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RÜFÜS THE AUDREYS

BEN LEE CHET FAKER GRIMOIRE BRISBANE HOTEL BIRTHDAY BASH

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JUNE 2014

PAT BRASSINGTON

SLIM JIM PHANTOM THE BRONX EARTH THINGS OF STONE AND WOOD

FRIDAY 6 JUNE REPUBLIC BAR HOBART SATURDAY 7 JUNE REPUBLIC BAR HOBART SUNDAY 8 JUNE CLUB 54 LAUNCESTON TICKETS ON SALE NOW! HOBART FROM MOSHTIX.COM.AU, LAUNCESTON FROM OZTIX.COM.AU NEW SINGLE ‘SUCKERPUNCH’ OUT NOW THROUGH DEW PROCESS T W I T T E R . C O M / K I N G S WO O D B A N D FA C E B O O K . C O M / K I N G S WO O D M U S I C K I N G S WO O D B A N D. C O M


Kingswood Fri 6th & Sat 7th June

Things of Stone and Wood Sunday 8th June

Slim Jim Phantom (Stray Cats) Friday June 13

The Audreys Saturday June 28

June Emma Russack + Jed Appleton Sunday 1th Helen Crowther Monday 2nd Billy Whitton Tuesday 3rd Billy Longo Wednesday 4th Claire Anne Taylor Thursday 5th Kingswood + New Saxons + Babylon Howl $8pre/$10door Fri 6th Kingswood + Smokestack + Verticoli $8pre/$10door Sat 7th Things of Stone And Wood + Amaya $30pre/$35door Sun 8th Quiz Night Monday 9th Rach And Damo Tuesday 10th Bobcats Wednesday 11th Slyde Thursday 12th Slim Jim Phantom (Stray Cats) + Fireballs $40pre/$50door Fri 13th Boil Up Saturday 14th Peter Hicks and the Blue Licks Sunday 15th G.B.Balding (Finger Picking Blues) Monday 16th Priscilla Salter Tuesday 17th

The Darlings Wednesday 18th Dave Wilson Band Thursday 19th Angry Anderson $20pre/$25door Friday 25th Gape + Mephistopheles + Infernal Outcry Saturday 21st Phil Smith Sunday 22nd Finn Seccombe Monday 23rd Baker Boys Band Tuesday 24th Homebrewed - Edge Radio Social Night Wednesday 25th 4 Letter Fish Thursday 26th Amnesty Refugees: Beautiful Chains + Jed Appleton + Leo Creighton + Big Money + The M.Y. Boys Friday 27th The Audreys $30pre/$35door Saturday June 28 Ross Sermon + Rick Plant Sunday 29th Quiz Night Monday 30th July Adalita Fri July 11 Remi Sat July 12


3 BRISBANE STREET HOBART 6234 4920

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Fri June 13 Grimoire

8 Sun June niless 1 nd Pen a r o o P Piss Show ans Choir l a t e M Buck + Omnicide + Talism

ll Black Lambs Baseball (Vic) + Sma use The Cleaner + Treeho & y tt mu S + d ke + Na (Vic) + Gutters + Dogtower + Piklet ffolding + Ecclesiastical Sca lis shold Forms + Chrysa re Th e Th & er uin R + + DJ BTC + Mutterlard + Cycle

sum osce Teip N + e p a + G

Sat 14 / Sun 15 J une The Graveyard Train (Vic) w/ Th e Dead Maggies

Fri June Grimoire 20

w/ Squ are Ton y & The Chan (N Arps (V SW) + ic) + R T o x ic ainbow + Ela S Lipstick tiles (N (Vic) + SW) + A ll The We Kitchen + Ironha athers wk + D Witches r acula + + B + Ocean .A.A.D.D Matthe s + Cry .D. w Brow pt Vapo n + B u r la + ck Paul Pip Sta + OklaP fford okla + E xit At T he Alter + DJ B TC

Sat June 21 ST! NX FE UP THE PUD ischarge (VIC) ishonourable D



bar's ed (VIC) w/ Admiral Ack opes Abandon H + ) IC (V s IC) aRRioR uor Snatch (V iq L + ) IC + K-MaRt W (V thPaw IC) ty (VIC) + Sou izard Punch (V L + ) IC (V + Public Liabili e nce Abus (VIC) + Substa of e & ro P t us R + + Cassie Hop ) IC (V rs ge ur Esther + The Cruntb hawk + Fatty + Foley (VIC) n Iro + n ow D ity IC) + Stay ss Of Human ca ar C + Alex Gawly (V es gi ead Mag ifiny + The D + Drayfus' Ep r + In Your Honou

Sun June 22 WAVEFORM 8Bit TUNES

(Vic) w/ cTrix (Vic) + Pselodux (WA) + Derris-Kharlan + Tiasu (Vic) + Special Guests

27 Fri June li (NSW) omp Fait Acc urs (NSW) umo stic + The R Cannibali e h T & Film w/ BEden and and B rd a w Po Ho

Sat THE BRISS June 28 IES “WARRIOR 7TH BIRTHDAY BASH S FILM THE w/ Barbariön (Vic) + The W ME” izar'd + Craic pot + The Infants (V + Pinchgut + ic) + White S Pines ummer (Vic) + Speakeasies + DJ

Pub Meals

BTC

Lunch - Tues till Fri 12:30 till 2:30 Dinner - Tues till Sun - 5:30 till 8:30 *** New Mexican Night!!! Mexi-Cantina Wednesday's with Sir Mex-a-Lot*** Tuesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday are counter meals as usual. Awesome and cheap


News

News in Brief KINGS OF THE HOOD

Hay everyone! Kingswood are back again after their Party In A Paddock set! This probably makes them more enduring and reliable than an actual Kingswood. They should change their name to Volvo, or something. his time around, they’re playing two shows at ye olde Republic Bar & Café in Hobart, and one at Club 54 in Launceston. Friday June 6, and Saturday June 7 you’ll be able to see them parked at The Repub. Tickets are $15 + BF and are available from the venue or online via Moshtix. Sunday June 8 at Club 54 tickets are $18.40, but those ones are available online via Oztix. Check out www. kingswoodband.com for all relevant info and service manuals. A CLASSICAL WEEKEND OUT

ULTRA COOL All us super cool kids in the know already knew that Hobart’s Ultralux was under new management, but now they’re letting the rest of the world in on the secret by throwing a big ol’ re-launch party! Friday June 6 is when it’s all going down. 6pm. Be there. There’ll be free booze, 20% off all stock and one of Tasmania’s finest bands playing. They’re called The Sin & Tonics, you may have heard of them. They’re ace. From Tiki’s to Hot Rods and from Hawaiian shirts to Brothel Creepers, Ultralux has a complete range of Kustom Kulture stock sourced from the U.S.A and also Hawaii, Mexico, Tahiti, Europe and Australia. Ultralux is located at 9 Criterion Street, right in the middle of the HBTCBD.

Warp Tasmania JUNE 2014

June is here and with it the cutting winds, long nights and the bone chilling cold that only whisky can warm, so round up your crew and get your horns up because there’s six months down of 2014 and it’s time unleash some brutality! Boris the Blade will be releasing their fury across the state this June in three shows of balls to the wall technical deathcore. The lads will be taking in Hobart for an 18+ show at Damage Nightclub on Friday June 6, an All Ages show at the Brisbane Hotel on Saturday June 7 at 2pm, followed by a quick drive up to Launceston for an 18+ at Club 54 at 9pm! Plenty of opportunity to go along and see testicles pressed against walls.

Music is going to the dogs these days. Either that, or it’s for the dogs. Whatever. Incorrect spelling makes everything cooler, and that’s definitely the case with the “FOR THE DAWGS” Fundraiser Benefit on Sunday June 8 at The Homestead. It’s raising funds for The Dogs Home, which is a great cause, those dudes and dudettes need all the help we can give them. Playing at this particular event is a swag of local legends, including Jacob Thomas, Jess Patmore, Shamen FoxHenry, and Djs Kireesh and Ben Lawless. There’ll also be a rocking raffle! Kicks off at 4pm, entry is a cool $5. Get along and help out our furry four legged buddies.

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The Brissie is turning 7! Booyeah. Party time! This year they’re throwing a party based on the completely badass flick The Warriors (Pointless fact: Warriors is based on the same story as 300). Headlining the awesomeness is the almighty Barbarion! Supported by The Wizar’d, The Infants, Pines, Craicpot, White Summer, Pinchgut, Speakeasies and DJ BTC. Epic. Saturday June 28 is the night of nights. Doors at 8pm. Tickets are available now via The Brisbane Hotel, or online at Oztix. Heaps of sweet dress up ideas here, but there’ll be a heap of prizes for best outfits. Caaaaaaannn yyyoooouuuu ddddiiiigggggggg iiiiiiiiiiittttttttttttt? BANDS IN BATTLE MODE This whole north/south rivalry that’s been going on forever is a bit dumb really. We’re too small for that. We should be uniting to fight against the real enemy, which is obviously Queenslanders. Anyway, In the spirit of uniting the state‘s music scene, two local musicians are heading North to play in Launceston, and then South, to play in Hobart. They are Tim Davies and Summer Edmunds and they’ll be performing acoustic gigs at Irish Murphy’s in Launceston on Wednesday June 11, and at The Homestead in Hobart on Saturday June 28. More gigs will be added along the way, check out www.timdaviesmusic.com. au for more details.

GIG GUIDE Submit your events to

gigs@warpmagazine.com.au

The annual Global Battle of the Bands is on again, with the Hobart regional heat on Thursday July 3 at The Republic Bar. Any upcoming band seeking a spot in the play off needs to email redletter@bigpond.com or call 02 9519 3978 as soon as possible. Further infomation can be obtained from www.gbob.com. GET YOUR TEETH INTO THIS MUFFIN

HAYDEN JAMES CARRIES ON THE PARTY

The Sinking Teeth are the name of the band and You Can’t Build a Bike Out of Muffins is the name of the tour. There is DEFINITELY a HILARIOUS gag in there somewhere, but

One of the most recognizable faces in Australian music, the frontman for Rose Tatoo, Angry Anderson is spending a couple

Editor Nic Orme

If you’re looking for something to do after the Rufus gig st Wrest Point Casino on Saturday June 14, PlanB has got you covered, yo. Rock along after 11pm, give the door person $15, go inside, party. That’s all ya gotta do. On the 1’s and 2’s and probably 3’s and 4’s and a laptop, will be Future Classic favourite, Hayden James. His completely awesome tune “Permission to Love” has been doing the rounds lately, and for good reason. Supporting Monsieur James will be Hobart’s own Sexy Lucy and DJ No Regrets. Wear your best leisure suit and plan for a big one! PARTY TIMES

STILL ANGRY

ART Andrew Harper

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MUSICAL BATTLES

THE UNBREAKABLE DAMAGE

DOGS DAY IN

Tasmanian pianist, Jennifer Marten-Smith joins TSO musicians, Monica Naslow, violin, William Newbery, viola and Brett Rutherford, cello in concerts of piano chamber music on Saturday June 7 and Sunday June 8. Since returning home after a distinguished career overseas, Jennifer has been kept very busy guesting with the TSO, and performing as a soloist chamber musician. The concerts will take place at two of Virtuosi Tasmania’s favourite venues, Home Hill Winery, Ranelagh and The Hans Vonk Music House at Spreyton. On the evening of Saturday June 7, the concert will take place in the beautifully restored Epsom House at Pontville.

of weeks touring around Tasmania this June with The James Southwell Band. We arent sure exactly everywhere he is playing but we know it's going to be somewhere close to you, so if you are fun keep an eye out for a bald guy with heaps of tatoos cruizing through your town this month. We do however know he will be playing at The Republic Bar on Friday June 20.

Writers Mark Acheson, Shane Crixus, Kylie Cox, Dane Hunnerup, Olivia Durst, Lisa Dibb, Stephanie Eslake, Andrew Harper, Erin Lawler, Chloe Mayne, Nic Orme, Ella Richmond, Lucinda Shannon, Daniel Townsend NEWS Submit your press releases plus publicity images through to the appropriate editor for consideration.

ALL SUBMISSIONS REMAIN THE PROPERTY OF WARP MAGAZINE. ALL CONTENT IS COPYRIGHT TO WARP MAGAZINE AND CANNOT BE REPRODUCED IN WHOLE OR PART WITHOUT WRITTEN AUTHORISATION OF THE PUBLISHERS. WARP MAGAZINE makes no guarantees, warranties or representations of any kind, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy, reliability, or completeness of the information provided. WARP MAGAZINE will not be liable for incorrect use of the information and will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result from the use of the information. WARP MAGAZINE is not responsible of any kind arising out of use, reference to, or reliance on such information. The opinions expressed in Warp Magazine and Warp online do not necessarily reflect those of the editors or publishers.


I haven’t had any coffee yet today so I have no what it is. Anyway, The Sinking Teeth are a post-punk rock band from good ol’ Melbournia, and they’re playing a couple shows in good ol’ Tasmania next month. On Friday July 4 you’ll be able to catch them at The Brisbane Hotel in Hobart, and on Saturday July 5 you’ll be able to catch them at The Pav in Launceston. Both gigs will feature The Grenadiers on support. If postpunk-rock is your thing, check ‘em out.

THE FEATURE DJ

LLOYD ADDS ANOTHER DATE Old mate Lloyd Cole sure does get around. Seems like we’re always seeing him on these here music news mean streets. Struttin’ around like he owns the place. Who does he think he is? Tasmania get’s two opportunities to ask him that, in person. One of those opportunities will be on Friday July 4 at MONA in Berriedale. It’s an “In Conversation” dealy, he’ll be talking about music, which he should know a bit about. Tickets are $20 + bf and are available via the MONA website. On Saturday July 5, he’ll be doing a regular old music gig at Red Hot Music in Launceston, tickets for that one are $35 and are available from the store. Get along to either gigs and ask him who he thinks he is. Go on. GET FUNKY

If you’re a fan of good music, you too, would have been a bit annoyed that Melbourne funk outfit Saskwatch left poor old Taswegia off their national album launch tour when they announced it recently. Fortunately, they saw the error of their ways and added us to the list. They’ll be playing one night only in Hobart, at The Waratah Hotel on Friday, July 11. Their latest album (their second), Nose Dive, has already received rave reviews on tha interwebz and in traditional, old school media. Catch Saskwatch w/ Special Guests on Friday July 11, doors open 9pm. Tickets are $17 Pre or $22 on the night, and are available through oztix.com.au, or at the venue.

How would one describe a Mr. Roland Tings? Quirky, electronicy, synthy, dancey, technoey, acid trippy, I dunno-ey. He sure makes some good stuff though, and is definitely worth checking out any time he’s in town. Guess what? He’s gonna be in town real soon! And is definitely worth checking out! He’ll be playing in Hobart at The Homestead on Friday July 18. This is all we know for now. So please go to the Homestead facebook page and constantly press “refresh” until they give us more details. Post on their wall asking to know more. Send them private messages. Call them. Email them. Be relentless. There is a Tiger inside you, set it free, on The Homestead.

(although you have to have just turned 18 to make this one). Don’t wanna get you in trouble with your olds huh? They just don’t understand. They were never young and cool, like you are. MAKE A COMMITMENT TO SEE THE COMMITMENTS

BONJAH TIMES

Featurecast is a man on a mission to funk his way across the globe, bringing his unique brand of mid-tempo Breaks, Hip-Hop, Funk and Bass to venues and festivals all over the world. He kicked off 2014 playing the main stage at Australia’s biggest break beat festival - Breakfest. He can add that to an already impressive list of festivals including Glastonbury, Bestival, Beat Herder, Fusion festival and Shambhala, Canada. Now, here in Hobart, Tasmania, on Friday 11 July 2014, Featurecast is set to go beyond anything he could have imagined in his wildest dreams. He is taking the next step into the stratosphere of arena tours. He’s going super saiyan on the music industry, because, ya know, he’s playing a set at The Homestead on Elizabeth Street.

Bonjah are back with their most extensive national tour yet, supporting their brand new critically acclaimed record Beautiful Wild. Playing 20 shows across six states, the guys want to thank their fans in all corners of Australia. They’ll be thanking their fans in both corners (well, both ends) of the state in September by playing at Hotel New York in Launceston on Friday September 5, then travelling down the highway to play at The Republic Bar & Café in Hobart on Saturday September 6. Check both venues respective websites to get all the deets on the tix, then get yourself along for a night of awesome bluesy rock swagger. THE PRINCE OF HOP

ROLLING WITH ROLAND

The Commitments! Remember that/them/ it? If you do, you should definitely head along to Wrest Point Casino Showroom on Friday October 10! Andrew Strong will be playing there! He’ll be bringing his The Commitments Years & Beyond album to you in the form of a live show. What a top bloke. It’s part of a mammoth international tour that’ll see him going around Australia twice in the period of a few months. What a busy, jet setting, top bloke. For more information on the Tasmanian leg of his nearly-neverending-world-tour, keep an eye on www. tixtas.com.au, you’ll be able to get all the details on all the tickets.

So tattooed pinup boy rap singer 360 is back with another huge tour. I dunno what he‘s doing this time, probably bringing hologram Madden twins with him or something. They seem like they’d be a good match. Anyway, this time he’s hitting up the Uni bar in Hobart on Wednesday September 10. I’m sure there’ll be more details available pretty damn soon, keep an eye out on the interwebz. So yeah, there’s something to put in your new fangled iPad diary app. Hope it’s an early show as so it doesn’t interfere with your teenager curfew

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Music

THE WORLD WITHIN SYDNEY BAND RUFUS HAVE CAPTURED THE HEARTS OF MODERN MUSIC LOVERS AROUND THE COUNTRY WITH THEIR UNIQUE BLEND OF INDIE-DANCE TUNES, AND SCORED SPOTS ON SOME OF THE BIGGEST SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVALS THIS YEAR INCLUDING THE FALLS FESTIVAL AND BIG DAY OUT. THEY ALSO SCORED THREE SPOTS IN THE TRIPLE J HOTTEST 100 WITH ‘TAKE ME’, ‘DESERT NIGHT’, AND ‘TONIGHT’. THE LAST FEW DAYS HAVE BEEN SPENT RACING ALL OVER SYDNEY, SHOOTING THE CLIP FOR THEIR NEXT SINGLE ‘SUNDREAM’.

