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sustainable construction resource and learning centre kingston upon hull january 2009

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


contents page 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46.

project location location aerial view aerial views 1 aerial views 2 location histoy public realm (water) existing public realm (ecology) public realm (strategic overview) regeneration population/local economy potential sites chosen site site history historic maps (1853) historic maps (1892) historic maps (1893) historic maps (1910) historic maps (1928) fruit market breakdown area photograph study map photograph study photograph study photograph study photograph study photograph study photograph study massing microclimate movement noise pedestrian routes building frontage historic character site analyss site photograph map site photographs site photographs site photographs surrounding elevations surrounding elevations surrounding elevations existing site sections shadow study shadow study shadow study swot analysis

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


contents page 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72.

why the building type (history) why the building type (modern day) why the building type (uk recycling) what is green building? recycled architecture recycled architecture recycled architecture recycled architecture recycled architecture recycled architecture recycled architecture building brief (outline proposals) functional reasoning/layout building function/spaces analysis of building/site analysis of brief schedule of accommodation intentions/qualities genesis centre, sommerset genesis centre, sommerset off-site 2007 conceptual thinking conceptual thinking

bibliography

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


project location The chosen location for this project has taken me to Kingston upon Hull, invariably referred to as ‘Hull’ in the present day, in the East Riding of Yorkshire about 25 miles from the North Sea on the River Hull at its junction with the Humber estuary. Previous to this study my knowledge of the area has been rather limited visiting only to use the well established links with Holland via passenger ferries and the Deep aquarium looking out over the River Humber. The richness of Hull is long in the making with a deep and broad history which has shaped the city we see today. With the cities roots lying in the international transportation of goods via shipping it shows an industrial facade which holds many revolutionary stories and has founded many legendary figures. The success of Hull as a major international port has seen its involvement in many past times such as exporting local wool to northern Europe, importing raw materials from the Baltic region into England, and later under the control of King Edward I even being used as a supply base for his military campaigns in Scotland. The continuation of this activity has built strong trade links with international locations, still importing some of the same goods today, timber and oil seed being a few of them. Because of its importance as a dock, the city’s history has many prominent areas. It has influenced and seen the damaging effects off war, created trade through industry and played a leading role in fishing and creating links with other countries. Much of the originality still presently thrives in Hull but not all remains as time changes, however the overseas trade and passenger ferries still prosper. Hull today is currently undergoing a phase of both regeneration and new build projects throughout the city driven by the Economic Development Company of Hull which aims to deliver a lasting change to the city. The organisation is working on the back of Hull Citybuild, the previous urban regeneration program which took great strides forward in terms of economic and physical regeneration. The relatively recent mistakes in Hulls development do not go unnoticed even as a visitor. Its ugly clashes of beautiful internationally influenced buildings with the random spills of heavy present day industry and commerce which strangely stand out more than the buildings themselves. With Hulls substantial history and the progressive initiative there is huge scope for development with architectural merit to be gained.

1.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


location

2.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


aerial views

victoria dock

deep aquarium

albert dock

humber estuary river humber

prince’s quay A63 roadway

fruit market queen’s gardens

hull train station

william wright dock

new city centre boundary (hull city coucil)

A63 roadway

hull marina

3.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


aerial views

4.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


location history Hull grew up in the Middle ages on the River Hull at the Humber estuary which links the Yorkshire rivers and the Midlands with the North Sea. It developed as a port through which wool from surrounding areas was exported to Northern Europe. Imports of the time were naturally raw materials such as timber from the Baltic region. At this early stage ships would anchor to the Hull’s mouth and send smaller vessels down river to Beverly, Nottingham, Knottingley, Selby and York. In 1299 the borough of Kingston upon Hull was founded by King Edward I which gives the city its name today, and after buying the port it was used to supply the military for his campaigns in Scotland. During the later Middle Ages Hull continued to be an important port importing cloth from the Netherlands, iron-ore from Sweden, oils seed from the Baltic and timber from Riga and Norway. This brought great wealth to some traders which resulted in them joining the English aristocracy.

in the fishing industry but also seeing improvements in housing and planning with the construction of council housing estates on the outskirts of the city. Hulls’s importance as a port meant it was the heaviest bombed outside London in the Second World War. The process of re-building was slow and the city’s profile of trade was changed for good as the smaller docks closed. In 1969 the Queen Elizabeth Dock opened to handle shipping container traffic, still thriving today, with some of the largest super ferries operating from here. The city lost its fishing industry after it collapsed after the ‘Cod Wars’ with Iceland. However many of the old industries which developed to process imported raw materials still exist today, meaning that the 700 year old port is still a major importer of timber from northern Europe.

