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M AT T H E W O K A Z A K I M A S T E R I N A R C H I T E C T U R E ( M A R C H I ) C A N D I D AT E

PORTFOLIO


ACADEMIC HIDDEN ROOM

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SITE / BUILDING RECIPROCITY

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PLAN PERIMETER

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INTENSIVE // EXTENSIVE

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PROFESSIONAL T H E N AT U R E C O N S E R VA N C Y

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G O L D E N G AT E U N I V E R S I T Y

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T H E H E A LT H Y H O U S E

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A BETTER MARKET STREET

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THE HIDDEN ROOM H A R VA R D G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F D E S I G N FA L L 2 0 1 4 - C O R E S T U D I O INSTRUCTOR - KIEL MOE

The project involves designing a group of five rooms, one of which seems to be hidden from the other four. The hypothesis of concealment requires consideration of the relationship between the visual, experiential, and conceptual bases of architecture. In this project, the hypothesis of concealment deals with the duality of room and corridor. Four rooms, visible from the exterior, are internally connected

MODULE

D O U B L I N G & L AT E R A L T R A N S L AT I O N

ROOM + CORRIDOR

X : 2 ’ - 0 ” ; Y: 5 ’ - 0 ”

by linked corridors. After visiting all four rooms through a specific sequence, one realizes that he has already visited the hidden room, hiding in plain sight as another corridor.

SECTION A - CORRIDOR CUT 1/32” = 1’-0”

1

1

A

A

PLAN 1

4


R O TAT I O N A L T R A N S L AT I O N

C O R R I D O R C I R C U L AT I O N

C O M PA R T I T I O N D I A G R A M

X : 5 ° ; Y: 8 °

SECTION B - ROOM CUT 1/32” = 1’-0”

2

2

PLAN 2

B

B

5


6


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SITE / BUILDING RECIPROCITY H A R VA R D G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F D E S I G N FA L L 2 0 1 4 - C O R E S T U D I O INSTRUCTOR - KIEL MOE

The typical relationship between a site and a building is assumed to work one way: the site precedes the building. As such, the architect responds to the site and typically assumes control of the building only. In this project, the site is not a fixed and stable precondition, but rather determined by the architecture at the scale of the building, resulting in a larger field condition at the urban scale.

E L E V AT I O N - I N I T I A L H O U S I N G PA I R 1/32” = 1’-0”

The initial conditions provided in the project are a pair of houses, three stories tall with an independent housing unit on each floor. When house contains a deck on the second floor, accesible only by that corresponding housing unit.

The project begins with the manipulation of the relationship between this pair of houses. Here, a single bathroom window serves as the catalyst for designing the larger urban pattern that contains the two baseline houses. The reprecussions of this manipulation allow for a condition in which a more typical urban field condition transitions into a more typical suburban pattern.

To think architecturally is to understand the relationship between site and building. The objective of this project is to develop the two simultaneously, producing discernable architectural and urban relationships that are calibrated, interdependent, inextricable, and irreducible.

G R O U N D P L A N - I N I T I A L H O U S I N G PA I R 1/32” = 1’-0”

The large-scale field condition is derived from a parametric loop based on the alignment and manipulation of the windows of one of the housing units. The loop begins with the shift of a first floor window -- a bathroom window in alignment with and mirroring a first floor window of the other building. This window shifts along the wall until it becomes in alignment with another window, which is defined as Disruptive Condition I. Now, both windows are associated with bathrooms in each house, and necessitate a building shift in the first house. This shift simultaneously results in a manipulation of stoop and foyer of the second building, providing a new relationship between the two houses. The original window continues to move down along the facade of the building until it reaches Disruptive Condition 2. Here, the windows are associated with more public programs, and neccessitate a different type of building shift. In this scenario, the windows are still allowed to remain in alignment, but the two buildings repel and move away from each other. At this point, the first building is moved back so that it is in alignment with the second building, and the parametric loop repeats, but on the second floor. The same loop repeats on the third floor, after which it restarts on the first floor. Additionally, other windows in the first building also move along the facades as a result of the initial window shift.