“We’ve been running around a lot, shooting the video for the release of ‘Sundream’,” RUFUS drummer James Hunt says.

venue, hotel, plane, venue, hotel, plane. We’re trying to take a few days off here and there on this tour to just look around. We want to see places.”

“We originally never thought to push it as a single, but it gets such a strong reaction from people when we play it we decide to release it. With the way buying music has changed, there’s more emphasis on individual singles as opposed to buying a whole album now.”

“We’re also trying to get healthy, and going to try running, which we’ll start in the US. This is our job and we love it. Not everyone gets to do something they love as their job, so we need to be professional about it and look after ourselves too.”

“Then we’re heading to the US, which we are pretty excited about.”

The icing on the cake in this is amazing journey is the band’s debut album Atlas going Gold.

James and the band have had limited experience in the states, but despite a few last minute visa hiccups they’ve finished packing their bags and are pumped for the journey ahead. “We did a few showcases there a few years ago and that’s about it. When we first started writing our album, we really never thought we’d be touring on it internationally, or still touring on it six months after its release. It’s really blown our minds.” It’s looking like this tour will exceed all their expectations – a sold out show in San Francisco and ticket sales going through the roof on their other dates, plus shows at SXSW and dates in Canada all before heading to Europe. “The reaction to our shows has shown us we’ve got far more of a fan base in the US than we ever imagined. The joy of the internet is that it gives a much wider audience the accessibility to your music.” The boys are set to spend four weeks in North America before performing at Colorado’s biggest music festival Snowball. They’ll then head out to Europe, playing gigs in England, Scotland, Amsterdam, and Paris. “We only ever played showcases in Europe, now we get to play our own shows. Normally on tour it’s simply

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Atlas reached number on the ARIA Charts in August 2013 – a massive boost for the trio after investing so much time into the record. The same time the previous year saw them recording the album on the country property Berry, soaking up the atmosphere and using the isolation to their creative advantage. “It’s a really inspiring location. We were playing tennis and all our favourite albums and being generally being inspired. That shaped the initial stage of the album, a really bright and euphoric kind of feeling, which is basically what we felt while we were there,” James says. “We never thought it would get legs of this nature when we were writing and recording it. The fact is, it’s still selling six months after it got released. It’s amazing how far beyond our expectations it has gone. It has been this beautiful series of milestones, and we are so grateful and appreciative of what’s happening with it.” The success of the record has proved a potent experience for this particular band. James, Jon George and Tyrone Lindqvist were encouraged to put the album together by DJ Ajax (Adrian Thomas), a man who had influenced the band since the very beginning; who had performed with them, and who very

much appreciated their unique style. RUFUS joined Ajax’s label Sweat It Out earlier in 2013 to record their debut. The renowned DJ, who was an important figure in the Australian electronic music scene, tragically died in a road accident in February 2013, but James still talks about him with high regard. “He was someone we really respected in the scene and who we always looked up to, and then we got such a good response from him about the album.” “It was really sad when he passed. But at the same time, his enthusiasm spread throughout Sweat It Out and they got really behind it, which is really amazing and beautiful. A really bitter sweet process, I think.” Despite the bumpy road to the success of their debut, RUFUS will keep pushing through to write a new album after relocating to Berlin in July. But before that happens, there’s a huge 15 stop Australian Tour to get sorted, including a date with Tassie audiences at Hobart’s Wrestpoint Casino. “Straight after we get back from US and Europe, we are back into it with the biggest run of shows we’ve ever done in Australia. It will be a nice way to finish off the run we’ve had since the album. It’s a way to say goodbye to the fans before we disappear for a few months to Berlin.” KYLIE COX AND ERIN LAWLER

The Hobart Rufus show has sold out.


Music

HOBART’S UNDERBELLY DARK. DIFFERENT. DEVIOUS. THIS YEAR’S DARK MOFO IS SET TO UNLEASH TWO WEEKENDS OF AFTER-DARK ACTION STARTING JUNE 13. THE BRISBANE HOTEL WILL HOST GRIMOIRE – A CELEBRATION OF LIVE MUSIC AND MAD ART INSTALLATIONS UNTIL JUNE 20.

First batter up on stage will be Melbourne’s self-managed Indie-punk band Baseball. With an oddly contrasting array of influences – some, gypsy musicians from the Middle East and Eastern Europe, and others, bands including The Ex, The Pixies, and Led Zeppelin –Baseball have concocted a unique sound which has appealed to audiences in Russia, Scandinavia, the United States, United Kingdom, continental Europe, Japan, and Taiwan, here they come to little old Hobart. Small Black Lambs will create a sense of spaciousness with their stoner-rock hits. The band’s wickedly echoey, reverbladen track ‘City of Gold’ was featured on Community 3 – a Compilation of Hobart Music, produced locally by Rough Skies Records. Indie-punk band Naked are also from our mad little town, and with their raw and liberated sounds they don’t hold much back. Band members Rober Fisher, Sam Harrison, Jordan Marson, and Kieran Sullivan have described their influences as “kitchens, bedrooms, and rubbish bins.” Hitting the stage solo and in true Grimoire style is Smutty Sam. Smutty has been creeping onto the scene for years, developing a style which is always intense, usually dark, and unquestionably original. Hobart’s self-described “riot girl boy band accident punk theatre joke” DogTower are perhaps most notable for their bold subject matter. As the band stated on Facebook, “since one of our songs was about periods, I think it is a good opportunity to acknowledge that not all women experience periods and that being a woman is not about biology. We will be playing this song, which is about the period shaming that some women experience.” Be prepared for a post-gig sociological debate. Evelyn Morris from Melbourne, who is also the drummer for Baseball, started an ambitious solo career in 2003 using a mixture of instruments and loop pedal. She’s released three albums and toured them across three continents. In case you were wondering, the name comes from Evelyn’s childhood memories of her mother, who spoiled her with pikelets. Hot bands The Threshold Form, Gutters, Ruiner, and The Cleaner Treehouse will be joined by dark ambient Hobart musical project Ecclesiastical Scaffolding, and Philadelphia alternative hard rock band Cycle. DJ BTC will head the pre-recorded musical movement. And that’s just in the first night.

June 14 and 15 will see Graveyard Train and Dead Maggies take to the stage. Melbourne horror-country six-piece Graveyard Train are fresh off the release of new album Takes One to Know One and they’ll bring a taste of it with them to the Brisbane. The Dead Maggies, on the other hand, come from a little closer to home. The Tassie rock-thrash-punk band have performed with every band under the sun, including the Crooked Fiddle Band and the Real McKenzies, and their songs tell tales of Tassie’s past to modern light punk. Their double bass, banjo, clarinet, and fiddle will charm your little socks off. On June 20, you’ll hear from the likes of Square Tony + the Arps, Toxic Lipstick, All the Weathers, B.A.A.D.D.D, Matthew Brown, Black Paul, Crypt Vapor, Oceans, Pip Stafford, Kitchen Witches, Olka Polka, Dracula, and Ironhawk. Sydney solo artist Rainbow Chan will also grace the stage with a mixture of the electronic and the acoustic. Influenced by Bjork, Chopin, and Timberlake, Rainbow Chan is trained in classical saxophone, piano, and choral music. Her fellow Sydney-sider Ela Stiles recently released a solo debut album exclusively featuring a-cappella performances, so get ready to hear the voice behind the genius. Brisbane punk-rock band Xero started way back in 1978, and has had a plethora of band members over the decades. They’ve got four albums under their belt – maybe after Grimoire, they’ll release a fifth. While it’s certainly a musical event to rock your night away, it just wouldn’t be MOFO without some crazy art installations to confuse you while you listen. Erin Linhart, who works in painting, sculpture, video, photography and drawing, describes herself as an “emerging visual rapist/ make believe performance artist.” Her work will be displayed alongside that of Ali Pyrke, whose handmade garments, costumes, and accessories are quirky, cute, and a little bit creepy. Josh Pringle, occasionally inspired by succulents, creates stylishly hand drawn creatures and designs – and sculptures with big nipples. Like Josh, Brain Foetus also works in Tasmania and the self-taught artist is extremely talented in the realm of street art and graffiti. She is inspired by artists within the same style including Brooklyn’s Swoon and Australia’s Miso and Ghostpatrol, as well as nature’s beauties such as flowers and trees. Jacob Leary is another one of our gems – and a studious one at that. Jacob finished his Masters of Fine Arts at UTAS in 2012, having created a multimedia installation which explores technology in contemporary culture. His works in painting, printmaking, installation, and sculpture have awarded him prizes such as the John Fries Memorial Prize and a National Award for Emerging Visual Artists during his final year at uni. This year, the artist received an Australia Council grant to continue his work. His pieces have been displayed in many galleries including the Despard, Plimsoll, and Long Gallery. Works by Georgia Lucy and Mia DonnetJones will also be on show at Grimoire – every single night. Check them out. Thank me later. STEPHANIE ESLAKE Grimoire is an 18+ event. The Dark MOFO celebration will run at the Brisbane Hotel from June 13 – 15 and June 20, with doors open from 10pm. Tickets are available from www.darkmofo. net.au.

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Music

OUT OF THE FIVE BOROUGHS CALIFORNIAN HARDCORE PUNK BAND THE BRONX ARE NO STRANGERS TO AUSTRALIAN SHORES. CELEBRATING TEN YEARS OF NOTORIOUSLY NUTS LIVE SHOWS AND TOURING A FOURTH ALBUM, THE BOYS ARE GOING BACKCOUNTRY FURTHER THAN EVER BEFORE, CROSSING THE DITCH INTO THE DEPTHS OF DARK MOFO.

The festival (plus shows in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney) marks the eighth consecutive year the band has toured in Australia, a place guitarist Joby J. Ford likens to the band’s home state. ‘Our whole band loves Australia. It’s like California junior, or maybe we’re Australia junior. The weather is fantastic, people are nice, the shows are good. You can actually eat food there. There are certain countries where flavour is illegal and that sounds like me bitchin’ but man it wears on you! I just want to eat something that tastes like something!’ Hailing Australian bands The Victims and Lime Spiders as forbears of punk and garage, Joby says the band is happy playing in a country whose musical heritage they deem as “the classics.” ‘People talk about British punk or Southern rock, but we’re like dude Australian rock is ferocious! There’s this unsung, underground punk-rock/ garage thing that happened in Australia that I feel never got its shake; some of the most fantastic records I’ve heard and people are like, ‘who the fuck is that?’ Such incredible bands that I guess, when they came out, were so far away from anything else.’

During their Soundwave slot in 2007, The Bronx covered The Victims song ‘Television Addict’ but according to Joby no one had heard of the song. ‘I was like, TV Addict man - this is the greatest song ever! No? Alright…’ Awks. Yet being ‘underground’ (to the point of non-existence) is something the boys are all too familiar with. Whilst the band are well-known for landing manager Jonathan Daniel at their first gig and initially turning down several deals from major record labels in favour of a DIY approach, the decade prior spent playing to empty bars - is less documented. ‘I was in a band called Let Down and we played at this club in Hollywood and by the time we were done everybody had left, except for the bartender. Everybody. We were that bad. A couple of years later we formed The Bronx, made a website and 11 record labels wanted to sign us, which was hilarious because we’d all been in bands for ten years playing to nobody, bands that everyone hated and were so bad, to a band that had 11 record deals on the table.’ Looking back, Joby admits their major label years and the fame that came with it did questionable things to his ego and wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be. ‘It was cool in certain aspects that don’t really mean anything. Major labels are huge machines that need to sell a zillion records to continue doing what they’re doing. They’re designed for people who can accept that life or who think that life is what music is, which in fact is the furthest thing from it. I look back on that time and I have no idea what anybody did, or what we did. We were going to dinners that cost $3000 and I’m thinking man, you could make a record for that. I always felt like the whole facade was more about their people enjoying life rather than spending money wisely or doing something for the band.’

The Bronx have since released four eponymous albums, formed their own label White Drugs and toured North America, Europe and Australia extensively for the past decade. Admitting they hit a creative wall after Bronx III, they swerved off the beaten track and released two albums of mariachi music under their alter ego Mariachi El Bronx. ‘We gave The Bronx a break so we could recharge creatively and sharpen our skills elsewhere so that we stayed connected and inspired to the music, rather than pumping out records for the sake of it,’ Joby says. Re-emerging last year under The Bronx banner, guns blazing and a fourth album to boot, Joby says the record is one of his favourites yet. ‘Something I’ve kind of been obsessed with is: do less, emulate more. That sounds weird, kind of hippy, but it’s sort of my thing now. It’s a very clean and simple record, it’s not as technically proficient as some of the other records we’ve made but it sounded right and felt like what we should be doing.” As well as writing the band’s music, Joby also does the graphic work for the album covers, defining each record by its artwork rather than a title. “I love bad rock art. Weird stuff with bad taste. I just did Every Time I Die’s new album, there’s rainbows and laser beams coming out of their eyeballs on the cover - it’s fantastic! Album art has always been the thing for me. I really care about records, I want to look at it and think what does that sound look like, and that’s what I always try to emulate in the covers I do.” Lucky for you and The Bronx, Dark Mofo has plenty of weird stuff, laser beams and a big-ass stage at The Odeon for the lads to flip their lid on so don’t be a punk and miss it. OLIVIA DURST The Bronx play Dark Mofo on Thursday June 19. More information available from www.darkmofo. net.au.

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Music

WHAT THE FOLK SURVIVING A RELATIONSHIP BREAK UP AND GOING ON TO BECOME A TRIPLE ARIA AWARD-WINNING ALT-FOLK OUTFIT IS NO MEAN FEAT. BUT ACHIEVING LONGEVITY IN TODAY’S MUSIC INDUSTRY IS ONE OF THE HARDEST TRICKS IN THE BOOK, UNLESS, PERHAPS, YOU’RE THE AUDREYS.

After a three year hiatus (excuses about procreating and new life experiences), the South Australian duo have released their fourth album, Til My Tears Roll Away, a much grittier, axe-heavy record with a familiar dose of fiddle for good measure. So what prompted The Audreys to get their rock on? “Tristan [Goodall] and I didn’t want to write an acoustic record,” front-woman Taasha Coates tells me. “We were getting sick of hearing acoustic guitars and banjos on the radio all the time, it was starting to really piss us off. We spent some time in the States about a year ago and there was a Mumford and Sons song that you literally couldn’t go anywhere without hearing. It was like it was the only song that had ever been recorded in the history of recorded music and there was this banjo part that to me, was just a little bit out of tune and I just heard it so many times that I thought if I hear one more fucking banjo it’s going through a window. We put the banjo in our first couple of records because we were really into it back then; now it’s at the top of Tristan’s cupboard. You naturally evolve and change and have different things you want to hear, and you don’t want to cover the same old ground.” It would seem that motherhood hasn’t softened Taasha one iota, describing the raw and spontaneous sound of the new album as “suiting her mood at the moment.” Tracking the album live with their regular backing band (who saw the

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songs once or twice before recording), the four day turn-around time was a deliberate move to avoid over-cooking it and because, “I’m trying to be a mum as well!” So it’s buttered her up a little. Taasha and I talk about her 2 ½ year-old son Finlay, his new red truck and her failed attempt at making yellow play-dough (“It looks like a big lump of wet sand”), followed by an admission that longevity in her music career is now, more than ever, “kind of necessary.” “It’s a lot of work making a record and in Australia the numbers of records you sell barely covers the cost of making it. It becomes quite hard to justify doing it when you get a bit older and have kids. You can’t go, oh well I’m 23 so who cares if I’m working my ass off and not making any money and if sometimes I eat cornflakes for dinner. When you’ve got a family you can’t justify that anymore.” Not surprisingly, these industry stalwarts have a few side- projects in the pipeline, including a new publishing deal in the US and a likely appearance there (their last at SXSW in Austin, Texas last year) to go ahead soon. “We’ve always had a really good response in the US which is why we keep going back,” Taasha says. “A niche genre in America can still sell a lot of records; some of those big country artists sell 100 million copies. You just can’t compete with that over here. You can’t make a living in Australia unless you’re a big pop artist, and even then it’s probably pretty difficult because people aren’t buying records like they used to.” Despite industry short-comings, Taasha seems relaxed and level-headed about the whole business. An Aria per album ain’t bad after all. When asked if she feels any pressure to pocket a fourth she replies, “Not anymore. I really felt that on the second record but I don’t think about that anymore. My three Arias look very nice on my piano; if I had a fourth the whole mise en scène would be out!”

With no intention of hanging their boots up anytime soon Taasha says the band will definitely make a couple more records. “I don’t know about ten more years though, we’ll see. It might be up to my kids at that point. They’ll probably tell me I’m too old and to stay at home; they’ll be really embarrassed!” Right now the band’s hunger to get back on the road couldn’t be stronger. “I love touring,” says Taasha. “You can’t be a musician if you don’t love touring.” With her lads in tow, the ballsy balladeers are kicking off a national tour in June, taking in seven states and performing capital city and regional shows. Despite less than balmy conditions predicted, Taasha says she’s looking forward to a Tasmanian sea change. “Hobart is one of the prettiest cities in Australia. I like that it centres around that really pretty harbour; I live up in the hills 45kms from the coast so for me it feels very different.” With a new fire in their bellies and sleazy guitar riffs up their sleeves, punters can expect to hear the bulk of Til My Tears Roll Away, a few old faves, a traditional cover request (nominations welcomed via their Facebook) and plenty of friendly banter - don’t miss these cunning old dogs perform new tricks. OLVIA DURST

See The Audreys play one of their three Tasmanian shows this month. Starting in Launceston on Thursday June 26, they then travel to Devonport on the Friday to play at Tapas Lounge Bar, before heading south to Hobart on the Saturday to perform at The Republic Bar. Tickets for all shows are available via www.moshtix.com.au.


