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matt callan a r c h i t e c t u r e

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matt callan

matt.callan@okstate.edu 4 0 5 . 6 2 3 . 4 8 8 9 3


The works shown are a comprehensive palette of projects over the course of my education. I have had the opportunity to work on several unique and challenging designs for a broad range of building types and clients. The studio environment (as shown above) has been a fun, educational, and exciting interaction among fellow students and faculty. The collaboration among classmates, even in individual design projects, was an opportunity to learn to interact and compete with fellow designers and be among a rich pool of design styles. Throughout the course of my education, I have learned design fundamentals and problem solving. I’ve been exposed to a broad range of design software as well as being able to use my hands in seeing these projects come to life, whether through physical modeling or design build. As my growth in design has evolved, I’ve been able to take part in other educational opportunities such as structural courses, team projects, international site visits, a graphic journaling trip, architectural management and finance courses and more that have been pivotal in giving me a comprehensive view of

architecture.

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Looking to help revitalize downtown Tulsa, the client is seeking a specific design solution for a boutique hotel. The client is looking to bring new life to the city with modern improvements while still respecting the historical Art Deco style of architecture. The needs and comfort of the user were considered from the very beginning of the design process. Instead of diving into this large scale project looking at the entire program, we started with the individual guest suite. The conceptual idea was that the experience of the individual guest room would ultimately give life to the hotel as a whole. Keeping in mind the wishes of the client and the city, the building was to weave into it’s surrounding architectural context and to create a sense of hierarchy without being a distraction. This was achieved by studying and pulling neighboring building lines and floor heights. The interlocking motion of the façade follows the conceptual idea of weaving with the context of the city. Verticality was an important characteristic of the art deco style. Therefore, strong vertical elements were incorporated in the design, creating a frame around the weaving motion of the fa-

downtown tulsa, oklahoma 6 week project spring 2010

hotel dwell

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structural perspective 7


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site 9


sketches

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building aerial perspective

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top: 1-4 bottom: 5-10

floor plans 12


lobby perspective

suite perspective

lounge perspective 13


Located in the Wichita Wildlife Reserve, the facility offers a spa and full bath amenities. Being located in a purely natural setting, the spa allows for a unique design solution that would offer a peaceful and tranquil experience from start to finish. Guests of the facility are looking to get away from the fast pace of their everyday lives. The natural environment and context aid in accomplishing this desire, but the building itself must also successfully achieve this. This was done by using a local and natural material palette. The building form was achieved by seeking to maintain a low profile that almost grew from the site instead of sitting atop it. Long horizontal lines respond to the contours of the earth, while the nose of the facility reaches out to the water’s edge. wichita mountain wildlife refuge, ok 6 week project spring 2010

wichita mountain spa 14


exterior perspective 15


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site

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exterior lake perspective 18


sketches 19


floor plans

sections 20


approach perspective

pool perspective

entry perspective

spa perspective

rest room perspective 21


Cohousing is a new communal concept that is starting to gain popularity internationally. Instead of single family living arrangements with disconnected neighborhoods, cohousing communities entail groups of people living in individual units, while sharing common outdoor spaces and a community center. The design focus was to create a community where interactions among residents are maximized. The “main street� of the facility is where the major circulation and grouping of spaces is located. The sustainable arrangement of the houses was constructed in pairs, similar to a duplex, in order to minimize building footprint and allow for a closer proximity to neigh-

stillwater, ok 6 week project fall 2010

cohousing community 22


main street perspective 23


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site 25


sketches 26


site model 27


common house perspective 28


common house floor plans 29


house floor plans 30


house interior perspective 31


Located along the south bank of the seine river, the American University of Paris wanted to expand the current campus by offering more classrooms, offices, community areas, a library, and more. The mission statement of the University was to reach out to the world through means of technology and innovation. It was important for the design of the school to represent this fundamental idea, while also responding to and respecting the classic Parisian style. The facility responds to classic Parisian building culture by the use of a central courtyard, classic vertical zoning, and an urban response to the affluently diverse street life. The library was placed at the north front to be a bold symbol of education to the public. The layout of the facility is formed and cut by important points of the Parisian context. paris, france 6 week project fall 2011