During the 16th and 17th centuries Hull saw a lapse in trade due to the Civil war but due to its strategic importance, it received the military attentions of both sides. By the 18th century Hulls development as a port began to rapidly accelerate due to the agricultural and industrial developments in Yorkshire and the East Midlands. The first dock opened in 1778 with others following suit in the next 150 years which saw a population increase as Hull burst its medieval walls spreading to middle-class suburbs to the east and west of the town. The 19th century saw the introduction of industries for processing raw materials which were imported through the port, including corn milling and seed crushing. Whaling became the dominant trade towards the end of the 18th century, with 40% of the country’s whalers sailing from the town by 1800. The trade greatly benefited Hull until its rapid decline during the mid-19th century due to over-fishing. Along side all this activity the fishing industry was beginning to thrive with large fish-rich parts of the North sea, known as ‘silver pits’, attracting trawlers from as far as Kent and Devon. 1840 saw the trade industry boom as the first rail link with Leeds was established with others to Barnsley to follow shortly. Born and educated in Hull, William Wilberforce was part of the merchant class and later went on to achieve national prominence. Wilberforce became and MP for the town in 1780 and later went on to become MP for the County of York in 1784. His devotion to the Christian faith saw him become the leading figure in the movement against slavery in parliament. His work contributed to the abolition of the slave trade in the British Empire in 1807 and slavery as an institution in 1833. Hull’s major civic buildings, such as the Guild Hall, are an indication of its civic pride and that Hull was at its most prosperous before the First World War. The 1920s and 30s saw a decline in industry mainly due to overproduction

5.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


public realm

water

Pre 17th Century – the city has established 17th Century – a moat surrounds the city, 1888 – the city centre dock network is at 1935 – Queen’s Dock has been filled in a on the banks of the River Hull and the Hum- the extent of which today covers the Old its most extensive, the line of Humber Dock, becomes Queen’s Gardens. ber estuary. Town and Fruit Market areas. Prince’s Dock and Queen’s Dock clearly follow the line of the old moat.

Information from ‘Hull City Centre Public Realm’

Today

Consultation Draft Supplementary Planning Document October 2005

6.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


existing public realm

ecology

Proposed Humber Estuary SPA and Ramsar site and Humber Es- Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) Priority Habitat (Mud- Sites of Nature Conservation Interest (SNCI) and Urban tuary SSSI. flats). Greenspace.

The city centre is dominated by buildings and general infrastructure with minimal green space other than Queen’s Gardens and the Burial Ground. Nature however is still present in the centre. The River Humber is designated by the English Nature as a ‘Site of Special Scientific Interest’ (Humber Estuary SSSI) and has two habitat action plans (The Mudflats and Natural Areas). However the River Hull does not have SSSI status. As the river is tidal with many derelict dry docks along its course there are large areas of mudflats which are included in the Mudflat habitat action plan as identified by English Nature. Queen’s Gardens is an existing urban greenspace which is a wildlife haven central within the city keeping a balance between ecological value and human life. The Burial Ground is of similar importance to the city centre with many mature trees and shrubs located there with resident bats also being recorded.

Information from ‘Hull City Centre Public Realm’ Consultation Draft Supplementary Planning Document October 2005

7.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


public realm

strategic overview

Information from ‘Hull City Centre Public Realm’ Consultation Draft Supplementary Planning Document October 2005

There are plans for a series of special walks, new cycleways and clearly defined, structural elements of landscape to form a new Masterplan for the city. The most prominent of these will be: • • • • • •

An outer walk that will define the extent of the city centre core, a walk that will link all the public spaces, old and new, on the edges of the centre. An inner dock walk which will link the River Hull to the RiverHumber largely following the line of, and recalling, the old docks built outside the medieval walls which used to surround the Old Town. An east/west walk that links the new St Stephens scheme at Ferensway to the east bank of the River Hull, through Queen Victoria Square and into Whitefriargate as the new ‘portal’ into the Old Town. This will extend along Silver Street/Scale Lane over a new footbridge onto the west bank. A green walk that links the outer walk with Queen’s Gardens/College Quadrangle, Lowgate and Market Place, and extending southwards along Queen Street to Wellington Street (East and West). A riverside walk linking the River Humber to the River Hull, as well as the series of urban squares including the square adjacent to North Bridge. A retail circuit which provides a strong, clear route linking existing and proposed develop ment.

