Page 1

MATTHEW R. FICHTER 2010-2015 DESIGN PORTFOLIO


MATTHEW R. FICHTER The Pennsylvania State University Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 2015 610.675.7690 mrf5164@psu.edu


VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

URBAN DESIGN

LITY IS MAP

Köln, Germany

RIVERFRONT DESIGN

DESIGN CONCEPT 1:1000

DIAGRAMS

Großmarkt Platz functions as a dramatic gateway into the southern quarter of Köln, Germany. It is not just a plaza space, but a link between old and new; the built environment and the green belt. A long Alleé of London Plane trees with a lawn and a water mirror fountain form the major axis between the Großmarkthalle and the new Transportation Hub on Bonnerstraße. This axis sets a dramatic stage for the unique architecture and history of the Großmarkthalle. An intricate system of paths integrate with the proposed development plan to create a seamless connection across the Bonnerstaße.

CAR / BUS CIRCULATION

The design seeks, not only to create desirable connections, but also to create desirable spaces. The Großmarkt Event Plaza provides space for outdoor markets, food trucks, and other outdoor gatherings. The Water Mirror Fountain provides spaces for people to play in the heat of summer or ice skate in the cold winter months. The adjacent green belt, cafés, and shops draw neighbors and visitors into the space on a regular basis. All of these elements shape Großmarkt Platz into a highly successful landscape.

PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION

Brownsville, PA

ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVES AßE

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

SELECTED WORKS

AßE

ERSTR

ERSTR

BONN

BONN

TRAM / TRAIN CIRCULATION

MAJOR AXIS VIEWSHEDS AßE ERSTR BONN

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

Perspective...

AßE

AßE

ERSTR

ERSTR

BONN

BONN

GREEN / PARK SPACE

PLAZA / POOL SPACE

AßE

URBAN DESIGN

AßE

ERSTR

ERSTR

BONN

BONN

Philadelphia, PA

HEALTH CARE DESIGN Pittsburgh, PA

Design 3

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN Center County, PA

Miles

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

The design for the living barrier centers on three

primary aims:

LEGEND:

DD DP -4 E 110 4.5

0

ADA PARKING SPACE

5.8 5.5 0 0

Inv Out 1105.18

Inv In 1104.50

0

0.5 0

6.2

DD DP -3 E 110

1105

FS

0

4.2

110

LP

4.8 4.5 0 0

2

110

5.0

FS

DIDIR 19 DIB 110 110

FS

-R

PIPE

FS

DD DP -2 E 109 8.5

0

110 110 2.2 3.2 0 0

LP

S

1103

0

4.2

3 110 2

110

2.8 2.5 0 0

DIDIR 16 DIB 110 110

3.0 0%

1104

3

5.5

110

1101

1105

5

6.0

110

110

TR

1100

0 110 6.0

TW BW 110 110

4

109

5.6 5.0 0 0

6.0

3.00%

0

1096 1095

8

97

TW BW 110 110 8.5 7.5 0 0

110

TW BW 110 110

109

3 5.1 110

5 5.4

110

5.0

110

9

109 9

TW 8.6 BW 110 110 8.6 5.6 1 5.6 1 1 1

7 4.4 110

3.00% TW BW 110 110 8.6 4.5 1 5

TS BS 110 110 5.5 5.0 0 0

1105

0% 3.0

5.5 8 110

3.00% 5

7

5.5 5

5.3

5.4

0

110

110

5.8

5.7

110

110

0 110 6.0 0 5.7

6.0

0

110

SYSTEM 4 Pipe Name T

Pipe From DI-20 to DD-4

109 2

TC

TOP OF CURB

BC

BOTTOM OF CURB

TS

TOP OF STAIR BOTTOM OF STAIR TOP OF WALL

BW

BOTTOM OF WALL

5.8

3

109

6.0

0

TW

TR

TOP OF RAMP

BR

BOTTOM OF RAMP

Locations

10

95

109

5.4 7

109 5.8 3 109

5.7 8 109 5.7

3

109

6.0

0

1095

BS

5.4

LOW POINT

DIR

DRAIN INLET RIM

HAND DRAWINGS DIB

0%

DD-1 DI-1

.64

BS TS 1099 1099 .26 .14

0%

3.0

109 109 5.5 5.4 2 2

0%

HIGH POINT

109

109 109 6.0 109 5.8 0 5.4 8 2

2.0

0%

110 6.0 0

05

TC BC 110 110 5.5 5.0 5 5

11

LP

TR

TC BC 110 110

TC BC 110 110 5.6 5.1 4 4

TC BC 110 110

5.5 5.0 5 5

TC BC 110 110 5.9 5.4 2 2

0%

2.00%

2.0 HP

S

110

TC BC 110 110 5.9 5.4 2 2

TC BC 110 DI 110 5.6 DI- 110 5.1 9 8 5.1 9 9

110 5.5 8

5 5.4

110

110

0% 3.0

SIDEWALK

109

4.5 8 110 4.7 6 0

0

5.0

6.0

0

110

110 4.9 7

110

110

6.0

110 0

8.8 4.5 8 8 BW

3.5

0

TW BW 110 110

110

BW

110 5.4 0 TW TW 110 TS 110 8.8 BW 1105 5.3 8 .88 110 8 TW 0.0 TW 110 BS 0 1102 110 5.3 TS 1102 .38 2.1 8 .26 4

2.1 8.6 4 4

Length 67'-10"

TW TW 110 109

Slope (%) 1.00

2.0

PATIO

2.0

PIPE-A

.00

%

96

Dia (in) 8

1097

Inv In 1100.50 1100.50 1100.50

LOW POINT SWALE

HP LP

BS

11

10

Inv Out 1101.17 1100.66 1101.28

HIGH POINT SWALE

LPS

DPE

DRAIN INLET BASE

DRAINAGE DISCHARGE NAME DRAIN INLET NAME

DRAIN PIPE NAME

DISCHARGE POINT ELEVATION

Various Locations DATE: 11/03/13 (mf) REV.:

7.5

0

FILE: Fichter+M_FinalGradingPlan.pdf

SHEET:

DD DP -1 E 109

Pipe From DI-17 to DI-19 DI-18 to DI-19 DI-19 to DD-3

HPS

0%

TW BW 109 109 8.6 5.0 4 0

Length 67'-1" 16'-1" 78'-4"

RETAINING WALL

SYSTEM 3 Pipe Name Q R S

FINISH FLOOR ELEVATION

3.0

95

Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00

0%

10

Dia (in) 8 8 8

1099

Inv In 1100.73 1100.73 1100.35 1099.97 1099.64 1099.16 1098.50 1098.50

1101

Inv Out 1101.01 1101.02 1100.73 1100.35 1099.97 1099.64 1099.16 1098.99

11 00

Length 28'-0" 29'-1" 38'-1" 38'-1" 33'-2" 48'-5" 65'-11" 48'-9"

7

5.5 5.0 5 5

TC BC 110 110

5.6 5.1 4 4

03 11 Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

11 02

Dia (in) 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

TC BC 110 DI 110 5.6 DI- 110 5.1 9 15 5.1 9 9

FS

LP

110

4.2

0

TC TC BC 110 BC 110 110 6.1 110 6.1 5.6 5 TC 5.6 5 TC 5 BC 110 5 BC 110 110 6.1 DI 110 5.8 5.6 5 DI- 110 5.3 9 5 7 5.3 9 9

TC BC 110 110

110 6.1 5

TR

5.5

3

110 6.0 5

110

TR

0 110 4.2 LP

11 1105.2 05 0

05

PIPE-H

11

0% 3.0

04 11

2.2 110

2.8 2.5 0 0

DIDIR 6 DIB 110 110

03 110

11

%

-F

Pipe From DI-9 to DI-11 DI-10 to DI-11 DI-11 to DI-12 DI-12 to DI-13 DI-13 to DI-14 DI-14 to DI-15 DI-15 to DI-16 DI-16 to DD-2

2.0

SIDEWALK

STAIRS 7 STEPS 3'-6" ELEV. CHANGE STAIRS 6 STEPS 3' ELEV. CHANGE STAIRS 7 STEPS 3'-6" ELEV. CHANGE

4.00%

.00

RETAINING WALL

PIPE

Pipe Name I J K L M N O P

PATIO

(2) FFE 1106.00 (1) FFE 1096.00

0%

10

SPOT ELEVATION

FFE

E-O

14

4.0

STORM DRAIN

PIPE-P

PIP

SIDEWALK

2.00%

LP S

06

5.8 5.5 0 0

11

SYSTEM 2

SIDEWALK

2.00%

-N

SIDEWALK

0

FS

110

11

FS

6.2

0

9 5.3 9 9 TC BC 110 110 6.1 5 5.6 5 5

FS

0

TC BC 110 DI 110 5.8 110 5.3

RAMP

4.00%

110 5.5 BR

07 11

06 LP

110 5.2

E-D

2.00%

FS

1106

PIP

DIDIR 5 DIB 110 110

Inv In 1100.53 1100.16 1099.73 1099.08 1098.50 1097.50 1099.14 1098.50

BIORETENTION DRAIN INLET DRAIN PIPE

1098

2.50% FS

0 7.2 110 DIDIR 4 DIB 110 110

09 11

08

5.8 5.5 0 0

Inv Out 1100.91 1100.53 1100.16 1099.73 1099.08 1098.50 1099.63 1099.14

FLOW SPLITTER

STORM DRAIN DISCHARGE

PIPE

2.00%

DROP-OFF

3.2

8.2 0

FS

0 110 LP 110 7.2

6.8 6.5 0 0

DIDIR 3 DIB 110 110

0 6.2

1107

110

1107

LP

Length 37'-11" 37'-4" 42'-10" 65'-4" 57'-11" 100'-7" 48'-8" 63'-11"

SWALE CENTER LINE

DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION

PIPE-S

RAMP

5.3

FS

2.50%

PARKING LOT

E-C

E-E

Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

TC BC 110 6.1 110 6.1 5.6 5 TC 5 TC 5.6 5 BC 110 5 BC 110 BR 110 6.1 DI 110 5.8 DI- 110 5.3 9 110 5.6 5 BR 18 5.3 9 5.6 5 5 % 9 110 110 6.1 5.5 4.00 5 5

FS

FS

5.2 0

110

0

6.2

06

110

4.8 4.5 0 0

11

06

FS

PIPE-M

8.6 8.1 4 4

11

DIDIR 13 DIB 110 110

FS

TC BC 110 110

1106

TC BC 110 DI 110 5.8 DI- 110 5.3 9 14 5.3 9 LP 9 TC 110 BC 110 4.2 110 6.1 0 5.6 5 5

LP

FS

E-L

PIP

Dia (in) 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

110

FS

FS

0 110 5.2

2.50%

FS

0 110

0

LP

7.2

07

110

5.8 5.5 0 0

07

11

11

FS

PIP

1108

PIP

11

10 Pipe From DI-1 to DI-2 DI-2 to DI-3 DI-3 to DI-4 DI-4 to DI-5 DI-5 to DI-6 DI-6 to DD-1 DI-7 to DI-8 DI-8 to DI-6

1107

FS

6.2

PIP

E-B

11 11 11 Pipe Name A B C D E F G H

LP

FS

TC BC 110 110

PIPE-J

8.6 8.1 4 4

7.8 7.5 0 0

DIDIR 10 DIB 110 110

0

7.2

0

110

LP

110 8.2

08

PIPE-I

E-G

SYSTEM 1

DIDIR 17 DIB 110 110

110 110 9.3 8.8 3 3 TC BC 110 110 9.3 8.8 3 3 TC BC 110 110 8.8 8.3 8 8 TC BC 110 110 8.6 8.1 4 4 TC BC 110 110 8.8 8.3 8 8

FSBC

FS

TC

2.50% 9.3 8.8 2 2

2.50%

TC BC 110 110

08

11

11

9.7 9.2 5 5

TC BC 110 110

BC 110 110 9.3 8.8 2 2

DIDIR 9 DIB 110 110 7.8 7.5 0 0

1109TC FS

2.50%

PIP

LEGEND:

5' PROPOSED CONTOURS

E-Q

PARKING LOT

E-K

TC BC 110 110

PIP

110

0

8.2 0

9.2

110

110

LP

DIDIR 2 DIB 110 110 7.8 7.5 0 0

8

1109 9 110

1108

FS

9.3 8.8 3 3 TC BC 110 110 9.3 8.8 3 3 FS TC BC 110 110 8.8 8.3 8 8 TC BC 110 110 8.6 8.1 4 4

2.50% FS

PIP

TC BC 110 110

DIDIR 1 DIB 110 110

8.8 8.5 0 0

1110

11

E-A

FS

PIP

soften sensory inputs from adjacent utilitiesVarious

2.50%

FS

11

FS

2.50%

8.8 8.3 8 8

FS

8.8 8.5 0 0

DIDIR 20 DIB 110 110 FS

FS

FS

TC BC 111 110 0.4 9.9 7 7 TC BC 111 110 0.4 9.9 7 7

TC BC 111 111

12

11

DRIVEWAY

DIDIR 12 DIB 110 110

T PIPE0 9.2

0

110

8.2 110

LP

9.7 9.2 5 5

TC BC 110 110

FS

2.1 1.6 4 4

TC BC 111 111

2.1 1.6 4 4

TC BC 111 111

1.2 0.7 4 4 TC BC 111 111 1.2 0.7 4 4

3.0 2.5 3 3

TC BC 111 111

18

integrate organic form into the existing site geometry FS

DIDIR 11 DIB 110 110 6.8 6.5 0 0

2.0 1.5 0 0

TC BC 111 111

TC BC 111 111 3.0 2.5 3 3

17

4.6 4.1 6 6

16

TC BC 111 111

15

12

14

11

13

1' PROPOSED CONTOURS 1106

12

0%

06

11

2.0

5' EXISTING CONTOURS

11

10

DRIVEWAY

1109

1107

9

2.00%

13

8

1' EXISTING CONTOURS

8

1111 1112

11

7

6

07

COURSE: LArch 431 Design Imp. III PROFESSORS: Stuart Echols Gary Kesler DRAWN BY: Matthew Fichter DATE: 11/03/13

redefine the views from the emergency room waiting area

110

11

110

1109

1110

f Concern (low-high)

ADA 5' LOADING ZONE EXISTING VEGETATION

COLLEGE TOWNSHIP, CENTRE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

2

FINAL PROJECT: STORMWATER & GRADING

1

PSU EDUCATION CENTER

0

0

10

20

STAIRS

40

TREADS: 10 RISES: 9 ELEV. CHANGE: 4'

SCALE: 1" = 20'

80 FEET

NORTH

L-1

MODELS

Various Locations


GROßMARKT PLATZ DESIGN TYPE: Urban LOCATION: Köln, Germany INSTRUCTORS: Thomas Knüvener + Johannes Böttger

Großmarkt Platz functions as a dramatic gateway into the southern quarter of Köln, Germany. It is not just a plaza space, but a link between old and new; the built environment and the green belt. A long Alleé of London Plane trees with a lawn and a water mirror fountain form the major axis between the Großmarkthalle and the new Transportation Hub on Bonnerstraße. An intricate system of paths integrate with the proposed development plan to create a seamless connection across the Bonnerstaße. The design seeks, not only to create desirable connections, but also to create desirable spaces. The Großmarkt Event Plaza provides space for outdoor markets, food trucks, and other outdoor gatherings. All of these elements shape Großmarkt Platz into a highly successful landscape.


VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT


E

ST

NER

BON

MAJOR AXIS CAR / BUS VIEWSHEDS CIRCULATION

TRAM / TRAIN CIRCULATION

only to create desirable connections, but also to create desirable spaces. The Großmarkt Event Plaza provides space food trucks, and other outdoor gatherings. The Water Mirror Fountain provides spaces for people to play in the heat of in the cold winter months. The adjacent green belt, cafés, and shops draw neighbors and visitors into the space on a DETAILED PLANPlatz into a highly successful landscape. hese elements shape Großmarkt Project Site: Grossmarkt

Movement Between Buildings: Dipl.-Ing. Thomas Knüvener Diol.-Ing. Johannes Böttger

Student: Matthew Fichter

PEDESTRIAN / BIKE CIRCULATION E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

B‘

B‘ B‘

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

SECTIONS SECTIONS

B

SITE SECTIONS

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

PLAZA / POOL A‘ SPACE

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

A

A‘

B

SECTIONS B

E E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

A

Locator Map // NTS

B

B‘

A

Locator Map // NTS

A

Großmarkthalle Event Plaza

Major Axis / Viewshed Vertical Light Art Display Water Mirror Fountains

Großmarkthalle Event Plaza Großmarkthalle Event Plaza

A

Major Axis / Viewshed Vertical Light Art Display Water Mirror Fountains

Major Axis / Viewshed Vertical Light Art Display Major Axis / Viewshed Water Mirror Fountains Vertical Light Art Display Water Mirror Fountains

Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls]

A‘

A‘

Bonnerstraße Car / Bus / Tram

Locator Map // NTS

Locator Map // NTS

A

A

Großmarkthalle Großmarkthalle Event Plaza Event Plaza

Major Axis / Viewshed MajorVertical Axis / Viewshed Light Art Display VerticalWater Light Mirror Art Display Fountains Water Mirror Fountains

1:200

Bonnerstraße Car / Bus / Tram

Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls] Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls]

1:500 1:500

1:500

Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls]

A‘ B

Großmarkthalle Großmarkthalle Event Plaza Event Plaza

Vertical Light Small Water Vertical Art Light WaterFountain Display SmallMirror Art Display Mirror Fountain

1:500 Large Water Mirror Fountain Large Water Mirror Fountain Seasonal Event Space / Ice Skating Rink Seasonal Event Space / Ice Skating Rink

London Plane Alleé / Activity Lawn LondonMixed PlaneUse Alleé / Activity Lawn / Residential Buildings Mixed Use / Residential Buildings

1:500

A‘

Bonnerstraße Bonnerstraße Car / Bus / TramA‘ Car / Bus / Tram

New Road London Plane Alleé / Activity Lawn New Road PlaneUse Alleé / Activity Lawn to Access LondonMixed / Residential Buildings B‘ to Access Development Mixed Use / Residential Buildings Development

B B

B

Großmarkthalle Event Plaza

Vertical Light

Großmarkthalle Art Display Event Plaza

Small Water Mirror Fountain

Large Water Mirror Fountain

Locator Map // NTS

Vertical Light Seasonal Event Small SpaceWater / Ice Skating Rink Art Display Mirror Fountain

London Plane Großmarkthalle Alleé / Activity Lawn LargeA Water Mirror Fountain Mixed Use / Residential Buildings Event Plaza Seasonal Event Space / Ice Skating Rink 1:500

B‘

1:500 1:500

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

A‘

A‘

TELLT

A

A‘

Bonnerstraße Car / Bus / Tram Bonnerstraße A‘ Car / Bus / Tram

Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls]

B 1:500

A

Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls] B

Großmarkthalle Event Plaza

B

A‘

1:200

1:200

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

A

Locator Map // NTS

A

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

1:200

SECTIONS

1:200 1:200

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

1:200

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

PLAZA / POOL SPACE

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

GREEN / PARK SPACE

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNG VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRO

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E

RAß

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

E Aß E R RAß ST ST ER NER ON N B BON

GREEN / PARK SPACE A

B‘

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNG VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRO

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

MAJOR AXIS VIEWSHEDS

MAJOR AXIS VIEWSHEDS

Student: Matthew Fichter Student: Matthew Fichter

B‘

TRAM / TRAIN SECTIONS CIRCULATION

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E RAß ST NER E BON E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

E E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

Locator Map // NTS

RAß

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

Perspective...

A‘

E

DETAILED PLAN DETAILED PLAN

PLAZA / POOL TRAM / TRAIN SPACE CIRCULATION

GREEN / PARK/ BIKE PEDESTRIAN SPACE CIRCULATION

A

Akademie für Internationale Bildung (AIB) Project Site: Grossmarkt Movement Between Buildings: Dipl.-Ing. Thomas Knüvener The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Diol.-Ing. Johannes BöttgerProject Site: Grossmarkt Akademie für Internationale Bildung (AIB) Movement Between Buildings: Dipl.-Ing. Thomas Knüvener Fall 2014 LARCH 499B URBAN DESIGN STUDIO The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Diol.-Ing. Johannes Böttger Fall 2014 LARCH 499B URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

CAR / BUS CIRCULATION

E E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

DETAILED PLAN

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

Major Viewshed Axis Lawns / Repeated Landscape Forms [Seating Walls] New RoadAxis /London Plane Alleé / Activity Lawn B‘ London Plane Alleé / Activity Lawn New Road to Access / Residential Buildings Vertical LightMixed ArtUse Display Development Mixed Use / Residential Buildings to Access Water Mirror Fountains Development 1:500 1:500

Bonnerstraße London Plane Alleé / Activity Lawn Car / Bus / Tram B‘ Mixed Use / Residential Buildings

A‘

SK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT CHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

SK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT CHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

1:1000

TELLT

e...DESIGN DIAGRAMS LAYERS

E E Aß RAß ST R ER ST N NER ON B BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUN VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPR

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

ERIC PERSPECTIVES

SECTIONS SECTIONS

VON

K-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT HULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

Akademie für Internationale Bildung (AIB) The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) Fall 2014 LARCH 499B URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

1:1000

RAß

DIAGRAMS

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ER

E

RAß

ST

NER

BON

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT ERSTELLT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULU ERSTE B‘

PROCESS

VON EINEM AUTODESK-SCHULUNGSPRODUKT ERSTELLT

DESIGN ONCEPT

tions as a dramatic gateway into the southern quarter of Köln, Germany. It is not just a plaza space, but a link between environment and the green belt. A long Alleé of London Plane trees with a lawn and a water mirror fountain form the he Großmarkthalle and the new Transportation Hub on Bonnerstraße. This axis sets a dramatic stage for the unique ory of the Großmarkthalle. An intricate system of paths integrate with the proposed development plan to create a across the Bonnerstaße.


ATMOSPHERIC PERSPECTIVES

Perspective...

PERSPECTIVES


REINVENTING A RIVERTOWN DESIGN TYPE: Riverfront LOCATION: Brownsville, PA INSTRUCTOR: Cecilia Rusnak

Throughout time, Brownsville, PA has grown due to its location along U.S. Route 40, the National Road, and its intersection with the Monongahela River. The Industrial Revolution allowed this community to thrive through its abundance of natural resources and ease of transportation. The project goals were to strengthen the connection between Brownsville and the Monongahela, provide recreational opportunities for the community, highlight lost or obstructed views and cultural features, create a landscape destination, incorporate ideas from our community workshop, and connect to a greater trail system. Brownsville Riverfront Park creates a linear experience that acts as a catalyst for a promising, sustainable future for 21st century downtown Brownsville.


MASTER PLAN

R

IVE

E

R LA

N

H GA ON

MO

PROCESS +MASTER LAYERSPLAN PROCESS + LAYERS - research - field survey - analysis - brainstorm

research ďŹ eld survey analysis brainstorm


DESIGN LAYERS

MONONG

AHELA

MONONG

AHELA

MONONG

AHELA

MONONG

AHELA

RIVER

RIVER

RIVER

RIVER

CENTRAL PLAZA MONONG

AHELA

RIVER

MONONG AHELA RIVER

MP MONONG

AHELA

RIVER

Sc e al 0

10

1:

EVENT LAWN


DUNLAP’S CREEK

RIVERWALK

SITE SECTION - RIVERWALK - EVENT LAWN - NEMACOLIN GARDENS Nemacolin Castle

Nemacolin Castle

ed

rac

Ter

Building

A’

s

den

Gar

Market Street

Albany Road

Train Tracks

Oval Path

Patio

Event Lawn

Movie Screen

A

A

0

Monongahela River

10

20

Riverwalk Ramp

40

A’

0

10

20

40


EVENT LAWN + RIVERWALK A

Cantilevered Riverwalk

B

350’ River Access Ramps

C

30’ River Overlook

D

Existing CSX Track

E

Upper Event Patio

F

Lower Recreation Lawn

G

Infinity Canal

H

Movie Screen

I

Granite Slab Pavement + Benches

J

Albany Road

K

Market Street

L

Monongahela River

I

B

J L F

C

H

E A G D

B

I

K


RECONNECTING CHINATOWN DESIGN TYPE: Urban LOCATION: Philadelphia, PA INSTRUCTOR: Bryan Hanes

Throughout history, the Chinatown community has had its share of hardships with being recognized as a prominent neighborhood within Center City, Philadelphia. It has been dissected and divided piece by piece due to major construction within the city. As of today the community is strong, but lacks room for future growth. This project looks at restructuring the current road network to create better circulation patterns that would ultimately increase commercial, residential and recreational space to further strengthen the community and allow for expansion.


NEW CORRIDORS + LINKS 10th street restaurants vine street east shops franklin-viaduct green link

MIXED USE STRUCTURE

FABRIC IMPROVEMENTS convention center expressway viaduct + franklin square broad street road + ramp relocation new community park

30’ SIDEWALK CAFE SPACE

VINE STREET EAST [2 LANES]

NEED FOR ORGANIZATION existing parking lots unnecessary streets

STORMWATER REMEDIATION ZONE

OBSTACLES + OPPORTUNITIES convention center expressway viaduct +franklin square broad street


CHINATOWN GATEWAY BRIDGE

GATHERING + ENTERTAINMENT SPACE

COMMUNITY GARDEN + RECREATION SPACE

RELAXATION + CONTEMPLATION SPACE

34 acres of redeveloped land CHINATOWN COMMUNITY CENTER

5 acres of community park space 32 proposed buildings 200,000+ sq. ft. of proposed commercial space 600,000+ sq. ft. of proposed residential space

10TH STREET BRIDGE VINE STREET EXPRESSWAY [6 LANES]

VINE STREET WEST [4 LANES]

20’ SIDEWALK

MIXED USE STRUCTURE

NTS


UPMC LIVING BARRIER

organic forms provide visual relief from harsh surrounding geometry

DESIGN TYPE: Healthcare LOCATION: Pittsburgh, PA INSTRUCTORS: Barry Kew + Eliza Pennypacker

UPMC Shadyside Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania conducted a living barrier competition in June of 2012. The design that my team created for a living barrier draws from the contextual elements of the city of Pittsburgh and its surrounding landscape. The design’s intent is not only to serve the programmatic conditions of its site, but also to encourage positive connections between people and place. The three primary goals of the design were to redefine the views from the emergency room waiting area, integrate organic form into the existing site geometry, and soften sensory inputs from adjacent utilities.