Music

A CHOIR OF A TIME

FESTIVAL OF VOICES MAY BE CELEBRATING ITS 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY, BUT ITS LINEUP PROVES IT’S HOTTER THAN EVER. WITH PERFORMANCES FROM BIG STARS INCLUDING CLARE BOWDITCH AND BEN LEE, HOBART WILL BE ROCKING A FESTIVAL THE NATION WILL ENVY BETWEEN JULY 4-13.

From the Federation Concert Hall to the intimately decorated City Hall, Hobart is dressing up for some of the biggest gigs of the year. The popular Voicebox festival series will once again see the City Hall clothed in red velvet and offer adequate amounts of cocktails for a range of performances. Curated by New York cabaret artist Kim Smith, the series boasts an impressive international lineup. New York’s cabaret drag artist Joey Aria has been on the scene foår three decades and he’ll bring his seductive jazz vocals right to our doorstep. “Joey Arias is one of my all-time favourite performers,” Kim said in a statement.  “He’s an impossibly beautiful creature with an exquisite, rare voice and the mind of an ancient madam. I’m really proud to have him appear as part of Voicebox.”  Also gracing the local stage from the U.S of A. is Erin Markey, who will perform as part of her Aussie premiere, and Jane Badler, who Kim describes as evoking “pure sex appeal and mischief on stage. I can’t wait to see her ensnare Hobart with her charms.” Hot and bothered? You will be. But the most anticipated events of the Festival of Voices are one-night-only concerts by Ben Lee and Clare Bowditch – both in the classy Federation Concert Hall.

Clare Bowditch’s songwriting abilities have seen her win an ARIA, chart her albums in the Top Ten, and named Rolling Stone’s Woman of the Year (Contribution to Culture). Among other daily activities, she’s co-written with Gotye and gone on tour with none other than Leonard Cohen. While she’ll perform a sure-to-be sell out gig at the Hall, she’s also set to hold a three-hour workshop so that you can pinch all her vocal and songwriting hints. Ben Lee, on the other hand, is down straight from L.A. for a one-night-stand with Hobart audiences. Having started out as a child prodigy, his unusual past includes a musical family in which his great uncle performed as the Russian court of Czar Nicholas’ official violinist. Inspired by the science of human nature, Ben has also scored a bundle of ARIAS and reached total fame with his hit ‘Catch My Disease’ back in 2005. “I’m really looking forward to spending some time with the workshop participants and performing at the Festival of Voices,” Ben said in a statement.  “While I’m not a technical singer by any means, I’ve always believed that a unique voice is all about the authenticity and communication of intention. Looking forward to coming to Hobart and getting to know the singers, their voices, and what they each have in their hearts to share.” Not technical not schmectical – he’ll share his mad talent in his very own 90 minute vocal workshop and then we’ll see who’s laughing. Among the headline acts are some other treats such as the family event, Little Red Riding Hood and the Wolf – and surely, I don’t need to explain this one for you. But I do need to tell you it’ll start Monica Trapaga, Craig M. Wood and Ryk Goddard  - so it’ll be bigger than the little girl’s booties.

Local artist Craig Wellington will be back with his Craig Wellington and Friends event, which previously sold out as part of the 2013 Voicebox performances. The popular Legally Blonde the Musical will visit the Playhouse Theatre, while Perfect Tripod will sing Australian Songs at the Theatre Royal. Also hitting up the Federation Concert Hall after touring Europe with the Backstreet Boys is The Exchange, who fuse pop, gospel, rock, opera, hip hop and R&B with its multitude of members. These guys have performed alongside Olly Murs, Lou Bega, Ben Folds, Flo Rida, and Wynton Marsalis – so you’re in good hands. They’ll also be releasing their new album this year before hitting up another international tour. A unique event will be held between June 14-15 for anyone and everyone looking to start up their own business in the arts. The Entrepreneurial Leadership in Practice course allows participants to talk through and develop their business ideas with advice from speakers such as Lara Giddings and Jac Bowie. If you’re still in the mood for learning, gospel great Eric Dozier will give a short course on blues, spirituals and everything in between at the Long Gallery, while the Hobart Town Hall will house lovers of classical music as esteemed conductor David Lawrence gives a workshop on Mozart’s Requiem. For a more intimate series of performances, head to the Rosny Barn to hear singers from around the world including Melody Beck, Will Ferguson, Allison Farrow, Andrew Short, Claire Dawson, Fiona Stewart, and Emma Bennison. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

For more information on the Festival Of Voices performances go to www. festivalofvoices.com.

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JUNE BOTTLESHOP SPECIALS

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale $20 per six pack Storm Bay 2008 Pinot Noir & Storm Bay 2011 Merlot $16 per bottle or 2 for $30 Sailor Jerry 700ml $40 per bottle

$4 SCHOONERS OF BEER AND CIDER phone: 6234 3685 272 Murray Street, Hobart

Johnny Q 2010 Shiraz $13 per bottle

www.thewaratahhotel.com.au


Music

TALK IS CHEAP NICK MURPHY, AKA CHET FAKER, IS ONE OF THE BIGGEST ENTITIES IN AUSTRALIAN MUSIC RIGHT NOW, SECOND ONLY TO HIS BEARD. HIS COVER OF R&B ANTHEM “NO DIGGITY”, AN ACCIDENTAL VIRAL SENSATION, AND SUBSEQUENT EP THINKING IN TEXTURES, CATAPULTED HIM TO INTERNATIONAL FAME, LEADING TO A STRING OF WORLDWIDE SHOWS, COLLABORATIONS AND AWARDS BEFORE HE’D EVEN DROPPED A DEBUT ALBUM.

Fast track two years and Murphy’s first LP Built on Glass cruised to the top of the ARIA charts following its release last month. Yet for all the hype that currently surrounds him, this disarmingly genuine, low-key Melbournian exudes subtlety and restraint in all he does. “I wrote about four albums worth of songs before finishing Built on Glass,” Murphy tells me. “It was a much bigger process than I initially anticipated. Canning stuff was liberating though, because you’re paying attention to that gut instinct, which is almost always right.” Recorded in his home studio over a twoyear period, the twenty-five year old EDM Soul artist wrote the songs about his own personal experiences and performed every instrument featured on the album, bar one – his friend Cleopold pinched the guitar solo on ‘Dead Body’. “He’s the nicest dude,” Murphy says. “But it annoyed me, because I feel like you only get one debut album. I wanted to end my days looking back going yeah, I did that. My mate was like, chill out man, just give me a go, you don’t have to use it! Then he plays this

amazing solo in two takes and I’m like… Fuck you!” Moral of the story? “Don’t hang out with talented friends or shit like that’s going to happen - aim so low!” Admitting his music is extremely personal to him, and that he “overthinks everything,” Murphy says Built on Glass is a metaphor with multiple meanings. “One of the metaphors for glass is honesty, the idea of being transparent, and in order to do that there is a fragility involved. Glass can also be strong, it can be beautiful as well. You can take the mundane and by framing it in glass it can totally change how it’s perceived, like in a gallery. I thought that was kind of appropriate because essentially what I’m doing is producing an album based entirely on my life, which is mundane. I don’t live some crazy exciting life, I’m just another person, but because it’s put in that musical format it’s consumable.” The sensitive, new-age hipster isn’t wrong. His evocative ‘Talk is Cheap’ video clip is nudging two million hits on Youtube, and links with Murphy’s minimalistic approach to the album: “I knew that if we could get a clip to work with just one camera angle, one single frame and one shot then the content had to be quality. That is what the song is about, quality over quantity,” he says.

artists make EDM and Soul so people think they must all be a part of that!” “Genres are just temporary things to help people explain what they’re listening to, but people get caught up with it. Sometimes people forget the label is only there to be useful and they think it’s the way the world works and then they argue about it, which is not useful. The irony is palpable because you’re actually undercutting the only reason it was ever defined which was to make life easier, not more complicated.” Whatever multi-hyphenated name you want to give it, Murphy’s sound seems to have the mixture right. He says that the “humanness” of soul and limitless possibilities of electronica captivate him, but that ultimately he doesn’t see much difference between acoustic and digital instruments. “It’s all music, people think of them as separate entities just because ones been around longer but they’re the same thing, you just have more colours to choose from. They’re just more tools, it’s about how they’re used. You still need to tell a story, you need emotions. Built on Glass wasn’t about trying to achieve a specific style, what I wanted was a feeling. It’s hard to articulate because that’s not what music is really about.” OLIVIA DURST

“Actions speak louder than words, you don’t need to overdo something, you don’t need lofty descriptions and to dress things up. If the content’s there, that’s all that matters.” In response to claims that Murphy represents a burgeoning EDM Soul ‘scene’ in Australia he says, “People are obsessed with the idea of scenes. There are a lot of good Australian artists now so people refer to an Australian ‘scene!’ Some of the bigger

Chet Faker performs a soldout show in Hobart at The Odeon in July. Built on Glass is available now via Future Classic.

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Music

LIFE FROM TOP OF THE WOODCHIP PILE THE VIEW IS A WHOLE LOT BETTER WHEN YOU’RE AT THE TOP OF THE MUSIC INDUSTRY GAME. IT’S EVEN MORE REWARDING WHEN YOU’RE 17-YEARS-OLD. PERCHED COMFORTABLY AS THE NUMBER ONE POSITION ON THE TRIPLE J UNEARTHED CHARTS IN JUNE LAST YEAR, YOUNG INDIE ROCKERS URSINE REALISED THEY WEREN’T KIDS ANYMORE.

That song was CloudBerries, and guitarist Jack Howe said it was an important first step the Burnie outfit needed to take. A Tasmanian Rock Challenge win also complemented their success last year, but 2014 brings a new level of excitement and maturity. With the average age of the six piece now 18-years-old, the boys are off to Melbourne to promote their just released EP, Everything Looks Better. “This is the first time we are heading over to Melbourne to play some shows. As part of the Everything Looks Better Tour, we are playing at the Espy on the 4th and we are doing a special warehouse show in Richmond on the 5th of July. The warehouse show is going to be the best; we can’t wait to release the details to everyone. It’s going to be insane amounts of fun.”

So when the parents go away, who ya gonna call? Your band mates of course. Howe explained the band’s unique approach to writing their EP. “We wrote most of it at our drummer Alex’s house. His parents were out for three or four days so we just lived at his place and wrote a heap of music. Nick also turned 18 and Jack watched Anchorman for the first time. Those were a momentous couple of days. The influences vary a lot, there is a bit of The Jungle Giants and The Kooks throughout the EP. It’s got upbeat indierock vibes going on for the most part, but it also gets a bit darker with some Queens of The Stone Age influences on the closing track Wolves. We have also done a bit of work with Perth MC Purpose for a remix that is going to be released later in the year. So oddly enough that hip-hop influenced the whole process as well.”

The froff rockers evoke a sound similar to the Arctic Monkeys, Two Door Cinema Club and FIDLAR. Their new EP doesn’t fall far from these sounds. Living on the NorthWest Coast, where pub rock is the average man’s staple music diet, hasn’t hindered the band’s enthusiasm. “It would be easy to give you the whole “it’s so hard to be successful coming from a small town” but it’s really not true. Yes, there have been limitations starting out on the North-West Coast, but the community support we have from here is so good that any negative aspects seem kind of insignificant. For example, our home town of Burnie only has one main regular live music venue. Our music isn’t really what they are after in there, but there was a show once where we filled their dance floor with pretty much everyone we knew by name. That was so rad.” Ursine members promote what other bands lack: fun. It sounds cliché, but their sincere approach to playing music is refreshing. This is evident when you catch them live. Howe looks at his guitar like it’s his new born child, and drummer Alex Raw could easily play blindfolded. Stressed, depressed or tired? Listen to Ursine, because heck, life will look better once you do. MARK ACHESON

Ursine’s EP, Everything Looks Better, is out from June 1. For more information head to www. facebook.com/UrsineOfficial.

DREAMY DRONES DON’T BE SURPRISED IF YOU FEEL THE URGE TO PINCH YOURSELF AT AMAYA LAUCIRICA’S GIGS IN HOBART NEXT MONTH; AUSTRALIA’S QUEEN OF DREAM POP CAN HAVE THAT TRANSCENDING EFFECT ON PEOPLE. UPON THE RELEASE OF HER LATEST ALBUM, SWAY, THE MELBOURNEBASED SINGER-SONGWRITER ENLIGHTENED ME ON THE CREATIVE PROCESSES BEHIND HER ETHEREAL SOUNDS.

“I’ve never felt comfortable constructing a song with a narration,” Laucirica explains. “It feels more natural to describe emotions and create a sensory feeling. My lyrics are usually quite abstract, in that they’re not really telling a story from A to B. They are abstract descriptions of feelings and things, which I guess gives it another dimension of dreaminess. Where you’re not really sure where you are in the song, you more feel like you’re being taken to a place rather than being told a story.” The soft-spoken gal from Millicent South Australia (population three pubs) has a visceral style that’s evident across her albums, most notably in Sway. Her debut EP Sugar Lights (2008) and defining second album Early Summer (2010) saw Rolling Stone magazine name Laucirica as one of ten exciting new female voices in Australian music and a nomination for female artist of the year at The Age EG awards in 2011. Rather than churning out another album in quick succession, Laucirica took a year off to “dig deeper” into a richer rhythmical landscape. “I’ve always written quite immediately so there was a bit of trepidation but I needed to figure out where I wanted to go. For a second you think, maybe I should be pumping out stuff rather than sitting around thinking about what that should be.” But regurgitation isn’t really her style and the time off gave Laucirica renewed purpose and a fresh approach to her music.

a second-hand Roland Juno synthesiser which, she says, led to a flood of new songs and a hopefulness in her music, most evident in the album’s first single Found Some Secret. “[The song] is describing the sense that I’ve found something meaningful out of this journey, but I have no idea where I’m going...a lot of the songs are based on notions of hope, even redemption. Instinctively, that’s how I feel about life right now, so I think that just comes out in my songs.” Complimenting Laucirica’s beguiling vocals are performances by JP Shilo (Hungry Ghosts) and Sam and Adam Sherry (A Dead Forest Index); also featured is Adalita (Magic Dirt) who played alongside Laucirica during her debut show in Tasmania at The Republic Bar three years ago. Laucirica will once again grace the stage at The Republic Bar this month, and is even squeezing in a sneaky afternoon set at Mona, where the subversive vibes (and the odd peacock) are sure to bring on a synth-induced out-of-body experience for listeners. Laucirica plans to start writing a fourth album before the year is out, and has Europe in her sights, so check her out locally while you can. OLIVIA DURST

“I felt like I was writing backwards to [how I wrote] Early Summer. I wrote the songs on Sway from the middle outwards…the rhythm and mood of the song dictated what the song was going to be about, so it was much more experimental and curious.” The bulk of the songs on Sway features Laucirica’s new favourite play-toy,

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See Amaya perform in the Void space at Mona on Sunday June 8 from 1pm, followed by an evening show at The Republic Bar from 9pm as support for Things Of Stone And Wood.


Music

IT’S SLIM JIM, BUT NOT AS WE KNOW IT SLIM JIM PHANTOM, THE LEGENDARY DRUMMER OF THREE-PIECE ROCKABILLY STARS THE STRAY CATS, LIVES A LIFE OF ROCK AND ROLL. SPREADING HIS PASSION ACROSS NUMEROUS BANDS OVER THE LAST FOUR DECADES SLIM JIM HAS ASSERTED HIMSELF NOT JUST AS A TALENTED DRUMMER WITH A DISTINCT STYLE BUT AS A FIGUREHEAD FOR THE GENRE OF ROCKABILLY. HE IS HEADING TO HOBART FOR THE FIRST TIME THIS MONTH AS PART OF HIS AUSTRALIAN SOLO TOUR.

The Stray Cats started their career in 1979, performing regularly in Long Island, New York. The three young men who made up the band, singer/guitarist Brian Setzer, double bass player Lee Rocker and drummer Slim Jim Phantom, had tapped into a form of 1950s rock and roll that appealed instantly to music fans. The band moved to London in 1980, where 50s rock and roll was enjoying a revival, and quickly won the attention of musician and producer Dave Edmunds. By 1981 Stray Cats had recorded their debut self titled album, which almost immediately surged to popularity in the UK, gaining places in the Top Ten Pop Charts. Slim Jim Phantom was not yet 20 when they entered the studio, but points out that though young, these three cats had worked extremely hard for their early success. As well as a pinch of luck, he says, it was “also opportunity and preparation.” “We’d been playing in New York for a year and a half, five nights a week, four sets a night after school in the day time, you know. So it wasn’t an accidental thing,

we worked very hard at it, even at that young age. We loved it and we worked hard.” Music was Slim Jim’s calling from an early age. “Oh let’s see,” he says, recollecting his early days of drumming. “I started playing drums when I was back at school, I was 11 or 12. I always wanted to be in a rock and roll band, the drums were something that early on I thought I could do. And I kept at it, I never looked back.” Slim Jim was influenced by his parents’ jazz records and consequently began learning a jazz drumming style. “Yeah, that was kind of what was available. The Swing beat always appealed to me,” so when the Stray Cats entered his life with their swinginfluenced rock and roll with its driving beats, he says, “I was well prepared for that.” Even when the Stray Cats introduced their own take on 50s rockabilly to New York and UK audiences in the 80s, it was a vintage genre of music. 30 years later, it is still popular, to niche audiences at least. Is it a timeless genre? “Oh, positively.” Slim Jim says. “I think it’s a timeless thing, but I do think that it has to be nudged along every now and again. Like, the Stray Cats did it, now it’s up to someone else to have a hit record. It’s going to take someone to keep it going.” I suggest that some modern rock music has lost an element of soul, and Slim Jim agrees, though he remembers the same feelings were expressed in the early 80s and throughout music history as styles evolved. Still, he comments, “That’s why I think it’s important that someone keeps it going. I think that it’s always going to seek to a certain amount of people.” And he should know; as well as his time with the Stray Cats, Slim Jim played in a number of rock and roll bands in the UK and the States, including Phantom, Rocker and Slick with famed guitarist Earl Slick, The Swing Cats with guitarist Danny B Harvey, The Head Cat with Lemmy Kilmister from Motorhead, and Dead Men Walking which included Glen Matlock from the Sex Pistols, and Captain Sensible of The Damned among its impressive line-up. Lately at home in LA he’s been hosting his own radio show The Big Beat, which takes listeners through the 50s rock and roll, jazz and swing greats of history. In what must be a refreshing change of scene, Slim Jim says he’s enjoying working by himself. For the meantime though, the live scene will be his focus. “Well for the next six months or so it’s kind of my own thing, it’s just me, I’m going to Australia, then back to the states, and then Europe (…)Yeah this year I’m focusing on the live thing.” The Stray Cats came down under numerous times during their career. “I always loved going to Australia,” he says. Slim Jim has never, though, been to Tasmania where rockabilly music takes a small but important place. Hobart’s show will include a set by supporting Melbourne psychobilly band Fireballs. ”I go to all of the support acts. They add something to it, if they love music like the stray cats, they can put their own little spin on it. Make it your own.” The drumming legend assures me that there will be a generous mix of songs in his upcoming shows. He says, “We’ll be playing stuff from our Stray Cats catalogue, some family favourites.” ERIN LAWLER Slim Jim Phantom plays at The Republic Bar on Thursday June 12, supported by Fireballs and Sin & Tonics.