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As a result of the parametric loop, new relationships between building units arise. As the field condition shifts from an urban pattern to a more typical suburban one, the initial building pair (1 with 2) dissolves, and a new pair (2 with 3) becomes the standard. Along with this new pairing, a gradient of building condition subsets

emerges as well.

SUBSET 1

AUXILIARY WINDOW SHIFT DIAGRAM

The diagram illustrates the pattern of movement of the auxiliary windows of the first building, which move as a result of the single window that faces the second building. These windows spiral along the facade and move upwards towards the third floor. The final building condition in the

SUBSET 2

parametric loop results in a completely windowless entrance facade of the first building. Below, the penultimate condition in the parametric loop can be seen.

SUBSET 3

The topography follows a sinusoidal pattern, which begin at grade level, and where the second

SUBSET 4

floor deck serves as a peak datum point. When necessary, entrances to the buildings are dug out of the topography, creating another level of variance in the field condition.

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10


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PLAN PERIMETER H A R VA R D G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F D E S I G N FA L L 2 0 1 4 - C O R E S T U D I O INSTRUCTOR - KIEL MOE

The project deals with the relationship between the plan of rooms, an enveloping façade, and the interior circulation of a building. The configuration of just these three elements proves to have significant consequences for the composition of the building as a whole. In this sense, the project is designed to require the negotiation and resolution of tension between dueling organizational forms and systems.

In order to exercise the tensions inherent to the relationship between the plan, the enveloping façade and the internal circulation, the project was provided with three initial conditions and constraints: a maximum area requirement, an unrolled façade of fixed length that must be folded or curved to produce a closed figure in plan, and a staircase(s).

The subject of the inquiry is a dormitory. The maximum total building area is limited to approximately 68,000 square feet. The required perimeter is 960 feet long, 54 feet tall, and is composed of a regular pattern of windows spaced 6’ on center. The length, height and proportion of the overall façade and windows were ordered to be maintained. The building is composed of single rooms and double rooms, and every bedroom must have access to natural light.

For this design, the driving element of the building was the primary circulation system, composed of a double helix staircase, with one being a square staircase, and the other in a pentagonal form. One staircase provided access to the private programs of the building, the dorm rooms, while the other provided access to the public programs, which were the common rooms and event spaces. Access to both programs are available only on the ground floor and roof. The nature of the circulation systems provides variety both in section and in plan, and the building’s floors shift laterally and longitudinally according to the staircase landings.

SECTION A 1/16” = 1’0” DORMITORY FLOOR SHIFTS (CENTERED ON LANDING)

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P R I M A R Y C I R C U L AT I O N S Y S T E M T R A N S L AT I O N T O M A S S I N G S H I F T S (CENTERED ON LANDINGS)


P R O G R A M C I R C U L AT I O N

PROGRAM AXES

C O M M O N R O O M / E V E N T S PA C E

DORMITORY / STUDENT HOUSING

P E N TA G O N A L S TA I R C A S E

S Q U A R E S TA I R C A S E

C O M M O N R O O M / E V E N T S PA C E DORMITORY / STUDENT HOUSING

The main axis is in alignment with the dormitory staircase, or the square staircase. The staircase that provides access to the common rooms and event spaces produces several sub-axes, which are in alignment with the pentagonal staircase in plan. Below, the juxtaposition of these two programmatic axes can be seen both in the form and material of the dormitory.

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P E R I M E T E R S T R ATA ( 9 6 0 ’ - 0 ” ) 1/64” = 1’0”

As previously stated, one of the three given conditions and constraints was a continuous perimeter of 960 SF at all heights of the building. Due to the multitude of landings and floors from the double helix staircase, many levels of perimeter strata were developed to ensure the 960 SF perimeter rule.