There are also a number of linked new public spaces proposed: • • • • • •

Humber Quays – a continuous riverside promenade and new plaza Fruit Market – a new plaza centred on the restored dry dock providing a flexible space. Eastbank – new pocket parks and urban squares to accept the new feature bridges in this area. Albion Square – a new public square. Quay West – a new public plaza. New treatments for Queen Victoria Square and Queen’s Gardens.

The forward city movement recognises the importance in developing a structure for the streets and space so that a hierarchy is established. Principal streets and spaces: Spaces including Queen’s Gardens, Trinity Square and the river edges are important thoroughfares. It is seen that these spaces should be treated with the highest quality materials and planting etc. reflecting the status of their use. These spaces also provide opportunities for major public art installations. Major streets and spaces: Busy city streets and well used spaces such as Alfred Geider Street, George Street and King Edward Street. These two fall under high status materials and planting with localised use of natural stone. Other streets and spaces: The narrow streets and private courtyards of hull should be standardised to provide a back drop to the key spaces within the city centre.

8.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


regeneration There is a city centre masterplan for the city of Hull, funded by the Council and managed by Citybuild. It is a long term plan for improving Hull city centre, providing shopping and leisure facilities, offices, homes and employment opportunities as a result. The masterplan’s five Strategic development areas are – • • • • •

Humber Quays Fruit Market Area East Bank of the River Hull Albion Square and the heart of the city Quay West

The Humber Quays and the Fruit Market area are the closest regeneration areas to the site, reaching up to Queen Street. The Hull Harbour has plans to be a spectacular business and international trade centre with parts of the plan already visible with One and Two Humber Quays already built. Alongside this are plans for hotels, waterfront residences and stunning public space. The main objectives of the development are to re-establish links with the city centre, enhance the use of the area and through mixed use build-up for a round-the-clock safe community. Closer to the site, the Fruit Market area is to be reinstated and celebrated once again to become a place of distinction, recognised in the UK and overseas. It will become a new place to live and work, complemented by cafe bars, speciality shops, restaurants, boutique hotels as well as new public space. The main objectives of the Fruit Market are to: • • • • •

Breathe new life into the city’s waterfront and build on the success of The Deep, Humber Quays and Hull Marina. Recover the distinctive spirit and vitality of this part of the old town conservation area. Create a new vibrant community to live, improving and enhancing the environment for existing busi nesses and residents. Help the city’s small business community to grow and prosper Keep visitors in the city for longer and spending more.

city regeneration areas

waterfront developments

proposed humber street looking east

fruit market regeneration by igloo

9.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


population, local economy There has been a decline in Hull’s population over the last few decades with a 5.3% reduction between 1991 and 2001. This was mainly due to people leaving the city for various reasons. The 2001 census recorded a total of 253 400 of which 48% were male and 52% female. This was later re-estimated to 248 000 in July 2004. ‘The economy is dominated by low wages, high unemployment and inactivity rates and, for those in employment, low value/low paid professions’. As a result of this, Hull is the ninth most deprived of 354 English districts which is creating low motivation and the drive to regenerate the area. With high unemployment around 100 000 households are relying on government benefits to survive and even when there is an income, 27% of the households bring home under £10 000 per annum. As a city it has a high birth-rate and an abnormally high teenage conception rate in relation to the rest of the UK, which together with the economy problems is creating a nondesirable place to be.