5 PRIMARY COMPONENTS: METAL FRAME rigid framework provides wall’s form GALVTEN PANELS weathered metal product from US Steel SOUND PANELS reduce noise from adjacent rooftop GREEN WALL SYSTEM secured to metal frame

5 PRIMARY COMPONENTS:

Suspended Plant Material Green Wall System

METAL FRAME rigid framework provides wall’s form

SOUND PANELS reduce noise from adjacent rooftop GREEN WALL SYSTEM secured to metal frame

5

PLANT MATERIALS native, shade-tolerant forbs and ferns

Waterproof Membrane

Integrated Irrigation System

Steel I-Beam Structure System Soundproofing Material Cladding Panel Cladding Panel Anchor

The design for the living barrier centers on three Concrete Copping with Sunken I-Beams Existing Wall

primary aims:

2’-6”

GALVTEN PANELS weathered metal product from US Steel

0’-3”

5’-3”

0’-3”

9’-2”

Design

EXISTING VIEW

5

PLANT MATERIALS native, shade-tolerant forbs and ferns

EXISTING VIEW

PROPOSED VIEW redefine the views from the emergency room waiting area


textures and light enhance formal relief

form evokes contextual landscape

maintenance access for adjacent rooftop

integrated paneling screens existing site elements

fountain feature improves sensory experience

plant material absent for ease of maintenance

integrated paneling screens existing site elements

The construction of the living barrier consists of 5 primary components:

0’-3” 0’-3”

METAL FRAME rigid framework provides wall’s form 5’-3”

SOUND PANELS reduce noise from adjacent rooftop GREEN WALL SYSTEM secured to metal frame

Green Wall System Waterproof Membrane Integrated Irrigation System 9’-2”

GALVTEN PANELS weathered metal product from US Steel

Suspended Plant Material

B

C

D

E

F

Steel I-Beam Structure System Soundproofing Material

Cladding Panel Cladding Panel Anchor

PLANT MATERIAL native, shade-tolerant forbs and ferns

Existing Wall Concrete Copping with Sunken I-Beams

2’-6”

A - White Wood Aster - Aster divercatus B - Pennsylvania Sedge - Carex pensylvanica C - Marginal Shield Fern - Dryopteris marginalis D - Wild Columbine - Aquilegia canadensis E - Broomsedge - Andropogon virginicus F - Hay Scented Fern - Dennstaedtia punctilobula

A


SPRING CREEK WATERSHED

DESIGN TYPE: Environmental Planning LOCATION: University Park, PA INSTRUCTORS: Larry Gorenflo, Frans Padt, Neil Korostoff

This studio was designed to introduce us to tools, such as arcGIS 10.1, and techniques to describe the spatial and temporal context of a site’s region using geospatial data, fieldwork, and descriptive analysis. I personally conducted a focus study on stormwater solutions within the Spring Creek Watershed. The suitability analysis reveals the lowest to highest areas of concern in the Spring Creek Watershed that can assist improving stormwater quality and runoff rates. This information creates a highly informed starting point for planning and designing within the watershed to enhance quality and rates of stormwater.

STREAM BUFFERS <150 ft. 150-300 ft. >300 ft.

SINK HOLE BUFFERS Sandstone Derived Siltstone/Shale Derived Limestone Derived

POPULATION DENSITY <100 People/Sq.Mile 100-1000 People/Sq.Mile >1000 People/Sq.Mile

SOILS >300 ft. 150-300 ft. <150 ft.

SLOPE <2% 2-10% >10%

LAND USE Forest Agriculture Other


Rid

Benner/Loysburg Coburn/Loysburg

Pleasant Gap

Coburn/Nealmont y tan

Hamilton Group

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

Keyser/Mifflintown

Mo

Nittany

The much smaller mountains and ridges that exist today and can be seen on the map include Bald Eagle Ridge, Mount Nittany and Tussey Mountain. The two valleys that are present are Nittany Valley and Penns Valley. These landforms share the same geologic formations that previously dominated the region. This can be seen by the matching bands of color on each landform on the geology map. From mountain peak to valley bottom the geologic formation order remains consistent. They are sandstone, then shale/siltstone, then sandy limestone, and then finally limestone/ dolomite. This specific order is caused by the erosiveness of each geologic formation, with Sandstone being the least erosive and limestone/dolomite being the most erosive (Korostoff, 2012).

Warrior Run

Sandstone Boalsburg

Bald Eagle Juniata

n

ntai

ey

Tuss

Tuscarora

Mou

0

2

4

6

Miles

Sandy Limestone

¯

Lower Member of Gatesburg Mines Member of Gatesburg Shale/Siltstone

Projection: PA State Plane North

Onondaga & Old Port

Data Source: LArch 311

Reedsville

Slope Map Legend Major Cities

Slope (Percent)

Pleasant Gap

Colluvium & Residuum Spring Creek Canyon

Forests Mount Nittany

Bellefonte

ld

Ba

le ag

Rid

E

Pleasant Gap

Nittany Valley

0-6

It is noticeable that all of the cities, towns and most major roads in this region are located in the valley and not on the adjacent mountains and ridges. This shows that the valley is much more conducive to development due to its flatter, more gradual, changes in slope. The ridge and mountain sides are not as habitable for civilization, due to extreme slopes, and therefore forests remain and natural ecosystems are more present. The ridge tops themselves are fairly flat like that of the valley, however, historically building in the valley was the more favorable choice because it was close to water sources and easier to travel to and from. The slopes and ridge tops have mainly been used throughout history as a source to obtain natural resources, such as tree harvesting and mining, rather than developed land. This connection between slope and land use can be seen on the large creative map to the right.

6 - 12

y tan

12 - 19

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

19 - 28

Mo

28 - 37 37 - 46

Penns Valley

46 - 58

State College

58 - 86

Boalsburg

86 - 215

n

ntai

ey

Mou

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

0

as

Colluvium & Residuum Spring Creek Canyon

ge

The Ridge and Valley Region, located in central Pennsylvania, contains many unique features. The ridges and valleys were formed due to the geology of the region. The ridges and valleys found in this area are now just remnants of an enormous mountain range that once dominated the eastern North American landscape. These geological remnants have formed the unique slopes of the Spring Creek Watershed and played a part in shaping the land use (Tamminga and Yahner, 2012).

Bellefonte

ge

Rid

le

Eag

Ba

HIGH

College Avenue Downtown State College

Stonehenge & Larke

Penns Valley State College

Pine Grove Mills

ld

Old Main PSU Main Campus

2

4

6

Miles

¯

N nt

M

y an

itt

ou

Penns Valley

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

State College

Soils Map

LEGEND

Legend

Rid

Major Cities

Eag

Soil Type

Pleasant Gap

Alluvium

y tan

Colluvium

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

Water Other

Mou

Tuss

0

2

4

6

Forests Development

Miles

ey

Limestone/Dolomite

Tuss

Sandy Limestone

Soils provide living record of landscape processes and human activities. Land use can be clearly noted on the map by the type of soils that occur there. The anticlinal valleys of the region contain limestone/dolomite residuum soils. These soils, especially Hagerstown, are perfect for agriculture due to there being well drained and extremely fertile due to its high rate of erosion and the collection of water and nutrients that run off the surrounding ridges. The ridges are the areas of least development due to the incline, elevation and non-fertile, residuum soils that are developed in sandstone and shale/siltstone (Brady and Weil, 2010).

Residuum Sandstone Residuum Sandy Limestone Residuum Shale/Siltstone Boalsburg

n

ntai

ey

Agriculture

Geology Sandstone

Residuum Limestone/Dolomite

Penns Valley State College

Pine Grove Mills

Boalsburg

Land Use

Residuum

Mo

Priority Urban Environments Priority Agriculture Environments Priority Stream Buffer Zones

Legend

Soils are grouped by formative processes and by parent material. The soils map shows soils that are developed in alluvium, colluvium and residuum. Alluvium are soils that have been moved by water, therefore they are located along all streams and waterways in the region. Colluvium are soils that have been moved by gravity, therefore they are located at the bottom of the ridges. Residuum are soils derived by parent material, therefore they cover the majority of the Spring Creek Region. These residuum soils are developed on the limestone/dolomite, sandstone, sandy limestone and shale/siltstone geologic formation (Brady and Weil, 2010).

Bellefonte

ge

le

ld

Ba

¯

Pine Grove Mills

Shale/Siltstone

Slope (Percent) 19 - 215

ge

Rid

le

Eag

ld

Legend

Pleasant Gap

Ba

Major Cities Land Use

y tan

Agriculture

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

Forests

Mo

Development

Penns Valley

Land Use Types

Other

State College

Forest

Mou

0

2

4

6

Miles

¯

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

Agriculture

31%

3

Miles

¯

The creative map above reveals the correlation between current land use and the geology of the Spring Creek Watershed, which includes slope and soils. The surrounding mountains and ridges of the region are Mount Nittany, Tussey Mountain and Bald Eagle Ridge. These mountains and ridges, along with their foot hills, contain the majority of the forests throughout the entire region. This is due to the geological formation of these zones being mainly sandstone and with some siltstone/shale. These types of geological formations form soils that are not nutrient rich and are highly acidic. They are also not nearly as erosive as the limestone/dolomite and sandstone soils making the slopes of this area extremely steep, surpassing twenty-eight percent. These slopes make it difficult for development, therefore not much is found here. There are also forested areas found throughout the valley as well where development and agriculture has either not occurred or has been reverted back to the landscape (Tamminga and Yahner, 2012).

Agriculture Forests Other

39%

Data Source: LArch 311 Produced by: Matthew Fichter

14%

Geologic Formations

8%

Percent of Entire Watershed Acreage 100% = 93343.41 Ac.

Development within the watershed includes residential, commercial, industrial and other miscellaneous land uses. These types of land uses cover less of the area, but ultimately reveal the population density of the region. It is apparent that higher population density values can be seen among the major cities of the region. These cities are State College, Bellefonte, Boalsburg, Pleasant Gap and Pine Grove Mills, with State College being the most dense.

ntai

ey

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

2

Analysis & Conclusion

Development

Boalsburg

n

1%

Percent of Entire Watershed Acreage 100% = 93343.41 Ac.

The Spring Creek Watershed contains many important cultural resources. The information on this map focuses on the four different, major land uses of the region: agriculture, forests, development, and other land uses. By looking at the land use of the region, negative and positive effects of man on the environment become apparent and solutions to improve the area can be formed. The more natural landscapes within the Spring Creek Watershed are forests and agriculture to an extent. One can see that agriculture and forests dominate most of the region. This is due to the topography and soils. The agriculture is found within the valleys of the region, where the nutrient rich and well drained soils are derived from limestone. Patches of forests are found sporadically throughout the valley, but most of the larger expanses are found on the ridges and mountains. This is because slopes are too steep to develop and the soils are not rich in nutrients since they are derived from sandstone and shale (Tamminga and Yahner, 2012).

Bellefonte

1

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

Geology Shaping Land Use

11%

Projection: PA State Plane North

Legend

0

0 - 19

Data Source: LArch 311

Land Use Map

in

unta

Mo

It becomes apparent that all of the agricultural land and most of the developed land can be found within the valleys where the geological formations are predominantly limestone/dolomite and sandy limestone. This type of geologic formation with its residuum soils that are well drained and highly erosive have made the valley land rich in nutrients and formed a gradually sloped landscape. The slopes range from zero to twenty-eight percent. These qualities make Nittany and Penns Valleys the ideal location for civilization and cultivation to thrive. The Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania established in 1855, was the perfect location for starting an agricultural school due to valuable conditions. This high school evolved into the Pennsylvania State University and shaped State College and the surrounding landscape as we know it today (Szczygiel, 2011).

Limestone Sandstone Sandy Limestone

17%

61%

Shale/Siltstone

FOCUS STUDY ANALYSIS

Priority Stream Buffer Zones

Stream Buffers

150-300 ft.

>300 ft.

Hi gh Co nc er n

M ed Co ium nc er n

Stormwater Quality Suitability Matrix Lo w Co nc er n

Streams Priority Urban Environments Priority Agriculture Environments

Sink Hole Buffers

>300 ft.

150-300 ft.

<150 ft.

Soils

Sandstone (derived)

Siltstone/Shale (derived)

Limestone (derived)

Priority Stormwater Management Areas

Stream buffers are important to preserve and recreate because it helps to filter stormwater before it makes its way into the stream system. Areas that are beyond 300 feet away from the stream are of low concern compared to areas inside of 150 feet because they are much closer to the stream. This allows for as much stormwater as possible to be filtered before it reaches the stream and also assist in creating healthier ecosystems in this area.

