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M a t t h e w R y a n S i l l a m a n m s i l l a m a @ u o r e g o n . e d u 5 4 1 . 5 4 3 . 0 4 0 7

Landscape Architecture is an art --but really it is so much more than that. It is a way of thinking. It is a way of echoing a connection to place, people, and dreams. It is the solution to complex problems and has the ability to enrich lives with beauty and enrich our environment with life. I am Matthew Ryan Sillaman, and this is my thought process.

Landscape Architecture | UNIVERSITY OF OREGON


C o n n e c t i n g . E u g e n e Term: Spring 2009 Site location: Eugene, Oregon Professor: Professor Ron Lovinger This studio was organized around the issues of urbanity and the notion of connecting downtown to the riverfront and university. My role on this masterplan project focused on the courthouse district and how to better transition from riverfront to downtown. Using unique characteristics of the site, I proposed a multi-use civic stadium and park blocks. The framework for this idea came about in response to the newly finished courthouse and its aggressive architecture. By constructing such a place, opportunity for commercial retail and restaurants would ensue-inviting exchange, and allowing visitors to enjoy, take ownership of, and animate the public space. The stadium and its surrounding area would ultimately contribute to a much-improved public realm and draw people back to the downtown.


courthouse.district

The stadium location sits on the nexus between the city grid and river, an area that naturally depicts a triangle. This influenced me to use the strengths of the site to define the area. Finally, it became evident to go bold and propose a civic stadium. I wanted to create a space that beneficially used the site for game day atmosphere while also contributing to city vitality. The stadium venue has the capacity to host a wide range of commerce from eateries and sky lounges to commercial retail and underground parking.

ESTABLISHINGVITALITY Media: prismacolor | copic markers


The design of the stadium reflects the Morphosis architecture of the courthouse and embodies the sites natural metamorphosis from serpentine to grid. The proposal of the stadium was influenced by the need of a venue for the Eugene Emeralds. s t a d i u m . e n t r y. s k e t c h

Media: photoshop | illustrator | sketchup


U r b a n . H o u s i n g . F o r e s t Term: Fall 2009 Site location: Gresham, Oregon Professor: Professor Brook Muller I had the opportunity to join my first architecture studio in Fall 2009. I worked with two architects, Dan Edleson and Tobin Newburgh to form an interdisciplinary team. The design challenge was to develop high-density housing units while enhancing the rich ecological structure on site. The concept focused on utilizing existing habitats and a created wetland to strengthen local habitat corridors. The buildings on site were integrated with the landscape to act as an amenity for residents. Sustainable Cities Initiative Entry Award Notable Project List Award: This project was selected by the Sustainable Cities Initiative to be presented to Congressman Earl Blumenauer.


The zigzag effect within the plan view represents community balconies that overlook the site. Right below, terracing gardens give residents the option to own garden plots. The zigzag was inspired by the break between declining habitat and the encroaching commercial district that the site currently resides on. The design aims to bring curiosity and awareness to the surrounding environment-- and how to better design for it.


habitat patches/corridors

transit line

habitat patches/corridors

habitat patches/corridors

site location

site location

habitat gateway

residential

site location

bus route wildlife buffer

commuter hubs

emigration/migration flows core habitats wildlife buffer

human disperal directions site

wildlife buffer

residential

commerical

commercial

human.node.diagram

ecological.structures.diagram

threshold.diagram

Respecting the location, the building footprint focuses its weight on the periphery of the site to allow for the highest degree of habitat integration. Through the structural organization of the site, paths, walls, and building placement create buffers between human and wildlife function. Additionally, a created wetland softens the separation while mitigating for sensitive areas of the site.

single.unit.patio.sketch

Media: photoshop | illustrator | indesign | sketchup


S A I F . O a k . C o u r t y a r d Professor Brad Stangeland Term: Winter 2010 Site location: Salem, Oregon Professor: The tech studio required attention to detail and a final set of construction documents. The program involved redesigning the headquarters courtyard for the SAIF Insurance Corporation. The challenge was to explore ways in which to design around a legacy oak (center of courtyard) and berm protecting the space from a nearby creek. Our aim was to connect employees and clients of the SAIF Corp. with the underutilized courtyard that seemed to go unnoticed. This studio was conducted with a studio teammate, Lytton Reid.