10.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


potential sites

Site one: hull central dry dock Again the vista potential is great out to sea and along the River Hull but the reverse direction offers no frontage and noise from the A68. The vehicular access is more direct off the main roads and pedestrian routes from the city centre are equally direct with links from the western side of the estuary via the bridges. The site offers the success of the fruit market and the opportunity to be apart of the regeneration without imposing a unique building type to a residential/leisure based area. Although just one street away the site appears more rugged with the re-flooding of the dry dock an option to increase the links in and out via boat. Site two: humber keys/hull marina The site has great prospect vistas in all directions as the area currently stands with the harbour, fruit markets and sea front, with this only to get better with the regeneration works. It can be accessed on foot easily and lies on both the ‘green’ and ‘inner dock’ walk of which is a linear route straight from Queen Victoria Square and Queens Gardens in the centre. Vehicular access is good however parking would be an issue. There is a grade II listed building located on the site which would pose problems and also raises the issue the building type being feasible in this specific area with the proposed regeneration.

11.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


chosen site

Sharing many of the positive points found with site two, I have chosen site one due to its opportunities to work with the River Hull and the chance to boost interest along the river banks, working alongside the success of the Deep aquarium, making use of the recently installed links across the estuary. The site’s listed dry dock is unique, which also offers the chance to work with the existing features and the opportunity to create unique scheme characteristics, which might not have been possible with site two. This characteristic offers great potential to marry the historical purpose of the area with personal intentions and targets. Being on the edge of the Fruit Market development area means it can be a part of the promising regeneration works whilst holding its own individual identity, to be recognised for its purpose and architectural merit.

12.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site history High Street, leading from Humber Street, was once the hub of the city and the trading base for many of Hulls wealthy merchants. Amongst the merchants that lived on the street included the Wilberforces, the Maisters, the Thompsons, the Blaydes and the Sykes. Daniel Sykes, a close school friend of William Wilberforce, was a former MP for Hull and was prominent in the anti-slavery movement. The Blaydes family had deep rooting in the maritime ventures over several generations from shipbuilding and freight shipping to ropemaking. The Blaydes were the prominent shipbuilders in Hull during the 18th and 19th centuries and owned one of the city’s oldest ship yards on the High Street, then called North End Yard which is now a disused dry dock. Brigham and Cowan were a ship builders company founded in South Shields in 1876 before starting another site in North Bridge Road in Hull in 1913. The ship repairers and marine engineers company have been recorded moving and merging both in and out of Hull throughout the two century’s. 1889 saw The Hull Central Dock & Engineering Works Ltd as the shipbuilders at Humber Street, Hull. However in 1953 Brigham & Cowan bought Amos & Smith which had previously taken over Hull Central Dry Dock 1936 which became subsidiaries of Brigham & Cowan and the parent company. As shown in the historical characteristics section of the site analysis, the old city walls used to follow the line of the High Street, along Humber Street and up Humber Dock Street. The whole site is within the boundary of archaeological interest with dock itself being a listed structure. BBC News reported on the 13 June 2004 that ‘archaeologists working next to the old Central Dry Dock on Humber Street have uncovered the remains of three of the Battery’s gun positions’. Pottery was also found with a collection of clay tobacco pipes. ‘It is of major regional, and even national, importance for our understanding of the development of artillery fortifications’, said the archaeologists.

13.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic maps

(1853)

The Hull Central Dry Dock, then called South End Graving Dock is clearly visible on the western side of the estuary which is much wider than present day, with no land where the Deep currently sits. The South End Battery is shown creating a courtyard structure with the north boundary. To the west, the fruit markets area is amass of buildings, similar to today showing the same grain patterns. The land to the north, in between Humber Street and Blackfriargate is saturated with buildings which is the opposite to the wasteland that presently remains. The road layout remains the same today only Blackfriargate is dwarfed by the four lane A63 running to the north of it.

14.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic maps

(1892)

This more detailed map shows the,now called Hull Central Dry Dock, as an engineering works with the Holy Trinity School facing onto Humber Street. The London Hotel is located where Ruscadors is on the corner of Humber Street and Queen Street which at this time has a tram line running along its course. Still remaining today is the Queens Alley which cuts through the site in the north east corner.

15.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic maps

(1893)

This map sees the arrival of the South Bridge connecting the two sides of the River Hull. The estuary has also narrowed and distinctive triangular land shape is now visible which holds the Humber Iron Works (Ship building and engineering). Building mass is the same as the previous year with Blackfriargate still running to the banks of the River Hull.

