabric, create a conversation space. The most spectacular feature of the room is the reverse-lapped walnut-clad ceiling that soars above the space.

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For the office, the homeowners selected bold artwork with red-and-pink brush strokes and pops of turquoise and orange. The painting sits over walnut cabinetry inlaid with an exotic striped veneer.

netry, including the baseboards and casework, is made of solid walnut. “The warm, light walls were used to create contrast and add to the level of sophistication of the home,� says Carrie. Defining Spaces for Interest and Function The kitchen backsplash is covered in textured glass tile, and the massive island is a natural quartzite stone known as Taj Mahal. 54

Three oversized pendant light fixtures, sourced by Carrie from Cyan Design, reflect a bronze glow onto the solid walnut cabinetry. Adjacent to the dining table is a bar with a stunning countertop made of semiprecious agate that is underlit. Carrie paired the live edge dining table and bench with Theodore Alexander host chairs that add sculptural height to the room, while custommade armless chairs with a performance velvet fabric by Kravet

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The entrance to the living room from the hallway on the second floor is framed by textured columns cladded with a wood mosaic tile; its woven pattern was inspired by a design from Thailand. McGuire lounge chairs look out to the bay.

In the main living area on the second floor is the dining room, which separates the kitchen from the living room. The designer paired the live edge dining table and bench with Theodore Alexander host chairs and custom-made armless chairs with velvet fabric by Kravet. The design added height to the room. The custom Fuse Lighting light fixture with hand-stitched shade and brass accents further defines and separates the space.

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In the kitchen, the backsplash is covered in textured glass tile, and the massive island is a natural quartzite stone know as Taj Mahal. Three oversized pendant light fixtures by Cyan Design cast a bronze glow onto the solid wood cabinetry.

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soften the space. The custom light fixture over the table helps define and separate the space, with hand-stitched shades and brass accents made by Fuse Lighting. “Every inch of the home was designed with functionality in mind because the family enjoys entertaining,” says Carrie. The custom window treatment combines a sheer casement fabric layered over linen and decorative hardware to outline the view of the bay. The privacy shades and draperies are motorized throughout the home. Outdoor Areas Flow Effortlessly with Indoor Spaces Right off the kitchen is an outdoor entertaining space that is a natural extension of the kitchen. It includes a gorgeous custom-made shell-stonetopped dining table and a food preparation area with a built-in grill and under-counter refrigerator. Made and supplied by Goguen’s Kitchen Company, the outdoor kitchen features NatureKast cabinetry, which is composed of epoxy resin to look and feel like stained wood and stand up to the corrosive salt air. A group of lounge chairs with an open weave by Summer Classics surrounds a round, dark cocktail table. The monotone color scheme of the tongue-and-groove ceiling, furniture and cabinetry in the outdoor area pulls the look together. “My goal was to create a cohesive feel Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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The master bedroom features a ceiling covered with seamless grasscloth by Phillip Jeffries. Warm colors and natural elements like large plants harken back to the outdoor living of the South Pacific. More expansive views of the gulf can be seen from each bedroom.

throughout the home, so every room felt like a natural extension of the next room, flowing effortlessly,” says Carrie. “From the background finishes to the furnishings, no detail was left to chance. Every single thing I selected and designed was focused on creating a luxurious, tranquil Polynesian-style retreat.” Floating in Space Above the Water On the third level, a lounge area between the master suites features a custom sectional created by Century Furniture and madeto-order swivel chairs by Kravet, covered in a durable woven fabric. Table lamps the color of the gulf glow during the day, with natural light pouring in from the expansive slider-door opening. The sectional sofa surrounds a cerused rift oak cocktail table, and in the background is an exquisite bar made with a translucent quartzite countertop that glows after dark. The most spectacular feature of this room, however, is the reverse-lapped walnut-clad ceiling that soars above the space. “The sheer elevation of the home and the expansiveness of the breathtakingly gorgeous views make you feel as if you are floating over the bay,” says Carrie. A Beacon of Light and Nature in Southwest Florida The bedrooms feature ceilings designed with seamless grasscloth by Phillip Jeffries and attached balconies for owners and guests 58

to enjoy views of the bay. The doors throughout the home are solid walnut with frosted glass panels, allowing natural light to flow through the space. In the study, walnut cabinetry is inlaid with an exotic striped veneer. The bold artwork—with red and pink brush strokes and pops of turquoise and orange—was acquired by the homeowner and custom framed by Carrie. Completed in 2017, the “Polynesian Dream Home” welcomes the warm sunshine and gentle breezes of Southwest Florida like a beacon. It is an ideal residence for the owners who, like the families of the Pacific, spend much of their time outdoors. “This was an incredibly special project to be involved in,” Carrie recalls. “I was so fortunate to have the complete trust of the homeowners to create this magical space they call home.”

Resources: Carrie Brigham Carrie Brigham Design 5117 Castello Drive, Suite 1 Naples, Florida 34103 239.261.1720 carriebrigham.com

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Right off the kitchen is an outdoor entertaining area that serves as a natural extension of the kitchen. It features a food preparation area and seating by Summer Classics in an open-weave design. The monotone color scheme of the tongue-and-groove ceiling, furniture and cabinetry pulls the area together.

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Cover and Portraits by Neil Landino Shot on location at Artis Naples

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FAITH FIX

FREESTYLEINTERIORS.COM

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Lucie Simmons, Paula Myette, Deana Skelly, Ana Oates, Faith Fix, Alex Theis, Michelle Stahl, Arylinn McDaniel, Christy Lederer, Jamie Herzlinger

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My role is to expose my clients to all the design possibilities for their new home—be it style, beauty or function. I encourage my clients to consider their lifestyle in order for us to customize their home to realize their dreams. I also encourage quality over quantity. How do you define luxury design? A room that is designed with thoughtful consideration and feels luxurious every time you experience it, not just the first time. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? In my teens, I was at one of my friend’s homes in Miami. It was built with tilt-up exterior walls, and the interior was designed with breakaway walls so it could be completely redesigned over time to change as their family grew and changed. I have since seen the home with two completely different interiors. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned?

Keep your eyes open for inspiration wherever you are. To which city or country would you move for the design? Morocco. What design rule would you love to break? Ditch the formal rooms if it’s not your lifestyle. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? I don’t mind Internet searches. It gives us a common language to discuss our client’s vision. What are three things about you that nobody knows? If New Zealand were closer, that is where I would have a second home. The rest I like to keep private. What is your favorite space in your own home? My office. I love my work, and the view out to my yard gives me a lot of joy. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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CARRIE BRIGHAM CARRIEBRIGHAM.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My philosophy is one of juxtaposition. No two projects are the same, so each home is developed differently. I approach every project with an open yet strategic mind. Being flexible yet focused in design is paramount. My determined yet collaborative method ensures our client’s needs are always met. How do you define luxury design? Luxury design is comfortable, durable, sophisticated and stylish yet timeless.

clients from the onset of a project. What design rule would you love to break? I would have to start following the rules to break one! What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I was born and raised here in Naples, left only to go to college in Tallahassee at Florida State, and promptly returned. 2. I grew up show skiing, starring in a water-ski show at the top of a three-tiered pyramid. 3. During the downturn, I took four weeks off and backpacked with Michael through Costa Rica and Panama on a shoestring budget.

Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? The first creatively designed home I toured, at a very young age, was The Ca’ d’Zan, the home of John and Mable Ringling, in Sarasota. I remember being What is your favorite space to design? awestruck by the expansive grand salon and Venetian glass in the skylights, the Bathrooms of all purposes: master bath, pool bath, powder bath, guest bath! These rooms rely heavily on interior architecture, finishes, materials and very little furnishings and the original marble bathrooms. furniture. Every square inch is deliberate. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Ultimately, my client’s unique perspectives are the most inspiring to me. In addi- If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? tion, the wide range of incredible products and materials that are shared with us by Art Deco, but not Miami Vice-style. Think Chrysler Building in New York City. our reps, my team and the incredibly talented craftsman and builders we work with all inspire me to be my most creative. Outside the design world, spending time on If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the curthe beach in Naples, Florida, is inspiring. Recognizing the patterns created in the rent trends here, what would you do? I would love to create a home underground on the Gulf with the earth as the sand by the water gently crashing on the shore is always fascinating. roof. The exposed architecture would be very modern and furnished with antiques and super-comfortable sofas, wild fabrics on everything, and white, high-gloss lacWhat is the best interior design lesson you have learned? Unrelated to actually creating or taking design risks with color or textures, the best quered walls. Can you dig? lesson I have learned is to set expectations on deliverables and timelines with our Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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LOU SHAFRAN

PACIFICAINTERIORDESIGN.COM

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Lou Shafran, Mark Vanagas, Rick Foreman, Katie Penn

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? Timeless Simplicity = One and Done. When clients trust us with the interior design of their homes, we ensure them that they will not have to go through the process again once we have finished. We guide them through the selections process, constantly reinforcing that what we choose together must stand the test of time and appeal not only to them but to potential future owners. Very few people relish the thought of a remodel and redesign of a space, but why put them through it more than once? What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? My inspiration within the design world comes from finding things that surprise me. When I see something that is unexpected and well thoughtout and executed, it inspires me to think outside the box. I continually revisit the designs of certain designers I knew in Los Angeles who still create magnificent spaces. My inspiration from outside the design world comes from things I see when traveling. Architecture, art galleries and museums all plant seeds in your mind that eventually come out in your design. To which city or country would you move for the design? Every country has its own design character. However, my favorites are older cities with fabulous architecture, such as Paris, Florence and Barcelona. What design rule you would love to break? Don’t overscale your furniture. I break this rule sometimes in our design,

based on the fact that sometimes larger-scale pieces can actually make a room look larger if used correctly. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? The Internet can really be a double-edged sword. While it serves as a great tool for designers to search for ideas and products, it can be confusing to homeowners. The sheer volume of ideas and information on home design websites can cause a lack of focus that can sometimes hinder the design process. We as designers sift through the information on the Internet and glean the elements we know will work, based on budget and architecture. Clients simply want what they want and don’t always recognize that the things they love in pictures may not work in their space. It can be an inspirational tool, but it can also lead to some frustration. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? Palladian is my preferred type of architecture. It’s simple, balanced, elegant and traditional, but timeless. The style comes from the 16th-century Venetian architect Andrea Palladio, and is strongly based on symmetry, perspective and the aesthetic of the formal, classical architecture of ancient Greek and Roman temples. Remember that interiors can be anything, but it’s the architecture they are surrounded by that resonates. If a home doesn’t look good without the furnishings, it doesn’t have the background necessary to create an elegant space. It is a style I would love to take elements from and modify to work in the more tropical surroundings of Southwest Florida. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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DEBRA YELNER DLY-DESIGN.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? I advise my clients to remember they are creating a home, not a stage set, showroom or magazine photo shoot. Be true to yourself and how you want to live. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? Yes—the drawing room of the Chilston Park Country House in Kent, England. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Inside: Any Benjamin Moore paint fan set. Outside: The colors and textures of the flowers in my garden, along with the insects and birds that visit daily. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? Price, quality, service: pick any two. To which city or country would you move for the design? I would want to divide my time between Paris and London. Difficult to choose just one! What design rule would you love to break? I don’t design by the rules, so I must be breaking them all!

you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Absolutely yes! Many clients do not have the glossary of terms to express their wishes. Photos are a great narrative— a picture speaks a thousand words! What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I’m a 1973 national equestrian champion. 2. I’m terrified of snakes—although I did name one Ramone. He lives in my garden. 3. I’m completely spastic riding a bicycle. (It makes no sense to an equestrian.) What is your favorite space in your own home? Our screened porch in Greenwich, Connecticut, overlooking the Byram River. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? Romanticism, toward the end of the 18th century. This era was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism, as well as honoring the past and nature. If you could create any style home in southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? Cotswold Cottage goes to the beach!

A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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DAVID FRUSCIONE REPUBLICOFDECOR.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? I truly believe that my mission in life is to create spaces that people thrive in. It’s important to me to really listen to what my clients are looking for. I am creating a space for them, so I want them to love it. I like to make the process very collaborative but get them to think outside the box. If you are resourceful and creative, it’s amazing what can happen! How do you define luxury design? I don’t think of luxury as needing to be very expensive; rather, I think of it as a feeling you get when things you love all come together. A curated space, filled with pieces that have good energy, is the most luxurious feeling to me. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? I am often inspired by music. Listening to evocative music makes my mind create spaces and see colors and transports me to different environments. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? To create something fabulous doesn’t necessarily mean you have to spend a lot of money or order from high-end resources. I have found that being skillful and creative can yield impressive results. What design rule would you love to break? I love to mix metals. People often think they must do all silver and wouldn’t think to add some gold, but I think the combination of warm and cool metals with different sheens gives a space some dimension and interest.

A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? I encourage my clients to create an inspiration folder with images that catch their eye. This helps me understand what they like and can expedite the process. After key images are gathered and the concept is generated, then I prefer that the client not get distracted with sites I don’t use as a resource as I can’t vouch for the quality of the products. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. While doing an Ancestry.com search, I discovered there is a palazzo in Italy that bears my last name. 2. My dad played professional hockey for the N.Y. Rangers. 3. I took Banana Republic international and helped create the store design concept for them in Asia and the Middle East. What is your favorite space to design? I love doing bars, because you can use a mix of materials and do creative details with the cabinetry and hardware. Then you layer in amazing wallpaper, accessories and lighting, and it’s a formula for something spectacular. It’s really fun to create a space in a home that can become a focal area where people gather and entertain. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I really love the work of Antoni Gaudí from the early 1900s. His forwardthinking Art Nouveau architectural style in Spain is artful, organic and futuristic. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I love the Prairie style of architecture, so I would create a home that pulls from that period but update it to reflect the brighter Floridian aesthetic. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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Laurie Tuttle, Kathleen Rapp Lisa Davenport, Sara Cotter

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My interior design philosophy? Design is personal, and it is intimate. My job is to make that happen for our clients. For some potential clients, design starts off as overwhelming—we understand this and know how busy our clients are. That’s why we spend the time to understand each client’s personal style, to take the world of options offered in custom design and narrow down those choices to a manageable few. For our clients, design becomes fun and easy because we educate them along the way. As their design develops, I introduce my clients to people, products and even places they would not find on their own. Often, my signature style, Cashmere & Blue Jeans®, is woven into the design, which is a wonderful way to add to our client’s personal style within a specific design aesthetic. How do you define luxury design? Today’s luxury design isn’t necessarily the look of bold displays of wealth, opulence and grandeur we’ve known in the past. Today’s luxury is defined differently—it is defined with more exclusivity. Clients today who are looking for and expecting luxury are longing for uniqueness in their design: pieces and products that are high quality and customized to their wants and needs. Yes, of course that comes with a price, but it doesn’t necessarily drip and scream, “Look at me!” What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? I find people inspiring. Everyone has a story, and stories are captivating. As I learn more about people, I want to know more about their passions, careers and families. What makes them tick is almost always inspiring in one way or another. We’re all on this ride called life, and it certainly is more exciting and inspirational when we share the journey together.

What design rule would you love to break? Well, I don’t follow the rules to begin with! I was the kid in school who was always coloring outside the lines. I don’t know design to be much different! What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I can frame a house. 2. I love Vin Diesel and the Fast & Furious series—please don’t judge me! 3. I would like to become a Master Gardener someday. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? Anything but glazed chintz! If you could create any style home in southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I’d love to weave rustic or reclaimed elements into a Scandinavian modern design. This doesn’t mean just furnishings, but within the architecture itself. Imagine grabbing the clean, contemporary front-door handle on a reclaimed antique nine-foot-tall door, pushing it open to reveal a sleek, white, crisp entry with a direct sight line through to a 20-foot wall of glass overlooking a long reflecting pool. As you step into the foyer, your feet land on reclaimed whitewashed brick that interfaces with an almost nonexistent base detail. Above your head is a stunning vaulted ceiling of salvaged planking—another element drawing your eye to the reflecting pool focal point. This exquisite ceiling intersects with a square, polished white molding detail balancing the baseboard and creating a nondescript pocket to wash the walls with light. One single, simple, modern fixture adds dimension and depth to the ceiling, while to your right is a stunning, bold, yet not overbearing painting that fills a niche almost the size of the wall itself. To the left of the foyer, a large opening draws you around the corner into a great room where all you can see is the corner of another reclaimed element—the wood floor pulling at you, demanding your attention to see what is in store for you. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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SUSAN PETRIL

INTERIORSGROUPSWFL.COM

Jennifer Bouchard, Susan Petril, Irene Harms

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? When meeting with clients, my first philosophy—as corny as it may sound—is honesty. Meeting a client for the first time, I stay true to how we will approach and understand their needs and wants. Sometimes I feel like a psychologist, trying to get what will make them happy, how they will use the space, what colors make them feel calm, etc. This process can be lengthy, but when we get to what I call the “click”— “she understands,” “they understand”—the rest is definition. My second philosophy is definition: defining how the client will use each space.

indulged, pampered. Your home should feel like an oasis from the outside world. Luxurious interiors will never go out of style. Regardless of what fads come and go, we’re always going to feel drawn toward spaces that make us feel pampered. It’s only natural. So I set out to embellish the developer’s product instead of my product. It was not so much about the furnishings and luxury pieces, but more about the way the entire home fit their needs: the exterior colors of the home, the roof tiles and hardscapes, the design of the interior kitchen island. I had to design a shell—and I loved it! It gave me an outlet to express my own personal venue and taste. This had a huge impact on me. I have since honed my skill for doing developer models along with all the new trends coming up in the building industry, which has been an integral part of designing homes for my clients, especially preconstruction. My new extended knowledge of building and construction has been such a plus when meeting new homeowners. So I would have to say this was the first space that really made an impact on me.

