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Matthew Rolston Architecture

Portfolio


Matthew Rolston MatthewARolston@Gmail.com 484 554 2587


Education University of Oregon Portland, OR Masters of Architecture Sep 2017 / June 2019 Graduating with a specialization in Historic Preservation Courses: National Historic Register, Media in Design Development, Masonry, Building Enclosures

Northeastern University Boston, MA BS Degree in Architecture Sep 2012 / May 2017 Courses: Integrated Building Systems, Structures and Tectonics, Theatrical Design

Skills

Experience BAR Architects San Francisco, CA Intern Jan - July 2016 Assisted on wide array of projects at various stages of completion from early design development to post-construction marketing material. Completed complete set of Construction Drawings for historic theatre renovations.

David Yum Architects New York, NY Intern Jan - June 2015 Produced multiple sets of construction documents for various projects. Made weekly visits to job site to take notes between architect and contractor. Produced detailed survey drawings of existing historic, pre-war apartments.

Operating Systems: Windows and Mac Rhino, Maxwell Render, Microsoft Office Suite, AutoCAD, SketchUp Adobe Creative Suite Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, and Premiere

Interests Music (playing/writing Guitar, Piano and Drums), Photography, Theater, Animation, Audio Recording, Radio

Volunteer Music Teacher Bethlehem, PA Drums / Guitar / Music Theory Feb 2010 - Present (summers only) Taught introductory guitar and drums to school-aged children. Had to convey complex ideas on music theory. Encouraged and enabled them to develop their own style and songs.


Contents 1

Portland Opera

2 3

Old Town Bathhouse Adaptable Lab

4

Boston Public Library

5

BAR Architects

6

David Yum Architects

7

Art Pieces / Installations

8

Photography


1

Portland Opera

This studio was based around the redevelopment of the Rose Quarter in Portland, Oregon and the design of an opera house as its centerpiece. The neighborhood was formerly an active and vibrant area with ties to WWII shipbuilding before being paved razed for the creation of Memorial Coliseum. The goal of this studio was to create an accessible public space that is available to all people. My concept of an unobtrusive, civic architecture begins with creating a real connection to the community, in both its current and historical form. From the southwest axis, the opera is seen as only light vertical lines, giving the architecture a transparency and openness, making the boundary as permeable as possible and recognizing the site’s troubling history with dominating, solid, object buildings. The cultural history of the site manifested itself in the structural system of the canopy. The large frame is derived from the local connection to shipbuilding. These spans, resembling the frame of a ship in progress, together imply a form and extend outward into the site.

Winter 2018 Rose Quarter, Portland, OR


Concept Sketches


Site Analysis: Character

Industrial

Historical

Naval


Structural Axon


Site Plan

Floor 3

Floor 2 Memorial

Bandshell

Floor 1


Section 2

Section 1

Elevation


2

Old Town Bath House

The function of a bath house and spa is to foster connections, both inward and outward. A visitor retreats from the chaos of the city to reflect and gain understanding on themselves. This isolation, however, is not solitary. There are others around them on the same mission. My design allows for both the individual and societal connections by dividing and dispersing private space and using it to shape the public. The architecture began as a singular, open space. The insertion of enclosed programmatic solids then begin to shape and define that void. In the box is a private experience cut off from the larger space and featuring a designated program and unique atmosphere of the ‘sento’ typology. The boxes, cantilevered from the walls, create public space atop them that is shaped by the program boxes around. These public spaces are shaped by visual and aural connections. To connect the solids, a bridge network is added to link the open and enclosed spaces.

Fall 2017 Old Town, Portland, OR


Concept Model


Floor 1 Floor 2 Sauna Pool

Circulation

1/8” : 1’

ness that is both expansive and contained.

Diagrams

Communal Roof

Floor 3

Roof

Communal

Mech / Storage

Pool

Floor 4

Steam

Baths

Private Baths Pool

Circulation

Washing / Showers Public Washing

Changing

Changing

Kitchen

Restrooms

Restrooms

Floor 5

Storage/ Mech

Circulation Cafe Lobby

Laundry

Mech

Floor 6 Communal

Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Basement Lv 1 Lv 1 Lv 1 Lv 1 Lv 1 Lv 1 Lv 2 Lv 2 Lv 2 Lv 2 Lv 2 Lv 2 Lv 3 Lv 3 Lv 3 Lv 3 Lv 3 Lv 3 Lv 4 Lv 4 Lv 4 Lv 4 Lv 4 Lv 4 Roof Roof Roof Roof Roof Roof

Communal Roof

Outdoor Wash

Changing

Steam

Concept Diagram

Plans

Baths

Private Baths

Washing

Pool

Mech


Unwrapped Section

Sections


Modeled Rendering


3

East Boston Lab

This semester-long, comprehensive studio project was organized around an adaptable, future-proof architecture. With my studio partner, Shawn McCloy, we developed an adaptable lab space capable of serving a multitude of functions based on the economic and environmental future of East Boston. The history of East Boston is one of a lost shoreline. Access to the Chelsea River and Boston Harbor, which surround the peninsula, has been almost exclusively permitted to industrial and infrastructural use. The community’s only direct engagement with the water occurs at Constitution Beach. Our project creates an additional moment of convergence. At that moment, we implement an architecture that explores the possibilities of multi-functional, recurring pieces arranged with consideration for an unknown future. Individual members are repeated and permeated across the architecture to create a specific ecological, pragmatic, and/or formal response unique to its respective moment.