16.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic maps

(1910)

The tram lines are still visible leading from the Market Place down to Nelson Street on the way passing the site which still holds the London Hotel on the corner with much of the same massing as in previous years. The fruit market remains the same with the same building grain and the massing to the north of Humber Street is still present defining the areas clearly. Where Victoria pier now is there are two ferry boat docks fed off Nelson Street.

17.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic maps

(1928)

The area looks similar to how it is today apart from the lack of buildings to the north of Humber Street and around Blanket Row. The South Bridge still remains linking the two sides, the opposite of which now houses a timber yard rather than an iron works.

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


fruit market area breakdown

19.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study map

n 20.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

1. panoramic looking west over humber dock basin

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

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10. panoramic looking over the hull marina

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

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17. panoramic looking at the hull marina

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

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32. panoramic looking from the ‘deep’ over the humber estuary at hull central dry dock 25.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


area photograph study

33. panoramic looking north west off victoria pier

34. panoramic looking south off victoria pier

35. panoramic looking east along nelson street 26.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


massing The site itself, not including the dry dock, is split into two, half being vacant of building and the other half with a mixture of derelict and non-derelict buildings facing onto Queen Street. The derelict structures backing onto ‘The Art Lab’ are structurally unsound whereas the Ruscadors eating establishment on the corner of Humber Street and Queen Street and the Machin store remain fully functional. The area remains mostly empty within the boundary with the bulk of the massing running along Queen Street with the largest single structure (the Deep) sitting over the estuary. Immediately over Humber Street is empty wasteland providing no frontage with clear views of the A68 from the north site boundary.

27.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


microclimate

n 28.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


movement

n 29.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


noise

n 30.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


pedestrian routes

n 31.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


building frontage

n 32.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


historic character

n 33.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site analysis Microclimate The site and surrounding buildings are positioned in a way so that the majority is south facing and therefore receives maximum amounts of sunlight throughout the day. With south westerly winds steadily increasing across the River Humber, the more exposed areas including the site are subject to windy conditions when it becomes strong. With the orientation of the River Hull, wind is channelled in this direction past the site and into the open waste land to the north.

within the site boundary. The dock is grade II listed along with a number of buildings in Nelson Street. The site just sits within the Old Town Conservation Area boundary which brushes the western side with the ‘Area of Archaeological Interest’ brushing the southern boundary line including it within. The old city walls although not present now were located along Humber Street.

Movement The major link close to the site is the A63, also known as Castle Street, which feed the more secondary routes around the fruit market area and subsequently the site. Roads in the area are not busy and parking doesn’t pose any problems but with the future development plans, the business of the area will undoubtedly increase. Castle Street is a noticeable barrier between the area and the city centre even for cars as there is no crossing point forcing people to use Humber Street and the High Street. Noise As predicted the A63 is the biggest noise polluter of the area as the immediate roads are so quiet but there is also noise potential from boats and seagulls from the sea front but these are insignificant in comparison. Pedestrian Routes The Pedestrian Routes map shows the Strategic Development Areas recognised walks but there is increased activity around Nelson Street and the sea front and also around the Harbour along Humber Dock Street where people sit outside the public houses. More specific to the site is the immediate walkway around the boundary leading from Nelson Street to Humber Street and the end of the newly built Millennium Bridge. The bridge remains busy transporting people between the eastern and western sides of the River Hull where the Deep attracts crowds along the seafront walkway. Building Frontage This particular area of Hull has many good and bad examples of Architecture. Nelson Street holds some of the best frontage in the area with some prime Georgian buildings but the area is dotted with 1960s accommodation buildings, which alter the charm of the area. Since demolition there are many gaps where building frontage is needed desperately in order to give the streets some identity. An example of this is Blanket Row where both sides lack character. However the future development plans include plans for these areas. Historical Character As shown on the map the Humber Harbour and Basin’s walls are listed structures as is the Hull Central Dry Dock

34.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site photograph map

n 35.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site photographs

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7. panoramic looking south across the site from the foot bridge at the dry dock gates

36.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site photographs

8. panoramic looking at site boundary from east to west along humber street

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12. panoramic looking at site boundary from north to south along queen street