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courtyard perspective 33


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site

site model

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sketches 36


northwest exterior perspective

southeast exterior perspective

exterior building perspectives 37


gym/parking level

ground level 38


office level

classroom level 39


library perspective 40


library floor plans 41


library cross section

library longitudinal section 42


parapet cap flashing cant 6” slab with metal decking and roof rigid insulation i-beam sprandal glass curtain wall system 1’ column rigid insulation metal cladding l-beam 3/8” gypsum board batt insulation 6” slab with metal decking drop-in ceiling hvac unit spandral glass metal stud concrete foundation on vapor barrier sand

wall section 43


This project offered many unique and educational opportunities. Being a full semester long, we were given a full comprehensive view of the full design process of a building going through the Schematic design, Design Development, and Construction Documents phases. Through the process we also took part in material research, structural and mechanical analysis, as well as cost estimating and budgeting. The client offered a design competition for an Oklahoma City homeless shelter, located just outside of downtown near I-235. A unique design solution was required for a temporary home for families who are working toward becoming independent and self-sufficient. The program asked for three major functions of the facility: Living spaces, a medical clinic, and spaces of necessary amenities for the needs of the guests (counselors, dining hall, recreation spaces, etc.)

oklahoma city, ok 16 week project- comprehensive design studio spring 2011

oklahoma city homeless assistance center for families 44


lobby perspective 45


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site 47


sketches 48


exterior building perspectives 49


communal space perspective 50


study models 51


ground level shelter level 1 shelter level 2 floor plans 52


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south elevation

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building longitudinal section

north elevation 55


shelter level perspective 56


structural models 57


While going through the different design phases of the building, we were also required to pick a specific space in the building that had a significant worth to the function of the building. Within the focal space, we dove even deeper into design specifics and construction. This included researching and designing the material coordination, detailed skin models and sections, building systems research and coordination (lighting & HVAC), a reflected ceiling plan, and more. The space I choose to focus on was the dining hall. Located on the ground level in the heart of the facility, it served as a central gathering space for guests as well as a key point of cross circulation throughout the building on all levels. The space could be opened up with the use of the flexible nana walls, allowing for an abundance of natural light and cross ventilation, as well as a connector to the outdoor communal spaces.

focal space: dining room 58


lobby perspective 59


focal space sectional model 60


wall section 61


The final phase of the project was very educational and real life applicable. Through a series of lectures and specific presedent examples, we were able to take our final design drawings and prepare them as construction ready documents. Although it was not a full set, we were able to focus on specific parts that included: elevations, a longitudinal building section, a wall section, building details, a partial floor plan, and a reflected ceiling plan.

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This project was a group effort of six team members addressing urban issues and the study of interlocking forms. Located in San Juan, Puerto Rico, a popular tourist cruise destination, the client requested a design solution for a new water transportation hub, as well as an aquarium that served as an educational attraction for the rich ocean wildlife. In the first phase of the project, the team of six produced a masterplan for the facility. The next phase asked for the team to be divided into two teams of three to produce the two main facilities while still keeping in close communication for effective design coordination. The two facilities shared a large common atrium entry where the functions of the buildings interlock. The overall composition sits adjacent to the water front, allowing for easy cruise ship and water taxi access, as well as creating a unique experience and interaction of the aquarium to the ocean context. The aquarium is elevated off the ground to allow for smooth ground circulation, allowing guests direct interaction with views to the ocean and backdrop of Old San Juan.

san juan, puerto rico masterplan, 2 week project aquarium & terminal, 7 week project, fall 2011

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water approach perspective 71


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site

site

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sketches 74


concept model pictures 75


final form model

vehicular train

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site analysis 76


masterplan studies 77


observation tower perspective 78


OUTDOOR AQUARIUM LEVEL (-16’)

GROUND LEVEL (0’)

2ND LEVEL (16’)

floor plans 79


3RD LEVEL (32’)

4TH LEVEL (48’)

floor plans 80


exterior perspectives 81


aquarium lobby perspective 82


sections 83


circulation diagrams 84


aquarium perspective 85


This project serves as an urban renewal of an aging and disconnected urban hot spot. The client desired a design solution for a new masterplan of the San Patricio plaza. Teams of six were assembled to take part in a design competition that would set the stage and lay the ground rules for the development of the future site. The complicated program included office, residential, hospitality, entertainment, retail, institutional, and public green space. Once a masterplan was chosen and regulations were set, the teams were divided into three person groups to take on an individual and unique project from the larger overall program. My team chose to work on the shopping mall that needed to be replaced in the masterplan. The project acted as a single, fundamental vein connecting the surrounding community to one another through improved means of vehicular and pedestrian circulation. The success of the building design and connection was dependent on a thorough investigation of the forces that needed to be addressed. These included a stable connection to the residential area across the highway, the difficulty and function of spanning the building across the highway, responding to the surrounding plazas, and responding to the vehicular circulation through

san juan, puerto rico masterplan competition, 1 week project mall design, 4 week project, fall 2011