<150 ft.

Sink hole buffers must be addressed because they are apart of the Karst topography of the region. This type of topography has a high infiltration rate and is of great concern to water quality. Pollutants can easily make their way into the underground stream system and into the aquifers that are used for drinking water throughout the watershed. Soil types and the parent material they are derived from identify where polluted stormwater and easily infiltrate into the ground and make its way into the aquifers. Sandstone derived soils and siltstone/shale derived soils are found in a small portion of the watershed and these soils are least erosive making it difficult for water to percolate into the soil. The majority of the watershed contains limestone derived soils. Although these soils are rich in nutrients, they are of high concern because they are highly erosive and susceptible to water infiltration.

Hi gh Co nc er n

2-10%

>10%

Slope is an important factor to recognize when dealing with runoff rates. The areas where slope is less than 2% are of least concern because the water will flow at a slow rate once it reaches the ground surface. Areas of highest concern have a slope that is greater than 10%. These type of slopes must be addressed because of erosion and increased stream water levels.

Agriculture

Other

Land cover is a major factor in the rate stormwater runoff. Forests are of least concern because the vast amount of vegetation is able to intercept and slow down stormwater naturally and effectively. The area of highest concern is all other land covers that are created by the urban environment due to the amount of impervious surfaces. Agricultural areas are of medium concern because of BMPs and pollution of stormwater from fertilizers.

100-1000 (people/sqmi)

>1000 (people/sqmi)

Population density reveals the level of impervious surfaces within the spring creek watershed. The areas where there are over 1000 people per square mile contain the highest levels of impervious surfaces. These high levels, in turn, produce higher rates of stormwater runoff and pollution is also increased. Stormwater management needs to be of great importance to reduce runoff rates within the watershed.

Lo w Co nc er n

M ed Co ium nc er n

Runoff Rates Suitability Matrix

Slope

<2%

Land Cover

Forest

Population Density

<100 (people/sqmi)

14 Matthew Fichter 10/25/12

Data Source: LArch 311 Produced by: Matthew Fichter

Stormwater Solutions: enhancement of water quality & runoff rates within the Spring Creek Watershed

Urban

Creative Map

Bellefonte

ge

le

Eag

Ba

AREAS OF CONCERN

PSU Arboretum Agricultural Fields

The Spring Creek Region is located within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province. Nittany Valley is the largest Carbonate Valley made of limestone/dolomite geologic formations. The ridges and valleys found in this area are now just remnants of an enormous mountain range that once dominated the eastern North American landscape. The geologic formations of the region consist of four types and they have shaped the land use that presides today in the Spring Creek Watershed. These four geologic types are limestone/dolomite, sandstone, sandy limestone, and shale/siltstone. This can be seen on the large creative map showing how geology shapes land use (Tamminga and Yahner, 2012).

Spring Creek Watershed

Major Cities

Limestone/Dolomite Axemann

ld

Overlook Heights Residential Community

Legend Geologic Formations Bellefonte

Suitability Analysis

Geology Map

Improving Stormwater Quality, Rate & Volume

LOW

* All Photographs Produced by: Matthew Fichter

Geology Shaping Land Use within the Spring Creek Watershed

Spring Creek Watershed

SUITABILITY MAP

19

Geology Map

• Bellefonte

Legend Major Cities

ge

le

ld

Streams (Strahler Stream Order)

Rid

Eag

2

• •

3

y tan

4

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

5

Mo

Geologic Formations Penns Valley

Limestone/Dolomite Sandstone

State College Boalsburg

Sandy Limestone Shale/Siltstone

ntain

ey

• •

Sink Holes (Karst Topography)

Mou

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

0

1

Pleasant Gap

Ba

2

4

6

Miles

¯

Geological formations of the Spring Creek Watershed are limestone/dolomite, sandy limestone, sandstone, shale/siltstone. Limestone soils cover the majority of the Spring Creek Watershed as seen in the map. Limestone soils are well drained, pervious soils. Sink holes occur frequently throughout the valleys of the Spring Creek Watershed, including Nittany and Penns Valley. These extremely nutrient rich soils cause a major issue when it comes to stormwater runoff. Pollutant can easily make their way into the soils and eventually into the aquifers and streams within the watershed harming ecosystems and civilians who drink the water.

1

2

3

High levels of impervious surfaces in urban areas and farming practices within agricultural areas are not conducive to providing high stormwater quality and low runoff rates and volume.

• Bellefonte

ge

Rid

le

Eag

ld

Major Cities

!

y tan

Land Use

t Nit un

Agriculture

Mo

Forests Development

Penns Valley

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

Legend

Pleasant Gap

Ba

Nittany Valley

State College Boalsburg

ntain

ey

Mou

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

0

2

4

6

Miles

¯

Land use is the factor that has negatively affected the quality, rate & volume of stormwater. The most constant variable between land use and stormwater runoff are the forests that cover 39% of the Spring Creek Watershed. Development (Urban Areas) covers 19% of the water shed & Agriculture covers 31% of the watershed. As seen in the map Development, Agriculture and other unidentified land uses take up 61% of the water shed, meaning that the water quality of the aquifers and streams are at a high risk and the rate and volume is most likely very high. Stormwater management must be addressed to alleviate these issues.

ld

Legend

Rid

Major Cities

!

Pleasant Gap

Ba

Streams (Strahler Stream Order) 1

y tan

2

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

• •

3

Mo

4 5

Penns Valley

Population Distribution

State College

1 Dot = 40 People

The increasing population within the Spring Creek Watershed, especially within State College, is a detriment to the amount of urban growth. The population distribution map shows the streams adjacency to the major populations of the region. This data assist in knowing where growth is occurring and what streams should be paid more attention to. Clearly, stormwater management must be taken into account in and around State College due to its abundance of residences, commercial businesses, and the university.

Boalsburg

Mou

0

2

4

6

Miles

¯

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

Riparian Buffer Zone Map

• Bellefonte

Major Cities

! (

Rid

Streams (Strahler Stream Order)

Eag

Pleasant Gap

1 2

y tan

3

t Nit un

Nittany Valley

5

Riparian Buffer Quality

Penns Valley

ntain

ey

Mou

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

0

2

4

6

Miles

¯

Legend

State College

Streams (Strahler Stream Order) 1

Boalsburg

2 3 4

n

5

ntai

Weaknesses:

- Karst topography and limestone dolomite is highly permeable, making it suseptible to being contaminated by stormwater pollution - Underground streams and aquifer recharge can easily be contaminated and harm those in the valley that drink it and ecosystems within the watershed and beyond

ey

Tuss

Mou

Major Land Uses Agriculture Urban

Pine Grove Mills

1

2

Threats:

- Pollution to the streams and aquifer - Harm citizens drinking water from the aquifer and ecosystems within the watershed - Laws and regulations prohibiting new stormwater techniques

-

10

Riparian buffer zones and their existing quality are identified within this map. Current quality of riparian buffers are important to understand in order to see where this project should be focused first to assist the lowest quality buffers to increase the quality of water flowing into their adjacent streams. Improving the quality of all riparian buffer zones will greatly enhance the stormwater quality, rate, and volume the drains into the streams that does not get filtered or redirected by human intervention. Riparian zones are a natural way to process stormwater and we must not ignore them or else the ecosystems within the Spring Creek Watershed and others in watersheds downstream will be harmed.

Miles

¯

Limestone/Dolomite Sandstone Sandy Limestone Shale/Siltstone

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

WHY THIS

FOCUS?

In urban and suburban areas, much of the land surface is covered by buildings, pavement and compacted landscapes with impaired drainage. These surfaces do not allow rain and snow melt to soak into the ground which greatly increases the volume and velocity of stormwater runoff. In the agriculutral regions highly permeable soils and sink holes are suseptible to pollution due to plowing and planting techniques, along with incorrect application of plant nutrients, pesticides and sediment.

Design Alternative 2

Design Alternative 1

“Mechanical” Urban & Agricultural Solutions to Eliminate Non-Point Source Pollution

“Green” Urban & Agricultural Solutions to Eliminate Non-Point Source Pollution

Urban techniques include: - green roofs - vegetated swales - grassed filter strips - bioretention - pervious pavements

3

Major Land Uses

Agricultural techniques include: - BMPs - no-till farming - contour farming - correct application of plant nutrients & pesticides - perserving & enhancing riparian buffers

By adding stormwater management techniques that are soley mechanical and not nature-based will enhance stormwater quality, it does not have as much of an affect of decreasing runoff rates and volume. Runoff rates and volume are dealt with through retaining it within sewer systems until in reaches a dump source. Mechanical techniques include: - Tank Detention - Filtration Systems - Sewer Systems (Redirection) - Storm Drains

Matthew Fichter 11/04/12 LArch 311/Phase 2

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

NITTANY VALLEY NITTANY VALLEY

AREAS OF CONCERN (LOW-HIGH) 7

Value: 1 Lowest Quality - 10 Highest Quality

1

Boalsburg

BALD EAGLE RIDGE BALD EAGLE RIDGE 6

4

Mo

State College

ELEVATION

Legend

ge

le

ld

Ba

- Enhancement of stormwater quality - Reduction of stormwater rates - Preservation and improvement of ecosystems downstream within the watershed - Promotes education on the importance of managing stormwater properly - Can provide aesthetic beautification of urban environments

By adding nature-based stormwater management techniques within our existing urban and agricultural structure, stormwater quality can be enhanced and stormwater runoff rates and volume can be greatly reduced.

ntain

ey

Tuss Pine Grove Mills

itta

Penns Valley

Strengths:

0

ge

le

ny

N nt

ou

SWOT Analysis

- Allow the concepts learned to be applied elsewhere - Bring community together to help the environment and feel a sense of pride - Improve water quality and in turn all ecosystems in the watershed

Bellefonte

Eag

Pleasant Gap

Nittany Valley

Opportunities:

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

Population Distribution Map

ld

Ba

Rid

Ea

M

Land Use Map

Miles

ge

gle

Land Use & Management:

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: LArch 311

0

Bellefonte

Area of Interest: Spring Creek Watershed Relevant Stakeholders: Benner Township, Penn State University, Fish & Boating Commission, ClearWater Conservancy, Western PA Conservancy, Gaming Commission

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

*All Images Provided by www.google.com/images

MOUNT NITTANY MOUNT NITTANY 15

16

17

*All Images Provided by www.google.com/images

PENNS VALLEY PENNS VALLEY

TUSSEY MOUNTAIN TUSSEY MOUNTAIN

18

Elevation (Feet)

1,800 1,600 1,400

SPRING CREEK CANYON

1,200 1,000

0

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

30,000

Distance (Feet)

35,000

40,000

45,000

50,000

Concept Statement

PROJECT GOAL:

Improving Stormwater Quality, Rate & Volume within the Spring Creek Watershed

Spring Creek Watershed

Matthew Fichter

55,000

60,000


DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION DESIGN TYPE: Construction Documents LOCATION: Various INSTRUCTOR: Various

Through several design implementation courses and internship experience, I have learned how to draft plans/construction documents, grade, and analyze stormwater in order to fully convey my designs to a contractor. It is important to be clear in drawings, text, and format to reiterate to the contractor the specific design that you want to achieve. This is accomplished through line weight hierarchy, proper dimensions, alignment of text/leader lines, and any supporting notes, such as material choice, finish and application procedures.


INTERNSHIP: Charles E. Hess L.A.