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


site photographs

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


surrounding elevations

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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


surrounding elevations

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n 40.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


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design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


existing site sections Geographically the site and surroundings are almost level excluding areas around the Myton Swing Bridge where Humber Street becomes the High Street. From Humber Dock Street to the dry dock edge on Humber Street the ground is dead level with a drop of 100mm to the meeting of Queen Street and Nelson Street and a 200mm drop to the furthest point of Wellington Street. section scale: 1:1250 (C - C)

n

(A - A) (B - B)

section (A - A): looking east through dry dock

section (B - B): looking east through site massing

section (C - C): looking north through site and along wellington street

42.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


shadow study

summer 09:00 The site receives maximum morning sunlight from the east, and with no massing immediately to the east there is nothing to cast shadow. The shade cast by the surrounding massing falls onto Queen Street to the west.

winter 09:00 Roughly two thirds of the site is under shade caused by the Deep which is casting long shadows across the estuary. The dock entrance is receiving what light is hitting the site. Queen Street again receives total shade cover.

43.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


shadow study

summer 12:00 Short shadows are cast to the north of the current on-site buildings with the site and Queen Street flooded with sunlight. Large massing to the south cast shadow but it does not reach the site boundary.

winter 12:00 Longer shadows mean that the southern massing put around an 8th of the site in shade but the remainder is still light.

44.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


shadow study

summer 18:00 Existing site buildings cast shadow onto the site but it remains well lit at this time. The shadows cast from opposite buildings on Queen Street hit the western site boundary.

winter 18:00 The site looks dark under shade with long shadows of Queen Street massing and southern buildings. The north eastern corner of the site is guaranteed not to be under cover.

45.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


s.w.o.t analysis Strengths

Opportunities

The sites many assets include:

Opportunities define the potential of any site, identification and exploitation of these can lead to successful building:

The potential to form a close relationship with the estuary where the more traditional forms of transportation can be reinstated and enjoyed.

• The potential to combine with the Deep aquarium to create interest in the area and draw people from the city centre and beyond. • The great views out to sea and the views into the corner site when entering the River Hull from the Humber by boat. • Access to the site is easy by both land vehcle and by sea/canal vessel with parking for both types. Prevailing winds from the South West can assist the building in natural ventilation. • Little/no massing to the south of the site allowing sun to penetrate for most of the hours • of the day which would assist in natural internal lighting. Sitting on the canal walkway and being pedestrian friendly with close links to Nelson Street on the sea front.

Being a corner site being visible and accessed from Humber Street, Queen Street, Nelson Street, Humber Dock Street, Blanket Row, Castle Street (A63) and the southern side of the city centre and the Humber estuary.

• • • • •

Weaknesses

The current (partial) use of the site is not representational of the site and could easily be located elsewhere which leaves the potential to use the site to create a positive and inspira tional intervention which can benefit the city and people of Hull. To create a truly unique building for the North of England with worthy cause based on the need to alter human’s way of living to save the planet. To bridge the gap between eco-sustainable archi tecture for professionals and eco-sustainable ar chitecture for the everyday man through an archi tectural intervention. To reinstate the existing dry dock which holds the history and heritage of the site. As all the surrounding buildings reflect their time of erection and purpose over time there is potential of create a building of this day and age reflecting human activity and current topics of the 21st Century.

Threats

The site also has problems which should be raised and con- Identifying possible threats which could affect the site is sidered: a vital part of analysis, unidentified threats could lead to problems post design stage. •

Corrosion from the sea air on building materials potentially used in the construction.

Noise issues from the A63.

• •

Uninspiring views of the A63 to the north due to a lack of building frontage on the opposite side of • Humber Street (in the short term). It has an unnatural pedestrian link from the town centre due to the strong barrier caused by the A63. •

Large areas of mud in and around the dry dock.

Potential for flooding.

Off course vessels could potentially career into the site with little protection from the extreme forces of a colliding ship. The return of mud post removal. This is highly likely due to the tidal nature of the river which causes the build up but as long as it is moni tored it can be accounted for. Strong sea winds.