A

B

C

D E

F G H

=

I J K L A = B = C = D = E = F = G = H = I = J = K = L = M = 960’

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M


SECTION B 1/48” = 1’0”

2

2

1

1

PLAN 1 1/48” = 1’0”

A

A

PLAN 2 1/48” = 1’0”

B

B

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INTENSIVE // EXTENSIVE H A R VA R D G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F D E S I G N I N T E N S I V E PA R A M E T E R

FA L L 2 0 1 4 - C O R E S T U D I O

M AT E R I A L D E N S I T Y / P O R O S I T Y

INSTRUCTOR - KIEL MOE

The project focuses on the relationship of form, matter, and energy in both abstract and actual ways through a study of the intensive and extensive properties of architecture. What is at stake in this project is a question of causality. Architects both suggest order as well as amplify the orders suggested by matter/energy in the formation of buildings. This recursive causality is the focus of this project

To elaborate this question of causality in architecture, the project considers both the extensive and intensive properties of architecture. An intensive property is one that does not depend on the system size or the amount of material in the

S TAT E 1

The density map of State 1 uses a basic nine-square grid system as a precedent, and is divided into four main levels. Each level maintains its own unique density map.

system, like temperature or density. An extensive property, such as mass or volume, changes when the size of the system changes. The fundamental aim of considering the intensive and extensive properties of architecture is the development of an agenda for matter, energy and form; a way of thinking thermodynamically about architecture and architecturally about thermodynamics.

Initially, a geometric armature was provided to develop two base states depicting an intensive property. In this project, the material density of concrete -- and its reciprocal property S TAT E 2

of material aeration -- was chosen. From there, an extensive translation was developed. This tectonic translation was then

State 2 was derived using a given geometric

mapped back onto the initial intensive states to produce the

armature, and manipulating the State 1 map through

final forms. After this, circulation and program were given

this armature. This map is comprised of two levels,

freedom to push back against this system, which added another

and the striation of material density no longer runs

layer of development onto the original intensive property map.

along the same axis as the overal density form.

S TAT E 1 . 1

S TAT E 2 . 1

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S TAT E 1 . 2

S TAT E 1 . 3

S TAT E 2 . 2

S TAT E 1 . 4


E X T E N S I V E T R A N S L AT I O N A R C H / V A U LT E D A R C H

Higher density materials have more resistance to applied stress, and can span longer distances between structural support, or load per unit area. Therefore, it can be said that there exists a reciprocal relationship between density and structural support; i.e. areas of lower material density have higher structural intensity, or necessity. As a result, the arch and vaulted arch were chosen as an extensive translation of this change in material density.

M AT E R I A L D E N S I T Y

STRUCTURAL INTENSITY

A catalog was developed to reflect this change in material density, ranging from a span of 0’ - 50’ to a height of 0’ - 18’. When combined with adjacent arches, a system of vaulted arches emerged, some of which can be seen below.

V A U LT C ATA L O G

V E N T I L AT I O N / THERMAL BUFFER

CORRIDOR

A R C H T Y P E : V E N T I L AT I O N / T H E R M A L B U F F E R

OPEN PLAN 1

OPEN PLAN 2

V E R T I C A L PA S S A G E

ARCH TYPE: OPEN PLAN 1

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Using the catalog of arches, the extensive translation was mapped back onto the original intensive density maps of State 1 and State 2. Using a 5’-0” x 5’-0” grid system, arches were manually laid out, with corresponding vaults spanning among these arches. These extensive translations, while manual, were the result of a rigorous interpretation of the density maps, and their success is evident through the likeness of the floor plans to the original density maps.

While less integral to the objective and investigation of the project, program and circulation were considered, and circulation was necessary to navigate in the vertical direction. Despite a minimal use of vertical facades, natural partitions, corridors, and ventilation channels emerged due to the wide variety of arch and vaulted arch types. Vaults spanning between 3’-0” and 50’-0” with a height between 9’-0” and 18’-0” were considered to serve as circulation and could house major programmatic elements, whereas smaller spaces could serve as ventilation channels, or host building infrastructure. Additionally, as an initial condition, each building required two separate circulations systems: one public and one private. The public circulation is evident -- a tunnel-like passageway that spans between two arches on different floors. The private circulation is hidden, carved out of the areas where there is the highest structural intensity, i.e. the poche spaces shown in plan.