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Music

ALL NATURAL IT’S BEEN A WHILE BETWEEN DRINKS FOR 90S FOLK ROCKERS THINGS OF STONE AND WOOD, BUT WITH THE 25 ANNIVERSARY OF THE ICONIC MELBOURNE BAND’S DEBUT THERE’S NO BETTER WAY TO CELEBRATE THAN GETTING A TOUR TOGETHER. PERHAPS BEST KNOWN FOR THE BREAKTHROUGH SINGLE, ‘HAPPY BIRTHDAY HELEN’, FRONT MAN GREG ARNOLD TELLS ME IT’S THE CHEMISTRY OF THEIR LIVE SHOWS THAT KEEPS THINGS OF STONE AND WOOD ON THE AUSTRALIAN MUSIC MAP.

I was wondering what was the motivation for getting Things of Stone and Wood back together for a tour? Obviously, there’s the anniversary factor but is there more to it than that? Its always a bit hard to get people in the same emotional and geographical states to all be in the right place to do it at any given time and this time it just felt right to do the shows and I mean I can speak for myself there’s just this sort of magic chemistry in that band that has always made it a really happening live band and the experience of playing in that band is a very satisfying musical thing. I think everyone enjoys that side of it, just getting together and playing that music. And with the passage of time we all have this very warm feeling about that time of our lives. So it’s really a bit of a love connection between the band? Absolutely. We’re really 90s hippies, you know. We really notice around the gigs and there’s just a fantastic feeling about that time. We didn’t expect it to resonate at quite at the level it seems to have done, but we’re thrilled about it of course. It feels like 25th anniversary was the right time.

So the name came from that and a little camping hut on the west coast of Victoria. That just kind of popped into my head. So given how technologized we are now do you think the music industry has changed significantly and is it harder for musicians to earn a crust? Well I think it’s a very interesting time in that we’ve undergone an accessibility revolution. Back when we started out, you… needed that budget to make a seriously big sounding record. You needed some sort of deal [with a record company] back in the day whereas now you can make records on your computer at home, really serious records. To use a famous Marxist analogy, the means of production actually are in the hands of the workers now. You can go and do it yourself. But that means in addition to a lot of incredible records being made by people on their home computers there’s so much more white noise I think it’s even harder to stand out at the moment. With everyone producing and everyone I guess listening to the same sounds across the country it does seem to become a lot harder to differentiate yourself or develop something unique.

because after a while you sort of go ‘you know, I’ve written some other songs’ but I don’t feel that at all. I love the song and I love its place in our life. Having said that I think I’ve written more melodic songs than Happy Birthday Helen, songs that I might consider to be better songs but I don’t think I’ve written a song that has so obviously connected with a lot of people in such a big way. A Hobart show has been added to your tour dates. Are you excited about coming down to the small island? There are a couple of reasons I’m looking forward to coming to Tassie. We did some fantastic gigs down there, just awesome and really fun so we have very fond memories from there as a band. And I have a soft spot for Hobart because I did my PhD there at UTAS. I just finished that last year so I’ve been spending a lot of time there so it’ll be nice to come down and do a Things of Stone and Wood show. I’m very excited to be coming down and playing at the Republic. I’ve played there myself a couple of times and I’ve played there with Carus a couple of times and it’s going to be fantastic to play there with the old Things of Stone and Wood. LUCINDA SHANNON

And so where did the name Things of Stone and Wood come from? I suppose it was sort of like a mission statement in some ways. I was in particular trying to shake off that over technologized stuff that was going on in the 80s and everything was kinda big and we just wanted to get back to some direct organic music. I was getting right into folkie stuff, especially that early 70s singer songwriter sound. It was quite a strident position that we wanted to do what we could with acoustic instruments.

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I think so. I mean the fact that [Things of Stone and Wood] started out as a live band I think that foundation of the band stands out, I think people appreciate that more now…I guess people really appreciate a firey live band. The song Happy Birthday Helen was a huge success and was a break through hit, but would you call it your personal favourite? I really love the song and I meet some people who often begrudge their big hit,

Things of Stone and Wood will play at the Republic on Sunday 8th June at 9pm.


Music

CEMETERY EFFICIENT PUBLIC TRANSPORT GRAVEYARD TRAIN HAVE COME A LONG WAY SINCE THEIR HUMBLE BEGINNINGS ON THE NORTH MELBOURNE PUB SCENE. THE COUNTRYMUSIC-MEETS-STONER-ROCK SIX-PIECE HAVE RELEASED A NEW RECORD, TAKES ONE TO KNOW ONE AND WILL BRING IT TO THE BRISBANE HOTEL ON JUNE 14 AND 15 AS PART OF DARK MOFO. SINGER-GUITARIST BEAU SKOWRON TALKS US THROUGH THE EARLY DAYS OF GRAVEYARD TRAIN AND THE THOUGHTS BEHIND THE NEW RELEASE.

How did the boys of Graveyard Train come together? Pretty much everyone in the band at some point has worked in this same little bar in Melbourne – so we all hung out there for years and years. It just became a weird roundabout for a long time, but we all knew each other; all listened to the same music at the same time. I was walking up the street one day and I saw our guitarist Nick Finch and banjo player Josh Crawley, and they said ‘we’re going to have a jam’, and I said ‘I’ll come along’. I picked up a guitar and that was it. When did you decide to take your jam sessions to the next level and go pro? We didn’t. At the beginning, we were horrible. But we knew so many people around Melbourne that every time we played, people would rock up. North Melbourne was a great place to be at exactly that time, because everyone was younger and living on the dole or in share houses there before getting priced out of that suburb. So, it was a really good melting pot. In terms of that special step, we never decided to take it. But we kept playing bigger and bigger gigs, and the recordings get better, and you can afford to spend a little bit more time in the studio.

Nick had a baby, people bought houses. But the thing that came out of that time away was reinforcement. We’ve all played in other bands as well, but you need that six people in the room to get that sound. No one else can play with another band and expect the same result – you have to have those people there to get that sound. How did Takes One to Know One come about? To tell you the truth, we all had a couple of songs and had a jam. We didn’t even plan on doing the full album – but we had so many to smash through and it all came together. We got invited to a festival in the Czech Republic this year, and we thought if we’re going to get back on the road again and go for big tours, we need to have more material. What can we expect from your Dark MOFO gig? If you haven’t seen us before, come down to the Brisbane. It’ll be a different show – we’re getting older and more inventive. I’m going to eat a lot of chips and drink a lot of beer STEPHANIE ESLAKE

So has Graveyard Train always been a fun ride? Pretty much. Everyone gets older and has their responsibilities – but obviously not too much, because everyone’s still doing it. We sort of put the brakes on a little bit about a year ago because we had worked really hard. In the first year, we played something like 54 gigs, it was ridiculous. After four years, we were all getting a bit tired and thought ‘we’ll have a bit of a rest’. Then

the

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Graveyard Train will perform at the Brisbane Hotel on June 14 and 15 as part of Dark MOFO. For tickets go to www.darkmofo.net.au.

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Researchers from the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre would like to speak to people who use drugs when they go out. Face to face interviews will be conducted between April and June. The interview takes around one hour and is held at a convenient location for you. Interviews are anonymous and confidential. You will be reimbursed $40 for your time. If you live in Hobart call 03 6226 7697, email estudy@utas.edu.au or SMS details to 0458 748 758 (you do not have to use your real name). Questions? Head here: http://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au /content/answers-frequently-asked-questions

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Music

ONE OF THE BOYS LOCAL SINGER-SONGWRITER HANNAH MAY HAS HIT THE BIG TIME. HER NEW SINGLE ‘THE LITTLE THINGS (CHLOE’S LAW)’ IS ROCKING ITUNES WITH PROFITS HELPING TO FIGHT BULLYING THROUGH THE CHLOE’S LAW CHARITY. ON THE BACK OF HER NEW RELEASE, THE 24 YEAR OLD SMOOTH JAZZ MUSO HAS TEAMED UP WITH FIVE TALENTED GUYS TO BRING YOU THE HANNAH MAY MINDSET.

You are one, but you are many. Tell me what it’s been like to go from Hannah May to the Hannah May Mindset. I find it quite challenging because I’ve grown accustomed to relying on myself and my husband Grady being my roadie, but now I have to rely on many more of the male species! I’m going to be pushing forward – cracking the whip, basically – and they’re happy for that, so it’s really good. I’ve also spent a lot of time with three of the people in the band, and we have a very close relationship in the sense that I can rely on them 100 per cent. You’ve written about themes of love and hardship that are faced by women – how have you found your all-male band members are able to connect with the music as intimately as you have?

I think most of my songs are universal and that was why the guys wanted to play with me. Music isn’t just about lyrics. To be a singer-songwriter, there are lyrics involved, but if you’ve got an awesome bass line or a riff or a drum section or a solo section, any of the guys in the band are enjoying it. One girl. Five guys. Need I say more? It’s so funny. The guys that I’m working with are fantastic. I have worked with a lot of different guys over the years, and some I have loved working with. But I think I have become a lot more confident in myself. Maybe it’s always been evident to everyone else, but to me personally I feel like I’ve turned a corner in the past four months. I know where I’m going, I know what I’m doing, and if you don’t want to follow me that’s fine – but if you want to come along

LUCKY SEVEN THE BRISBANE HOTEL HAS BECOME SOMEWHAT OF AN INSTITUTION HERE IN YE OLD HOBART TOWN. THE CORNERSTONE OF THE ALTERNATIVE MUSIC SCENE HERE IN TASMANIA, THE IS HOME AWAY FROM HOME FOR LOVERS OF METAL, PUNK, HARDCORE AND MUSIC GENERALLY CONSIDERED LEFT OF CENTRE. STEERING THE GOOD SHIP HAVE BEEN JOINT CAPTAINS CASEY AND GIBBO. WE ASKED THEM A FEW SHORT AND CURLIES AHEAD OF THEIR SEVENTH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS LATER THIS MONTH.

for the ride that’s awesome. I’d love to have you. So how do you gel? Everyone has different strengths, which is brilliant and they’re all in it to share. A few times, I’ve had to step in and say, ‘no, that’s not what I want the band to be doing’, which is really hard. I want to say yes to everything. I’m a yes kind of girl. Having to say ‘no, that’s not appropriate’ or ‘no, we’re not ready to do that yet’, has been a challenge. They’ve seen the serious work that I’ve been doing over the last couple of months and they’ve seen the strategies – for example, I’ve said to the guys that when we do band gigs, I want to be careful with the amount of alcohol we consume and with

The Brisbane Hotel is Lucky Seven; how are you celebrating this special birthday? By getting all our mates and locals together for the rootinest tootinest Warriors film themed dress up party! Barbariön, The Infants, The Wizar’d, Pines, White Summer, Craicpot, Speakeasies and Pinchgut and DJ BTC are all playing. Make up a gang and bring ya mates! Plug plug plug!

the girls – because I’m in a band with all guys, and what does that mean when we go out to gigs? There will be girls wanting to say hello, and I’m going to have to be mother Hannah! The other part of me is that I really do feel protective of them. It’s weird, but that mother’s instinct of wanting them to be safe and careful. That’s where so many of the bands go wrong. Being the oldest of seven children, it’s how I am. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

The Hannah May Mindset are Hannah May, Dan Vandermeer, James Wheller, Caleb Perry, Hamish Cunningham, and Robert Kellond. Their next performance will be at the Republic Bar on Sunday June 22 supported by Phil Smith.

up n coming artists for our Grimoire show during Dark Mofo. Upstairs beer garden is in the works, new fucking carpet on its way. A few other things that are hush hush too ;) There are many wild stories of mad behaviour at The Brisso that circulate Hobart, what’s the best one you’ve heard?

Has the scene around Hobart changed much in the time you’ve been open?

Dunno, you don’t hear about stories when you are a part of them. I’ll write a book one day. Mozza will get a mention, possibly a chapter.

Yeah! There’s more venues, more bands are giving it a go, people are getting wilder ideas.

What’s the most succesful event that happens at The Brisbane that is not music?

Take a guess: How many gigs have you had since the first one?

The Comedy Forge, Quiz-A-Saurus, Brissie Bingo with Ramblin Ryan, Box Wars. Annnd starting this month on the last Tuesday of every month BEER PONG COMPETITIONS.

1,666 exactly! We counted. Power to one Satan, the almighty beast! Okay, what’s the most memorable show you’ve had? Sydney City Trash Halloween 2009 - Crowd surfing tardis, blood everywhere, everyone dressed up. Good times! Melvins too, how could you not love this show. KING BUZZO!! Jello Biafra Dj set too. Smutty Sam’s 2hr set before Small Black Lambs album launch, basically stole the show. Fuck, heaps. Piss off, ask me a real question!

Do you guys ever get any sleep or are you just at the pub the whole time making it all work? Sleep is over-rated, ya get it when you get it and ya don’t when ya don’t. In the meantime, crackie naps, family time and sex are essential. ANDREW HARPER

Have you done what you set out to do when the doors opened (that is, have a good rocking pub that anyone can come to)? Fuckin’ oath mate! 7 years and still kickin’! Things are only going to get better too, we just renovated the front bar, upstairs is being artified by some of Tassies best 20

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Be a party warrior and come to The Brisbane Hotelon Saturday, June 28 to celebrate with Casey and Gibbo and the crew


Music

INSPIRATION IN A CUP OF TEA ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL SINGER-SONGWRITERS OF OUR TIME, BEN LEE HAS PRODUCED HIT AFTER INDIE-POP HIT – PICKING UP FOUR ARIAS, TWO APRA AWARDS, AND COPIOUS NOMINATIONS ALONG THE WAY. THE AUSSIE MUSICIAN CHATS WITH WARP ABOUT HIS NEW ALBUM AYAHUASCA AND THE SPIRITUAL, HALLUCINOGENIC SUBSTANCE WHICH INSPIRED IT, AHEAD OF HIS JULY 5 FESTIVAL OF VOICES GIG AT THE FEDERATION CONCERT HALL.

The Sydney-sider first broke onto the scene in 1993 as a ripe young 14-year-old with his band Noise Addict, after a rocking Nirvana concert inspired him to work up to gigs of his own. He didn’t waste any time jumping out as a solo artist – at 16, he recorded his first solo album Grandpaw Would and staked out the United States with an international tour. With his celebrated hits ‘Catch My Disease’ and ‘We’re All in This Together’ appearing in television series, films, and even the closing ceremony of the 2006 Commonwealth Games, Ben has marked his place in the West as a hugely successful solo artist. Now, with a well-established career under his belt, Ben has the space to make a few changes to his music, giving us something a little different to what we might expect. Ben’s latest release Ayahuasca delves into the singer’s interest in spirituality, his search for joy, and what it means to be human, through an intense aural journey. Ayahuasca (or the “death vine”) is a South American vine with hallucinogenic properties. Brewed into tea and consumed ceremoniously by natives for thousands of years, ayahuasca is said to evoke a death and rebirth experience through which one

may look deeply into their own soul and connect with their spirit through the divine. The songs on Ayahuasca each represent a moment in Ben’s spiritual journey, and he gives us an insight into the experience of the vine and its impact on his music. Tell me a bit about your new release Ayahuasca, and how you translated the experience of this hallucinogenic tea into your music. Spiritual paths and religions have always used various techniques to create amplified states of consciousness. Mantra, prayer, meditation, plant medicines all do similar things: they give us a different perspective from which to view our lives. Hopefully, that is a perspective that shows our errors and mistakes clearly so that we can rectify them definitely. I have a lot of gratitude for my experiences with that particular medicine, and I just tried to make a collection of songs in gratitude to it. My album, much like the medicine itself, is not for everyone. It’s quite abstract and impressionistic. But I’ve always aspired to be an artist who followed their natural rhythm as opposed to constantly chasing hits. How did you first come across the tea? I had read about it since I was a teenager. A friend of mine had been working with it for a while and I saw some positive changes in him. He had stopped drinking and taking drugs and was beginning to mature in his relationships to women. These changes were definitive and encouraged me to see what was going on with this practice. How would you describe the experience of ayahuasca and how has it changed the way you feel or the way you look at the world? It’s a death and rebirth experience. All spiritual practices contain the death-rebirth experience in different ways. We have to allow the old to die and be born anew

into the present moment, with all of its complexity and glory. It’s hard to describe the death experience. It can be very scary. But the larger the sacrifice, the larger the victory. You’ve often talked about spirituality in relationship with your music. What was the most intense spiritual experience or moment you’ve ever had? Marriage. It’s an ongoing spiritual experience. An ongoing experiment in growth, compromise, alchemy, and letting go. How have your fans responded to the drastic change in style, mood, and themes of your music since you first started? My music has changed many times over the years, and generally, some drop off when I change, and other new ones are gained. What to you makes a really good voice that fans will continue to be drawn to? Authenticity, honesty, and inspiration. A good voice is not really even the voice of the singer anymore, it is the universal song that is being sung through them. Communicating the psychological truth of a song can be a complicated process. It’s often more about getting out of the way, rather than tricks or techniques. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Ben Lee with perform in the Federation Concert Hall on Saturday July 5 at 8pm, and will also provide a vocal workshop in which he aims to show singers the psychological and internal process of making music. For more information go to www.festivalofvoices.com.