46.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


why the building type

history

The vessels that operated in the whale fishery of Hull required ballast in order to hunt with empty cargo areas which saw the buying of red brick from Holland and stone from Iceland because of its low cost. Due to the over fishing in the 18th century the practice ended meaning there was a surplus of Dutch red brick and Icelandic stone which had previously been of use to the marinas when balancing the ships. Rather than waste the resources the, brick was used in construction of houses in Hull and the stone was used to pave the gas lit streets. This practice was not unique to Hull and can be seen also in Topsham in Devon when the bricks were used to substitute the lightness of the imported cotton from Holland. Housing built in this way can be clearly identified with their Dutch influences; usually the first to be noticed is the gables. Another branch of this architecture from unwanted materials was the ‘Ford Boxes’. These were large plywood boxes which were shipped to assembly plants globally containing car and tractor components (starting with the Model T, the first ever production motor car) which obtained no purpose prior to the overseas journey. In southern Ireland the boxes would be sold as lumber outside the factory, used as building components and eventually became vernacular architecture in the area, especially Cork. The boxes, already containing the social and industrial history within them, were used to produce single room to multi-room sophisticated dwellings, as well as dance floors, pigeon lofts, beach huts and summer houses. ‘The trade in such boxes was finally killed off as late as 1980 by the arrival of today’s version of reusable steel containers..’ The idea that today’s shipping containers should be reusable is a positive one but sadly is often not the case. Due to trade imbalance between countries and financial reasons there are growing stocks of unwanted containers with no purpose around the world. It seems that the purpose of these goods and the need to reuse is being overlooked for matters that are greed based rather than for global welfare.

47.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


why the building type

modern day

In the past there has been an evident imbalance in the trade between richer countries and larger exporters of the world. A much publicised example of this is the massive importing that the US has carried out in past years from China via the use of shipping containers overseas. This has had a huge impact on places like Long Beach and Long Island, NY, where the lack of demand for exportation (due to the strength of the dollar) has seen the piling up of empty containers. The alternative for these unwanted goods was either scrapping or returning to their origin with the chances of being empty highly likely. However in the recent months the dollar has dropped and there is more interest from overseas countries in exporting from the US with a predicted bidding war for the supposedly unwanted containers. This problem is noticeable in the UK also with trade being top heavy towards Chinese imports resulting in most vessels returning empty which means the production of CO2 for no reason. However there has been a recent rise in the shipping of recyclable goods to China as an alternative to land filling in the UK which is making use of these empty vessels, proving to be more environmentally friendly. In the last 10 years exports to mainly India, China and Indonesia have risen from 470 000 tonnes to 4.7m tonnes and plastic bottles from 40 000 to half a million. As a greener alternative to land filling it is becoming precedent that all these empty runs should transport rubbish around the globe if the outcome should be recycled usable products. ‘The growth in exports is in part a success story, reflecting the rapid development of the UK’s collection infrastructure and increase in recovery rates. Exports to China are bridging the gap between plastic bottle collections being established and the future development of domestic reprocessing capacity’ says the WRAP report. If this is the future of recycling then there is a scope to catch these unused products before they are shipped in order to produce goods or systems and then export them out to countries in demand. There would always be involvement with government/organisation led competitions for international welfare which would undoubtedly require world shipping and where better from a founded successful port, i.e Hull. The building would be seen as a starting point for the production of such goods which could be under mass production from a nearby location along the estuary.

48.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


why the building type

uk recycling

The UK produces 400 million tonnes of waste each year. Facts • 1. 2. 3. • • • • • • • • • • • •

The amount of waste produced in the UK: In one hour – would fill the Albert Hall In one day - would fill Trafalgar Square to the top of Nelson’s Column In nine months – would fill Lake Windermere 9% of the UK’s waste comes from households – 30 million tonnes per year; 81% is land filled; 11% recycled/ composted; 8% incinerated. If UK domestic waste recycling was increased to 40%, up to 10 000 new jobs would be created The UK uses about 12 billion cans each year; placed end to end, they would stretch to the moon and back £36million worth of aluminium is sent to landfill each year Recycling aluminium cans saves up to 95% of the energy required to produce one from aluminium ore Recycling one glass bottle saves enough energy to light up a 15-watt energy efficient bulb (equivalent to 100- watt normal bulb) for 24 hours. Five out of six used bottles are thrown straight into the dustbin Up to 90% of new glass can be made from reclaimed scrap glass- saving energy and raw materials In Europe, only 2.5% of plastic bottles are recycled; most are used only once and then discarded About 20 000 tonnes of aluminium foil packaging (worth £8 million) is wasted each year; only 3000 tonnes are recycled (worth £1.2 million) The UK disposes of 50 million tyres a year- the law prevents them going to landfill Transporting a years worth of UK waste would require five times the world’s fleet of super tankers or a nose to tail queue of juggernauts stretching six times around the globe

