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Fisherman’s pier Matthew Cheng

Matthew Cheng l Unit 3 l ID: 4074603


Fisherman’s Pier project Despite it sleepy appearance, Queenborough is rich in maritime history. While commercial fishing has been in decline for years, the abundant amount of food sources at river estuary has attracted various types of fish in the area. Coastal fishing like angering is a popular sport along with other water activities like yachting. A fisherman’s pier is an ideal way to revive a long standing fishing tradition, regenerating the old town at the same time. The other objective of the fisherman’s pier is to promote a new seafood eating habit. Years of overfishing certain species, like cod, has depleted their natural supplies, threatening the long term survival of the species. On the other hand, the ample supply of local fish is a good substituent source of food supply which has been overlooked. Three main programmes are incorporated in the pier’s design to introduce consumers with the new idea – a fish market, a cooking school and a seafood restaurant.

Site - Queenborough slipway


Isle of Sheppey

Queenborough

scale 1: 75 000


02 Pouting Pouting are members of cod family. They grow to be about 1 foot (30 cm) long, with large eyes. They live near Atlantic shore from Northern Europe down to Spain. Most Northern Europeans don’t consider them good for eating, and so regard them as a nuisance fish because they travel in large schools and strip the bait off lines. The French will eat pouting, though. They feel that the flesh is tasty enough. In fact, in the 1950s in France, pouting was an expensive fish. Pouting must be eaten within 6 hours of catching it, because the taste goes downhill very quickly after that, and the day after it is caught, it tastes like a completely different fish, in a way that is a change for the worst.

City of London Thames Estuary

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01 Rockling Shore Rocklings live in and around rocky areas throughout the English Channel feeding on both worms and crustaceans. For cooking: Gut and remove the head. Wrap in foil and leave it on the hot coals made for great eating. It is also suitable for baking and frying. It has a firm, white flesh with a subtly robust fish flavour. Watch out for the bones though. They’re only short but very thick and almost needle like.

Site plan - Isle of Sheppey

scale 1: 200 000


Edible fish found in the Isle of Sheppey Not Commonly Consumed at Dinner Table

03 Garfish Garfish are one of the UK’s most ignored species. Good numbers of gars are present right along the South and West coasts during the summer, and even greater numbers exist off the Southern Irish Coast. They are a tenacious fighter on matched tackle, eager to feed, and can be taken on varied techniques from both boat and shore. Yet, few anglers try for them. They are very tasty to eat, but their green bones make them an unpopular option on the menu. Clean the fish and wash in running cold water to remove scales. Lightly flour and fry in oil for 4-5 minutes turning occasionally. A little care is required because of the small bones however they are quite delicious.

04 Wrasse

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02 local fishing area

Queenborough

Isle of Sheppey

They are typically small fish mostly less than 20 centimetres (7.9 in) long. They are efficient carnivores, feeding on a wide range of small invertebrates.

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Humans eat wrasse in many places. In the western Atlantic, the most common food species is the tautog. The flesh is bland. In other European countries they are cooked with a tasty sauce or used in stews with tastier fish. They have very tough scales so it is best to skin them with scales on. Wrasse are common in both public and home aquaria.


Fisherman’s Pier, Queenborough Fisherman’s Pier, Queenborough

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Fisherman’s Pier project Besides fresh fish are delivered daily to the fish market to be sold, fishing clubs and fishing schools are set up offering classes on fishing techniques. There will be shops for anglers selling all sort of fishing equipments and tools. The cooking school is set up along with the restaurant to promote eating different types of local fish. Large aquarium and fish tanks where live fish are on display are constructed around the restaurant. The idea is to familiarise visitors with the knowledge of local fishes and at the same time allowing fresh fish to be served at the restaurant. Some local fish (eg. Pouting) have to be kept alive until they are cooked and consumed at the table. Their tastes change quickly when they die. One primary aim of the building form is to blend with the environment and the history of the place. The paces between each metal frame are meant to reflect its surroundings. The metal frames appear to be rather pact at one end (reflecting the close urban setup) and loosen out at the other (symbolising the openness of the river). There is also an element of randomness and distortion with the metal frames. The effect is to suggest a natural, unplanned fashion representing the accidental nature of things and of historical developments.


Site plan - Queenborough

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level 00

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4. toilet

5. lift

6. kitchen

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8. shop

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2. exhibition space


floor plan scale 1: 500

3. seafood restaurant

7. fish market


14. cooking school

15. function room

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9. plumbing room

10. maintance room

11. staff toilet

12. staff room

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13. office

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16. the pier in the early morning when fish tanks are being loaded by cranes

16. public recreational space during daytime

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floor plan scale 1: 500


Section

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Acknowledgements My thanks to the generosity shown by the staff of Lower Berryfield Fisheries, who helped me enormously in my research.

References p.3

Isle of Sheppey (scale 1:75 000) source: google map

p.4-5 Site plan - Isle of Sheppey (scale 1:200 000) source: http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/digimap/home Images of Rockling, Pouting, Garfish & Wrasse sources: http://www.aphotomarine.com/fish_rockpool_five_bearded_rockling_ciliata_mustela.html (Rockling & Pouting) http://www.sussexseafishing.co.uk/9.html (Garfish) http://www.uk-fish.info/pages/corkwingwrasse.html (Wrasse) Isle of Sheppey (scale 1:200 000) source: google map p.9

Site plan - Queenborough (scale 1:2000) source: http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/digimap/home


Matthew Cheng Born in Hong Kong in 1988, Matthew has always been interested in art and design. At the age of 13, he went to study in England, where he did his GCSEs and A levels. He then studied Architecture in the School of the built environment, University of Nottingham, which he graduated in 2010. after that, he spent time traveling around Europe and Asia, exploring differernt cultures as well as different types of architecture. Matthew likes photography, travelling, and reading to explore various cultures and customs.


Site - Queenborough slipway

Fisherman's pier  
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