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S TAT E 1

S TAT E 2

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20


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REFLECTED CEILING PLAN - THIRD FLOOR 1/48” = 1’0”

SECTION 1/48” = 1’0”

PLAN - THIRD FLOOR 1/48” = 1’0”

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REFLECTED CEILING PLAN - GROUND FLOOR 1/48” = 1’0”

SECTION 1/48” = 1’0”

PLAN - GROUND FLOOR 1/48” = 1’0”

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T H E N AT U R E C O N S E R V A N C Y 2013 - 2014 TENANT IMPROVEMENT MKTHINK P R O J E C T R O L E - D E S I G N S T R AT E G I S T

Located in San Francisco’s Financial District, The Nature Conservancy was looking to revamp a dated, cramped, and underutilized office environment with an eye toward enhancing their company culture and physically representing their mission of conservation and appreciation for nature.

As a result of this quantitative and qualitative analysis, MKThink proposed a radical cultural shift. What if, instead of fixed, assigned office spaces, TNC adopted a ‘hoteling’ protocol by which employees could reserve desk space day-to-day? In flattening the hierarchy of the workstations and eliminating private offices, the space was reorganized to encourage more efficient overall utilization. With enhanced linear circulation, the space was rezoned into five discrete areas based on sound level (from noisy to whisper quiet). To mirror this rezoning, a color palette derived from the very ecosystems and environments that TNC serves was applied throughout to visually differentiate the floor plate’s discrete work environments. Now, employees individually reserve a desk in one of the five zones on a daily or weekly basis. A personal rolling file cabinet to store belongings and paperwork can be easily taken with them to their desk and docked in a central location when not in use.

A variety of furniture was specified, ranging from standing desks to tiered seating for enhanced teleconferencing sessions. Using local and sustainable materials, including a reclaimed old-growth redwood, were used to create custom features including a full-height planter wall, a topographic ceiling installation, reclaimed wood benches and counters, and a 100% wool reception desk.

ENTRY / RECEPTION

Previously spread across one and a half floors, MKThink began the project by undertaking a utilization and occupancy analysis to better understand how the space functioned on a daily basis. Through in-person ethnographic observation, and by studying aggregate data from unique carded door entries, our team ascertained that even at peak times, only 80% of the offices’ 107 desk spaces were in use. Widespread telecommuting and the closed-off nature of private offices discouraged interaction between employees and inhibited views to the outside.

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Overall, the cultural evolution has been dramatic. By eliminating unused space and consolidating onto one floor plate, the organization is able to save upwards of $270,000 a year in operational expenditures on the lease alone. Additionally, with enhanced linear circulation, the space was rezoned into five discrete areas based on sound level.

Aggregated data from unique carded door entries collected over several month periods showed that even at peak times, only 80% of the offices’ 107 desk spaces were in use.

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The engagement process revealed that employees lacked space for private conversation and collaboration amongst teams; the design team thus outfitted each zone with a series of spaces for collaboration, from small workstations for 1-2 employees, to larger 8 person teleconferencing spaces, to more traditional board rooms for groups of 20.

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OPEN COMMON AREA

TRAINING SESSION ROOM

O P E N W O R K S TAT I O N S

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G O L D E N G AT E U N I V E R S I T Y 2011 - PRESENT |

CLASSROOM IMPROVEMENT

MKTHINK P R O J E C T R O L E - D E S I G N S T R AT E G I S T

In the late 1990’s, Golden Gate University began the process of establishing a multi-year institutional master plan. Having completed the first phases, MKThink was brought on in 2011 to realign the master planning effort to the university’s current needs and goals. The analysis included an investigation of

GGU 4th Floor_Final Photos by Cesar Rubio

potential program and space deficiencies, opportunities, and infrastructure concerns.