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Music

THE GREEK CONNECTION

Tell me a bit about your history with and personal connection to the music of Greece.

GREEK-AUSTRALIAN BASSIST NICK TSIAVOS IS WILL REIMAGINE THE ANCIENT BURIAL SONGS OF HIS HOME LAND THROUGH TWO GENREBUSTING MIDNIGHT PERFORMANCES AT DARK MOFO THIS JUNE 20 AND 21. HE TEACHES US ABOUT THE DEPTH BEHIND THE MUSIC AND CULTURE AHEAD OF THE GIGS.

I was whisked off the Greek landscape and deposited into Australia just as the 1960s arrived. The earliest music I was exposed to, and en-cultured into, was my weekly immersion via our local Greek Orthodox Church, into Byzantine Chant; and what I feel is one of its secular satellites in music, Ipirotika - the music of the region of Epirus in North Western Greece…slow, trance like dance rhythms; dark and full of melancholy. This was the stuff my parents had on records at home. This is the stuff embedded into my unconscious, and like memory, it is fragmented, transitory - and quite often, mistaken! Greece is a country with such a rich cultural history - can you talk us through the stories and traditions behind these ancient chants? What keeps them so powerful today? Many of these texts have been a part of Greek Orthodox worship for centuries, written in the early years of the Christian Church - and some speculate that some of these texts may have been derived from pre Christian pagan forms. The fact that this music has been around so long, makes it seem as if it is almost woven into the Greek DNA. What I do with it is another thing. Your music has been described as a “personal response to the problematics of Australian culture.” Where you feel these problems lie, and how can we make things better? I have always felt a slight unease at some aspects of contemporary Australia; the stuff of the past that has not really been put to rest, no real sense of justice to the first people of the land. Not all can be dismissed, or excused, with a ‘she’ll be right, mate!’ My own position has been one

of a sense of displacement, never truly feeling a sense of belonging. I have not a clue about how to make things better, but I hope my kids can read the outcomes in future historical publications.  Tell me a bit about some of the philosophical questions and themes you’re exploring through your inclusion of text by Nick Trakakis and C.P. Cavafy in Maps for Losing Oneself.  Some of the texts sung here come from the threnodies and burial songs of Northern Greece. There are fragments of dark text from a local poet and philosopher, Nick Trakakis that have woven themselves into this journey, alongside a trace of C.P. Cavafy and his wonderful spin on ‘the journey’ - the poem ‘Ithaca’. The music is a cartography of the landscape of loss and desire. How do you incorporate the bass into your performance, and what role does the instrument play in the performances in representing your musical ideas? It is the bass that provides the initial sound world; it is from this point that most of my explorations flow. The instrument encompasses a huge range of sonic possibility - drones, percussive effects, melodic lines and a range from sub sonic depths to brilliant harmonic sparks, throbbing pulse and a great noise generator! STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Nick Tsiavos will perform Maps for Losing Oneself on June 20 and Liminal on June 21 at St David’s Cathedral for Dark Mofo 2014. Both performances are free.

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Music

THE METAL GODS HAVE SPOKEN METAL HAS NEVER BEEN HEAVIER THAN BARBARION. LOUD, MANLY, AND COMPLETELY OVER THE TOP, THE MELBOURNE BAND BRING ARMOUR AND FIRE TO STAGE PERFORMANCES WHICH ARE BARBARIC ON A WHOLE ‘NOTHER LEVEL. GUITARIST HUGH BARBARION TELLS US WHAT LIVING BARBARICALLY IS REALLY LIKE AHEAD OF THEIR HOBART AND LAUNCESTON GIGS ON JUNE 27 AND 28.

How does Barbariön prioritise those three most important barbarian activities, being feasting, plundering and welching?

race during Roman times, he was sent back because he is far too offensive and arrogant. 

It’s like asking someone to prioritise sleeping, breathing and taking a shit. They are life’s necessities and are obviously all important. If you really want a favourite though, we would have to say feasting. You do not get this fat without eating a shitload. Barbariön always pay up on their debts. We are also not pirates clunking glasses, saying “argh” and we are only partially Welsh. Let us assume you meant ‘wenching’.

Fire is an integral part of your stage shows. What’s this about? Is there a pyromaniac in the group?

Do you feel music was an integral component of the barbarian way of life or just a backdrop for the above mentioned activities? Music was an integral part of that way of life. Having done absolutely no historical research into the period, other than watching Conan the Barbarian, we can categorically say that music, and most probably screaming metal music was the most important part of any barbaric society.  When the group of you came together, did you ponder becoming instead a group of super heroes such as the Justice League, or maybe a metal version of the Village People? Hell, no! We are far too tough and macho for that sort of shit. Myles said we should be called ‘The Bushrangers’ but we all said that it was a lame idea and we kicked him in the balls. What’s the inspiration behind the outfits of everyone in the band?

Researchers from Research Centre would like to speak to people who use drugs when they go out. Face to face interviews will be conducted between April and June. The interview takes around one hour and is held at a convenient

If you live in Hobart contact the Research Team on (03) 6226 7697, email estudy@utas.edu.au or SMS details to 0458 748 758 (you do not have to use your real name)

Gus Barbariön, guitar – escaped legionnaire, spent time hanging out in the Congo, killing leopards.  Chris Barbariön, guitar – dirty, rotten Celt, paints his face in the blood of enemies and collects bones. Hugh Barbariön, guitar – caveman wrestler, likes to strip off when excited, oils himself up in whale blubber. Yuri Pavlinov Barbariön, bass – the Russian bear hunter. He has a fondness of fire and ritually burns sacrifices to some sort of potato god. Richard Barbariön, drums – once a powerful druid, he has died over 200 times in battle. Each death makes him paler, thinner and stronger. Myles of Barbariön, vocals – Gladiator gimp spaceman. Captured by a master reptilian

It’s pretty simple really. Fire is f***ing cool! Yuri gets up close and personal with the flames most shows, but we like to think of him as ‘Master Combustician’ rather than ‘Pyromaniac’. Can there ever be a female member of Barbariön? Yes, but being a strictly hereditary band she would have to be the daughter of a Barbariön. Being a group of fairly large men, does life in the road in planes, buses, hire cars, motels become a little difficult? It’s fine for us, though some fellow airline passengers look very worried when they see us getting on the plane. You can see the fear in their eyes. “Please don’t sit next to me”, their expressions say. When you hit the big time (level of Metallica, Megadeath, Iron Maiden) what would be listed as essential on the band’s rider? Bearskin rugs and toilet paper, Egg-flip Big Ms, a roasted ox and a panel van shaped kiddy pool filled with beer. Memories of your last Tasmanian winter? Pretty sure it was cold, but we were too drunk to really notice. Our stage manager also bought a really sweet looking R2D2 piggy bank from some guy on the side of the road half way between Hobart and Launceston. NIC ORME AND STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Barbariön will perform at Launceston’s Club 54 on June 27 and Hobart’s Brisbane Hotel on June 28.

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Music

HIGH SCHOOL DISCO TIM CAMPBELL WAS BORN TO ENTERTAIN. THE HOUSE HUSBANDS, DANCING WITH THE STARS, AND HOME AND AWAY TALENT HAS SPENT YEARS WORKING HIS WAY THROUGH THE AUSSIE ARTS SCENE AS A SINGER, ACTOR, AND TV HOST. HE’S BACK LIVE FOR HIS HIGH SCHOOL DISCO ALBUM TOUR, AND BRINGS THE BEST HITS FROM THE ‘70S AND ‘80S TO TASSIE THIS JUNE 27 AND 28.

So how does it feel to spend a life entertaining others in every way possible? “The fact that I can do a job I love and still pay the house off, I’m very lucky and very happy,” Tim says. “The good thing is that I’ve been able to go through different mediums – I love that I can mix it up and still call it a career.” While he may certainly seem like a natural, Tim was in fact a late bloomer when it comes to the performing arts. Raised in a family whose careers were centred on accounting and finance, the choice to become an entertainer was supported, but unexpected. “I know people who had been into entertaining since they were five, but I was into sport instead. I used to play soccer and athletics. But in our school we had variety nights, where I would do some sketch comedy moments and from that I kind of discovered it.” “I grew up with quite a good work ethic, and my family knew I would look after myself. Now, they love the fact that I’ve found my own niche with what I do and I’m making a great career out of it. But touch wood – I’m still paying the house off! It’s all been good so far.”

they take you back to a memory, to a time that was just so easy and fun.” Songs like ‘Shake Your Groove Thing’ and ‘I’m a Believer’ are revived through Tim’s new release High School Disco, taking him back to the days of his youth. “I grew up in the western suburbs of Sydney, so any song that’s got a bit of that ‘80s bogan vibe to it like ‘My Sharona’ or ‘What I Like About You’, that’s the thing I like.” “Even though I look like a clean cut game show host, my voice really suits ‘80s rock and ‘70s punk rock. I used to have moments playing ‘Funky Music with the lights down and I really did feel like a rock star when I was singing it – but unfortunately, I don’t look like one! But that’s ok.” Tim confesses these songs come with the vision of making mums and dads feel young again, but affirms that even for younger generations, the “melodies are so catchy that even if you haven’t heard them, they’re still so fun.” STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Tim and his band have spent the last few years performing at corporate events, private gigs, and public festivals. His audiences have long asked him if he’d recorded – but it was in 2013 that the idea came of creating an album with songs that “everybody loves.” “These songs were from that time in high school where everything was care free. These songs aren’t just great to dance to –

WRONG PLACE, RIGHT TIME WRONG PLACE RECORDS IS A NEW AND EXCITING CREATURE POISED TO GRACE THE PLAINS OF THE TASMANIAN MUSICAL COMMUNITY. A SMALL, INDEPENDENT RECORD LABEL INTENDED TO SHOWCASE SOME OF THE BEST IN LOCAL MUSIC, IT’S THE LATEST VENTURE AND PROJECT BY THE SAME PEOPLE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE HOBART HOUSE SHOW SYNDICATE, NUMBER ONE HITS COMPILATION AND THE HOBART LITTLE BANDS GIG.

“[Wrong Place] is a combination of a record label and gig-running “brand” I suppose,” says founder, Rob Fisher. “In terms of a record label, the focus is on small run releases of bands Australia wide, with a firm focus on Hobart hits.” The first trio of releases on the label will be a split Lenin Lennon/Naked 7”, RBP & KEK’s Devotional cassette and a compilation of tracks by local bands titled Wrong Place, Right Time: Hobart 2014. Featuring an impressive wingspan of names including Bi-Hour, Mess O’ Reds, Small Black Lambs and Molle St Therapist, Wrong Place Right Time: Hobart 2014 is an excellent catalyst of some of the best music that Hobart has to offer – it strikes to the core of its pulsating heart, pushing fingers into its deepest, murkiest and most interesting places. For those of us that do or have called Hobart home, it’s delightfully endearing, speaking to us of long winter nights whittled away in a dark corner of the infamous Brisbane Hotel, boots sticking to the grungy carpet, miniature music festivals in church halls and DIY shows in living rooms that spill out into the garden in the summertime. The WPRT: Hobart 2014 compilation encapsulates the complexity of our relatively small musical community neatly – the raw, fuzzy edged nostalgia of garage favourites Treehouse complements the clean, minimal curves of ocean-poppers Heart Beach and the rollicking psychedelic sprawl that is Small Black Lambs. It adds to and extends a similar independent aesthetic found in the burgeoning musical scenes of larger cities such as Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane. “I don’t know that Hobart’s sound is necessarily unique,” agrees Rob, “but it isn’t particularly trendy and is for the

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Tim Campbell’s High School Disco tour will hit Launceston’s Country Club on June 27 and Hobart’s Wrest Point Casino on June 28. For tickets go to www.highschooldisco.com.

most part pretty sincere. Because of its size perhaps, there isn’t a sense of competition for attention, there’s lots of room for personality and for people to do their own thing and for there to be a core of people at the very least interested in what’s happening.” While the label’s name originates in one of Rob’s favourite albums by The Fall, he points out another, unintentional allusion. “I suppose as an afterthought,” he says, “Wrong Place (Right Time) works as a snarky comment about the Hobart music scene. Insinuations that bands should get off the island, that we are isolated etc – which is a long running joke within the scene, because it’s so untrue. It’s unintentional, but it works in that way, a less subtle option would be “Isolated Island Records.” The future of Wrong Place is looking humble, but optimistic. “A realistic long term goal,” says Rob, “is just to be one among many fantastic relatively small time labels in Australia doing its thing. Even in Hobart there are a number of awesome labels in Rough Skies Records, Consumer Productions and Wormwood Grasshopper. Nationally, there are a plethora of labels boasting exciting releases that likeminded folks across the country are excited about. Perhaps, one day, Wrong Place will be one of them.” CHLOE MAYNE You can keep up with Wrong Place Records and its forthcoming releases via bandcamp at www. wrongplace.bandcamp.com, tumblr via www.wrongplacerecords.tumblr.com and finally Facebook on www.facebook.com/ wrongplacerecords.


Music

BURNING BRIGHT WHEN LEO CREIGHTON MIGRATED FROM IRELAND AS A 16-YEAR-OLD, HE DIDN’T KNOW ANYONE AT ALL. NOW JUST OVER TWO YEARS LATER, HE’S GOT A BAND UP AND RUNNING AND IS SET TO LAUNCH HIS NEW SINGLE ‘BURN THE PHOTOGRAPHS’ AT THE WARATAH HOTEL ON JUNE 28. LEO TELLS US WHAT IT WAS LIKE TO MOVE FROM IRELAND TO THE COUNTRYSIDE TASSIE TOWN OF CYGNET, AND THE IMPORTANCE OF ACCEPTING CHANGE. For three years before he moved to Tasmania with his mother, 18-year-old muso Leo was a student at an Irish boarding school, where he hung out with his best friends around the clock. But he dropped it all to make a brave new start here in Tassie, and has settled into his lifestyle with maturity and success. “You live with people every day in boarding school, and you get some really strong relationships. I had never moved before, so I had never not known anybody,” Leo says. “When I came here, it was a real ‘wipe the blackboard’ type of thing, and a nice opportunity to start over and open my mind to whatever came and whoever I met. Luckily, I met some pretty amazing people.”

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Leo and his band will perform his new single ‘Burn the Photographs’ from his upcoming EP Cold Water, and through it the alt-rock/folk songwriter shares his extensive experience with change – including the positives which are often overlooked. “There’s often a negative side to change, but progress is about seeing how you can make the negatives into positives, and getting on with it.” Leo has certainly found the positives in his move to Tassie. Now living here on a permanent visa, he has a college certificate from Rosny and is learning about his childhood passion in his Certificate II in Animal Studies – in addition to his musical achievements. But it didn’t come to Leo without effort. Before he left his home country, he had to get used to the idea of moving on from the past and, quite literally, burning his old photographs before a new life could be made. “When I was growing up, we didn’t have a digital camera, we had boxes and boxes of photographs. Before we left Ireland, we obviously couldn’t take seven tonnes of photos with us. So, we picked an album of the best ones and condensed 17-18 years of our lives, then we had a fire for the rest.” “I remember standing there looking at each photograph, thinking, ‘I’m never going to see that hiccough again’, and, ‘I’m never going to see that finger mark again’. When you know you’re never going to see something again, it can also be positive because you know you’ll see new things.” Leo’s song ‘Burn the Photographs’ was written in burst of passion over a couple of hours during the night, and scrawled on the chocolate wrapper he had by his bed. Leo hasn’t changed it much since then, and his reflection on change will be performed on the same stage as Jed Appleton and special guests. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

The launch of ‘Burn the Photographs’ will take place at the Waratah Hotel on June 28. Doors open at 9pm and tickets are available from www.oztix.com.au or at the venue.

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Music

THE DIAMOND IN THE CROWN DARK MOFO’S JEWEL IN THE CROWN FOR 2014 IS THE PRESENCE OF DIAMANDA GALAS IN HOBART. WITH AN ASTOUNDING THREE AND HALF OCTAVE RANGE TO HER VOICE, DIAMANDA IS A POTENT ARTIST WHOSE LEGENDARY VOCAL SKILL IS SURPASSED ONLY BY THE WEIGHT OF HER COMMITTED ACTIVISM – SHE HAS SOMETHING TO SAY ABOUT THE WORLD, AND YOU ARE GOING TO LISTEN TO HER.

She’s confronted the hypocrisy about HIV and stared down the Catholic Church itself in her art, and yet is profoundly human and generous. Take your seats, ladies and gentlemen; you are about to witness one of the finest artists on the planet. Diamanda took some time to answer some questions; read and discover a fraction more about this astounding performer.

Correct on all fronts. Contrary to what is generally written about him, Artaud demanded arduous physical, psychological, and psychic work as well as research on the part of the performer/creator. It is because people prefer to write about his drug addiction that one does not imagine him to be the etymologist, for example, that he must have been.

Firstly, you’re presenting a new work at dark MOFO, Das Fieberspital (The Fever Hospital). What captured your attention about the poetry of Georg Heym and this work in particular? 

As every word in a poem must resound with magic (and until then, a work has far to travel), the research of the subject of a poem, for example, requires a GREAT amount of work, as does, indeed, the retranslation of a poem by the artist who interprets it. Translators, for a large part, are also careerists. And many do not think enough of the mechanical nature of their job: x dollars equals y Euros. Instead of just using the word “barracks” for example, many translators chose to rewrite three entire lines, to be more “artful.” Crap. A nice short word.