My third philosophy, the most important, is truly understanding the space in perspective to balance. Balance is the most important rule for me when doing a design. Did you ever notice when you are in a room and you just don’t feel right—sort of off? The balance is off-kilter. All you need to do is rearrange something, maybe just one thing, and the feeling changes immediately. Planning the space with my client is one of my favorite steps. I love to find that unique twist to approaching the space; this has always been If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? The ’50s. I love the simpleness of the design back then. It was also the start my passion. of the Mid-Century Modern era, where form verses function became the As the designer, my inner philosophy is “Exploring all the unique and unex- norm. My dream would be to redo a diner. What fun that would be! pected ways to design a space.” I love the journey every time! If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? How do you define luxury design? Ahhh…luxury! To me, luxury is lounging on a plush sofa after a hard day at I would love to see a Cali-Bungalow look come to Southwest Florida. It’s work, soaking in a hot bath in your elegant Jacuzzi tub, seeing a waterscape still a coastal look, but with low roofs and long, breezy porches. It is a take out your bedroom terrace, or even cooking on a kitchen island that leaves on Western arts-and-crafts style, merging organic beauty with an easy-living plenty of room to spread out. This type of luxury feels as if we’re being style. I think it just may happen! Crossing my fingers. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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MINKA MCDONALD JINXMCDONALD.COM

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Beth Walker Fenton, Minka McDonald, Barbara Schwenk, Chrissy Howard

hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? Our goal is to help our clients create beautiful, comfortable, livable homes that reflect their personalities, lifestyles and interests. We help them express themselves through their interior design, so when they walk through the doors, they feel connected and happy.

A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Yes. It helps when your clients are knowledgeable. It is much easier to help them when they know what they want.

What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Beauty—in all its creative expressions. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? Look and listen before you act. Then listen some more.

If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I would like to see green design come to the forefront more; it’s so important. I would also like to see a resurgence in the popularity of porches and verandas. I love the spaces between outside and in. That is where we should be living.

To which city or country would you move for the design? Jamaica for the West Indies feel, the incorporation of the gorgeous natural surroundings, where the British colonial culture meets an organic vibe. Miami for the exciting hotel lounges and restaurant spaces that surprise you and take your breath away.

If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I adore the West Indies style we are seeing in Naples currently. Being from Jamaica, I have an affinity for casual elegance and a coastal aesthetic. This design style makes sense in the Southwest Florida climate.

What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I love hot yoga and wish I had more time to practice. 2. Good music, great food, red wine and a good read. These are a few of my favorite thing. How do you define luxury design? 3. I love playing soccer with my eight-year-old son. We crack up trying to To us, luxury design means the marriage of beauty and comfort. Every steal the ball away from each other! single thing in your home should delight your senses! Are you a morning or a night person? Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? Morning. I love going for a walk or jog before the sun is up. I can still see Growing up with Jinx McDonald (our founder and president) as my the stars. It’s cool out and so quiet and peaceful. It’s a great time to gather mother, I was always surrounded by beauty, and our homes were gor- my thoughts. On weekends my favorite time of day is twilight, just before geous and supremely comfortable. However, I’ll never forget the first dusk when you can see evening lights twinkling in the darkening sky. It’s a time I walked into The Delano hotel in South Beach, Miami. Design romantic time. legend Philippe Stark broke all rules of scale and proportion there. He created a fantastical environment, and it was very cool and sexy, bring- What is your favorite space to design? ing an energy that excited everyone who walked through the doors. Living rooms. For me, living rooms are the hub of the house and set the tone. That’s when I realized how powerful good design could be. They are usually the most exciting and elegant spaces in the house.

Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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NATASHA PEREIRA NPINTERIORDESIGN.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does What are three things about you that nobody knows? it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? 1. I find fishing to be relaxing. Honesty and communication. 2. I have a note pad next to my bed for the nights when I wake from a dead sleep with an idea or a concept. How do you define luxury design? 3. I play classical music in the office when I’m starting a new design and Luxury design is where every aspect is not only incredibly detailed, but also need to detail a lot of things. functional and defined. For example, I have been awed by some absolutely stunning pieces of furniture that looked as if we were sitting on a cloud, Are you a morning or a night person? but felt like we’d lain down on a box. A home may have this detailed wall I am very much a morning person. I feel I can accomplish more between the paneling, but it’s truly luxurious and stunning if the finishing of the detail hours of 5 a.m. and 8 a.m. than I can the remaining part of the day. in the paneling is perfect. What is your favorite space in your own home? Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? My home office is my “calming” place, ironically. My first high-rise condo that I remodeled and designed was for a wonderful family whose son was not mobile. Seeing the sacrifices that both parents What is your favorite space to design? made to give their son a better quality of life made us as a company create I have always loved creating spaces for children. Although it’s part of my the perfect space for their home. All the finishes and spaces were ADA- job, I always feel that creating a “fun” space can always make a somewhat compliant for his wheelchair. His entire space was designed for what he stressful process fun. needed and loved, which was cars. At the end of the project, seeing the happy tears from everyone including him was truly the reason why I love If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? working with clients and doing interior design. Art Deco design has always been a favorite. In my opinion, the architecture, colors and textures of that era have always stood out in a classic and someWhat is the best interior design lesson you have learned? what timeless way. Less is more. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the To which city or country would you move for the design? current trends here, what would you do? I would move to Spain. While in design school, I learned a lot about the I love the more modern trend that is currently in our area, or the simplified architecture of various countries, and Spain seemed to stand out in design, West Indies style that we occasionally see, but I would create something architecture and culture. different. I have always loved the architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, and his Fallingwater creation is one of my favorites. I would take that architecWhat design rule would you love to break? tural style with an Art Deco interior. The natural elements of both design Always follow a trend. Some trends we can adjust within a few years with- styles can balance out the significant different elements. out redesigning the entire space, and others, such as Tuscan design, you literally have to start from scratch. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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KIRA KRUMM

KOASTALDESIGNGROUP.COM

Kira Krumm, Elizabeth Hendrix, Kristina Dudley

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? In design, the focus should be not only on the aesthetic and style, but also on comfort and livability. It is essential that our interior environments are cohesive with our lifestyle. I think this is especially important in a coastal environment, where people come to relax and enjoy life. Understanding not only aesthetic preferences but how my clients live is what help me to achieve good design.

the Florence Dance Theater in college, and I lived in Florence for a summer. It was the most magical experience. I met amazing people and traveled to extraordinary places. I have always imagined I will live there again someday.