MKThink began with an extensive data collection of facility, user, and room scheduling information. This dataset served as the baseline for a rigorous facility and programmatic needs analysis. Additional data was gathered by conducting on-site investigations, running several university-wide surveys, and holding weekly discussions with a selected group of staff and faculty. With a detailed understanding of the existing conditions of Golden Gate University, both building and program inefficiencies and opportunities emerged.

The study uncovered significant latencies in utilization, which were determined to be driven primarily by non-standardized class times and discrepancies between class size projections

MKThink_GGU_10-01-13_170355

and actual enrollment numbers. The facilities were optimized to

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best fit the courses and enrollment data, and a recommendation was made to decrease classroom space by 14,427 square feet. Along with the physical right-sizing of classrooms, a set of classroom design guidelines were developed through an intensive stakeholder engagement process to develop the layout, program, furniture, and utilities of each classroom.

MKThink_GGU_10-01-13_170492 12

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FLEXIBLE SEMINAR ROOM

FLEXIBLE SEMINAR ROOM

MKThink_GGU_10-01-13_170253 5

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FLEXIBLE SEMINAR ROOM

PLANS - NEW CLASSROOM WING

MKThink_GGU_10-01-13_170159 3

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LECTURE CLASSROOM / FLEXIBLE TRIAL COURTROOM

CLASSROOM DESIGN GUIDELINES

MKThink_GGU_10-01-13_170542 13

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T H E H E A LT H Y H O U S E L O U I S V I L L E , K Y R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N S T R AT E G Y MKTHINK D I S T R I C T I N F O R M AT I O N

P R O J E C T R O L E - D E S I G N S T R AT E G I S T

In 2012, 9% of the 3,900 single-family homes in the Portland District of Louisville were vacant or abandoned, including over 100 shotgun houses. Today, many of these homes are in disrepair, yet the city has expressed interest in stabilizing and marketing existing vacant structures for future use rather than demolishing them. Furthermore, the city has promoted the “development of context-sensitive mixed-use projects at strategic sites within the neighborhood to serve as the catalyst for the revitalization of surrounding districts.” At the same time, Louisville has committed to increase the overall health quality of its citizens through a “health-in-all-policies” approach. In February 2014, the city released the Healthy Louisville 2020 Initiative to define and establish specific goals towards creating an overall healthier community. H E A LT H Y H O U S E M O D U L E S

What if the Healthy House is a set of components that hijacks the existing infrastructure of 100 abandoned shotgun houses in the neighborhood, creating a network of live/work community centers that targets a broader definition of community health in terms of housing, health servies, transportation, education, crime, and economics? The Healthy House will embed itself within the pre-existing shotgun housing development system, and will primarily serve the residents of the Portland District community. Each single-lot module will address a particular issue relating to community health.

As a larger network, the Healthy House will act as nodes that “promote the development of significant, context-sensitive mixed-use projects at strategic sites within the neighborhood to serve as the catalyst for the revitalization of surrounding districts,” and by doing so, improve the overall community health of the Portland District.

M A P O F P R O P O S E D H E A LT H Y H O U S E S I T E S

1

2

3

4

PROPOSED SITES [economics] [transportation] [education] [safety] [health services]

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5

VA C A N T S H O T G U N S D E D I C AT E D B I K E L A N E S B I K E - F R I E N D LY R O A D S CIVIC INDUSTRIAL

SCHOOLS COMMERCIAL


1

3 4 1 0 RU D D AVE [ ECO N O M I C ] GROCERY CO-OP There is a noticeable lack of amenities and services in the area surrounding 3410 Rudd Ave. A grocery co-op would not only give residents healthy food options but also job opportunities. There is an incentive to keep Portland residents in Portland by providing local employment; in 2008, 3,516 people worked in Portland but only 9% of these people also lived in the neighborhood. These actions will help foster community engagement and investment in Portland, which are essential to revitalizing the economic health of the neighborhood.