Creating special grounds around the oak is what inspired the organization of the design. Surrounding the center, a continuum of spaces from public to private, and large to small, provide a variety of spatial qualities for people to enjoy at different times and different purposes.

l e g a c y. o a k

arbor

Site.Plan Additionally, we chose to establish high grounds atop the berm. This gesture provided visitors a sense of security and ownership, making the spaces within more desirable and comfortable.

berm

Planting.Plan

Media: cad | modeling


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L a n d s c a p e . P l a n n i n g Term: Fall 2010 Site location: Eugene, Oregon Professor: Professor David Hulse The objective of the planning studio for the Eugene and Springfield Metropolitan Area was to accommodate population growth while limiting urban sprawl and expansion of the Urban Growth Boundary. This was accomplished by using the residential grid structure as an indicator for locating residential infill and identifying where to allocate undeveloped land to provide spatial flexibility for future development. Additionally, there was a focus to promote a diversity of housing options and modes of transit to accommodate a range of densities and income levels. With population growth, it became crucial to protect and preserve natural areas with high ecological value for human and nonhuman function.

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Proposed Residential Densities

Scale: 1:25,000

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Media: gis


C R E A T E D R A W a

mixed.use

market.rate subsidized.housing

residential.type

A

green.space

streetscape

This reinvented community was established within the UGB along the Mckenzie River because of it close proximity to the River Bend Hospital and its relationship to the river. Uninspired by living in higher density environments, this image aims to persuade the greater population to make the transition.

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access

street.trees

green.space

parking

zoning

diversity.of.green.space

shared.yards green.roofs

shared.driveways

commercial.walkability

transit.hub community.orchards small-scale.agriculture

Media: photoshop | illustrator | gis | sketchup


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RA G aEm e CCh a nHg e r AF o r R G E Pontiac,MI

Term: Winter 2011 Site location: Pontiac, Michigan Professor: Professor Rob Ribe

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For my final studio, I had the unique opportunity to work for Triple Properties Inc., a development firm that just purchased the Silverdome Stadium in Pontiac, MI. My involvement with the project was to provide ideas that the developer could use economically to renovate the site in relationship to energy consumption, water use, programming, and site organization that would create a more sustainable and enjoyable site. The goal of my proposal was to produce a new framework for how to reclaim professional stadiums after they “retire�. The new owners are seeking to bring a professional soccer team to the site, converting the 80,000 seat stadium into a multi-use facility comprised of retail, entertainment, office, and recreational opportunities. Holcim Competition Entry Award Currently Under Deliberation Award:


1’’=100’ F Flint

mi

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Pontiac

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FEATHERSTONE RD

pocket parks

Detroit tr

40mi

Ann Arbor b

dog park ramp gym

entry plaza

Oakland Oaklan O lan U. la

GM Plant nt

Chrysle err H HQ Oakla and a d C.C.

i75

parking forest

Down ntow town o

prac. field

ramp/stair

H59

1mi

Residential Residentia

2mi

rec. fields Neighborhood Access

parking (3x)

Downtown Connection nn nnection

Student Access S .25mi Commercial ci Access

access (4x)

.5mi

Bike-Oriented e ed H59

Detroit Metro Connect

living machine parking forest cafe ramp

park car access retention pond

H59

N OPD YKE R D

ramp

Easy Car Access

car access

ramp

The reinvented stadium for Pontiac, MI is the focal point for a new civic destination. It sits within an overall masterplan concept that recognizes that the sporting event extends outside the time constraints of a match within the stadium.

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Media: photoshop | illustrator | cad | sketchup


vertical access

pedestrian access

car access

by.car

by.foot

access.today

by.train

access.tomorrow

a c c e s s . f o r. t h e . f u t u r e


My design developes new programmatic relationships between the event and the everyday and employs innovative strategies that tie the stadium into its environment in a more productive way. The aim was to create a stadium site that serves the community as a social hub and economic engine. The project serves as an example of how to generate new life for stadiums that go beyond stadium function alone.

BENEATHTHESURFACE 1’’=100’ Media: photoshop | illustrator | cad | sketchup


from.thought.to.vision

PARTI:

form

program

organize

MORETHANJUSTASTADIUM


S t u d y . A b r o a d . S k e t c h e s Professor Jenny Young Term: Spring 2010 Site location: Italy + Switzerland Professor:

Villa Emo, Vedelago

Congiunta, Giornico

Italy is a stunning country; every place seems to be carefully crafted. Italian buildings, streets, and open space cohere together in a rich and vibrant way. Layers of time have created a dense urban fabric so charming and dynamic it leaves us pondering the meaning of perfection. Whether in the heart of a medieval city or traveling along the road of the Italian countryside, Italy defines beauty. This work is a glimpse of my learning experience abroad, more specifically my observations...


FIRENZE.ITALY


VICENZA.ITALY Media: graphite


A b o u t . M e Term: Life Site location: West Coast Age: 24 Matthew hales from the sunny hills of Southern California. He is majoring in Landscape Architecture with a minor in Business Administration. He is a highly motivated individual seeking to explore his artistic and creative capacities. His passion for the environment stem from his participation in water polo, where, currently he plays collegiately for the Oregon Ducks.

designer | planner | strategist


Landscape Arch. Portfolio