What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. Many people don’t know about my love for martial arts and Eastern philosophy. I have practiced martial arts forms for several decades. When I am not working or with my family, I am practicing tai chi, yoga or Shaolin-Do. 2. I was an artist before studying interior design. It is hard to find time to explore fine art mediums these days, so I channel my creativity through designing interiors and my Koastal Kollection. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? My father was an architect and an abstract artist. As a child, I saw the home 3. I first launched my collection to the luxury market in China in 2009, and he designed and built in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. It was decided in 2013 to return to the U.S. market where I am in the process of completely unique, contemporary but built with the natural materials of the assembling new products for my Koastal Kollection. land, and in scale with the tall trees that surrounded it. Inside, the ceilings in half of the house were three stories tall with a huge winding staircase What is your favorite space to design? that led to the bedrooms, made of cables and floating wood treads, wrap- Bedrooms have always been my favorite rooms to design, and I have deping around a chimney that heated the house. The bedrooms had open walls veloped my Koastal Kollection around luxurious, comfortable bedding and that looked down into the living space, and big, woven chair swings that bath accessories. I consider the bedroom a sanctuary—a tranquil place to hung from cables 30 feet from the ceiling into the living room. There were rest, relax and revitalize. With the right balance of soothing, neutral elehuge plate-glass windows that let in the light that penetrated through the ments, the bedroom can become an enchanting retreat, which is essential for surrounding trees inside. My father’s huge, extraordinary modern paintings maintaining harmony in all aspects of our lives. hung on the unfinished wood plank walls. The home was him, and it was the If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? best example of pure design and innovation I have ever seen. I think we should forge forward, but I always admired the Arts and Crafts movement because of its emphasis on natural materials, simplicity, balance What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Nature has always been my source of inspiration. As an artist, I have spent and good craftsmanship. my life admiring the natural beauty around us and creating spaces that reIf you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the flect the colors, patterns and textures of our natural surroundings. current trends here, what would you do? I have always preferred not to follow trends. I have been an advocate for To which city or country would you move for the design? For me, Italy has always been the pinnacle of good design. It has a romantic moving away from formal, ostentatious architecture since I relocated here in culture full of history and art. I have always thought that Italians have great 2000. I am glad to see a variety of styles that are more appropriate for our taste in food, fashion, design— even their language is beautiful to me. Italy subtropical environment and casual Southwest Florida lifestyle. was the first country I visited when I began traveling. I was offered a job with Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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KIM COLLINS SHERRI DUPONT COLLINS-DUPONT.COM

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Jenifer Davison, Lana Knapp, Amy Coslet Kim Collins, Sherri DuPont, Mylene Robert

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? Sherri: I was taught to appreciate all styles of design and to design around my client’s needs, taste and lifestyle. Lana: Don’t overdesign! Keep the ideas simple, elegant and, most of all, functional. How do you define luxury design? Sherri: Use the finest materials you can afford and pamper yourself with as many conveniences as you can imagine. Lana: It is the epitome of style and comfort. It’s the feast for the body and soul.

design? Sherri: LA. Lana: Well, at least we won’t be too far from each other. I would move to the wine country in California, Healdsburg being my first choice. What are three things about you that nobody knows? Sherri: 1. I raced cars in high school and college until I had to pay for them myself. 2. The dean of my design school told me I would never make it as a designer. 3. My mother told her family that my wedding “really wasn’t a hippie wedding.” Lana (laughing): Oh, yes—remember the letter she sent to the family? Sherri (laughing): Yes. It was awful. Lana: My three: 1. I love to bake and cook, and do both a lot and well. 2. I love to dance but I’m not good at it. 3. I love to sing but I’m not good at it. Sherri (laughing): Yes, Lana—stick to baking.

Can you remember the first space that made an impact on you? Sherri: My first issue of Architectural Digest. I’ve been a fan ever since. Lana: Yes. I was traveling, and the room I was staying in was yellow and white with dark furniture. It made me so happy that it made my trip! What is your favorite space in your own home? Sherri & Lana (simultaneously): Kitchen! What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? If you could create any style home in Southwest Sherri: Travel! Anywhere, anytime. Florida and go against the current trend here, what Lana: Traveling always inspires me. would you do? Sherri: Something we agree on! Sherri: I think the quiet, organic look of Mimi London from LA translates well for Florida living, espeWhat is the best interior design lesson you have cially on the water. I would throw in a dab of “Pan learned? Asia” for spice. Sherri: I have two: Don’t design beyond your abil- Lana: Nice answer, Sherri. I wouldn’t necessarily creity to assemble it, and it is your client’s house, not ate a new style, but I would go back to the roots yours. of Old Florida architecture. I love the tin roofs and Lana: Never crowd a room. Each space should make wood siding along with the front and back porches. a person feel welcome and happy to be there. However, I would modernize the interior of the home but add touches of antiques. To which city or country would you move for the Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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APRIL SCHAURER

APRILSCHAURERINTERIORDESIGN.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? To me, being invited to create a personal space for a client is a privilege. When the finishing touches have been completed, this is their home—not mine— where they live every day. It should, without question, reflect the very essence of who they are. I know I have been successful as a designer when their friends and family walk through their front door and say, “Oh, this is so you!”

call “dangerous”—not understanding the reality of the design process and how it works. HGTV can be entertaining, but design challenges do not solve themselves in a 30-minute episode. There’s always more to a project than what meets the eye. Building codes, health, safety and welfare of the public are all things a designer has to be aware of and consider in the design process. It’s not as easy as the Internet makes it look.

What design rule would you love to break? Oh my! There are rules?

If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I love the avant-garde elements of the Art Deco era.

A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? I think we all strive to be well-informed consumers, regardless of the subject area, and the Internet has made it so easy for that to happen. Where it can get sticky is when people have just enough information to be what I

If you could create any style home in southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I’m a romantic at heart and never, ever tire of antebellum. It’s timeless: tall columns; a broad, lazy veranda; slow living. Besides, who doesn’t like Gone With the Wind?

What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. My first design project was designing and building a bookcase as a summer 4-H project. 2. I’ve been slalom water-skiing since I was 14 years old. How do you define luxury design? Coco Channel said it best: “Luxury must be comfortable, otherwise it is 3. My age. not luxury.” For me, it’s in the simplicity: a soft sheet and pillowcase...a comfy chair you just adore...the perfectly placed kitchen drawer full of your What is your favorite space in your own home? That quiet corner where I can curl up with a good book and my kitty in favorite kitchen utensils. What could be more luxurious? my lap. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Inspiration comes from anyone viewing life through a lens different from What is your favorite space to design? my own. It’s that difference of perspective that inspires me. I have three That’s like asking me which is my favorite child! Each space presents its grandchildren in kindergarten and first grade. How they see the world— own challenges, and no two spaces are the same, just as no two clients are the same. Whatever I’m working on at the moment is my favorite. now that’s inspiring!

Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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TROY BEASLEY BEASLEYANDHENLEY.COM

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Jena Smoak, Troy Beasley, Sarah Jacobs

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My design philosophy is to give my clients what they want, but beyond what they imagined. We listen intently to the secondary and tertiary objectives of our clients to provide a more intimate design—a design that always inspires feelings.

To which city or country would you move for the design? Australia. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Yes. If clients are doing research, then they are invested in the process and the outcome. We may need to redirect or further educate them, but we welcome the input and collaboration.

How do you define luxury design? Luxury design invokes all the senses. Of course, form and func- Are you a morning or a night person? tion are always the precursors to good design; however, luxury Night. design goes beyond and makes you feel something deep inside. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? against the current trends here, what would you do? I love international design. I follow several blogs from Austra- I would like to see more Palm Springs mid-century modernlia, Spain, and Brazil. Outside of the design world, nature is an inspired architecture throughout Southwest Florida. Sarasota amazing inspiration! has really impacted the essence of their communities with the influx of this style genre, and I think it works so nicely with our What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? coastal properties. Measure twice and everything will work out nice. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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LAURA PARSONS PUREDESIGNOFNAPLES.COM

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ow do you define luxury design? Functionality and comfort. Also, a calm yet uplifting space that reflects the uniqueness of those who live there. I feel that interiors should be in service to your life, not just a look.

What is one thing about you that nobody knows? Before falling asleep, I find it important to review the day in my head and acknowledge all the good work that was accomplished. I also take time to think about and appreciate all the great people I have in my life.

What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Without a doubt, nature is my biggest inspiration. The intense colors and dramatic cloud formations of our west coast sunsets are a religious experience for me.

What is your favorite space in your own home? There is not one area in my home that I do not love for different reasons. However, we do have a spacious lanai, which is our outdoor living room. We hang out there every night watching movies with our Cavalier King Charles Spaniel pups sitting on our laps. The layout allows for a wonderful cross breeze, which makes it comfortable year-round.

Are you a morning or a night person? Night person. Unfortunately, I need to be alone and without distraction to focus and be creative.

Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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EDWARD GARY SHANABARGER EDWARDGARYDESIGN.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My interior design philosophy is to truly understand how my clients live and what inspires them, so I can create spaces that are functional, personal and beautiful. How do you define luxury design? Luxury design is creating totally customized interiors: from a space plan that is specific to a client’s needs, to custom furniture relative to a client’s height and frame, to a custom pillow chosen for the client’s tactile taste. Luxury is bespoke. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Inside the design world, it’s fascinating to attend the latest markets and events, and constantly be ahead of the curve when it comes to the newest design trends and finishes that are everchanging. Outside the design world, I look at fashion, fine art, film, music and travel. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? To recognize when a client is intrigued by a new concept, but needs encouragement to take a chance. Some of the most exciting design results have come from pushing the boundaries. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design.

Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Yes! There is so much information available today on the Internet and social media. The more clients understand their personal likes and dislikes, the more successful and inspired the projects will be. Are you a morning or a night person? Well, it’s 11:30 p.m., and I am just answering this question… What is your favorite space in your own home? The bathroom and dressing area, which I combined. It started with a hand-painted tile from Spain and grew into a space that was functional and organized, but still beautiful and filled with all the things that I love. What is your favorite space to design? Lately, I’ve been really enjoying designing exterior spaces. It’s exciting to keep my clients connected to the natural world. I continue to discover amazing resources for outdoor living that push the boundaries of what’s been seen before. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I find that smaller, more intimate environments keep people more connected to each other, and the occupants more connected to the natural beauty of the landscape around them. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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SHARON GILKEY MONTANNA.COM

Linda Dunham, Sharon Gilkey

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? I create dynamic living environments rather than just static rooms. That means I give my clients gorgeous spaces that also fit their lifestyle needs and their style personalities.

known to buy myself a few sapphires for my birthday. 2. I just purchased a getaway in the mountains of North Carolina, in Highlands. Can’t wait to start redesigning that home! 3. I love to read and to collect books; finding a new fabulous bookstore is one of my favorite things.

Are you a morning or a night person? Morning: I love to get up and have quiet time with my dogs and my coffee How do you define luxury design? I always focus on quality in every surface, furnishing and detail—and in the first thing. It starts my day off on the right note. service we provide. That attention to detail and to my clients is what sets What is your favorite space in your own home? our luxury design apart; it isn’t just about what things cost. I recently finished redesigning my living room, and I love the wood-finished walls and the green-and-coral palette. It’s also a room with a lovely Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? Definitely the first time I went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in view and a lot of natural light. New York. I’m so inspired by art, and the open sculpture gallery off the Great Hall is perfection. The natural light and marble floors in that room What is your favorite space to design? That’s a tough one. I love designing kitchens and selecting the counters are incredible. and surfaces. It’s also a room where function can make such a big difference to the people who live there. But I also enjoy working with fabrics and To which city or country would you move for the design? Chicago is my favorite American city, and my favorite international cities wallpapers in a living room or master bedroom. are Edinburgh, Scotland, and Toronto, Canada. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I’m a fan of modern design, so the super-clean Art Deco of the ’30s is What design rule would you love to break? Formal rooms. If you won’t actually use a formal living room, and you plan fabulous to me. But I also love some of the Neoclassical details. to be in your family room all the time, then let’s talk about how we can use that space in a more dynamic way. It could be a library if you love to read, or If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against an art-filled gallery, a game room or anything at all! I just don’t like boring, the current trends here, what would you do? I already swim against the tide when it comes to what people think of as static spaces that will never be used. traditional Florida design. I love clean and edited spaces that celebrate all the natural light and gorgeous views we have here. If I were going to really What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. Although people usually see me in more tailored looks (and my signature step out of the box, it would be a lot of fun to do something like a Corhat), I do love some bling! I have fabulous beaded purses and I have been busier house or Philip Johnson’s Glass House! Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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DWAYNE BERGMANN DWAYNEBERGMANN.COM

hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My design philosophy is to give my clients what they want, but beyond what they imagined. We listen intently to the secondary and tertiary objectives of our clients to provide a more intimate design—a design that always inspires feelings. How do you define luxury design? Luxury design invokes all the senses. Of course, form and function are always the precursors to good design; however, luxury design goes beyond and makes you feel something deep inside. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? I love international design. I follow several blogs from Australia, Spain and Brazil. Outside the design world, nature is an amazing inspiration!

Measure twice and everything will work out nice. To which city or country would you move for the design? Australia. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Yes. If clients are doing research, then they are invested in the process and the outcome. We may need to redirect or further educate them, but we welcome the input and collaboration. Are you a morning or a night person? Night. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I would like to see more Palm Springs mid-century moderninspired architecture throughout Southwest Florida. Sarasota has really impacted the essence of its communities with the influx of this style genre, and I think it works so nicely with our coastal properties.

What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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KEVIN STEFFANNI

KEVINSTEFFANNIDESIGNGROUP.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? Designing a home that is reflective of the heart and soul of those who reside there.

How do you define luxury design? As a personal journey over time that reflects your lifestyle choices. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? Our neighbor’s house, growing up! She was an artist and a collector of unusual and interesting pieces, but they were never arranged or placed with any style. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Travel by far—so much to see that we don’t know about. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? That the client is not always right—otherwise they wouldn’t need me! To which city or country would you move for the design? Charleston, South Carolina, for the combination of historical architecture and traditional furnishing, together with Southern charm and hospitality. What design rule you would love to break? Some design rules are meant to be broken, otherwise we become stagnant and less creative. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why?

Yes, when it helps to clarify the client’s dream and desires, but not to stifle the creative process. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. In my head I’m 5’11” (not 5’7”!). 2. I would like to be an innkeeper/bed and breakfast owner. 3. I would love to have lunch with Dolly Parton. Are you a morning or a night person? Night, for sure! What is your favorite space in your own home? The den. It is my refuge at the end of the day—dogs/dinner/drink-inhand, surrounded by things that have history and sentiment. What is your favorite space to design? The dining room. There’s nothing greater than family and friends gathered around your table! If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? Not one particular era stands out, but there are elements that I appreciate in each. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? Classic traditional architecture, like you see in Atlanta or Charleston. Brick and mortar rather than stucco. I also appreciate contemporary architecture mixed with antiques; there is so much more soul and depth of character. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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HEATHER SERRANO SERRANODESIGNS.NET

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Frances Dickson, Heather Serrano, Mia Palumbo

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My design philosophy is: Listen to the clients. Pay attention to their lifestyle and personality and how they wish their home to function for them. The interior design should reflect the client, not the designer. How do you define luxury design? To me, luxury design is in textiles. There is such a plethora of textures, colors and materials that can be combined in your pillows, furniture, window treatments and rugs for a sumptuous atmosphere. Showcase these features with exquisite lighting, and you have pure luxury. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? When I was 20 and newly married, I toured the Rosecliff Mansion in Rhode Island. There I was introduced to an opulence and lifestyle I had not known possible. What struck me most and has stayed with me through my design career was the attention and thoughtfulness of each detail. Later in life I toured Versailles, which Rosecliff was modeled after. I came to understand that design is endless and far greater than I ever imaged. What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? My clients are a constant inspiration to me. I value their input and ideas and always look to incorporate them into the design. Outside the realm of interior design, I look…outside. Nature has always been an inspiration to me. To this end, my goal with each project is to bring the outside in, to showcase the beauty of living in Southwest Florida.

What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? Listen to your clients. To which city or country would you move for the design? Paris, for the architecture and overall energy. What design rule would you love to break? I am a firm believer in the construct of functionality within design, so I don’t tend to break rules. However, I am very solution-driven and have come up with many creative resolutions for challenging spaces. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I love to garden. 2. I was a professional ballroom dancer and instructor. 3. My Daddy owned a cattle ranch in North Carolina. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I would bring back the Gilded Age era: the age of the Vanderbilts, Rockefellers, Oelrichses and Carnegies. Opulence, luxury and exquisite design details. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I would love to see high-end farmhouses in Southwest Florida. It is a style that Florida is sorely lacking, and I would love to shake things up a bit and do a trendy, stylish farmhouse. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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ALIRIO PIRELA PIRELAATELIER.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My interior design philosophy is based upon the belief that your space is truly yours and that it reflects your aesthetic sense. It’s a space where every detail showcases your personal style and brings happiness and well-being to everyone who experiences it. A well-designed home should contain an extraordinary design that is timeless while maintaining a striking interior that is unique, luxurious, functional, livable and comfortable. Most importantly, it should speak the client’s language. Many clients come to me thinking they need more space, more storage, more of everything. I try to guide them toward simpler solutions. If a client loves a particular pattern—a very strong pattern—it’s crucial that the other elements in the room are quieter to make that important element stronger. I want to make sure those things are clear and not blurred by other elements.