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mall center perspective 87


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site

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tv station addition existing tv station

ZONING

MAX HT. & FAR

commercial commercial commercial commercial residential park. residential residential mid-rise residential retail/transport. / residential commercial/retail food retail/comm/resident. commercia l /residential mix-use mid-rise commercial / residential mix-use high-rise commercial extended stay hotel commercial / hospitality shopping mall / cultural retail / art & culture live / work residential commercial / residential mix-use mid-rise commercial mix-use high-rise commercial / residential mix-use mid-rise commercial / residential mix-use high-rise commercial / residential mix-use mid-rise commercial / residential mix-use mid-rise commercial / residential existing office building commercial existing office building commercial transportation hub commercial / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail dance theatre entertainment / culture arts center / hotel hospitality / culture art & cultural center entertainment / culture adult movie theatre entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail residential mid-rise residential residential mid-rise residential residential mid-rise residential residential mid-rise residential cultural center entertainment / culture arts center / hotel hospitality / culture entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail entertainment / shopping entertainment / retail urgent care facility health / education grade school health / education satellite university health / education cultural center entertainment / culture existing parking

TEAM unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed David / Matt Cl. / Molly Adam / Cristin / Scott unclaimed unclaimed Laith / Nick / Justin Austin / Matt Ca. / Tyler H. Brian M. / Elizabeth / Jessica S. unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed Ben / Frans / Jon Ben / Frans / Jon Ben / Frans / Jon Bryan W. / Nicole / Danna Andrew / Jessica I. / Josh Joey / Morgan / Yaz Chris / Tanner / Tyler W. unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed Andrew / Jessica I. / Josh unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed unclaimed

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final masterplan 90


masterplan studies 91


masterplan studies 92


found object model 93


ground level (restaurants)

second level (high -line)

third level (mall level 1)

fourth level (mall level 2) floor plans 94


main plaza perspective 95


section model pictures 96


mall/anchor store section art gallery section

sectional perspectives 97


road perspective 98


overall model pictures 99


highline perspective

bike path perspective

entrance perspective 100


class presentation pictures 101


The projects shown are design build objectives completed over the course of my education. Each allowed for a unique opportunity in seeing how a design becomes a tangible and functioning object. Plastic bottle sculpture, fall 2011: The class as a whole teamed up to construct a piece of sculpture that used empty plastic bottles and chicken wire as the material palate. The bottles are woven into the metal grid forming an organic form that shows the life of a bottle from packaging to its eventual trash can destination. Planter design, spring 2010: This group project was a study in the use of material connections. The planter used a palate of materials that included a concrete base, metalthreaded rods, and a wooden frame. The intended use of the planter was for a vine plant to weave and interact with the composition of the planter. Wine label design, fall 2011: This was a unique group opportunity where we were able to use graphic design and marking as a means to portray our potential wine production business plan. Plexiglass light box, fall 2010: This individual design project took a 3-D mass and section cut it numerous times to create a series of unique shapes. The individual shapes were placed and ordered in AutoCad then cut via the school laser cutter. The plexiglass pieces along with metal thread rods and washers together created the composition.

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MALBEC 2009 MENDOZA

C CONVENTO O

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In the summer of 2010, the School of Architecture offered a graphic journaling course that gave students the opportunity to fine tone their sketching skills, while also learning to accurately study and document building details. The sketches shown are in order of their completion. They are composed freehanded with ink pens and watercolor. Guthrie, OK: This was a training event the class took part in during the spring 2010 semester in preparation for the trip to DC/NYC. We studied and documented the historical district of downtown Guthrie, paying close attention to the architectural style and history. Washington D.C.: This was the first stop in our week long trip, consisting of three days. We had the opportunity to explore and document many historical and famous buildings such as the national galleries of art, the Smithsonian museums, the capital building, and much more. New York City: This was the remaining four days in our trip, as well as the most memorable. In the available time we had, we explored and journaled over nearly every part of Manhattan Island, several different museums, Chinatown and Little Italy, Time Square, and so much more. Oklahoma City: After we returned from the DC/NYC trip, we had one last analysis project where we were assigned to sketch and journal an additional city of our choice. Being from Oklahoma City, I decided to explore and document some of the well-known architectural features of the

travel sketches 108


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guthrie, ok 110


washington d.c. 111


new york city, ny 112


oklahoma city, ok 113


matt callan

matt.callan@okstate.edu 4 0 5 . 6 2 3 . 4 8 8 9 114

PORTFOLIO  

Architectural Portfolio

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