0' 1' 2' 3' 0' 1' 2'

SCALE: 1" = 1'-0" FS

2.50%

11 0

3.0

04

11

.53

05

11

TC BC 11 DI 11 05. 11 05 64

TC BC 11

LP

.20

04

11

TC TC BC 11 BC 11 11 06.1 11 05.8 05 5 05 5 TC .65 TC .35 BC 11 BC 11 11 06. DI 11 05. 05 15 . 6 AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL 5PRODUCT110505.3989 2.00% .39

.20

05

11

FS

FS

FS

2.50%

05

PARKING LOT

11

05

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 5. 05 80 .50 11 04 .20

FS

FS

LP

FS

.20

06

11

06

11 06

11

FS

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 4. 04 80 .50

SECTION

PRODUCED BY AN

11

LP

FS

FS

.20

FS

05

11

FS

FS

FS

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 5. 05 80 .50

FS

LP

FS

07 11 1107 07 .20

11

FS

FS

TC BC 11 11 09.3 08 2 .82

FS

FS

2.50%

FS

R

DI

FS

TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

LP

2.50%

FS

FS

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 5. 05 80 .50

FS

FS

FS

FS

TC FS B C 110 11 9.3 08 3 TC .83 T BC 11 C 0 BC 11 11 8.8 08 8 11 09.3 .38 08 3 .83 TC BC 11 0 11 8.8 08 8 .38 TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .1 4

FS

.20

09

11

.20

08

11

TC BC 11 11 09.7 09 5 .25

2.50% TC BC 11 11 09.3 08 2 .82

11 110 1107.2 DIB 111107. 08 8.20 0 07.5 80 0

LP

08

11

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 6. 06 80 .50

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 7. 07 80 .50

.20

06

11

FS

TC BC 11 DI 11 05. 11 05. 89 05 39 .39 TC XX BC 11 XX .X 11 05.8 X 05 5 .35

FS

.20

06

11

FS

FS

FS

FS

FS

FS

1

FS

.20

FS

FS

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 8. 08 80 .50

TC BC 11 11 09.7 09 5 .25

FS

FS

DRIVEWAY

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 5. 05 80 .50

.20

05

ENLARGED PLAN

07

CLASSROOM BUILDING ENTRYWAY MATERIALS & LAYOUT DETAIL 07

11

1107

.20

06

11

2.50%

TC BC 11 11 09.3 08 3 TC .83 T BC 11 C BC 11 11 08.8 08 8 11 09.3 .38 08 3 .83 FS TC BC 11 0 11 8.8 08 8 .38 TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

FS

FS

11 11 10.4 09 7 .97 T C BC 11 11 10.4 09 7 .97

FS

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 5. 05 80 .50

1

LP

CONCRETE PAVEMENT: BROOM FINISH

8 10

FS

TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

.20

FS

2.50%

2.50%

FS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

11

06

12 11

3'

.20

STAIRS AT CLASSROOM BUILDING - RAILING DIMENSION DETAIL SCALE: 1" = 1'-0"

11

EXPANSION JOINT 07

3'

09

WALL FOUNDATION OUTLINE DI DI R 1 B 10 11 6. 06 80 .50

STAIR TREAD EXTENDS *SEE STAIR SECTION DETAIL 08

2'

11

B

FS

FS

FS

1112

11

FS

FS

11

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 7. 07 80 .50

.20

08

TC C

TC BC 11 11 12.1 11 4 .64

TC BC 11 11 12.1 11 4 .64

1111

3'

11 0

03

11

2 L4

1'

.20

11

LP

0'

09

11

1 L5

10 11

EXPANSION JOINT EVERY 5'-0" 11

12

8

TURF/VEGETATION ON BOTH SIDES OF STAIRS/WALLS

0%

110

GRANITE STEPS *SEE CONST. NOTE #2

TC BC 11 11 11.2 10 4 .74 T C BC 11 11 11.2 10 4 .74

2.0

9

LIMESTONE COPING: WET RUBBED FINISH

LP

FS

FS

TC BC 11 11 13.0 12 3 .53

1110

03

STAIRS AT PSU CLASSROOM BUILDING BUILDING DETAIL ELEVATION SCALE: 1/2" = 1'-0"

CONSTRUCTION JOINT

07

6 10

2' 1 2"

DRIVEWAY

1109

ALUMINUM RAILING SYSTEM *SEE CONST. NOTE #4

11

11

1' 1 2"

11

110

BOS 24.65 EXPANSION JOINT

0

1 8"

CONSTRUCTION JOINT

111

1 8" 1 2"

8

11

2 L5 SCALE: 1/2" = 1'-0" ASHLAR BRICK COURSING *SEE CONST. NOTE #3

DI DI R 1 B 10 11 8. 08 80 .50

TOS 28.15

2.00%

110

LP

1

1 11

0'

TC BC 11 11 13.0 12 3 .53

2.00%

1109

7

2.25%

LOCATION: University Park, PA INSTRUCTORS: Tim Baird, Barry Kew, Sean Burkholder

110

13

1

11

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

CONSTRUCTION DETAILS 110 6

PARKING LOT

2.50%

CIP FREESTANDING SITTING WALL SECTION DETAIL

SECTION


Pipe From DI-17 to DI-19 DI-18 to DI-19 DI-19 to DD-3

Dia (in) 8 Slope (%) 1.00 Length 67'-10" Inv Out 1105.18

SYSTEM 3

Dia (in) 8 8 8 Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00 Length 67'-1" 16'-1" 78'-4" Inv Out 1101.17 1100.66 1101.28 Inv In 1100.50 1100.50 1100.50

SYSTEM 4

Inv In 1104.50

95

11

95

.64

10 9 10 5.5 2 95 .42

BS TS 1099 .26 10 99 .14

4.00%

2.0 0%

.83

95

.00

10

96

0%

2.0

95

.47

PATIO 10

.83

95

10

.00

(2) FFE 1106.00 (1) FFE 1096.00 10 96

.00

96

10

.70

05

11

.00

.37

05

0

6.0

10 9

3.00%

3.00%

SIDEWALK

97

110

9

109 8

1100 TW 08 BW 11 05 .61 11 08.6 .61 05 1 .61

0%

109

.47

TC BC 11 11 05.6 05 4 .14

3.00% TW BW 11 11 08.6 04 1 .55 TS BS 11 11 05.5 05 0 .00

04

11

FS

FS

LP

.20

07

07 11

07

11 11

D DIRI-12 DIB 1 1 11 05.8 05 0 .50

11

.20

FS

06

0%

11

04

1101

3 110 2 110

D DIRI-16 DIB 1 1 11 02.8 02 0 .50

3.0

1104

.53

LP

TR

11 03 .20 .20 02

11

DD DP -2 E 10 98 .50

S

LP

1103

1105

.05

06

11

.20

08

11

LP

1105

PIPE-S

FS

FSB

FS

2.50%

06

.20

DD DP -3 E 11 00 .50

11

.20

05

11

D DIRI-17 DIB 1 1 11 05.8 05 0 .50

FS

FS

-T

PIPE

110 DD DP -4 E 11 04 .50

ADA 5' LOADING ZONE

BIORETENTION DRAIN INLET

STORM DRAIN DISCHARGE

DRAIN PIPE

PIPE-P

RETAINING WALL

0

STORM DRAIN

SCALE: 1" = 20'

10 20 TREADS: 10 RISES: 9 ELEV. CHANGE: 4'

STAIRS

40

FFE

SPOT ELEVATION

FINISH FLOOR ELEVATION

HPS

HIGH POINT SWALE

LPS HP

LOW POINT SWALE

3.0 0%

3.0 0%

.00

%

LP

DI-1

PIPE-A DPE

HIGH POINT

LOW POINT

TC

TOP OF CURB

BC

BOTTOM OF CURB

TS

TOP OF STAIR

BS

TW

BOTTOM OF STAIR

TOP OF WALL

BW

BOTTOM OF WALL

TR

TOP OF RAMP

BR

DIR

BOTTOM OF RAMP DRAIN INLET RIM

DIB

DRAIN INLET BASE

DD-1

DRAINAGE DISCHARGE NAME

80 FEET

NORTH

PSU EDUCATION CENTER

FS

FS

LP D 11 DIRI-19 04 .20 DIB 1 1 11 04.8 04 0 .50

.02

05

11

FS

TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

.20

09

11 .20

TC C 110 11 9.3 08 3 TC .83 T BC 11 C BC 11 11 08.8 08 8 11 09.3 .38 08 3 .83 TC BC 11 11 08.8 08 8 .38 TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

D DIRI-10 DIB 1 1 11 07.8 .20 07 0 .50

TC BC 11 11 09.3 08 2 .82

08

ADA PARKING SPACE

COLLEGE TOWNSHIP, CENTRE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

07

PIPE-J

.20

11

TC BC 11 11 09.7 09 5 .25

2.50%

LP

FS

LEGEND:

FINAL PROJECT: STORMWATER & GRADING

-R

PIPE

FS

2.50%

FS

LP

08

11

D DIRI-11 DIB 1 1 11 06.8 06 0 .50

11

08

11

BC 11 11 09.3 08 2 .82

D DIRI-9 DIB 1 1 11 07.8 07 0 .50

TC TC BC 11 BC 11 11 06.1 05 5 11 06.1 .65 T 05 5 TC C .65 BC 11 BC 11 BR 11 06.1 D 1 05.8 DI- I 11 105.3 9 11 05.6 5 05 5 BR 18 05.3 9 TR .65 9 11 11 % 06 05 4.00 .15 .55

05

11

.20

FS

05

11

TC BC 11 DI 11 05.8 DI- 11 05.3 9 14 05 .39 9 TC BC 11 .20 11 06.1 05 5 .65

04

11

TC BC 11 11 05.5 05 5 .05

1105 0%

2.0

1096 1095

TW BW 11 11 08.5 07 0 .50

.13

TW BW 11 11

.45

05

11

05

11

.58

3.0

05

11

TC BC 11 D 1 05.6 DI- I 11 105.1 9 15 05.1 9 9

.09

05

11

TC BC 11 11 05.9 05 2 .42

LP

FS

LP

.20

06

06 11

11 06

11

D DIRI-13 DIB 1 1 11 04.8 04 0 .50

E-O

PIP

TW BW 11 11 05.6 05 0 .00

.84

05

11

0%

2.0 .55

05

11

11

S

11 0 05 5.4 .70 5

11

.00

11 06

06

11

HP

11 11 05.9 05 2 .42

PATIO

10 95

.73

95

10

.78

STAIRS 7 STEPS 3'-6" ELEV. CHANGE STAIRS 6 STEPS 3' ELEV. CHANGE STAIRS 7 STEPS 3'-6" ELEV. CHANGE

95

SIDEWALK

10

.00

11 06

B

05

TC BC 11 11 05.5 05 5 .05

11

2.00%

10

10 10 96 .00 10 95.8 95 8 .42

0%

.42

95

10

.37

0%

2.00%

-N

10

BS

.45

05

11

05

11

2.0

TC C

TC BC 11 DI 11 05.6 DI- 110 05.1 9 8 5.1 9 9

PIPE

96

%

SIDEWALK

TW BW 10 10 98.6 95 4 .00

TW TW 11 10 02.1 98 4 .64

.00

.00

2.00%

11 06

SIDEWALK

109 7

10

RAMP

10

RETAINING WALL

.00

.58

05

11

2.00%

.20

04

11

DROP-OFF

06

0%

LP

FS

FS

FS

FS

TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

C

1109T

FS

D DIRI-20 DIB 1 1 11 08.8 08 0 .50

TC BC 11 11 09.7 09 5 .25

FS

2.50%

11

3.0

TC BC 11 11 05.6 05 4 .14

TC BC 11 11 05.5 05 5 .05

TC TC BC 11 BC 11 11 06.1 11 06.1 05 5 05 5 TC .65 TC .65 BC 11 BC 11 11 06.1 TR D 1 05 05 5 11 DI- I 11 105 .89 .65 06 7 05 .39 .1 .3 5 9

2.00%

TW TW 11 TS 11 08.8 BW 11 05 8 05 .38 .88 11 00 TW .00 TW 11 BS 11 11 05.3 TS 02 02 8 .38 11 02 .14 .26

-H

PIPE

2.50%

2.50%

TC BC 11 11 09.3 08 3 TC .83 T BC 11 C BC 11 11 08.8 08 8 11 09.3 .38 08 3 .83 FS TC BC 11 11 08.8 08 8 .38

FS

FS

FS

TC BC 11 11 10.4 09 7 .97 T C BC 11 11 10.4 09 7 .97

TC BC 11 11 11.2 10 4 .74 T C BC 11 11 11.2 10 4 .74

E-Q

8

.20

.53

05

11

FS

TC BC 11 11 08.6 08 4 .14

DIDIR 2 DIB 1 1 11 07.8 07 0 .50

FS

FS

TC BC 11 11 12.1 11 4 .64

PIP

109

9

02

4.0

TW BW 11 11 08.8 04 8 BW .58 BW 11 11 03 04 .50 .58 11 04 .97 11 04 .76 11 05 .00 11 05 .40

11

E-E

S

PIP

0%

5

.55

RAMP

3.0

11 04

.0

06

11

4.00%

LP

D DIRI-6 DIB 1 1 11 02.8 02 0 .50

11 TR

FS

.20

07

11

FS

8

110

2.50%

109

0

11 03 .2

.20

04

11

1106

03

LP

TC BC 11 11 06.1 05 5 .65

FS

.20

06

1107

11

1107

11 1105.2 05 0

05

TC BC 11 DI 11 05.8 11 05.3 9 05 .39 9

11

FS

FS

11 06 .20

07

11 06 11

E-D

05

BR

.20

05

PIP

11

12 11

LP

.20

08

.20 11

LP 11 07

DIDIR 3 DIB 1 1 11 06.8 06 0 .50

E-C

D DIRI-4 DIB 1 1 11 05.8 05 0 .50

11

08

11

09

10 11

PARKING LOT

PIPE-M

10

Inv In 1100.73 1100.73 1100.35 1099.97 1099.64 1099.16 1098.50 1098.50 PIP

E-L

1106

0

Inv Out 1101.01 1101.02 1100.73 1100.35 1099.97 1099.64 1099.16 1098.99

1108 PIP

1107

7.5

Length 28'-0" 29'-1" 38'-1" 38'-1" 33'-2" 48'-5" 65'-11" 48'-9" E-B

PARKING LOT

DD DP -1 E 10 9

Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 PIP E-K

PIP

00

Dia (in) 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 PIP PIPE-I

11

Inv In 1100.53 1100.16 1099.73 1099.08 1098.50 1097.50 1099.14 1098.50 E-A

2.50% FS

11

Inv Out 1100.91 1100.53 1100.16 1099.73 1099.08 1098.50 1099.63 1099.14 .20

.20

08

11 FS

02

Length 37'-11" 37'-4" 42'-10" 65'-4" 57'-11" 100'-7" 48'-8" 63'-11" 09

11

11 FS

1108

11

03

SYSTEM 1 11

LP

12 2.50%

FS

DIB 1 1 11 05.8 05 0 .50

1

D DIRI-5

6 10

LEGEND: 0%

DRIVEWAY

LP

11

11

1109 9

110

111 0

2.0

1109

110 1

SYSTEM 2 11

Slope (%) 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

DRIVEWAY

-F

Pipe From DI-20 to DD-4 Dia (in) 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 TC BC 11 11 12.1 11 4 .64