The first time I visited the Château de Versailles, I found it captivating and breathtaking. It’s full of history, beauty, glory, architecture, color, design and richness. What design rule would you love to break? Never mixing the old with the new. I love breaking this rule, adding different period pieces to create depth, character and a sense of newness mixed with tradition. When looking to mix old furniture with newer items, you should start with the architecture of the room. Find pieces of the same era, then round out the feel of the space by incorporating modern lighting, contemporary rugs or even a few tech-inspired decor pieces. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I love doing laundry. 2. I am a huge fan of Martha Stewart. 3. I watch Golden Girls every night—they make me happy and laugh a lot.

If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? I love elements of the 1920s, when Modernism began to find its feet in homes all around Europe, described as Art Deco in Paris and the Bauhaus movement in Germany. Hollywood glamour became a great influence with the introduction of cinema. Living spaces were glamorous and sophisticated, but with a fun edge, too, with the use of geometric shapes, shiny surfaces How do you define luxury design? To me, luxury is all the aspects of home design that will make you feel pam- and stylized images of everything from skyscrapers to airplanes. pered and comfortable: attention to detail, rooms tailored to personal needs and an element of convenience. We often identify specific feelings with the If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go idea of luxury: sinking into a hot bath in your elegant Jacuzzi, relaxing on a against the current trends here, what would you do? plush sofa after a hard day at work, or even cooking on a kitchen island that I would bring back the Old World sophisticated palette and archiprovides a plenty of room to spread out. When we have the chance to do tectural details and mix them with ultramodern décor and advanced technology, creating a space with a sense of tradition but with a these things, we feel a little indulged. 21st-century update. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? It’s about creating a well-thought-out vision. When you can implement that vision, it should bring timelessness and longevity to the interior. You have to tell a story about how the interior is going to come together with all the different elements and pieces.

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LISA LOVETTO LOVETTODESIGN.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? I strive for simplicity in all my projects, whether traditional, contemporary or any style in between. In the words of Thomas Pheasant, “Simplicity is not simple…it is the process of fulfilling an idea using only that which is essential.” It is the paring down of all that is not essential and loved, and leaving only that which is essential and loved, using the finest materials and pieces that

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are available within budget. When the client and I both feel that if even one piece is taken away, the beauty and harmony of the whole will be lost, we know the needs of the client and the space have been met. How do you define luxury design? Regardless of the size of a space, luxury to me is using less to achieve more. Each piece and every detail is of the highest quality and craftsmanship available and attainable within budget. A small bathroom can be a little gem! Ideally, it is the freedom to select

what is most appropriate and beautiful, untethered by cost and time requirements. I would call that a dream. Pheasant again said it best: “There is nothing more luxurious than space to breathe.� What are two things about you nobody knows? 1. I use Barbie and Ken in photographic settings and vignettes to promote and educate about interior design with humor. 2. I collect/hoard beads, stones, feathers, bones and fossils for use in one-of-a-kind jewelry and interior adornment pieces. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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TINA ANASTASIA MARKFINLAY.COM

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Katie Schelle, Madelynn Hopkins, Alex Goossen, Tina Anastasia, Victoria Sirchia, Lisa Oakes, Alexandra Varvoglis

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My interior design philosophy is first and foremost to listen. Take in everything that your client has to say, and really digest it. Expertise will guide the right choices during the design, but having an internalized understanding of a client’s perspective is the best way to end up with a truly successful project and a happy client, which is the goal for any designer. How do you define luxury design? Luxury design to me is customized design at its highest level. Having a space that is 100% tailored to the individual is the epitome of luxury, a genuinely unique atmosphere. What design rule would you love to break? Naming the style of rooms. The room is what it is, and we do not need to call it anything but beautiful. A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? It can be a double-edged sword. Clients who do research online are obviously trying to educate themselves and gain an understanding of what they are looking for, which is a great attitude to have. It can help the initial process if they know from the beginning what they don’t want in their space. On the other hand, the Internet can be a misleading and inaccurate place for the untrained eye. It can also be overwhelming for someone to sift through pages and pages of products and inspiration photos, and sometimes leads to more

confusion than clarity. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I love football. I literally cannot think of anything else that people would not know once they know me. I guess I am an open book! What is your favorite space to design? I don’t have a favorite type of space to design; it really is all about what the client is willing to go for. The more I can experiment and take risks, the more fun I have and the more pleased I ultimately am with the design. What is your favorite space in your own home? I have actually just completed freshening up my living room to include a gorgeous palette of yellow and gray. It’s a place with no TV, which I am really enjoying right now. If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? Who doesn’t want the wild ’70’s back? I just want to make my hair big and sit on an avocado mohair chair wearing my knee-high boots. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? The blue-and-green palettes are certainly in keeping with the water here in Southwest Florida, but I would love to get wilder with color and push some boundaries there. Punch in some bold reds and oranges—they are a complementary color to the blue. Go with a new fresh color palette like plum. There should be no norm; you should have the colors you love. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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AMY ANDREWS HILTON-INTERIORS.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My design philosophy is to form a collaborative working relationship with my clients—to have an end result where the spaces are designed in a way that reflects the homeowners and embraces their lifestyle. How do you define luxury design? The famous interior designer Billy Baldwin once said, “Lately I have been thinking how comfort is perhaps the ultimate luxury.” Exactly! Luxurious design was once thought to be grand and lavish, yet often cold and stiff. Rooms can have grandeur, be formal or informal—we just want be comfortable in these spaces. Our designs define luxury. We work to combine beauty and functionality. A room can be filled with the most gorgeous furnishings, but if it is not comfortable you will not enjoy it. Luxury in design is a space that is aesthetically pleasing and inviting, a place in which to entertain and find serenity. Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? An early room might just be my childhood bedroom at my grandparents’ home in Louisville, Kentucky. Although it had been my aunt’s room, it did become “Amy’s Room” when I came along. It was not a large room, but it was filled with beautiful things: a four-poster bed, long curtain panels and a mahogany dressing table with a velvet-covered bench. As a little girl, I felt it was grand and elegant. The pretty four-poster bed was the perfect

spot to listen to stories and songs from my grandmother before I drifted off to sleep. Ironically, looking back, I realize this room defines luxury— it was both beautiful and comfortable! What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? After excellent customer service being the key to truly good design job, I would say I have learned to never ever stop learning! There is great history in interior design and architecture we continually revisit, but design is always changing and moving forward, too. I continue to educate myself. I never stop researching for the next great product, the best places for antiques or modern art, the most comfortable upholstery, the latest decorative finishes, wallcoverings no one else has, the best color lighting. I source everywhere I go, and I try to learn something new every day. If you could create any style home in Southwest Florida and go against the current trends here, what would you do? I would definitely renovate or build something in the Old Florida style. I would create as much indoor/outdoor living space as possible; who doesn’t love a great porch? I love the beach bungalow and cottage feel of the West Indies, which inspired many of Florida’s early neighborhoods. I would embrace timeless architecture with quality building materials and modern amenities. I love open spaces, but I would not want to build a home with a wide-open floor plan. I still enjoy intimate dining rooms and handsome studies. I like usable, functional spaces with great storage— and a view whenever possible! Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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EMILY LYON ALLEN BETH FIELD LYONFIELD.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? Our philosophy is quite simple: beautiful spaces are meant to be lived in, not just looked at. Make it beautiful, but make it functional and make it your own. As designers, we see our role as helping to facilitate the client’s individual style through a lively collaboration with us. At the end of the journey, we hope to create highly personal spaces in which to live.

tions. The beauty was breathtaking. What design rule would you love to break? We aren’t big on rules. We prefer to listen to the client’s wants and needs and approach a project from there, despite the trappings of tradition. For example, large-scale pieces in a small space? Sure! Why not? What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. We have been friends for 20 years. 2. We are both mad for our dogs. 3. We share a vintage jewelry collection.