I came upon his work while reading a book containing various drawings, paintings and poems by Kokoschka, Kandinsky, Trakl, Benn, and others known in this book as German Expressionists. Heym, Benn and Trakl’s works stuck out, and I subsequently found other texts by each which I have set to music (voice/piano/multitrack tape, including electronic, nonvocal sound). Heym’s poetry was incantational, in the manner of Baudelaire, but the imagery was horrific. Yes, Baudlelaire’s is disturbing emotionally, but Heym’s poetry is very visual, very graphic, as Benn’s is when discussing medical subjects. The combination of an almost liturgical cadence with repellent-to-many subject material is rare in this form. The poem I eventually landed on for Das Fieberspital is about the isolation and physical and psychological horror of endstage yellow fever patients in a barracks before WWI, during the height of Germany’s industrialization. I understand that Das Fieberspital is a work in progress. Where are you with it now and how’s it going? Does it evolve in performance? I change material and add to it at each performance, and it is also part of a larger work that will include the poems Die Daemonen der Stadt and Der Blinde, as well as my own writing. Do you get surprised by what can happen in performance?

You’ve got an incredible vocal palette, drawing from a range of musical traditions. What ideas and methods will you bring to Das Fieberspital? Or did the raw text suggest how it wished to be developed to you? Can you hear the performance as it might be as you read? Yes. As you suggest, the reading of the work itself over and over again in German and in English to place myself in the room, is the beginning of preparing for the work; it is also necessary to keep that reading work up in order to be as articulate as possible with the language and nonlanguage-based monologue. That is, essentially, what the composer must do, otherwise it is better just to read the poem and/or hear a first rate actor read it. Your work is archly political, motivated, it seems, by a powerful notion of human rights. It seems driven not by ideology, but compassion. Is this fair to say? Is ideology dangerous?  I think “compassion” is a good word. “Compassion” is a very big word. Idealism is a separate endeavour, and many of the poets whose material has been fraternal to me, were/are activists. “Ideology” is a word better drawn by the inhabitants of clerical orders, whatever their street names. You’re quite the musical archaeologist, drawing on, and knowledgeable about, many traditions and influences, from Whitney Houston to Iannis Xenakis. Do you still seek and investigate music? What is your favoured album or artist of this very moment? Well, the truth is that this is more of a hobby of mine than a serious endeavour. Many are those who know more about the details of singers, composers, and the like.

I enjoy them for what they have done and I have been influenced by some of their theories, and, indisputably the sounds of those I like. The brain has a good filter system, or not, for that. It is possible that I have been influenced by exceeding poor music, too. How, I will never be sure. Undoubtedly a pedant will arise after I am gone who will correlate my efforts with some forth-rate acrobat, just for a laugh. But, since there are so many that do this NOW, he would have to be completely buried in academia to propose this as new idea. You’ve tackled institutionalised hypocrisy for much of your life as an artist, living through and tackling events like the AIDS epidemic head on. In 2014, the extreme right with it’s brutalising agenda seems in ascendancy. How do you feel about this wretched situation? Well, there are many different agendas coinciding now, and each side is aided by new technology. On the surface, it would seem that those with the most access to propaganda vehicles will have the winning ticket, but, then again, there is no substitute for zeal.   You’re to perform in what is probably the oldest working theatre in the southern hemisphere (the first performance was in 1836), which is believed to be haunted. It’ll be the middle of winter, and given that Hobart is a port, temperature will be low and potentially freezing winds will be blowing up from Antarctica. Do you view such circumstance as an enhancement, a hindrance, or a mere distraction?  I am not inspired as a vocalist by extreme cold. I am not challenged by it. I am warned by it. However, this irreplaceable venue, its iconic stature in the world of theatre, brings me a great gift. This does not escape me, having just heard a week ago that the Port Arthur prison colony was known for the horrific research done on convict populations. This would have to interest me, as this topic has been the subject of much of my work. I speak in an understated tone because an artist must be equal to such synchronicities, not spellbound by them, until AFTER a performance. Finally, is thrilling people with horror an end in itself? What do you hope to offer an audience who witnesses your performance?  Never. I offer only truth and preparation in the performances I have thus far offered. When I decide to do a horrific burlesque act, or a remake of SNAKEPIT starring great stand-up comics, you will be the first to know. I do sometimes make money doing sound effects for horror films, but I don’t like it. And there have been films released bearing my name that some overzealous publicist cum liar must have benefited from, because I would have refused to do it. ANDREW HARPER

It is imperative for me to be surprised. If not, I have not been rehearsing the work. That would mean I was prepared to cheat my audience. I ask because there’s a distinct influence (or perhaps I’m just reading this in) of Artuad’s Theatre Of Cruelty in what you do – it’s visceral and fleshy, as if alive and spontaneous, it seems that the performance can take overtake the performer. I suppose that’s a little analogous with possession or channelling something external to yourself. 

Diamanda Galas performs one show only at the Theatre Royal, Hobart on Sunday June 22. She will deliver a special lecture following the screening of her film Schrei 27 at Cinemona on Wednesday june 18.

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Music

EARTH TO AUSTRALIA SINCE THEIR INCEPTION IN 1989, EARTH HAVE BEEN STOUT FIGURES OF THE METAL GENRE. BASED MAINLY IN THE “DRONE, DOOM” ARENA, THE BAND FORMED BY SEATTLE GUITARIST DYLAN CARLSON - WITH WHOM I AM SPEAKING TODAY- HAVE HAD AN INTERESTING, TO SAY THE LEAST, COUPLE OF DECADES. BUT FIRST, ONTO THE PRESENT.

“I just did a solo show in London” Carlson coughs. His immune system has taken a beating with constant touring and he currently has bronchitis, or something similar. Rock star life. “Played Geneva on the weekend, Amsterdam tomorrow, then heading to Japan to play with Earth and onto Australia!” Although Earth (in their current incarnation, with Adrienne Davies on drums and Bill Herzog on bass guitar) will be appearing in Australia and New Zealand as a group, Carlson spends parts of his musical life touring solo.

“I’d say I play more with Earth now. I started doing the solo thing in 2012, that was the first solo tour, between some Earth touring, but the bulk of my touring is with the band. They’re [types of touring] each different; the solo thing is either [just] me or I’ve been touring a lot with a Dutch drummer from the improv world which makes the gigs a little looser. Earth is more of a ‘show’, I guess. The solo thing is a little more lackadaisical, Earth is more prepared” Having come to Australia in 2012, Earth have returned to see more of the country

and give fans from the forgotten pockets a chance to see them play. “We came to Australia in September 2012, we did a tour with two shows in New Zealand and quite a few in Australia. We are touring in support of a new album which unfortunately due to pressing things won’t be out there in time (laughs) but you’ll get a preview of it.” This new album will be the band’s eighth, after 2012’s “Angels of Darkness, Demons of Light II” but you would probably be most familiar with their milestone record, “Earth 2” from 1993. Their debut album, released on Sub Pop, it gave them their place in the Seattle scene history. But, like so many fans of that era, does Carlson ever pine for those days? “I wouldn’t say I’m nostalgic for that scene, we didn’t really do the route that most of those bands did. We’ve actually done better since then than we ever did in those days, since our return in 2002. My nostalgia goes farther back than that but I try not to let that influence what I do. There’s more ways to skin a cat, as they say, nowadays.” Fans will notice a distinct change in tone and sound in Earth’s later crop of tunes. During their grunge-scene-heyday, their mostly instrumental music was comprised of the kind of length, darkness and drone that made music of that ilk. Since their ‘break’, the music has become substantially more diverse. Remaining the band you know and love, they have taken greater influence from British folk-rock, jazz and country-tinged tones, as well as apparent inspiration from novelist Cormac McCarthy and composer Ennio Morricone. There’s less distortion, but no less the band that has been ever-evolving since the early 90s. Earth’s hiatus had much to do with Carlson’s personal problems such as heroin addiction and his connection to friend Kurt Cobain’s suicide (Cobain having borrowed his suicide weapon from Carlson, a note which has divided fans, and created yet more conspiracy, since Cobain’s death in 1994), all of which culminated in a jail stint for residential burglary; a time that Carlson intends to put well behind him. “The hiatus was more a result of me being a fuckup (laughs). Basically I had a number of personal issues, did some jail time, so that’s why I took a break...it happened and when I came back and started playing again I wasn’t intending to do Earth, I just wanted to play again. There was no grand scheme or timeline or conspiracy (laughs) it just happened” It may be the time of the morning over there in the UK, or a new positive lean in his outlook, but Carlson maintains a simple, optimistic view when it comes to his colourful career and what he wants his fans, especially the Aussie ones, to get out of Earth shows (variously called ‘religious’, ‘hypnotic’ and ‘utterly consuming’) “I guess obviously, hopefully, they have a good time! That’s why you go to shows, right?” LISA DIB

Earth play DARK MOFO with Sun O))) and Veil of Darkness on Friday June 20 at the Odeon Theatre, Hobart. Tickets are available from www.darkmofo.net.au.

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Music

FEASTING THE DARK HOBART KNOWS WINTER. WE’VE SPENT OUR LIVES HERE HIDING FROM IT, HUDDLED UP INSIDE IN RUGS AROUND A TELEVISION SCREEN SHOWING RE-RUNS AS ENTERTAINMENT. THEN ALONG CAME DARK MOFO SHINING A LIGHT, A GLORIOUS BEACON THAT DREW THOUSANDS OUT OF THEIR HOMES AND INTO THE STREETS TO CELEBRATE INTO THE COLD NIGHT’S AIR.

A feast of magnificent proportions was required to fuel these party goers and thus began the City of Hobart Dark Mofo Winter Feast, a three-night Bacchanalian banquet drawing on age-old traditions of winter solstice celebrations from every corner of the globe and savouring the core of these: family and community; feasting and produce; singing and music; subversion and masquerade; rebirth and renewal; fire and life. Creative Director of Dark Mofo, Leigh Carmichael, describes the community gathering as “mixing ancient tradition with contemporary culture in a new recipe for celebration in the darkest time of the year. The winter solstice has traditionally been a time of wild festivals and parties with a carnival atmosphere, combining joyful and utopian aspects of careless well-being with disquieting elements of threat and danger. The City of Hobart Dark Mofo Winter Feast balances dark and light through communal celebration, and a bit of irreverent fun.” The centrepiece of irreverent fun this year is The Ferris Wheel of Death, part fairground ride, part performance and part sound and light installation conceived and produced by Supple Fox and Duckpond, featuring the world premiere of a commissioned work by vocalist and composer Sophia Brous featuring celebrated American artist Julia Holter. A hand-picked choir will perform on top of the structure as this dreamy soundtrack of spinning inertia shifts between atmospheric environments that are alternately dark and menacing, warm and ethereal – like the seasons. And the feasting. Oh there will be feasting. Winter Feast Tasmanian stalls curator Jo Cook has gathered an exceptional collection of new and experienced food

and drink producers from around the State bringing together more than 40 Tasmanian food and drink stalls. “There will be warming offerings created especially for Dark Mofo, and we’re going global with Chilean, Turkish, Malaysian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Japanese, New Orleans, Mexican, Indian, Korean and Italian on the menu. There’s also a huge focus on the local with stallholders from Stanley, Scamander, Launceston, Deloraine, Penguin, Greater Hobart, Derwent Valley, Bruny Island, Huon Valley, Cygnet and Longford with plenty of produce coming directly from the farm to the feast.” She’s also ensuring everyone is welcome. “With a range of options for vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free, you can expect anything and everything - even a whisky lounge to meet the producers, with five single malt whisky producers from around the state, to warm your bones.” The local stallholders are joined by MONA chefs Philippe Leban and Vince Trim and some very special guests. Jared Ingersoll is one of Australia’s leading chefs, restaurateurs, writers, and TV presenters. Jared has spent nearly three decades putting the spotlight on the importance of local, seasonal and sustainable food. Known for his uncompromising commitment supporting small, passionate growers, fishers and farmers, Jared pioneered this philosophy with his award-winning restaurant of 11 years, Dank St Depot – one of the first restaurants in Sydney to put the farmers as well as the chef on the menu. Alex Herbert has spent the past 25 years cooking alongside culinary luminaries Maggie Beer, Christine Manfield (Universal) and Martin Boetz (Longrain). She was also owner of Bird Cow Fish (Surry Hills and

Balmain) before founding Breakfast & Stuff at Sydney’s Saturday Eveleigh Markets. Duncan Welgemoed, head chef at Adelaide’s Bistro Dom (voted ‘Hottest Restaurant in SA’ by The Australian in 2013), will bring together fire and warmth with fresh, local Tasmanian winter produce. Duncan has worked with some of the UK’s best chefs, and recently co-curated the successful Lola’s Pergola at the Adelaide Festival. Winter Feast Producer Gillian Minervini sums up the whole experience well. “This year’s City of Hobart Dark Mofo Winter Feast takes you on some new twists and turns, leading through a dark forest into a world of fire, light and warmth. With the universal rituals of the winter solstice at its heart, the Feast celebrates our longest nights through food, music and company - sharing tables, tales and traditions. Our chefs will take Tasmanian produce into new realms with fire and flavour as the main ingredients. Winter Feast 2014 will have new areas for discovering our vast array of performance, produce, music and art, surprising you all over again with solstice celebrations at every turn.” The City of Hobart Dark Mofo winter feast runs from June 19 to 21 at Princess Wharf 1 on Hobart’s waterfront from 4pm to 10pm. The carousing and merriment reaches its zenith on Saturday night as they mark the moment of the winter solstice (8.51pm) and look forward to the everbrightening days ahead. Entry is $10 with children under 16 free and bring an extra $10 to ride the Ferris Wheel of Death! CARL WISE

For more information on the Winter Feast check online at www.darkmofo.net.au.

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Arts VISUAL ART :

PAT BRASSINGTON IT’S A TERRIBLE THING, TO ASK ARTISTS WHAT THEIR WORK IS ABOUT. IT PEGS ART DOWN. IT STOPS IT BEING A SHARED SECRET THAT EXISTS OUTSIDE OF STANDARD LANGUAGE. I FEEL ODD WHENEVER I ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT ART. SO, WHEN I SENT PAT BRASSINGTON A FACEBOOK MESSAGE ASKING HER IF SHE WOULD ANSWER SOME QUESTIONS, AND SHE REPLIED IN THE AFFIRMATIVE BUT NOTED THAT SHE IS NOT A ‘WORDY’ PERSON, I BALKED.

I felt a little weird. You see, the best exhibition I saw in Hobart last year was Pat’s show at Contemporary Art Tasmania. It was called “in search of the marvelous” and it was incredibly, gloriously affecting. If you do not know, Pat Brassington makes art that uses digital manipulation to alter or enhance photography or image. The end result can be surreal, in the truest sense of the word, in that somehow the genuine feel of dream is invoked. Her work is a slow moving cascade of images that seem to be code for something that waits on the edge of consciousness. It reminds me of the great Czech surrealist Jan Svankmajer, or perhaps the creepy sexualized dollthings that Hans Belmer makes, but Pat is somehow also quite unique. Her art intrigues and disturbs and will not be slotted neatly into anything. And it’s very hard to really put that into words. It feels cheap. If you don’t mind me saying so, you need to see it. You will feel as if you have seen it

COMEDY TO THE MAX HOBART ÜBER COMEDY IS AN EXCITING NEW MONTHLY COMEDY VENUE IN SALAMANCA AT DICKENS CIDERHOUSE, 22 MONTPELIER RETREAT, A SHORT WALK UP FROM KNOPWOODS & RETRO CAFE.  

before, but you could not have possibly, and the vertigo of déjà vu will ask you what it is you’re looking at it. It’s unassuming, subtle, perfectly crafted and will stay with you. So I would humbly urge you to go and see A Rebours, because it’s a survey of Pat Brassington’s work of the last 30 years. Wander into the TMAG and you’ll see what it is that I’m trying to get at and failing miserably; that really good art reaches beyond words to a space where language is not very useful anymore. Pat is not a wordy person, no. I don’t think she needs to be. I think she has something, instead, to show you, and that something is very wonderful. ANDREW HARPER

Dark Mofo And Tmag Present A Rebours: Pat Brassington from May 30 – September 14 at The Tasmanian Musuem and Art Gallery, Hobart. A special Dark Mofo event will take place on June 13 at 5pm.

On the second Thursday of each month Über Comedy presents some of the best stand-up performers in the state, both up-and-coming and experienced. From time to time Über also features sets that include mime or circus styled humour, and an occasional “dirt box” opportunity that gives someone a short time on stage to rant about something they hate, detest, loathe or resent.  Über will also feature interstate artists when the celestial bodies align. Über was created by Tasmanian comedian David J and, on most months, it’s hosted by new comedy wunderkind Jono Mastrippolito.  The show begins at 8pm and always finishes by 10pm.  It’s fuelled by a careful selection of diverse performers and styles each month, along with six to eight different varieties of local cider on tap. The ambience of the ciderhouse definitely makes it a special night. The next Über Comedy’s June show will be held on ThursdayJune 12 and features guest MC Emesha Rudolf.  Emesha is well known in Hobart comedy and theatre circles, not just for her quirky stand-up and twisted songs but also for theatrical performances in Little Women, Treasure Island and Robin Hood.  

6 – 29 JUNE 2014 THE BARN

Über in June includes the comedic styling of David J, Tracey Cosgrove, Meredith Cole, Troy Oates, James G Warren, Chris Menezies, Chantelle Rose and more. ANDREW HARPER

ROSNY FARM | ROSNY HILL RD

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Celebrate the comedy at Über Comedy at 8pm – 10pm Thursday June 12 at Dickens Ciderhouse. Entry is $10.