1112

PIPE

Pipe Name T Pipe From DI-9 to DI-11 DI-10 to DI-11 DI-11 to DI-12 DI-12 to DI-13 DI-13 to DI-14 DI-14 to DI-15 DI-15 to DI-16 DI-16 to DD-2 D DIRI-1 DIB 1 1 11 08.8 08 0 .50

TC BC 11 11 13.0 12 3 .53

TC BC 11 11 13.0 12 3 .53

1111

E-G PIP

Pipe Name Q R S

1110

1106

11 8

06 11

Pipe Name I J K L M N O P Pipe From DI-1 to DI-2 DI-2 to DI-3 DI-3 to DI-4 DI-4 to DI-5 DI-5 to DI-6 DI-6 to DD-1 DI-7 to DI-8 DI-8 to DI-6 2.00%

110

07

7

Pipe Name A B C D E F G H

1109

11

110

13

11

TC BC 11 11 14.6 14 6 .16

TC BC 11 11 12.0 11 0 .50

GRADING + STORMWATER

LOCATION: University Park, PA INSTRUCTORS: Stuart Echols, Kelleann Foster, Tim Johnson

COURSE: LArch 431 Design Imp. III PROFESSORS: Stuart Echols Gary Kesler DRAWN BY: Matthew Fichter DATE: 11/03/13

6

EXISTING VEGETATION

1' EXISTING CONTOURS

5' EXISTING CONTOURS

1' PROPOSED CONTOURS

5' PROPOSED CONTOURS

SWALE CENTER LINE

FLOW SPLITTER

SIDEWALK

DRAIN PIPE NAME

DRAIN INLET NAME

DISCHARGE POINT ELEVATION

DATE: 11/03/13 (mf) REV.:

FILE: Fichter+M_FinalGradingPlan.pdf

SHEET:

L-1


PLANTING DESIGN LOCATION: University Park, PA INSTRUCTORS: Tim Johnson, Ken Tamminga

(4) SB

(27) HA

(4) SB

(11) BC

(4) FG

(7) CV

(6) BC

(2) IV

(17) SC (4) PL

(8) FG

(8) FG

(4) PAt

(3) IG

(8) SB

(5) IV

(12) HA

(11) BC

(3) CV

(27) HA

(4) FG

(7) CV

(4) PL

(6) PAt

(8) FG (8) SB

(3) IG

(3) IG

(4) PAc

(12) HA

(3) HA (21) PAc

(22) HA

(16) HA

(32) PAc

CC

(2) SB (6) PAt

(3) PC (4) PAc (4) IV

CF

(22) HA

(16) HA

(6) DB

(99) PAc (17) FG

(2) SB

Brown Chip Multch (2) SB

(7) SB

(9) LS

(30) SC

(17) HA

(4) SC

CF

(4) IV

(5) SC

(99) PAc

(6) DB

(4) IG

(7) SB

(9) LS

(30) SC

(5) LS

(8) FG

(2) LS

(2) IV

(3) TC

(49) GP (3) PC

(2) LS (3) TC

(2) GH

(1) AA (28) PAc

(20) FG

(11) GP

(3) IV

(3) GH

(20) FG

(1) PAt (3) GH

CF

(1) FG

(4) PAt

(8) AM

(6) BC

(3) SB

(1) IG

(6) BC

CF

(1) CV (8) FG (13) FG

(10) FG (10) BC (3) SB

(3) RF

(2) CV

(3) RF

(59) PAc

(1) AA

(8) IG

(4) IV

(4) PC

Brown Chip Multch

EES Building

(59) PAc

(1) AA

(8) IG

(4) IV

(4) PC

(3) IG (3) IV (1) IG

(7) EP

(5) GH

(8) FG

(15) BC (5) GH (7) CV

(2) FG

(3) EP

(3) SB

(4) GH

(4) IV

(4) GH (8) FG

(4) RF

(2) CV

(3) CV

(6) FG

(13) SC

(3) GH (4) EP

(7) CV

(2) FG

(3) EP

(3) SB

2

EES Bldg. Mixed Border Planting Plan Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

(4) RF (6) FG

(3) CV (15) BC

(3) GH (4) EP

(6) EP

(6) RF

(3) CV

(3) IV

(3) IG

(6) BC (8) FG

(5) IV

(11) BC

(4) PL (8) FG (3) IG

(8) SB

(3) HA (12) HA

(21) PAc

(6) PAt (3) PC (4) PAc (22) HA

(16) HA (2) SB

Brown Chip Multch

CF

(4) IV

(99) PAc

(6) DB

Ferns

(17) FG

(7) SB

(2) SB

(30) SC

(4) SC

(4) RF

Quantity Scientific Name 3 1 2

(6) EP

(3) CV

(6) RF

(17) HA

(5) SC

FI IG IV PC

1 60 82 13

Forsythia x intermedia Ilex glabra Ilex verticillata Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta 2'

AM BC CV DB EP FG GP GH HA LS PL PAl PAt RF SC SB TC

28 118 79 49 88 158 136 25 194 42 4 6 28 22 234 95 108

Alchemilla mollis Bergenia cordifolia Coreopsis verticillata Delphinium x belladonna 'Bellamosum' Echinacea purpurea Festuca glauca Gentiana puberulenta Geranium himalayense x pratense 'Johnson's Blue' Heuchera americana Leucanthemum x superbum Paeonia lactiflora (Itoh) 'Cora Louise' Pennisetum alopecuroides Perovskia atriplicifolia Rudbeckia fulgida Scabiosa columbaria Stachys byzantina Tiarella cordifolia

Lady's Mantle Pigsqueak Thread Lead Coreopsis Bellamosum Larkspur Purple Coneflower Blue Fescue Downy Gentian Lilac Cranesbill Paris Heuchera Shasta Daisy Cora Louise Itoh Peony Fountaingrass Russian Sage Black-Eyed Susan Scabiosa Lamb's Ears Foamflower

Date: 4-25-13 Revised By: Revision Date:

Golden Bell Forsythia Inkberry Holly Winterberry Emerald King Carolina Cherry La

PAc

712

Polystichum acrostichoides

Christmas Fern

Legend

(4) IG

(2) IV

(3) IV

(9) DB (8) FG

(49) PAc (5) PAt (2) IG

(11) DB

(8)TC

(5) LS

(3) SB

(2) LS (3) TC

(2) PC

(8) GP

(11) TC (6) SC (1) AA

(2) GH (4) SB (4) IV

Small S

Brown Chip Multch

(28) PAc

Large Shrub

(3) PC

(1) PAt (11) GP

(6) DB

(2) GH

2/13/13

(5) LS (1) AA

(13) TC (13) BC

(1) IG

(8) AM

(1) PAt (3) GH

(62) PAc

(16) PAc

(9) EP

(14) FG

(1) IV (1) PC

(4) PAt (4)FG (2) CV

(4) PAt

(2) CV

(6) BC

CF

(10) BC (3) SB

(6) BC

(1) AA (4) IV

(4) PC

(35) PAc

(7) EP

(1) CV (8) FG (13) FG

(1) IG

Brown Chip Multch

EES Building

(59) PAc (8) IG

(3) PAl (9) SC

(8) FG

(1) FG

SpecimanTree

(3) IV

(18) TC

(3) IV (20) FG

(1) PAt

(8) EP

(5) FG

(3) CV (2) GH (3) RF

(1) FI

(3) RF

(3) IG (3) IV (1) IG

(10) FG

(5) GH

(3) PAl (4) GH

(8) FG

(13) SC (15) BC (7) CV

(2) FG

(3) EP

(5) FG

Drawn By: Matthew Fichter

Common Name Serviceberry Eastern Redbud Flowering Dogwood

Amelanchier aborea Cercis canadensis Cornus florida

(9) LS

(3) SB

(4) IV

(4) GH

(3) EP

Key

AA CC CF

Herbaceous Perennials

(32) PAc

CC

(4) SB

(2) RF

Trees

Shrubs

(17) SC

(3) FG

2/13/13

Planting Schedule

(4) FG

(7) CV

(49) GP

Course: LArch 332 Planting Studio

Course: LArch 332 Planting Studio

(27) HA

(4) PAt

(4) EP

(8) FG

Course: LArch 332 Planting Studio

(4) RF

(14) FG

(5) FG

Sheet Title: Parking Lot Softscape & EES Mixed Border Plans

(3) CV

(3) CV

(8) FG

(4) SB (3) EP

(4) IV

(4) GH (2) CV

(14) FG

(2) RF

(15) BC

(15) BC

*See General Planting Notes on L3 for Planting Instruction Details

Perennial/Fern Massing

(1) FI

(13) SC

(3) PAl

Perennial/Fern Massing

(8) EP

(5) FG

(4) GH

(10) FG

(4) EP

(8) EP

Herbaceous Perennial

(35) PAc

(8) FG

(6) BC

(35) PAc

10" O.C.

(1) FI

(3) PAl (9) SC

(3) IG (3) IV (3) CV (1) IG (2) GH (3) RF (3) PAl (4) EP

(1) PC

(5) FG

(3) CV (2) GH (3) RF

(8) FG

(1) FG

(1) IV

(7) EP

(8) FG (13) FG (10) BC

(6) BC

(2) CV (3) PAl (9) SC

(8) FG (1) CV

(4)FG

(4) PAt

(62) PAc (1) IG

Brown Chip Multch

EES Building

(1) AA

(13) TC (16) PAc

(4) PAt

(2) CV

(1) IG

SpecimanTree

(1) PC (5) LS

(4)FG

(14) FG

(3) IV

(18) TC (4) PAt

(2) CV

(13) BC

(1) IV

(4) SB (3) IG

(3) CV

(2) IV

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

(14) FG

Small Shrub

(62) PAc (1) IG

(8) AM

(9) EP

Herbaceous Perennial

Large Shrub

(1) AA

(16) PAc

(1) PAt

(2) GH

(3) IV

(13) TC (13) BC

(6) DB

SpecimanTree

Brown Chip Multch

(5) LS

(3) PC

(1) PAt

Large Shrub

(18) TC

(3) IV (4) SB

(1) PAt (9) EP

Small Shrub

Brown Chip Multch (2) PC

(11) GP

(11) TC

(6) DB

(1) PAt

(2) IG

(28) PAc

(8) GP

(5) LS

(1) PAt (3) FG

(4) IV

(2) PC

(8)TC (4) SB

(3) FG

Pot

(49) PAc

(1) AA

(11) DB

(4) IV

(2) GH

SP #4

(8) GP

(11) TC (6) SC

(6) SC

1'-1.5'

EES Bldg.

(2) IG

(8)TC (49) GP (3) IV

(9) DB

(5) PAt

(3) SB

Christmas Fern

Polystichum acrostichoides

Legend

(4) IG

(2) GH

712

(49) PAc

(17) HA

(11) DB

(3) SB

Legend

PAc

(2) IV

(5) PAt (5) SC

#4 Pot 4-5 canes #3 Pot Remarks #3 Pot #6 Pot Multi-stem Low-branched #1 Pot 20" O.C. Pre-selected & tagged by LA #1 Pot 12" O.C. SP #4 Pot 16" O.C. 4-5 SP canes #4 Pot 20" O.C. SP #5 Pot 30" O.C. SP #4 Pot 8" O.C. SP #3 Pot 12" O.C. #1 Pot 16" O.C. SP #4 Pot 12" O.C. 20" O.C. #1 Pot 8" O.C. 12" O.C. #3 Pot 30" O.C. 16" O.C. SP #6 Pot 30" O.C. 20" O.C. SP #4 Pot 30" O.C. 30" O.C. SP #4 Pot 20" O.C. 8" O.C. SP #4 Pot 15" O.C. 12" O.C. SP #4 Pot 12" O.C. 16" O.C. SP #4 Pot 8" O.C. 12" O.C. 8" O.C. 30" O.C. SP #4 Pot 10" O.C. 30" O.C. 30" O.C. 20" O.C. 15" O.C. 12" O.C. 8" O.C.