How do you define luxury design? The ultimate luxury in our minds has to do with not just how things look, but how they actually feel: a gorgeously soft mohair, a hand- Are you a morning or a night person? woven silk carpet, a favorite cozy blanket. These are the things that N.I.G.H.T. bring comfort and happiness—isn’t that the ultimate luxury? What is your favorite space in your own home? Beth: Anywhere my animals are. What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? The design process is an organic one. It has to be able to evolve and be Emily: Honestly? My bed. allowed time to breathe. Nothing is ever exact, and it is almost never perfect. Sometimes the greatest result stems from allowing those im- What is your favorite space to design? perfections to happen. Designers often wear the “problem solver” hat Kids’ rooms! So joyful. as often as we do that of “creative director.” In the end, we can and will If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? get it right if the creative process is respected. The Slim Aarons era just sums it all up: effortlessly chic, the good life. To which city or country would you move for the design? We are quite spoiled living in the New York metropolitan area—it is If you could create any style home in southwest Florida and go just such a feast for the eyes at every turn. It would be such a pleasure, against the current trends here, what would you do? though, to depart from the constant stimulation and exist within a It would be fabulous to do a gracious Jamaican-style home in Florida. simpler vibe. A recent trip to Havana proved to be just the ticket. The The center courtyards there—used as living and entertaining spaces— tropical environment played so magically with the spectacular archi- are just so magical, no matter the weather. tecture and sublime color palette, despite the often crumbling condiGulf Coast Design + Decor

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DIANE TORISSI

DIANETORISSIDESIGNS.COM

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hat is your interior design philosophy, and how does it apply to meeting your client’s design needs? My mantra is “I create spaces where my clients can create memories!” Knowing the importance of home and the significance of family, I consider it a privilege to be invited to design a home for my clients. How do you define luxury design? Quality, exquisite fabrics, expert workmanship, history, curated artwork.

A lot of consumers utilize the Internet for research on design. Do you feel this helps the process when they come to you as a designer? Why? Yes, it does if the client is straightforward about using it to do their homework and help explain their vision to you. It certainly gets in the way and undermines our design work if they surf the web and are not honest about it. What are three things about you that nobody knows? 1. I speak four languages and would like to have the time to learn three more (Spanish, Portuguese and Farsi). 2. I would have liked to study linguistics. 3. I would love to be a caretaker of panda cubs for a day.

Can you remember the first space that really made an impact on you? Yes! It was late ’70s in Switzerland—a friend’s powder room entirely cov- Are you a morning or a night person? ered (floor to ceiling) in gold mosaic tile. Very James Bond! Morning! What inspires you inside and outside the interior design world? Inside: New fabric collections always make my heart skip a beat! Also, discussing and bouncing off ideas with other respected designers (such as my “partner in crime,” Kevin Steffanni). Outside: The world is our oyster! As designers, we are highly visual people and notice everything—color, texture—around us. How we choose to interpret that is our gift.

What is your favorite space in your own home? My lanai—because the Florida sky offers me a different tableau each morning and evening. What is your favorite space to design? The powder room. It’s the one space that my clients can let their hair down and go wild with imagination!

What is the best interior design lesson you have learned? To surround ourselves with the best tradespeople we can find. And I’m hap- If you could bring back one era of design, what would it be? py to say that I truly have a dream team that I work with on all my projects. There actually is none—I love bits and pieces from each era, but I’m perfectly content with today. To which city or country would you move for the design? If you could create any style home in southwest Florida and go against the Paris. I have infinite respect and admiration for exquisite workmanship. current trends here, what would you do? What design rule would you love to break? I would love to create a home reminiscent of a French farmhouse with a dash There isn’t one I haven’t broken at least once! of California Coastal! Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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HOMEOWNER “A� Looking back towards the front entry, matching mid-century mirrored chests flank the door and a matched pair of stunning iron chandeliers visually break up the expanse of wall above the door.

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A Subtle Study in Contrasts Two friends, two homes, same neighborhood. Freestyle Interiors’ designs helped two families fall in love with their homes all over again. Story by Anastasia Storer | Photography by Lori Hamilton

HOMEOWNER “B” The Corbett chandelier brings elegance to the front entry. Two Hickory Chair wing chairs and a deep plum area rug create a small conversation area with a gorgeous view, and is the perfect place for an intimate conversation with a friend.

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HOMEOWNER “A” The long, narrow table was the special request of the client, who wanted an intimate dining experience and a table with enough room for all their friends. The chairs are Chaddock HRH: armchairs at both ends, with side chairs along each side.

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eferrals are priceless in the high-end residential custom home business. Often, referrals are a primary way design firms, builders and architects receive new business. For Freestyle Interiors, one project in the exclusive Quail West neighborhood of Naples led to another. “The Blaisdell project came first,” explains Ana Oates, the lead designer for both projects. “The client was thrilled with our work, and when their friend came over and gushed about the design, they passed along our name and we got the call to do the house on Sunnyslope.”

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Barbie Beginnings Ana was born a designer—it just took her awhile to get there as an actual career. “As a young girl, I spent hours designing my Barbie homes—I even colored prints on paper and used tape to hang it on the wall to make it look like wallpaper,” Ana says. “I took a lot of pleasure in rearranging my room all the time, and once I was old enough, I used my mother’s sewing machine to make coverlets for my dollhouse beds and turned thimbles into little miniature plants in pots. My Barbie house was definitely exceptional!” Surprisingly, no one thought to tell young Ana that interior design was something you could do for a living.

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HOMEOWNER “B� An exquisite crystal flower-shaped Crystorama chandelier blossoms above the formal dining room table, surrounded by dining chairs upholstered in a subtly patterned Romo fabric.

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Custom-built banquette with upholstery by Brentano Fabrics and cushions from Michael Schmidt Custom Interiors is the perfect breakfast spot before hitting the beach. Additional seating are side chairs from CTH-Sherrill Occasional, with upholstery by Jim Thompson Fabrics. HOMEOWNER “A” Beyond the kitchen is the family room, with custom built-ins and pocket sliding glass doors that open up the entire area to the outdoor kitchen and living space. A Currey & Company Novella chandelier hangs above the small breakfast table tucked off to the side of the kitchen.

It wasn’t until after Ana was married with children—getting a degree in psychology along the way—that she realized that her passion and talent for interior design could be a career. “I’d been doing design on my own all that time, of course, but I woke up one morning at age 40 and asked myself what I wanted to do with the rest of my life,” she says. “Interior design was the answer. I went back to school, got my degree in interior design, and have been working professionally in the industry ever since. I tell everyone it’s never too late to pursue your passion—it’s such a gift to wake up every morning loving what I do for work.” Ana has been with Freestyle for seven years, and Faith Fix, the design firm’s founder and principal, knew she was the perfect choice for both these projects. While Faith’s job, of 116

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HOMEOWNER “B” The kitchen is a study in gold and white, with the client’s purple making an appearance in the fabric used on the island chairs. To add a soft scintillation to the room, a trio of swirling Currey & Company pendant lights hover above the length of the island, and the ceiling was silver-leafed by hand.

course, involves oversight of all the firm’s projects to ensure client satisfaction, another important role is as matchmaker. “When clients come to our firm, I spend some time talking with them, and then I use my sense of their personalities and style to pair them off with one of our designers,” says Faith. “Ana has an impeccable taste that I knew would mesh well with both these clients. She’s very responsive and has an absolute dedication to making everything perfect.” Perfection is Mike Diamond’s stock and trade in the luxury homebuilding business. “The Sunnyslope home is without a doubt one of the finest homes we’ve ever built,” says Mike, who is president of Diamond Builders. “The clients were wonderful to work with, as was Freestyle Interiors. Creating a home like this is a collaborative Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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HOMEOWNER “A” The master bath is pristine and crisp, featuring a windowed alcove for the soaking tub with a charming view of a vined trellis. Visual Comfort sconce lighting adds a little glimmering glamour to the space.

process involving hundreds of decisions, and we were thrilled the clients put their trust in us to bring their vision to life.” Architecture Shapes Design Both clients came to the Naples area from the Northeast, and the interior design of both their homes are illustrative of how architecture shapes the interior design of a home. “Understandably, clients who come from another part of the country think they will just decorate their home here the same way as where they came from, only to discover it just doesn’t work from a design standpoint,” explains Ana. “The homes here are very different from homes in other areas of the country. The contemporary architecture and floor plans aren’t conducive to the traditional style many are used to.” Mike agrees. “There’s been a definite shift from the Mediterranean style you would see in Florida in the early 2000s to the more minimalist, clean, contemporary architectural styles of today,” he says, “and that certainly affects the work of the interior designer.” 118

Neither client wanted to go full-on contemporary. “Both still wanted that sense of softness and the gentle curves you find in more traditional design aesthetics,” Ana says, “so we opted to go transitional, retaining that softness while also incorporating the crispness and simplicity of the contemporary style.” It was also important to have a little glamour in both designs. “They both wanted a feeling of luxury and romance, so we found ways to bring shimmer and sparkle by using mixed metals, crystal and glass.” The Challenge of Color Both clients chose very distinctive color palettes, creating some unique challenges for Ana. “An important part of my process is to spend a lot of time with each client in the initial stages, so I have a good understanding of them as people, their lifestyle, and their wants and needs. I do a lot of listening; I always ask clients to provide me with whatever will help me see what their ultimate vision is, and I build on that.”