Completed with Shawn McCloy Spring 2017 East Boston, MA


Detail Sections


Context: Scale


Landscape Taxonomy


Site Model

Seasonal Perspectives


Wall Section Model

Building Model


4

Boston Public Library Analysis

The purpose of this studio was about analysis rather than design. I chose to examine Copley Square and the Boston Public Library in Boston. After staying there for a few hours, what grabbed my attention was the sheer number of people who came through it despite its size. It was clearly one of the most popular spots in Boston and a hub for all Bostonians and visitors. It borders four Boston landmarks; the John Hancock Tower, Trinity Church, the Old South Church, and the Boston Public Library, the last of which by far has the most visitors. For my analysis, I decided to map where all these visitors were coming from and where they were going. To gather data, I spent a day approaching people in the park and asking them. While most were friendly, a few were overly suspicious. After putting the data on a map, no real patterns could arose. People came from every part of town doing a variety of activities, which, to me, solidified the square as a true destination in and of itself.

Summer 2015 Boston, MA


Paths Through Copley Square

Local Visitor Origin Destination Walking Home Attraction Errand Bike Bus Car Train

Leominster

Cambridge

Brookline

Fenway Downtown Jamaica PLain

Dorchester


Cambridge

Dorchester

Cambridge Northeastern U Boston Common

Prudential Back Bay

Boston Common Boston Common Dorchester

Prudential Jamaica Plain

East Boston Brookline

Brookline

Airport Airport Back Bay Prudential Leominster

E. Boston

Airport

Boston Common Back Bay Fenway Park Back Bay


5 299 Haight 188 Buchanan

200 Buchanan

100 Waller

101 Waller

155 Laguna

0’ 20’ 40’

80’

1

ALCHEMY BY ALTA | SAN FRANCISCO, CA

2

The spring before my final year at Northeastern, I was hired as an intern at the medium-sized BAR Architects in San Francisco for 6 months as part of Northeastern University’s co-op program. Due to the firm’s size and San Francisco’s booming development, I was able to work as part of a team on larger projects, as well as more independently on smaller jobs. The more relaxed office atmosphere and amount of people at BAR more than willing to teach, each with individual specialties, allowed me learn so much valuable information I couldn’t have acquired at school. The work I did for BAR, too, provided a wealth of knowledge on an array of projects differing in program, budget, and scale. Over the course of my 6 months there, I worked on multi-family housing, a theater renovation, a winery, a survey package, and countless others. Occasionally, I would join a project days before its deadline requiring me to gain an understanding of both the project and my task quickly.

2

1

SURVEY GRADE LINE

+750m +748m +746m +744m +742m +740m +738m +736m

SECTION 1

SURVEY GRADE LINE

+754m +752m +750m +748m +746m +744m +742m

Winter / Spring 2016 San Francisco, CA

+740m +738m +736m +734m +732m

SECTION 2

CHILDREN'S ACADEMY

+730m

BAOCIA, HAITI SCALE: 1 = 200

10072

0

5m

10 m

20 m


6 Thanks to Northeastern’s Co-operative Learning program, I was able to earn an internship at David Yum Architects in downtown New York City. The firm was small, with just two other people working there fulltime. Due to its size, I was able to observe and participate directly in different projects at all stages of completion, from initial bidding to completion. This work greatly strengthened my understanding of the design and construction process. While there, I participated in all aspects of an architecture office, making boards to enter projects into competitions, designing literature to be sent out to clients, model-making, site analysis, and construction documents. Working there also allowed me to visit a construction site once a week to take notes between the principal architect and the lead contractor.

Winter / Spring 2015 New York, NY


NO.

ISSUANCE

DATE

KEYPLAN

N PROJECT

39 W 67th Street New York, NY 10123

STAIR & GUARD RAIL SEAL & SIGNATURE:

DATE: PROJECT NO.: SCALE: DWG No.:

26 JUNE 2015

DRAWN BY: 15104 CHK BY: 1/2"=1'-0" 21 OF 27

A505.00

MR/JW DY


Reactive / Renewal

7

Design Pieces Repetition / Variation

This series of art pieces was based on the chapter of Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities about the region of Eutropia. At several points throughout their lives, the people of Eutropia would collectively abandon their city and build a wholly new one where they would essentially restart their lives; new jobs, new family, new names. These pieces are abstracted versions of that process and explorations into the phenomenon of repetition and variance. How can the manipulation of a singular element in a context change its role. These pieces culminated in the temporary installation in the elevator, which serves this odd role as this repetitive, drab, dead space in our architecture. The piece activates the elevator by giving users an activity and allowing them to make visible their presence throughout the day.


Shifting Chessboard

Subject to Change


8

Photography

These photographs, taken almost entirely on 35mm Kodak Portra and Ilford HP5 Black and White film, are either a framings of a singular object on a backdrop or physical manifestation of repetition and variance, with some encapsulating both. The images vary in their level of abstraction and immediate clarity. The images furthest to the right, for instance, all sense of scale and direction is lost, focusing on only the repeating texture of the architecture.


Sanibel Island, FL


San Francisco, CA


Matthew Rolston MatthewARolston@Gmail.com 484 554 2587


Matthew A Rolston Portfolio  

A collection of my work architectural work.

Matthew A Rolston Portfolio  

A collection of my work architectural work.

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