Module 5, Assignment 5C

(8) FG

(4) SC

Condition Remarks

West Campus Commons

8'-10' FI 1 Forsythia x intermedia Golden Bell Forsythia 15'-20' IG 60 Ilex glabra Inkberry Holly Key Quantity Scientific Name Common Name ≈ Height Size Condition IV 82 Ilex verticillata Winterberry 3'-4' Trees(3) IG Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta 2' Emerald King Carolina Cherry Laurel 6'-10' PC 13 (3) HA AA 3 Amelanchier aborea Serviceberry 15'-25' 1" cal. B&B Herbaceous Perennials (21) PAc CC 1 Cercis canadensis Eastern Redbud 20'-30' 1.5" cal. B&B AM 28 Alchemilla mollis Lady's Mantle 2' (32) CF PAc 2 Cornus florida Flowering Dogwood 20'-35' 1.5" cal. B&B BC 118 Bergenia cordifolia Pigsqueak 1'-1.5' Shrubs CV 79 Coreopsis verticillata Thread Lead8'-10' Coreopsis 18" FI 1 Forsythia x intermedia Golden Bell Forsythia Pot Delphinium x belladonna 'Bellamosum' Bellamosum15'-20' Larkspur #4 3'-4' DB 49 IG 60 Ilex glabra Inkberry Holly #3 Pot EP 88 Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower 2'-3' (3) PC IV 82 Ilex verticillata Winterberry #3 Pot FG 158 Festuca glauca Blue Fescue3'-4' 1' Prunus caroliniana 'Compacta 2' puberulenta Emerald King Carolina Cherry Laurel 6'-10' #6 Pot PC 13 GP 136 Gentiana Downy Gentian 3" Geranium himalayense x pratense 'Johnson's Blue' Lilac Cranesbill 1.5' 25 Herbaceous PerennialsGH HA 194 Heuchera americana Paris Heuchera 14" AM 28 Alchemilla mollis Lady's Mantle 2' #1 Pot LS 42 Leucanthemum x superbum Shasta Daisy 2.5' BC 118 Bergenia cordifolia Pigsqueak 1'-1.5' #1 Pot Paeonia lactiflora (Itoh) 'Cora Louise' PL 4 Cora Louise Itoh Peony 2.5' CV 79 Coreopsis verticillata Thread Lead Coreopsis 18" SP #4 Pot Brown Chip Multch PAl x belladonna 6 Pennisetum Fountaingrass 1'-3' Delphinium 'Bellamosum'alopecuroides Bellamosum Larkspur 3'-4' SP #4 Pot DB 49 PAt 28 Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian Sage 3'-5' EP 88 Echinacea purpurea Purple Coneflower 2'-3' SP #5 Pot RF 22 Rudbeckia fulgida Black-Eyed Susan 1.5'-3' FG 158 Festuca glauca Blue Fescue 1' SP #4 Pot SC 234 Scabiosa columbaria Scabiosa 16" GP 136 Gentiana puberulenta Downy Gentian 3" SP #3 Pot SBhimalayense 95 Lamb's Ears 1.5' Geranium xStachys pratensebyzantina 'Johnson's Blue' Lilac Cranesbill 1.5' #1 Pot GH 25 TC 108 Tiarella cordifolia Foamflower 1' HA 194 Heuchera americana Paris Heuchera 14" SP #4 Pot LS 42 Ferns Leucanthemum x superbum Shasta Daisy 2.5' #1 Pot PaeoniaPAc lactiflora712 (Itoh) 'Cora Louise' acrostichoides Cora Louise Itoh Peony Christmas Fern PL 4 2.5' #3 Pot Polystichum 1'-1.5' PAl 6 Pennisetum alopecuroides Fountaingrass 1'-3' SP #6 Pot PAt 28 Perovskia atriplicifolia Russian Sage 3'-5' SP #4 Pot RF 22 Rudbeckia fulgida Black-Eyed Susan 1.5'-3' SP #4 Pot SC 234 Scabiosa columbaria Scabiosa 16" SP #4 Pot SB 95 Stachys byzantina Lamb's Ears 1.5' SP #4 Pot TC 108 Tiarella cordifolia Foamflower 1' SP #4 Pot

(3) IV

(2) SB

Serviceberry Eastern Redbud Flowering Dogwood

Amelanchier aborea Cercis canadensis Cornus florida

PlantingShrubs Schedule

Ferns

(17) FG (9) DB

3 1 2

≈ Height Size

Project Location: 15'-25' 1" cal. B&B Multi-stem 20'-30' 1.5" cal. B&B Low-branched West Campus Commons Project 20'-35' 1.5" cal. B&B Pre-selected & tagged byLocation: LA

FINAL PLAN (Contract Document Set)

CC

(17) SC (3) IV

AA CC CF

Common Name

Module Two: The Mixed Border

(3) CV

Quantity Scientific Name

University Park, Pennsylvania

(3) CV

(3) IV

Key

West Campus Commons

(3) IG

Trees

(5) IV

Assignment 2b: Drafted CAD Planting Plan & Schedule

(8) FG (4) PAt

(2) IV

Assignment 2b: Drafted CAD Planting Plan & Schedule

Planting Schedule

(6) BC

(3) CV

Project Location: West Campus Commons

(3) CV

Module Two: The Mixed Border

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT (3) IG

(3) CV

(2) CV

(4) RF (6) FG

(3) CV (15) BC

(3) GH (4) EP

(4) SB

(2) RF (3) EP (4) RF

(14) FG

(6) EP

(3) CV

(6) RF

(5) FG


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Project Location: West Campus Commons

Meadow Establishment Notes:

EES Bldg.

Module 5, Assignment 5C

SOIL PREPARATION SITE PREPARATION 1. Between September 1st to October 1st prior to the installation of the meadow, contractor must prepare soil. 2. Before soil disturbance refer to Civil Engineer's utility and grading and drainage plans for utility location and drainage information. Contractor must request a PA One call to mark existing utilities.

FINAL PLAN (Contract Document Set)

Treed Plaza

EES Bldg. Mixed Border

5. Contractor must removal of all existing vegetation. Contractor must use a tree spade to remove trees that will be replanted as a buffer between the parking lot and the quadrangle. Contact the Landscape Architect for specifications and conditions.

(See 1-L5)

EES Bldg.

Project Loca West Campu

Module 5, As

FINAL PLAN (Con

SOIL TESTING 6. Contractor must conduct a soil evaluation to determine its composition, compaction rate, nutrient qualities, organic content, PH levels, and water holding capabilities. 7. Send soil samples to the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University to be tested for proper soil amendments to be made prior to construction. Report results to the Landscape Architect.

(See 2-L4)

West Campus Commons

SOIL AMENDMENTS

Meadow Ecosystem (See 1-L2)

Applied Sciences Bldg. Softscape

Parking Lot Softscape

(See 3-L3)

Applied Sciences Bldg.

(See 1-L4)

8. After initial soil de-compaction procedures are performed, soil amendments should be added. The addition of soil amendments is determined from soil tests conducted prior to work beginning. 9. For soil amendments only use 1” organic, locally-obtained leaf compost and a 6” layer of settled mixed oak/hardwood leaf litter over surface of entire quadrangle. 10.Contractor must submit threes samples of each to the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University to be properly tested. Test results must be submitted to the Landscape Architect for approval prior to application. 11.Do not use any fertilizers. 12.All amendments should be mixed thoroughly tilled with existing soil and an additional soil test must be taken to ensure proper soil conditions prior to planting. TILLAGE OPERATIONS 13.Use a chisel plow to partially incorporate organic leaf litter and compost amendments to a 12” depth. Ensure that the soils are relatively dry for adequate mixing conditions.

University Park, Pennsylvania

(See 1-L3)

4. When performing soil de-compaction and turf removal, multiple passes across the area will be required and must be at varying angles to ensure adequate coverage and to kill roots completely.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

EES Bldg. Softscape

3. Contractor must de-compact soils and remove turf in planting areas by roto-tilling, disking or ripping to a depth of 6 -8” minimum and a depth of 12” - 18”. Always remove debris over 2” in size from the soil from the soil.

14.Till two more times to a depth of 12”. Vary tillage directions by tilling in both opposite and perpendicular directions to the line of the first pass. 15.Soil must then be deep ripped to 28”-38” depth, with shanks at 24”-30” spacing. Ensure that the soils are relatively dry for adequate shattering. 16.Use an offset disc to complete organic mixing in top 6”-8” layer. Conduct several passes, sufficient to uniformly mix amendments and smooth the soil surface. 17.Allow the ground to settle for three days before planting can commence. EQUIPMENT 18.To minimize compaction, all wheeled equipment used in tillage and planting operations must have low tire pressure to minimize soil compaction and pulverization. Tire pressure should be maintained at 8-12 psi range. 19.Prior to the installation of plant materials in planting areas, the compaction shall be reduced to 80% or less using previously described methods. SEED AND PLUG ARRIVALS AND INSTALLATION 20. Verify locations of pertinent site improvements installed under other sections. If any part of this plan cannot be followed due to site conditions, contact Landscape Architect for instructions prior to commencing work. 21. Perform excavation in the vicinity of underground utilities with care and if necessary, by hand. The Contractor bears full responsibility for this work and disruption or damage to utilities shall be repaired immediately at no expense to the Owner. 22. Exact locations of plant materials to be approved by the Landscape Architect in the field prior to installation. Landscape Architect reserves the right to adjust plants to exact location in field. 23. Verify plant counts and square footages: quantities are provided as owner information only. If quantities on plant list differ from graphic indications, then graphics shall prevail. 24. Must check all plant material for quality: a. The supplier of all seeds and/or vegetation shall certify that the origin of the seeds from which the plants or seeds were produced is from hardiness zones 4-6, from the Eastern or North Eastern portions of the U.S., prior to planting. b. Any nursery supplying the stock shall provide a current nursery inspection certificate from the State Department of Agriculture, or provide at least thirty days advance notice for the Landscape Architect. 27. Seeding and plug installation must occur in late Spring to early Summer only after soil temperature is above 60 ° F. 28. The Contractor must inspect the areas and conditions under which the seeding work is to be performed prior to beginning work. If conditions are not adequate, hindering proper and timely completion of the work, the contractor must contact the representative of the owner to postpone work until conditions are correct. 29. Do not seed during wet or muddy site conditions. 30. The specified seed shall be spread in areas specified on the planting plan. Care should be exercised to insure uniform seed coverage is obtained. Seed shall be applied at the rate specified on the planting schedule. 31. Following seeding, mechanically plant seed to a depth of 1/8th of an inch by the use of a hand rake to ensure contact with mineral soil. Make sure there is little organic matter/litter on the surface.

Sheet Title: Key Map and Limit of Contract Line

32. Mulch only with clean, chopped oat or wheat straw that is free of weed seeds only to settled depth of 1”-1.5”. 33. Do not remove plugs from tray containers until immediately before planting. Examine the roots to see if they are pot bound. Carefully separate any pot bound or cramped roots and spread them out when placing the plant. 34. Insert plugs into already seeded and mulched seedbed, then water thoroughly. As stated previously, do not plug or seed during wet or muddy conditions. If this is the case the contractor must follow the procedure previously stated. Adaptive Management WARRANTY & MANAGEMENT PERIOD

Course: LArch 332 Planting Studio

Sheet Title: Meadow Pla

28. The Contractor must monitor the site for 3 years starting the day after installation completion date. Notify the Landscape Architect for any questions or concerns regarding plant health at the beginning and end of each growing season during those 3 years. 29. The Landscape Architect must conduct a meadow site inventory during years 2 and 3. This will occur once in late Spring and once in late Summer. The inventory will include species count and coverage. 30. If areas larger than 5 sq. ft. are bare do to natural environmental conditions, reseeding will be performed. This service will also be provided to overseed the following Spring at the original rate if any species is not present at the end of the growing seasons of years 2 and 3.

Drawn By: Matthew Fichter Date: 4-25-13

Course: LArc Planting Stud

28. Contractor must submit proof of PA Pesticide Application Certification to Landscape Architect prior to applying herbicide.

Revised By:

29. Hand pull or spot spray noxious, persistent weeds with herbicide approved by the Landscape Architect.

Revision Date:

28. If problem infestations occur on the site, contact the Landscape Architect to inform the Contractor to conduct an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as advised by Penn State's IPM Extension service. 29. Contractor must monitor the site for herbivory issues and report to the Landscape Architect within three days after his/her visit. YEAR 1

Revisions: *See General Planting Notes on L3 for Planting Instruction Details

Leonhard Bldg.

Drawn By: Matthew F Date: 4-25-13 Revised By: Revision Date:

28. Monitor for healthy growth, full diversity, weed infestation, insect and rodent damage, and soil conditions 29. Water sufficiently to keep seeded soil surface consistently damp while sprouting occurs (up to 6 weeks) 30. Once most seeds are sprouted, allow brief drying of soil between waterings 31. After 6 weeks, water once a week only during drought periods to encourage root penetration and minimize fungal and mold problems. Watering should be done between 6 a.m. and 10 a.m.

Revisions:

32. When vegetation reaches 12”, cut back to 6” height, use string trimmer or high mower up to 3 times through the growing season as needed to prevent weeds from setting seed. YEAR 2

Meadow Ecosystem Planting Plan

1

33. Continue to monitor site.

Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

34. Use string-trimmer in mid-June to cut growth to 10-12”. Spot spray or hand pull any aggressive growers after that. Never allow unwanted weeds to set seed. Watering is necessary only when severe drought threatens meadow viability.