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HOMEOWNER “B” The double vanity of the master bathroom creates a dazzling illusion in its mirrors.

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HOMEOWNER “A” The pale green-blue chosen for the master bedroom creates a soothing sanctuary, and the Currey & Company Cleo chandelier brings a touch of romance.

The Blaisdell homeowner started by bringing Ana a magazine with photos of a home she loved. The home had a monochromatic, black-and-white palette with emerald green as the accent color. “The client wanted the classic crispness of black and white, but that color combo can be very stark and feel cold, so the challenge with this design was to soften and bring warmth,” says Ana. “Instead of the green, the client preferred blues, so that became my starting point. We journeyed to the paler hues of the blues and greens of the Florida skies and waters as the accent colors for the palette.” Not only did these colors soften the severity of the black-and-white primary colors, they added a freshness reminiscent of an early Florida morning. Ana masterfully layers rich textures and patterns in the furnishings and materials to add further visual interest, creating the illusion of a much more complex palette. The Sunnyslope home didn’t start from a photo; instead, it 120

originated from a swatch of fabric. “The client brought me a purple fabric,” Ana says, “and told me she loved the color eggplant.” Purple is a powerful color—there’s a reason it used to be reserved for royalty. “It can easily overwhelm, so the challenge was to subdue it.” This was especially important since the client also requested using gold metals. “Too much, and you run the risk of looking like a museum or a gilded palace in Versailles,” says Ana. “Purple can be scary,” Faith agrees. “It can overpower a design if you’re not careful. Using it as an accent color throughout the house creates a beautiful balance between the gentle neutrals and the violet hues.” Ana chose a myriad of purple hues for the home’s design, from the palest lilacs to the deepest plums. “Every part of the house had a little taste of the purple hues in it somewhere, with different intensities.” Instead of bright golds, Ana went with mixed metals in muted, sometimes brushed finishes. The result is a dramatic, regal ambience throughout the home.

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HOMEOWNER “B” The client’s favored eggplant hue, seen here in the side chair and Kravet Couture accent pillows, is beautifully paired with the palest of lilac bedding. Custom bed upholstered by Hickory Chair.

The Personal Touch What’s most important for Ana is for every home she designs to be a reflection of the family who lives there. “You want to make sure you’re creating a home for the clients—a home that’s as individual as they are,” says Ana. “In both these homes, I really believe the personalities of the clients shine through.” Perhaps not surprisingly, Ana discovered that her psychology degree is actually quite useful in her design work. “There’s a lot of psychology involved in interior design,” she notes. “It’s there in setting the mood of a room, creating the right emotion for a space, choosing colors…all of that involves thinking about human emotion and behavior.” Ana wanted her designs to give her clients as much future flexibility as possible. “Sometimes good design is about reminding the client that some things are easier to change out and others aren’t,” explains Ana. She often recommends that big elements,

like kitchen countertops, stay as neutral as possible because they are both time-consuming as well as expensive to change out frequently. Bedding, furnishings and pillows, however, are all easy to reupholster or change out when the client’s style or tastes change. In the Blaisdell design, Ana was able to use a unique specialty stone for the second kitchen island. “It works in this design precisely because the palette is limited,” says Ana. “The bold veining and inclusions make the island not just a functional space, but an eye-catching art piece that turns it into its own special location within the main living area.” In the Blaisdell and Sunnyslope homes, neutrals are thus the foundation of the design palette, and the colors the clients love and requested are used for accent and emphasis. “This makes it very easy for the clients to change out the colors completely at some point if they wish, or perhaps add other complementary colors to the palette,” Ana says. Gulf Coast Design + Decor

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HOMEOWNER “A” The windows of the house all have lovely views of the home’s exquisite outdoor pool and living space. Bubbling fountain jets surround the specialty fireplace, offering a stunning sight for evening entertaining.

Both homes have a soft sophistication that is classic and timeless, both have a similar rich sumptuousness and luxurious glamour, and yet each home is uniquely beautiful, with its own distinctive ambience. Ana still gets calls from both clients, and still visits their homes. “One thing I love about visiting is that every time I’m there, it feels so comfortable and inviting,” she says, “and I know that any guest walking in feels the same way.” Best of all are the continued compliments and thanks she still receives from both families. “These are their homes, the places they come to from the outside world to feel safe and loved and at home.”

Resources: Faith Fix, Founder and Principal Ana Oates Freestyle Interiors Design Studio 3525 Bonita Beach Rd, Suite 105 Bonita Springs, FL 34134 239.949.2210 freestyleinteriors.com 122

Mike Diamond Diamond Builders 239.325.4600 6646 Willow Park Drive, Suite 5 Naples, Florida 34109 diamondcustomhomesfl.com Rich Guzman RG Designs Inc. 28071 Vanderbilt Drive Bonita Springs, FL 34134 239.949.2929 rgdesignsinc.com Fox Custom Builders, Ltd. PMB#40 8595 Collier Blvd. Suite 107 Naples, FL 34114 239.261.1082 foxdev.net

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HOMEOWNER “B� The clients love to entertain. A full outdoor kitchen makes barbecuing a breeze, with plenty of seating available at the kitchen island. For more formal outdoor meals or additional guest seating, the outdoor dining area awaits.

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EVENTS

AN “EVENING IN SPAIN” WITH UMI On Thursday, August 16th, an ‘Evening in Spain’ was enjoyed by our local design community at UMI located on Trade Center Way. The evening began with a CEU presentation by Thibault Vanderdonck from Polycor, Vetrazzo, who gave a talk on the sources of waste glass, the “upcycling” process and the sustainability of recycled glass surfacing. After the presentation and a surprise random give-a-way of iPhone Vetrazzo covers, everybody walked next door to enjoy a sumptuous dinner of Chef-made Paella, Tapas, and special named Sangrias while listening to Flamenco music! The evening ended with door prize drawings of a Smart 4K ultra HD TV, and two gift cards to local restaurants. 124

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EVENTS

THE TOP 25 DESIGN FIRM KICK OFF PARTY On Thursday, August 23rd, Gulf Coast Design + Decor hosted The Top 25 Design Firm kick off party at Ferguson in Naples. The party was co-hosted by Gulf Coast Design + Decor, Ferguson and Bosch and included information of the upcoming article, attire and dates. A wonderful time was had by all and we congratulate this years honorees! 126

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PROFILE

THE WOOD FLOOR COMPANY

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hat flooring trends are you seeing people going for i.e..colors, grains, patterns and plank width? Wirebrushed European White Oaks with matte finishes are always on the up and up. There are endless color styles ranging from natural and warm to cooler tones of grays and browns. We always say the wider the better—our showroom floor is a 12” oak, but we offer planks up to 15” wide. Tell us 3 important tips on choosing hardwood flooring? 1. Always consider your furniture, light exposure, and cabinet colors. Flooring can update a space without overshadowing or clashing with your existing finishes. When venturing into neutrals, grays can change between rooms depending on existing colors. Having a wide assortment of tones helps to pick the perfect match. 2. What does an average day in your house look like? If you have kids, pets, or lots of parties, picking the right color and finish could have a lasting effect on the longevity of your floor. There are pros and cons to nearly every finish of wood. Having the right professional navigate you through the decision is critical.

family home, there are ways to maximize your space with the perfect flooring compliments. There are countless ways to achieve the look your want without breaking the bank. Consider installation directions, transitions, and area rugs. What types of wood do you suggest for Florida weather? You cannot go wrong with installing an engineered floor with several plies in construction. Thorough moisture testing is standard practice and should be performed before installation. Solid wood can be installed, but requires a subfloor. What are some of your top selling product lines? Legno Bastone is a gorgeous, designer-driven French White Oak. Their colors are always ahead of the trend curve and feature an excellent hard wax oil finish. Manufactured in Europe, this family-run business is headquartered in Naples, Florida. The Wood Floor Company 2122 Tamiami Trail North Naples, FL 34102 239.307.0994 thewoodfloorcompany.com

3. What type of home do you have? Whether it is a cozy condo or large 128

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Covers 3 AND 4 ECH+D.indd 3

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Covers 3 FALL SPRING AND2017 4 2018 ECH+D.indd GCD+D.indd GCD+D.indd 44 4

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Profile for East Coast Home Publishing

Gulf Coast Design + Decor  

Fall 2018 East Coast Home Publishing eastcoasthomepublishing.com

Gulf Coast Design + Decor  

Fall 2018 East Coast Home Publishing eastcoasthomepublishing.com

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