2

2 9 1 1 B A N K S T REET [ T RA N S P O R TAT I O N ] BIKE RENTAL / SHOP The location of 2911 Bank Street on a bike friendly road makes this an ideal site for a bike rental/shop location. Bank St also connects to a series of streets that lead directly to the Louisville Riverwalk, a dedicated pedestrian/bike path that provides access to the Louisville Waterfront Park, an 85-acre park located on the water that wraps around much of the city.

3

1 9 1 0 P O R T LA N D AVE [ ED U CAT I O N ] FARM-TO-KITCHEN A major commercial district is located a block to the west of 1910 Portland, where healthy food options are scarce – McDonald’s , Subway, and other fast food chain restaurants tend to be the norm. By establishing a farm-to-kitchen location on this site, residents in this corner of Portland will not only have much healthier food options, they will have an opportunity to learn about and participate in the food production for their neighborhood.

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2 8 1 0 D U N CA N AVE [ S A F ET Y ] CAFE / MUSIC VENUE Although 2810 Duncan Ave is only 8 minutes away from a Louisville Police sub station, the proximity of the site to a cemetery and an elementary school sets up an interesting situation where there is lower residential density but a heightened need for street presence. As a result, 2810 Duncan Ave is an ideal location to create a cafe/music venue. A cafe by day and music venue by night, the proposed program will encourage residents to linger and serve as watchful eyes both day and night.

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1839 BANK ST [ HEA LT H S ER VI CES ] EDUCATIONAL CLINIC 1839 Bank St will build off of the farm-tokitchen site at nearby 1910 Portland by providing educational health services. This location will functional mainly as an educational clinic for preventative care, as well as a basic health provider.

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A BETTER MARKET STREET 2 0 1 3 - U R B A N R E V I TA L I Z AT I O N S T R AT E G Y

F R A M E W O R K F O R A N A LY S I S

MKTHINK PROJECT ROLE : DESIGN CO-LEAD

DIMENSIONS

A collaborative project with the San Francisco Planning Department to analyze specific datasets, including crime statistics; pedestrian, bicycle, and public transportation data; and sales and revenue information. Through a rigorous analysis of these datasets, it was proposed that an understanding of the relationship between these datasets would help inform

PLACE

smarter planning decisions at an urban scale. A framework for analysis was developed with the Planning Department where the data was broken down and investigated at specific units of analysis, including the block, intersection, and block face. It was proposed that environmental, cultural, and economic data would then be layered on top of this ‘asset’ database in the

C U LT U R E

hope of understanding multi-variable relationships at the scale

PEOPLE

of a segment of downtown San Francisco called Market Street Corridor.

Phase I consisted of the development of this framework, along with the analysis of pedestrian utilization along a test site, which was a segment of the Market Street Corridor called Yerba Buena Lane. Phase II, the analysis of other transit data along this test

UNITS OF SCALE

site, Phase III, the overlay and analysis of crime and sales data on this utilization data, and Phase IV, the analysis of this information

UNIT TYPE A: REGION

at the larger scale of Market Street Corridor are currently in development.

