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“The answer, as every objective Australian will admit, was hysterical batting, sans spirit, sans skill, sans everything, in the face of some fine offbreak bowling.”

It was not, as might be supposed, that conditions became impossible for the 55 minutes astride the tea interval, the period when Australia lost their whole side, and that before and after this they were perfectly satisfactory. The answer, as every objective Australian will admit, was hysterical batting, sans spirit, sans skill, sans everything, in the face of some fine off-break bowling. The pitch, for instance, was much better than that at Old Trafford on which West Indies made 215 and 183 in 1950. It was different but infinitely more reasonable than that at Brisbane in 1946 on which England made 141 and 172, and with a more balanced approach Australia, one feels sure, could now have several first-innings wickets left in their pouch. Sport 1956 — The 1956 Grand National became famous not for who won but for the way in which the Queen Mother’s horse Devon Lock lost the race. Pictured here, the horse, ridden by Dick Francis, was leading the race at the last fence © Times Newspapers Ltd

Third Day 28 July 1956

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PAC Project FInal  
PAC Project FInal  

Final version

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