ART:

ELIZABETH BARSHAM TASMANIA’S LANDSCAPE HAS LONG LENDED ITSELF TO THE FANTASTIC AND SURREAL. IT’S FILLED WITH GHOSTS, TWISTED ALPINE TREES AND ROCKS THAT SEEM TO SPEAK. THE ISOLATED HIGHLANDS ARE COVERED IN FLORA THAT SEEMS EITHER ALIEN OR PREHISTORIC OR BOTH, AND WHEN IT’S COLD OUTER SPACE PRESSES IN. WRITERS AND ARTIST WHO LIVE HERE AND VISIT HERE ARE OFTEN ENTRANCED BY THIS ODD ISLE, AND THERE’S A RICH TRADITION OF WRITTEN AND VISUAL WORK THAT ENGAGES WITH IT.

Elizabeth Barsham is such an artist. Her work is described as a Tasmanian Gothic and it derives from her own life: an engaged vision that interprets the unique landscape in a manner that could be described as surrealist, although what it really ends up being is too singular to comfortably fir any label. She’s a Tasmanian by birth, with ancestry traceable to the first settlers and her work reflects this: she conjures a world with paint. She uses more traditional techniques, working with oils, with beguiling results – familiar landscapes and buildings are rendered strange and warped into another dimension. If it seems creepy, it sort of is but it sort of isn’t – it’s not so much about the horror of things like the penal system but a reflection on people who came here and made a life on what was thought of as the far side of the world. Working from a collection of old family photographs (many of which feature on Elizabeth’s fascinating website), the end result are paintings which blend history with her very personal take on the

Tasmanian Landscape, the old buildings, the dramatic and mountainous regions and the dense, ancient forests. A survey exhibition of Elizabeth Barsham’s work, Personal History, will be at the Nolan Art Gallery in the Salamanca Art Centre in June. Elizabeth will give an artist’s talk at The Nolan Gallery from 2pm – 3pm on the Saturday June 14, where you can get intimate with her fascinating ideas, the process she uses to create her work, and get into the complexities of The Tasmanian Gothic. Visit Elizabeth’s amazing website: www. tasmanian-gothic.com ANDREW HARPER Personal History an Exhibition of old and new paintings by Elizabeth Barsham will be showing at the Nolan Art Gallery and School, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart from June 13 – July 23 2014. The official opening will be at 6pm Friday June 13.

VISUAL ART :

ART FROM TRASH 2014 ART FROM TRASH HAS BEEN RUNNING AS A COMMUNITY ARTS EVENT IN HOBART SINCE 1994. IT’S AN INSTITUTION, DERIVED FROM A SIMPLE IDEA THAT WE SHOULD POSSIBLY USE THE DETRITUS OF OUR CULTURE MORE THAN WE DO. IT’S RUN EACH YEAR BY SOMEONE FROM RESOURCE, AN ORGANISATION THAT HAS BEEN SELLING OUR GARBAGE BACK TO US FOR EVEN LONGER. RESOURCE, AND ART FROM TRASH, ARE PART OF WHAT HOBART IS IN 2014. Art From Trash, beyond that though, has grown as an event. The Long Gallery at The Salamanca Arts Centre was filled to the brim with a very rich variety of artworks, with a huge range of skill and idea. That’s pretty normal for this annual exhibition, but I noticed something different as I cruised about the space this time. Of course, there were many of the usual works one sees at this show; stuff that’s ‘making a comment about capitalism and waste’ – well yes, good on you, but we’ve seen that now. By all means do so, but don’t re-use the wheel.

Photo credit - Peter Maarseveen

What has occurred and is now very evident at this show is that there are terrific works that are not making a comment about them being made from re-used trash. While I have long loved what this show says and what it does, that niggling detail has always made me a little critical; so much of the work is caught up in drawing attention to what it’s made from, and letting that be its reason and justification. What’s changed is that there are potent works that move beyond their material into another realm, and that’s genuine contemporary art. I must point out here I have no desire to be rude or to patronise the great range of works we always see at Art From Trash – it must never lose its community roots; but the notion that

this show is about making re-purposing, reusing and recycling legitimate, lifting out of being novelty, is very important. Works in the 2014 exhibition belong in serious art collections. I saw satire, comment on Australia’s culture of alcoholism from Rian Taylor, an deft conceptual gag about readymades from Andy Vagg, a sound work by Edith Penenot, and, the thrilling X by Mark Buckland. There was plenty more – this show is always stuffed to the gills, but it was a great moment to realise that the mission, begun twenty years ago, of making trash as legitimate an art material as clay or paint has been fulfilled. Basically, there’s high art right next to collaborative efforts from school kids, and what is really on show is what humans can do when they think hard enough. In these times, I cannot tell you how happy this show made me. It’s just so positive. I look forward to 2015; and I’m hoping the bar raises even higher. Here’s my gauntlet: it’s time to interrogate what this show is and what it can be, and to push harder. Art From Trash is ready; let’s hope some more of Tasmania’s professional artists are up to it. ANDREW HARPER

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Arts VISUAL ART :

AMELIA ROWE’S FUNEREAL ANIMALS

50 WAYS TO KILL RENNY KODGERS

AUSTRALIA HAS ONE OF THE HIGHEST INCIDENCES OF PET OWNERSHIP IN THE WORLD WITH A PET POPULATION OF AROUND 33 MILLION. THAT MEANS THERE ARE MORE PETS THAN PEOPLE AND TASMANIA HAS THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF DOGS AND CATS PER HOME.

THERE’S A BEAUTIFUL TRUTH TO BE FOUND IN TACKY NOSTALGIA. SOMETIMES SOMETHING IS SO UGLY IT’S BEAUTIFUL, SO RIDICULOUS IT’S SUBLIME. PLEASE, I WOULD LIKE TO DRAW YOUR ATTENTION TO RENNY KODGERS.

Damien Quilliam, Curator of Contemporary Australian Art at the Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery suggests that we only need to consider the ubiquitous ‘my family’ stick figures on car rear windows to see the place of the ‘pet’ in modern life. “Regardless if it’s the cat, dog, bird, fish, lizard or pot-belly pig, these personalities have become our friends, family and often our closest confidant,” Mr Quilliam said. We have developed a special affinity with our furred and feathered families, but what happens when our pets die? Launceston based artist Amelia Rowe’s new exhibition entitled Memoriam, converts The Barn at Rosny Farm into a ‘memento mori’, a place to be reminded of mortality and the mortality of the animals around us, using taxidermy, freeze-drying and sculpture*.

capturing the fragility of existence and the ways our species has honoured the dead over the ages. “The subjects of this exhibition have been handled with respect, there is a real feeling of emotion in these pieces, the way they have been handled with care and nurtured like family members. They sit now in an imagined state loaded with memory and emotion, asking us to discover the narrative that each work portrays,” said Mr Quilliam. *No animals were harmed in the production of this exhibition. DANE HUNNERUP

Presented in conjunction with Clarence City Council and Dark Mofo, her work is challenging, delicate and reverent,

Amelia Rowe’s Memoriam will be shown at The Barn at Rosny Farm from June 6 to 29. A special Dark Mofo event will happen on June 11 at 5pm.

IT’S NOT JUST ROCK AND ROLL

“Naked Girls Reading is a worldwide movement,” explains local burlesque star and event co-ordinator Miss Scarlett Jezebel. “It was started in Chicago in 2009 by burlesque performer, Michelle L’Amour. By the end of 2012 it had grown to over 18 international cities.”

THE NAKED GIRLS READING IS MORE THAN YOUR AVERAGE BEDTIME STORY. THIS MONTH AT THE HOMESTEAD, WOMEN WILL BE SHEDDING THEIR CLOTHES AND TAKING TO THE STAGE TO READ EXCERPTS FROM A SPECTRUM OF ROCK-RELATED WORKS BY THE LIKES OF PATTI SMITH, PINK FLOYD AND CHRISTIE AMPHLETT.

“Naked Girls Reading is basically what it says....naked girls who read. There is no deeper meaning or message: it’s purely for entertainment. I don’t think it needs a purpose. It just is what it is. Sure some people come for the nudity, but they stay for the reading.” The event comes as a highly-anticipated sequel to a similar event held in April this year, which was a celebrated success. “The theme was the girls’ favourite books,” says Scarlett of the previous show. “We had everything from Paul Keating to Jenna Jameson, Caitlin Moran to Harlan Ellison’s Deathbird stories. It was quite a mix. I think it was so well received because it’s simply something different. Also, as adults we rarely get read to and it’s quite a novelty to take two hours out of your day, sit back and relax with a drink and have someone read you a story.”

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Renny is not real, but he’s larger than life; he’s a ten year performance work by Sydney Artist Mark Shorter that is just a bloke in a wig and a fake grey beard with an orange tan that is more fruit than sunshine, that wears clothes the actual Kenny Rodgers never would have and never will. Renny is hard to describe and is best experienced. Renny croons and prances and gets murdered, again and again, by the Twilight Girls. The Twilight Girls are Helen Hyatt-Johnston and Jane Polkinghorne. Like Renny, they inhabit the world of B-grade, but live rather on the continent of Trash Cinema (Renny is from the island of Country in the stream of Adult Oriented Rock ). The Twilight Girls use comedy and cliché to undermine how we see the everyday and confront hypocriscy in contemporary culture. They use humour, much as Renny K does and make potent satire about how we see ourselves. Dark MOFO has bought these icons of trash culture together and presents 50 Ways To

Naked Girls Reading will feature orators as varied as the theme itself. “At our last event, all of the readers were burlesque performers,” says Scarlett. “This time we’ve mixed it up a bit. We’ll have Miss Burlesque Tasmania 2014, Scarlett Jezebel (me), Miss Burlesque Tasmania 2013, Lucy Sky Diamond, pin-up model Misty Demure and life drawing model Kendra Dick. And what can we expect to have read to us on the evening? “You’ll hear some funny stories, some sad and some disgusting, I dare say,” explains Scarlett. “The books chosen are: The Faber Book of Pop, One Way or Another: the Story of a Girl Who Loved Rock Stars,The Real Frank Zappa Book, Just Kids by Patti Smith, Pleasure & Pain by Chrissy Amphlett and W. Axl Rose by Mick Wall.

Kill Renny Kodgers at Contemporary Art Tasmania. Basically, it’s a bloodbath as all parties concerned celebrate their love of classic horror cinema by using those very B-Grade Techniques we know and love to re-create classic death and gore moments and make a few new ones along the way. These glorious vignettes of palpable terror will be on view for the entire exhibition but the discerning punter is stongly advised to get along to the opening event on Wednesday June 11 at 6pm as Renny will be there in the neon orange flesh, singing a live soundtrack (and presumably signing autographs), as will the devilish Twilight Girls, in a live and unscripted intervention. This is a one-off, so you know what you need to do discerning punter – Get to Contemporary Art Tasmania. ANDREW HARPER Dark MOFO and CONTEMPORARY ART TASMANIA present 50 Ways To Kill Renny Kodgers from June 11 to July 6. The opening and performance will be held at 6pm on June 11. More information can be found at www.rennykodgers.com.

The evening will be rounded out musically with a performance by Straddlepuss. “Straddlepuss are an all female punk rock band,” says Scarlett. “Their music can be quite in your face, but also funny. My favourite song of theirs is “Pleasure Fist”. Straddlepuss describe themselves as: They are three women! They play music! They play their own instruments! They masturbate in sync!” CHLOE MAYNE

Last time people asked for some poetry, so we’ll also be reading lyrics from Pink Floyd and The Who. The selection chosen touches on so many aspects of the rock industry.  We have groupies represented, women of rock, the good times and the hard times, the music, and the rise and fall.”

Naked Girls Rock will be held at The Homestead, Hobart, on Tuesday June 17. Tickets are on sale online for $10 from www.trybooking.com or $15 on the door.


Arts

Gallery

performing arts

Guide

Guide

South

NORTH

SOUTH

NORTH

146 ARTSPACE 22 May – 19 Jun Marissa Molin 26 Jun – 24 July Nadege Philipe-Janon & Felix Wilson

ACADEMY GALLERY Tasmanian College of the Arts, (Inveresk) 20 Jun- 25 July Megan Walch

COMEDY

COMEDY

THE BRISBANE 26 June The Comedy Forge

CIDERHOUSE

SOHO 4 June Cloud Comedy

FRESH ON CHARLES

ART MOB 6- 22 Jun First Generation Warmun Artists BETT GALLERY 6 – 27 June David Keeling CONSTANCE ARI 13 June Pip Stafford, James Horn, Sundari Carmody CONTEMPORARY ART TASMANIA 12 Jun – 6 July Renny Kodgers & The Twilight Girls COLVILLE GALLERY 13 Jun – 3 July Kate Piekutowski DESPARD 11 – 30 Renovation and Clearance Sale DUNALLEY WATERFRONT CAFE May Duncan Giblin, Martin Hamilton HANDMARK 6 jun – 2 July Nathan Grey, Emma Bugg HENRY JONES ART HOTEL 13 Jun – 4 Jul Nicole O'Loughlin and Peter Maarseveen INKA 12 Jun – 2 July Tina Curtis MONA Until 28 July Hubert Duprat Until 15 Sept The Red Queen Roger Ballen

BRAVE ART GALLERY (Longford) 7 – 29 Jun Jasper Da Seymour BURNIE REGIONAL GALLERY 10 May – 29 June The Art Of Sound National Film and Sound Archive 31 May – 29 June Late Bloomers: Tall Poppies 2014 Bendigo Bank Material Girl DESIGN TASMANIA 30 May – 2 August Head Inside Spaces Of Tension Belinda Winkler DEVONPORT REGIONAL GALLERY 7 – 22 jun North West Art Circle GALLERY PEJEAN 11 Jun – July 5 Jenny Burnett & Christine Hannan HANDMARK EVANDALE 1 Jun – 2 July Annual Northern Artists Exhibtion QVMAG 17 May – 27 July Bea Maddock Until 22 June David Keeling SAWTOOTH 4 – 26 July FRONT GALLERY: Ali Aedy NEW MEDIA GALLERY: Daryl Rogers MIDDLE GALLERY: Mat Carey PROJECT GALLERY: TBA

DICKENS CIDER HOUSE 12 June Uber Comedy THE WARATAH 19 June The Clubhouse presents: Michael Workman

FILM CINEMONA

From 31 May Cosi Fani Tutte From 14 June La Cenerentola 18 June Schrei 27 (Dark MOFO special event) From 21 Jun King Lear 22 Jun Still Our Country (World Premiere)

11 June Uber Comedy 20 June Fresh Comedy presents: Michael Workman THEATRE PRINCESS THEATRE

11 Jun David Williamson's Mananging Carmen 14 Jun Tapestry Dance Studio 25 -28 Jun Seussical DEVONPORT ENTERTAINMENT CENTRE

3 Jun Still Awake Still 12 Jun David Williamson's Mananging Carmen 13 Jun Alex Williamson – Dumb Things I've Done 24 Jun 1984 by George Orwell

THEATRE PLAYHOUSE

12 – 14 Jun St Mary's College presents The Wiz 25 -28 June Guilford Young presents The Addams Family THEATRE ROYAL

6 -7 Jun Perfect Tripod – Australian Songs 14 June Alex Williamson – Dumb Things I've Done 16 – 18 Jun It's Dark Outside 22 Jun Diamanda Galas 26 – 28 1984 by George Orwell DICKENS

PENNY CONTEMPORARY 23 May – 11 Jun Dan Withey ROSNY BARN - SCHOOLHOUSE GALLERY 23 May – 15 June Australian Society of Minature Art 22 Jun – 13 July Hunter Island Press TMAG 30 May – 14 Sept Pat Brassington

WARP RECOMMENDS…

MICHAEL WORKMAN Okay, we know there’s a whole lot of darkness and intense art and it’s awesome, but Warp humbly suggests you give yourself a laugh somewhere amongst it all – it’s cheaper than Vitamin D tablets. Get along to The Clubhouse and check out the sensational Michael Workman. He’s been described as the Nick Cave of Comedy so you can still goth right out whilst kacking yourself at the Waratah Hotel on the Thursday June 19 in Hobart, or if you’re in Launceston at Fresh on Charles the following night. www.facebook.com/warp.mag 33


Cd Reviews

Virtuosi Tasmania bring together Kelly Ottaway (vibraphone), Stephen Martin (double bass), Daniel Sulzberger (piano), and Matthew Ives (percussion) to share the spirit of the Modern Jazz Quartet – one of the most legendary American ensembles which spanned four decades of hits and performances.

Virtuosi Tasmania Spirit of the MJQ

East Brunswick All Girls Choir

Milt Jackson’s ‘Bags’ Groove’ opens the album with the eternally cool tones of smooth jazz. ‘Skating in Central Park’ follows with a pleasantly relaxed dance through which the melody is carried gracefully by the vibes, and it is utterly reflective of its name.