UNIT TYPE B: NEIGHBORHOOD ZONE VARIABLES

CRIME RATE

SALES DATA

TYPE C1: STREET

TYPE C2: BLOCK

TYPE C3: INTERSECTION

TYPE C4: PARCEL

PEDESTRIAN UTILIZATION

ACCESS TO INFORMATION

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CRIME RATE

SALES DATA

PEDESTRIAN UTILIZATION

PUBLIC DATA OPEN SOURCE SFDATA.GOV

PRIVATE DATA PLANNING DEPARTMENT

RESEARCH MKTHINK TO INVESTIGATE


A P P L I C AT I O N : M A R K E T S T R E E T C O R R I D O R

UNIT TYPE A: MARKET STREET CORRIDOR

UNIT TYPE B: NEIGHBORHOOD ZONE

TYPE C1: STREET

TYPE C2: BLOCK

TYPE C3: INTERSECTION

T Y P E C 4 : PA R C E L

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TEST SITE: YERBA BUENA LANE

WIFI Sensor Device Locations

1

3

2

To prototype this initiative, MKThink was given a test site by the San Francisco Planning Department. On the site was a recently developed installation by the Exploratorium as part of a city initiative called the Living Innovation Program (LIZ), which seeked to “create a flexible framework that harnesses the city’s creativity by using City-owned assets, such as public spaces, and partnerships with leading organizations as catalysts for exploration, innovation, and play.” (liz.innovatesf.com) MKThink deployed sensor devices around the LIZ to investigate pedestrian use patterns in and around the site in order to understand the installation’s impact on the urban environment and the interactions between urban inhabitants. The test site is located in a heavy urban region along Market Street. It is close to a variety of transportation stops, as well as a variety of civic hubs, destinations, and amenities. Wireless sensor devices were installed on one parcel along the sidewalks of Market Street to track real-time occupant utilization. A better understanding of use patterns in this parcel can help provide insight into this parcel, which will act as a control for other areas along the corridor.

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A N A LY S I S O F F I N D I N G S

WEEKDAY UTILIZATION 5,000

11.08.13 - 11.30.13

4,000 UNIQUE DEVICES

3,000

2,000

1,000

0 0:00

3:00

6:00

9:00

12:00

15:00

18:00

21:00

0:00

18:00

21:00

0:00

TIME OF DAY (24 HR)

WEEKEND UTILIZATION 5,000

11.08.13 - 11.30.13

4,000 UNIQUE DEVICES

3,000

2,000

1,000

0 0:00

3:00

6:00

9:00

12:00

15:00

TIME OF DAY (24 HR)

+

CRIME RATE

SALES DATA

& PUBLIC DATA OPEN SOURCE SFDATA.GOV

PRIVATE DATA PLANNING DEPARTMENT

= A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PLACES, PEOPLE, AND CULTURE TO MAKE MORE INFORMED PLANNING DECISISIONS

LOCATIONS OF TRANSIT STOPS |

WIDENING OF SIDEWALKS

|

LOCATION OF CIVIC EVENTS

|

LOCATION OF NEW COMMERCE

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RESUME

EDUCATION

H A R VA R D U N I V E R S I T Y G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F D E S I G N Master in Architecture I 2014 - 2017 (Expected) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES Bachelor of Science, Applied Mathematics, 2010 GPA: 3.78 Cum Laude

EXPERIENCE

MKTHINK Strategist January 2012 - May 2014; June - September 2011 Design strategist at a multidisciplinary architecture firm interested in the intersection of technology, culture, and the built environment. Worked on the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data to inform design strategies and align the programmatic needs of the user and client with the built environment. Produced graphics, data visualizations, space programs, written design guidelines, as well as helped lead the assembly and writing of numerous RFQ/ RFPs. Experimented with new tools and technologies to better understand the interaction between user, environment, and building. Extensive experience in stakeholder engagement and communication, including surveys, on-site investigations and interviews, and board and community member presentations.

LUXR, INC. User Experience Design Intern January 2012 - March 2012 Assisted with assembly and manufacturing of the company’s lean user experience development kit. Helped solve product design problems and created graphic web advertisements and posters.

MORPHOSIS Intern June - September 2008 Helped construct study and presentation models. Participated in the design and assembly of RFQs and RFPs. Created database of all model and written archives.

PROFICIENCIES

AutoCAD // Rhino // VRay // Grasshopper // Sketchup Adobe Creative Suite // Microsoft Office // Matlab // HTML

HONORS

Sigma Alpha Lambda //

Phi Eta Sigma

//

Golden Key International Honours Society

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National Society of Collegiate Scholars //

Athenian School Alumni Council


M AT T H E W O K A Z A K I +1 925 451 3884 okazaki.matthew@gmail.com mattokazaki.com

Okazaki Portfolio March 2015  
Okazaki Portfolio March 2015  
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