Leonhard Bldg. Softscape

YEAR 3 35. Under this 3 year warranty and management period, the Landscape Architect and contractor shall guarantee a minimum survival rate of each vegetation species.

Legend

(See 2-L3)

36. Any woody species that have started to invade the meadow must be culled out. 37. Meadow must be rejuvenated through either of the flowing preferred methods: a. Conduct a controlled burn in mid-Spring during late April to early May by a qualified professional. Always inform local Fire Marshall prior to any burning. Controlled burns require specialized training and perfect weather and plant moisture conditions.

Sheet #

L1

Leonhard Bldg. 1

b. “Scalp mow” down to soil level in mid-Spring, then carefully rake so that sunlight can penetrate and warm the soil. WORKS CITED

Sheet #

LArch 332 Module 5 Lecture Perennial Plugs

Tall Grass Meadow

Atkin Oslshin Schade Architects

Short Grass Meadow

L

Specimen Tree

Key Map and Limit of Contract Line Plan Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Project Locatio West Campus

Module 5, Assignment 5C

Module 5, Ass

FINAL PLAN (Contra

TILLAGE OPERATIONS 17. Use a chisel plow to partially incorporate organic leaf litter and compost amendments to a 12” depth. Ensure that the soils are relatively dry for adequate mixing conditions. 18. Till two more times to a depth of 12”. Vary tillage directions by tilling in both opposite and perpendicular directions to the line of the first pass. 19. Soil must then be deep ripped to 28”-38” depth, with shanks at 24”-30” spacing. Ensure that the soils are relatively dry for adequate shattering.

1. Work performed shall comply with the following: a. These General Notes, and Construction Documents and Specifications. b. All applicable local, state, and federal codes, ordinances and regulations. All codes listed in Specifications and Drawings shall be inclusive of all codes, regulations and requirements adopted by the State of Pennsylvania, including all Amendments. 2. Source of base information is The Pennsylvania State University and is assumed to be correct. Report any discrepancies immediately to the Owner's representative. 3. Verify locations of pertinent site improvements installed under other contracts. If any part of this plan cannot be followed due to site conditions, contact Owner's representative for instructions prior to commencing work. 4. Contact local underground utility services for utility location and identification, prior to commencing work. 5. Perform excavation in the vicinity of underground utilities with care and by hand, if necessary. The contractor bears full responsibility for this work and disruption of damage to utilities shall be repaired immediately and at no expense to the owner.

9. When performing soil de-compaction and turf removal, multiple passes across the area will be required and must be at varying angles to ensure adequate coverage and to kill roots completely. 10. Contractor must removal of all existing vegetation. Contractor must use a tree spade to remove trees that will be replanted as a buffer between the parking lot and the quadrangle. Contact the Landscape Architect for specifications and conditions. SOIL TESTING 11. Contractor must conduct a soil evaluation to determine its composition, compaction rate, nutrient qualities, organic content, PH levels, and water holding capabilities. 12. Send soil samples to the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University to be tested for proper soil amendments to be made prior to construction. Report results to the Landscape Architect.

SOIL AMMENDMENTS 13. After initial soil de-compaction procedures are performed, soil determined from soil tests conducted prior to work beginning. 14. For soil amendments only use 1” organic, locally-obtained leaf compost

6. Between September 1st to October 1st prior to the installation of the meadow, contractor must prepare soil. 7. Before soil disturbance refer to Civil Engineer's utility and grading and drainage plans for utility location and drainage information. Contractor must request a PA One call to mark existing utilities. 8. Contractor must de-compact soils and remove turf in planting areas by roto-tilling, disking or ripping to a depth of 6 -8” minimum and a depth of 12” - 18”. Always remove debris over 2” in size from the soil from the soil.

Conduct several passes, sufficient to uniformly mix amendments and smooth the soil surface. 21. Allow the ground to settle for three days before planting can commence. EQUIPMENT 22. To minimize compaction, all wheeled equipment used in tillage and planting operations must have low tire pressure to minimize soil compaction and pulverization. Tire pressure should be maintained at 8-12 psi range. 23. Prior to the installation of plant materials in planting areas, the

and a 6” layer of settled mixed oak/hardwood leaf litter over surface of entire quadrangle. 15. Contractor must submit threes samples of each to the Agricultural Analytical Services Laboratory at The Pennsylvania State University to be properly tested. Test results must be submitted to the Landscape Architect for approval prior to application. 16. All amendments should be mixed thoroughly tilled with existing soil and an additional soil test must be taken to ensure proper soil conditions prior to planting.

51. Spread Kentucky Blue Grass seed mix on all turf grass

34. The Contractor shall finish filling the planting hole with backfill planting soil, tamp soil gently, and immediately water to the point of soil saturation. The backfill must be a minimum of 4” from the top of the tree rootball. 35. Apply 1-2” of compost above the tree opening and planting area. Apply 2-3” of mulch on top of the compost. There must be a minimum 4” distance from trunk flare. 36. The Contractor shall not fertilize the tree at any point unless specified by the LA. 37. All trees must be limbed up to 6' vertical height for visual clearance and security. 38. The Contractor shall only prune tree branches to remove structural defects or to improve tree structure as specified by Landscape

TREE/SHRUB PLANTING NOTES: 24. Tree stock shall conform to all state requirements and the ALNA for 25. The Contractor shall use the trees as tagged by Landscape Architect prior to construction at the Nursery. 26. Remove entire wire cage from rootball. 27. The Contractor shall remove/ cut back the burlap for the top 1/3 of root ball. 28. The Contractor shall dig a bowl shaped planting hole that is three times the diameter of the tree root package and 3” less than the depth of the tree rootball. 29. Scarify the subgrade and sides of the planting hole prior to planting. 30. Prior to planting tree refer to the Landscape Architect on site to confirm the planting depth is correct by locating the primary root of each tree. 31. The Contractor must lift all trees from the bottom of the root ball to assure stable roots throughout and then carefully place them into their designated planting hole.

49. All plant rootballs must be planted even with soil surface. each forb. areas as designated on landscape plans at an application rate of 90 lbs. PLS per Acre. 52. Mulch all planting beds, underneath and around each individual plant, with Brown Bark Mulch at a depth of 2”. 53. If the site work is different or modified from what is depicted on the landscape plan, or poor soil and/or debris are encountered, requiring changes to the landscape plan, the Contractor shall contact the Landscape Architect for instructions. 54. If any plants die due to construction on-site they must be reseeded/replaced by the contractor at no additional cost to the client. 55. The Contractor shall water plants two times a day, once in the morning and once in the evening, until

Architect. 39. Landscape Architect to review plant materials at source or by photographs prior to digging or shipping of plant materials.

compaction shall be reduced to 80% or less using previously described methods.

nursery stock.

amendments should be added. The addition of soil amendments is

SOIL PREPARATION SITE PREPARATION

20. Use an offset disc to complete organic mixing in top 6”-8” layer.

50. Place non-compacted backfill in and around the base of

33. The planting hole shall be filled half way with backfill planting soil and water to eliminate air pockets. Do not compact backfill planting soil.

saturated for one month unless drought or heavy rainfall occurs. 56. The Contractor must monitor the site for 3 years starting the day after installation completion date.

FORB PLANTING NOTES 40. Perennial forb stock shall conform to all state requirements and the ALNA for nursery stock. 41. The Contractor shall use perennial forbs as tagged by LA at the Nursery prior to construction. 42. No planting shall be installed until all grading and construction has been completed in the immediate area. 43. All planting must take place in the spring time when soil temperature is above 60°F and not during periods of heat waves.

Notify the Landscape Architect for any questions or concerns regarding plant health at the beginning and end of each growing season during those 3 years.

WORKS CITED LArch 332 Module 5 Lecture Atkin Oslshin Schade Architects

44. Landscape plantings shall be free of debris and rocks larger than 3” in any direction.

6" C.I.P. Concrete

3

46. No plants shall be stored on-site beyond the a maximum of 3 days and must be watered in the morning and evening until saturated once they arrive on site prior to installation.

London Planetree & Rootball

Stainless Steel Perforated Cap for Drainage/Aeration (2" Diameter)

Stainless Steel Perforated Cap for Drainage/Aeration (6" Diameter)

Stainless Steel Tree Grate (Dimensions: 4'-0"L x 4'-0"W x 1"H)

Tree Grate Detail *NTS

*See General Planting Notes on L3 for Planting Instruction Details

1

Treed Plaza Planting Plan Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

Construction Notes: *Refer to Tree/Shrub Planting Notes #26-44 in General Planting Notes on L3 for Planting Instruction Details

Stainless steel edging reinforces brick pavers and tree grate. (See 3/L5 for Installation Extents) Arborguy staking rootball into position to keep tree upright. (Stake into compacted sub-grade)

Sheet Title: Exterior Softscape Plans

45. Topsoil with a minimum of 30% organic content must be placed at a depth of 4” in all planting areas.

Stainless Steel L-Bracket/Shelf Reinforces Brick Pavers and holds tree grate in place Red Brick Pavers

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2" PVC Pipe (3" Diameter) provides aeration and irregation to roots at tree base. Rootball (Dimensions: 3L x 3W x 2H). Turned-down burlap (Expose 31 of Rootball).

Sheet Title: Treed Plaza P

4" PVC Pipe (8" Diameter) provides aeration and irrigation to mature roots (Set above soil cells and geo-textile fabric).

47. Dig planting hole that is twice the size of the indicated plant's rooball in width and 2” below depth of rootball.

Course: LArch 332 Planting Studio

48. Before installation occurs carefully remove container as not to damage to the rootball and then place each plant into designated hole.

Course: LArch Planting Studio

Drawn By: Matthew Fich

Drawn By: Matthew Fichter

Date: 4-25-13

Date: 4-25-13

Revised By:

Revised By: Revision Date:

Revisions:

Revision Date:

Treed Plaza Plan Legend Short Grass Prairie Extension

Revisions:

Brick Pavers (Running Bond)

Construction Notes:

C.I.P. Concrete Pavement

London Planetree Plaza Tree: London Plantree

Red Brick Pavers (Dimensions: 2"H x 4"W x 8"L) Stainless Steel Tree Grate (See 3/L5 for Installation Extents) 6" C.I.P. Concrete (Broom Finish; 2800 psi) 6" Compacted Aggregate

Teak Wood Bench

Rotate Soil Cells 45 Degrees when starting a new layer of cells to provide maximum passages for root growth.

Backfill Material

Tree Grate (4'-0"-4'-0")

Compacted Sub-Grade Arborgreen's Citygreen Soil Cells (See 1/L5 for Installation Extents) 6" Compacted Aggregate

Structural Outline of Soil Cells

Leonhard Bldg. Softscape Planting Plan

3

Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

Applied Sciences Bldg. Softscape Planting Plan Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

Sheet #

L3 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2

Backfill soil within cell voids before placing geo-textile fabric on top of final cell layer.

Geo-Textile Fabric

Leonhard Bldg.

Tree Planter and Soil Information

2

Place unamended backfill soil around 21 rootball width. Tamp soil solidly around base of Rootball.

Tree Planter *NTS

6" corrugated drain pipe within compacted aggregate beneath soil cells. Connect to existing storm drain.

Soil Cell Technology Arborgreen's Citygreen Soil Cell System Tree Canopy Size: 20'-0" Soil Cells per Tree: 336 Depth of Cells: 3 Layers (112 Cells per Layer) Soil Volume Calculation Ideal Minimum Soil Volume: 628 Ft ³

4

Tree Planter Detail *NTS

Actual Soil Volume: 782.62 Ft³

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

GENERAL PLANTING NOTES GENERAL CONDITIONS

32. The rootball must be securely anchored to the pedestal underneath using rootball anchor straps after positioning the tree in the planting hole.

EES Bldg. University Park, Pennsylvania

Scale: 1" = 10'-0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

ESS Bldg. Softscape Planting Plan

Applied Sciences Bldg.

1

West Campus Commons

FINAL PLAN (Contract Document Set)

West Campus Commons

EES Bldg.

Project Location: West Campus Commons

Sheet #

L5


HAND DRAWINGS

ACADEMIC: PSU

DESIGN TYPE: Various LOCATION: Various INSTRUCTOR: Various

This is a collection of my hand drawing skills, both sketching and rendering. I am constantly trying to perfect my techniques to increase the quality of my renderings. I feel that hand drawings are just as important as digital graphics when representing any project visually.

INTERNSHIP: Charles E. Hess L.A.


INTERNSHIP: Charles E. Hess L.A.

ACADEMIC: PSU


MODELS DESIGN TYPE: Various LOCATION: Various INSTRUCTOR: Various

This is a collection of my model making skills. Every project differs in how it must be represented to comprehend the essence of the overall design concept. In many cases, a physical model is necessary to reach this full understanding. Throughout my academic career, I have had experience building models from various materials and through multiple methods. MATERIALS: chipboard; foam core; clay; foam insulation METHODS: laser-cut; hand-cut/crafted; cnc router


Matthew Fichter - Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

This portfolio contains works completed throughout my five years as an undergraduate landscape architecture student at the Pennsylvania Stat...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you