‘Cool Thing for Attractive People’, ‘Flow’, and ‘Mr Schifrin’ are part or complete original works by Ives and Ottaway, and hold their place strongly alongside the greats. ‘Cool Thing’ demonstrates the true spirit of Ottaway as it merges with that of the MJQ – sophisticated and cool, with a respectful balance between players. This is not restricted to this track alone, and the excellent quality of the recording combined with the spaciousness between parts allows for each player to be heard crisply and independent lines to flourish.

respect for classical composition, John Lewis borrowed from J.S. Bach’s baroque chorale Sleepers Awake and crafted it into a jazz hit performed spectacularly by Virtuosi. John Lewis’ ‘Django’ appears to complete the release on a sentimental note, perhaps lamenting the ending of both the album and the MJQ. However, empty textures and wide spacing eventually progress into a playful conclusion which leaves you in none other than high spirits. STEPHANIE ESLAKE

Perhaps the most joyous piece on the release is ‘Rise Up in the Morning’. Out of

Mac DeMarco Salad Days

Architecture in Helsinki Now + 4EVA

The Middle Names

I Need Space

Seven Drummers

Ever since I heard the Essendon 1986 single EBAGC released a few years back I’ve been hankering for this album. It took longer than expected drummers kept dying off like in that movie. But where Essendon 1986 was urgently, woefully good, the songs on Seven Drummers somehow feel more considered and natural at the same time. That’s quite a feat. Each feels like a jam that just fell into place perfectly, and whoever signed off on the track order deserves an award in track-ordering. The highest peaks are in the middle - 14 Clay Gully Court is as good a song as The Drones have ever written (close, at least).  Seven Drummers is forty minutes of Melbourne mania and history, musically and lyrically. Australian rock, eh? We can be pretty fucking good at it. Richard Cuskelly Down the Drain, Mondays at 10pm on Edge Radio

Mac DeMarco’s debut EP for Captured Tracks, Rock and Roll Night Club, was a sleazy and cheesy take on retro, lo-fi guitar pop and where DeMarco demonstrated a penchant for the hooks and hypnotic guitarwork he’s refined on each subsequent release. There’s a comedic line running through the lyrics, music and his videos that’s undoubtedly influenced by the straightfaced absurdity of Tim & Eric.  At first it’s on full-display but gets dialed back on his first full-length, 2, and again on his second, Salad Days. The earnestness within the goofy kitsch is where the heart of his music lies and that paradox may prove a difficult barrier to entry for some. Less so with this release which features more than one bluntly sincere emotional beat. DeMarco’s self-described ‘jizz jazz’ reaches new highs on his latest album, without altering his sound much from mid-tempo jams of his previous release. The lyrical content has a decidedly more wistful air this time around but still retains pieces of self-referential mocking as reminders that DeMarco still retains his lightness of heart and that his troubles won’t keep him down. Alex Laird Music Director, Edge Radio 99.3FM

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Now + 4EVA is Architecture in Helsinki’s fifth studio release. The five-piece indie pop band has been active since 2000, and they are currently based in Melbourne. Their latest album is very easy listening pop music. The beat and rhythm are catchy for all the songs, however the album feels repetitive. There are 11 tracks on the disc, with the stand out tracks being ‘In The Future’ which has an appealing disco feel, and ‘2 Time’ which has an engaging beat and nice rhythm. I also enjoyed the inclusion of horns and brass in some of the songs, adding a nice meaty layer to the songs. All the songs are original, with the exception of the Jackie de Shannon classic ‘When You Walk In the Room’. This number has been done better, by de Shannon herself and the Searchers. It’s unfortunate that Architecture in Helsinki’s interpretation was bland and forgettable. Overall this was a nice half an hour of listening. Now and 4EVA is a competent production, with good vocals, lyrics and melodies, performed well. But there was nothing that really jumped out and made me want to listen again straight away. It is a good album, but not especially memorable. Frederic Moll An Hour With…, Tuesdays at 2pm on Edge Radio 99.3FM

Independently released, this album showcases the energy, passion and ownership that comes from The Middle Names. I’m encouraging music lovers to have a listen and as such I will not pigeon hole this album by attempting to put it into a category or a silo. The writing is crisp, exciting and thoughtful and helps the listener grasp the emotions of everyday living. There is friendship, jealousy, family, fellowship, escape, waiting, searching and the hope that I Need Space will all be remembered. The playing is tight, the words are clear, the hooks stick and the musical feel is constructed in a way that transports the listener through the emotions. The writers/ players/production team have crafted I Need Space enough to make this album a shared experience. The Middle Names take the opportunity to thank everyone who has come to a show and who continue to support them. I for one will be playing this album a lot, especially the tune ‘Remember Me At All’. To quote “if the milk is sour I ain’t the type to drink it.” This a very sweet sort of ‘easy to listen’ to album (some course language). Mig Loo/JamesT Dr0p0ut to be iN, Sundays at 8am on Edge Radio 99.3FM


Event Guide

Hobart Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Brisbane Hotel

Piss Poor and Penniless 1 Buck Metal Show Gape + Nosce Teipsum + Omnicide + Talismans Choir

Sambo 12:30pm

Brisbane Hotel

Killer’s Bingo Night w/ Ramblin Ryan

Emma Russac & Jed Appleton 8:30pm

C Bar

Tony Voglino 12:30pm

The Coterie - Coal Valley Vineyard

The Sketches’ Josh Durno 1:30pm

Grand Poobah

The Small Press Zine Festival 1pm

The Homestead

Ben Lawless

Republic Bar & Café

Things of Stone And Wood + Amaya 9pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays w/ Reggae Ink 3pm

The Coterie - Coal Valley Vineyard

Billy Whitton & Tilly Martin 1:30pm

The Homestead

Fundraiser for Dogs Home

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays w/ Reggae Ink 3pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Rach and Damo 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 9pm

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Birdcage Bar

Lyn Thomas 8pm

C Bar Republic Bar & Café

Date

JUNE Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Helen Crowther 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Billy Whitton 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 9pm

Observatory Lounge Room

DJ Zankee

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

Billy Longo 8:30pm

Grand Poobah

Ologism and Warning Will Robinson 8:30pm

Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night

Observatory Lounge Room

TBC

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Peacock Theatre

Fred Smith - Dust of Uruzgan - Winter Tour 2014

Republic Bar & Café

Bobcats 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

Claire Anne Taylor 9pm

Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

DAMAGE NIGHTCLUB w/ Boris The Blade (Vic) + Opposer + Alpha Wolf + Dawn Of Your Discontent

Republic Bar & Café

Slyde 9pm

C Bar

Pete Thomas 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Federation Concert Hall

The Peasant Prince 6pm

Brisbane Hotel

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

Faldum “The Reel Sessions” with Unsoundbwoy (MEL), Cherry Slug & Nell degrassi 9pm

Grand Poobah Main Room

Abba Zaba, Orin and Violet Swells 9pm

Grimoire - Baseball (Vic) + Small Black Lambs + Naked + Smutty & The Cleaner + Treehouse + Dogtower + Piklet (Vic) + Gutters + Ecclesiastical Scaffolding + Ruiner & The Threshold Forms + Chrysalis + Mutterland + Cycle + DJ BTC

Observatory Lounge Room

DJ Magneetis

C Bar

Jerome Hillier 8:30pm

Observatory Main Room

DJ Johnny G

Federation Concert Hall

Revolution & Reformation 7:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Kingswood + New Saxons + Babylon Howl 10pm

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

DJ’s 10pm

The Homestead

Wham Bam Superman + House Guests From Hell

Grand Poobah Main Room

Adventurers, The White Rose Project, The Sketches, Bansheeland and The Stayns 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Observatory Lounge Room

DJ Magneetis

Brisbane Hotel

ALL AGES - Boris The Blade (Vic) + Dawn Of Your Discontent + Absolution Sequence + Alpha Wolf + Omnicide

Observatory Main Room

DJ Johnny G

Republic Bar & Café

Slim Jim Phantom + Fireballs + Sin & Tonics 10pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Graveyard Train (Vic) + The Dead Maggies

Brisbane Hotel

Late Night Krackieoke w/ MC Psychedelic Cannonballs

C Bar

Tony Voglino 8pm

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

DJ’s 10pm

Grand Poobah Main Room

Wham Bam Superman, Seth Henderson, Smokestack & The Pearly Whites

Brisbane Hotel Brisbane Hotel

Sunday

36

8

18+ - Abba Zaba (Swe) + Speakeasies + Yash + Smutty Sam

Monday

9

Tuesday

10

Wednesday

11

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

12

13

14

(Front Bar) - We <3 Bass w/ Newport vs Max Power + Project_Weekend vs Outlaw + Kireesh vs LawlessDJ + SoundwaveDJ vs Dfekt + Mez vs DJ Mad + DJ Do Little + DJ Secrets

C Bar

The Goodfellas 8pm

Grand Poobah

Her Majesty’s Favourite Really Great Graphical Festival with last Days of the Mill, The Shipright and the Banshee & Tom O Herns “Hell” 8pm

Home Hill Winery

Virtuosi Piano Quartet 11am

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

Boil Up 10pm

Republic Bar & Café

Kingswood + Smokestack + Verticoli 10pm

The Homestead

LoTek + Local Support

Bar Celona

Soul Session Sound System 3pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Graveyard Train (Vic) + The Dead Maggies

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo W/ Ramblin Ryan

warpmagazine.com.au

Sunday

15


Event Guide

Date

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Venue

Acts / Start Time

C Bar Republic Bar & Café The Coterie - Coal Valley Vineyard

Guitar and Vocals by Louise Goich 1:30pm

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays w/ Reggae Ink 3pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

G.B. Balding (Finger Picking Blues) 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Quiz-A-Saurus

Republic Bar & Café

Priscilla Salter 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 9pm

Brisbane Hotel Observatory Lounge Room

Date

Venue

Acts / Start Time

Billy Whitton 12:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Phil Smith 8:30pm

Peter Hicks and the Blue Licks 8:30pm

The Coterie - Coal Valley Vineyard

Tony Makro 1:30pm

The Homestead

Soul Session Sound System

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays w/ Reggae Ink 3pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Finn Secombe 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Sambo 8pm

Brisbane Hotel

Warhammer Nights!

Republic Bar & Café

Baker Boys Band 8:30pm

Birdcage Bar

Pete Thomas 9pm

Side Show Cabaret

Observatory Lounge Room

TBC

DJ Magneetis

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

Homebrewed - Edge Radio Social Night 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

The Darlings 8:30pm

Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night

Waratah Hotel

Quiz Night

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Glen Challice 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

The Comedy Forge

Republic Bar & Café

Dave Wilson Band 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

4 Letter Fish 9pm

The Homestead

Billy Whitton

The Homestead

The Aly Patmore Trio

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

Grimoire - Square Tony & The Arps (Vic) + Rainbow Chan (NSW) + Toxic Lipstick (Vic) + All The Weathers + Ela Stiles (NSW) + Kitchen Witches + B.A.A.D.D.D. + Ironhawk + Dracula + Matthew Brown + Black Paul + Oceans + Crypt Vapour + Pip Stafford + OklaPokla + DJ BTC

C Bar

Tim & Scott 8:30pm

Federation Concert Hall

Wallfisch & Wallfisch 7:30pm

Observatory Lounge Room

DJ Jim King

Observatory Main Room

DJ Johnny G

C Bar

DJ Gezza 8:30pm

Republic Bar & Café

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

DJ’s 10pm

Amnesty Refugees: Beautiful Chains + Jed Appleton + Leo Creighton + Big Money + The M.Y. Boys 9pm

Observatory Lounge Room

DJ Pravmaster Flash

The Homestead

Microtech

Observatory Main Room

DJ Johnny G

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Republic Bar & Café

Angry Anderson & James Southwell Band 10pm

Brisbane Hotel

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 9pm

Brisbane Hotel

UP THE PUNX FEST! w/ Admiral Ackbar’s Dishonourable Discharge (VIC) + K-MaRt WaRRioRs (Vic) + Hopes Abandoned (Vic) + Public Liability (Vic) + Southpaw (Vic) + Liquor Snatch Cruntburgers (Vic) + Cassie Hope & Alex Gawly (Vic) + Stay Down + Ironhawk + Fatty Esther + Drayfus’ Epifiny + The Dead Maggies + Carcass Of Humanity + In Your Honour

THE BRISSIES 7TH BIRTHDAY BASH - WARRIORS FILM THEME w/ Barbarion (Vic) + The Wizar’d + Craicpot + Pinchgut + Pines + The Infants (Vic) + White Summer (Vic) + Speakeasies + DJ BTC

C Bar

Tony Voglino 8pm

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

The Audreys 10pm

The Homestead

Summer Edmunds, Tim Davies, Terry Nomikos

Waratah Hotel

Leo Creighton “Burn the Photographs” Single Launch 9pm

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

23

24

25

26

27

28

C Bar

Manhattan 8pm

Federation Concert Hall

In Praise of Darkness 10pm

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

Grand Poobah Kissing Room

DJ’s 11pm

C Bar

Jerome Hillier 12:30pm

Grand Poobah Main Room

Moe Grizzly, Treehouse and The Curse 9pm

Grand Poobah

Japanese Film Society Night

Observatory Main Room

DJ B-Rex

Republic Bar & Café

Republic Music Quiz 3pm

Republic Bar & Café

Gape + Mephistopheles + Infernal Outcry + Create The Crayon 10pm

Republic Bar & Café

Ross Sermon + Rick Plant 8:30pm Ross Sermons & a visiting friend from Nashville who mightn’t know he’s playing! 1:30pm

Sunday

29

The Homestead

Aiden and Stoney - Cowboy Angels

The Coterie - Coal Valley Vineyard

Birdcage Bar

Jason Patmore 8pm

The Homestead

Tim & Scott

Brisbane Hotel

WAVEFORM 8Bit TUNES w/ cTrix (Vic) + Pselodux (WA) + Derris-Kharlan (Vic) + Tiasu (Vic) + Special Guests

Waratah Hotel

Reggae Sundays w/ Reggae Ink 3pm

Birdcage Bar

Billy & Randal 8pm

Republic Bar & Café

Quiz Night 8:15pm

Brisbane Hotel

Bingo W/ Ramblin Ryan

C Bar

Pete Thomas 12:30pm

Monday

30

Chet Faker Official Afterparty The Grand Poobah Chet Faker (DJ Set) Dexter (Melb) Celine Djion (NYC) Dameza Greta PGC 11pm start Saturday July 5 $15 plus b/f via Ruffcut & www.moshtix.com.au $20 on the door www.facebook.com/warp.mag 37


Event Guide

Launceston Date JUNE

Venue

Acts / Start Time

1

Lloyds Hotel

Karma Lounge with Gypsy and Spice

Wednesday

4

Club 54

Trivial Pursuits (Trivia Night) & DJ Vastra

Princess Theatre

Fred Smith - Dust of Uruzgan - Winter Tour 2014

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

Saturday

6

7

4

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Tapas Trivia

Thursday

5

Devonport

Molly Malones

Slats & Josh/Heat 1 Molly’s Got Talent 8:30pm In The Fade

Tapas Lounge Bar

Sheyanna Mach 4

Watergarden Bar

Colin Harvey 7pm

Saturday

7

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Brett Collidge 9pm

Club 54

Boris the Blade + Opposer + Zeolite + Uncle Geezer + Alpha Wolf

Devonport

Molly Malones

Blue Monday 9:30pm

Tonic Bar

Take 2 9pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Slats & The Big Naturals

Watergarden Bar

Tim Hibbard 7pm

Burnie

The Butter Factory

Rewind

Spreyton

Hans Vonk Music House

Virtuosi Piano Quartet 2pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Ringmasters

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Open Mic

Ulverstone

Ulverstone Wharf

Julie O’Hara 7:30pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Proud Phoneys/Heat 2 Molly’s Got Talent 8:30pm

Summer Edmunds & Tim Davies

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

Club 54

Akouo + Dameza + Spicer/Gypsy + Vastra + Papashango

Tonic Bar

Sambo 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Proud Phoneys 7pm

Club 54

Sans + Lyke Giants + Paper Souls + Summer Edmunds

Tonic Bar

Matthew Garwood 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Club 54

Lyrical Intent & DJ Vastra

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

Club 54

Shark Puncher + Rust Proof + Public Liability + Southpaw + Hounds on Hiroshima

21

Wednesday

Tapas Lounge Bar

Irish Murphy’s

Saturday

Fred Smith - Dust of Uruzgan - Winter Tour 2014

Devonport

The Round & Round featuring: Tiarni Cane + Dylan Patrick + Marty Kooistra + Chris Jackson & DJ Papashango

20

Burnie Arts & Function Centre

Devonport

Club 54

18

Burnie

6

11

14

3

Friday

Wednesday

13

Tuesday

Matthew Garwood 9pm

Kingswood + Seth David & The Beautiful Chains + So Do I

Friday

Acts / Start Time

The North V’s The Middle V’s The South

Club 54

Wednesday

Venue

Club 54

8

Saturday

CITY

Tonic Bar

Sunday

Friday

Date

JUNE

Sunday

Friday

NORTHWEST

Tonic Bar

Well Strung 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Jerome Hillier 7pm

Club 54

Teens of Thailand + Surreal Estate Agents + Staircase + Isaac Bowen + Tiarni Cane

Tonic Bar

Take 2 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Colin Harvey 7pm

Club 54

Thump - Electronic Music Night

Sunday

Wednesday

8

11

Thursday

12

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Matt & CJ

Friday

13

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Ringmasters

Saturday

14

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Sambo 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Brett Collidge 9:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Unit

Devonport

Molly Malones

Jerome Hillier/Heat 3 Molly’s Got Talent 8:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Evil Cisum

Thursday

19

Friday

20

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

Unbalanced

Saturday

21

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Jerome Hillier 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

The Collection 9:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Ringmasters

Devonport

Molly Malones

Ringmasters/FINAL Molly’s Got Talent 8:30pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

In The Fade

Burnie

Burnie High School Performing Arts Centre

Southern Gospel Choir 7:30pm

Thursday

Friday

26

27

Wednesday

25

Watergarden Bar

Trevor Weaver 6:30pm

Wynyard

Hotel Federal

Trevor Weaver 8:30pm

Thursday

26

Fresh on Charles

The Audreys

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Audreys

Friday

27

Club 54

Barbariön w/ special guests

Latrobe

Mackey’s Royal Hotel

Clay Soldier 9pm

Tonic Bar

Clay Soldier 9pm

Devonport

Molly Malones

Gypsy Rose 9:30pm

Watergarden Bar

Andy & The Woodman 7pm

Devonport

Tapas Lounge Bar

The Unit

Albert Hall

Wallfisch & Wallfisch 7:30pm

Burnie

The Butter Factory

The Red Kellys, Ursine

Club 54

Faith Accompli + Shark Puncher + The Rumours + So Do I

Tonic Bar

The Doctor Rocksters 9pm

Watergarden Bar

Jerome Hillier 7pm

Saturday

38

28

warpmagazine.com.au

Saturday

28


Chet Faker B uilt On Glass Tour

The Odean Hobart Sat 5 July

tickets available now through Ruffcut Records & www.ticketmaster.com.au

Chet Faker Official Afterparty The Grand Poobah

Chet Faker (Dj Set) Dexter (Melb) Celine Djion (Nyc) Dameza Greta PGC

11pm start Saturday July 5 $15 plus b/f via Ruffcut & www.moshtix.com.au $20 on the door


Warp Magazine June 2014