Government actions Waste management legislation today is developed from European laws which originate from the Control of Pollution Act 1974. These were greatly tightened with the introduction of the Environmental Protection Act 1990. With the birth of the EC Framework Directive on waste, the original targets focussing mainly on the disposal of waste have stretched to include the storage, treatment, recycling and transportation waste. The EU waste legislation comprises of three main elements: 1. 2. 3.

framework legislation, for example covering waste definitions, permitting requirements and infrastruc ture technical standards for the operation of waste facilities to ensure a high standard of environmental protection requirements for specific waste streams, for example measures to increase recycling or to reduce haz ardousness

Along side this, is the ‘Climate Change Bill’, which means that the UK is the first country to have a legally-binding long-term framework to cut carbon emissions and adapt to climate change. Optimistic new targets are being set with a strong multilateral agreement beyond 2012, and EU Heads of State have agreed to achieve at least a 20% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. The result is to create a low-carbon economy for the EU over time.

49.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


what is green building? Is green building the future? Even with the housing shortage and mortgage issues that plague the country during the economic crisis, even more commercial and go-it-alone builders are starting to green build. As it is no longer the case of setting up a wooden shack in a field and more community based sustainable housing programs it is proving exciting and worthwhile. Using recycled products, providing they work alongside low energy consumption, is about as green it gets. Although the most obvious of these materials is timber which has proven to be extremely efficient in the past the idea in green building is to ‘use as little as possible and look to other structural sources to eliminate wood construction where other materials could be used’. These can come from recycled tyres and bottles, cord wood, straw bale, metal (cans, sheet), sand bags, beer crates, wool, adobe etc.

50.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture Recycling in Stanmer In the UK alone there are 50 million dumped car and van tyres every year which can be broken down and re-moulded back into new tyres. Unknown to many these can be cleverly reused to build what is described as ‘ultra green housing’ (guardian). A system that is usually practiced abroad in warmer desert climates like that of New Mexico is being put to good use in Brighton by Biotecture, who are using 15000 old tyres to create a 16 home development. This ‘Earthship’ scheme boasts that each dwelling, made primarily of tyres, PET bottles, empty cans and packed dirt, will have no utility bills due to their efficiency. Design Indaba Inspirational projects that work in dealing with World issues make this subject exciting and demonstrate just how useful recycling can be. ‘Design Indaba’ is an annual conference involving the world’s brightest talent and showcasing the best of contemporary South African creativity. The 10 X 10 Low Cost Community Housing Project ‘challenged 10 architectural teams to provide innovative and dynamic design solutions for the low cost housing sector’. Each team consists of a South African architect working alongside an international architect to face the challenge of creating a design for 65000 Rand (£4300). Mark Dytham and Ruben Reddy responded by using two 20’ shipping containers with an exterior shell of modified beer crates filled with soil to provide thermal mass keeping the interior temperature regulated. The soil can then be planted with indigenous species allowing living accommodation within an envelope of foliage.

Mark Dythan and Ruthan Reddy

51.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture

design indaba

david adjaye

silvio rech & lesley carstens

A collection of designs which were the result of the 10x10 low cost housing project ‘design indaba’ in south africa

vanessa september and linda roy

don albert and tom dixon

stephan anthoni

will alsop

52.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture Freedom Park As part of the ‘Design Indaba’ project, African architects MMA, who had subsequently fallen out with the British partner Will Alsop, focussed on an adequate building solution. The outcome was low-cost, had minimal impact on the environment and would prove highly efficient for the occupants once erected. The building method developed would be called EcoBeam and would comprise mainly of sandbags. The South African system uses geo-fabric bags filled with sand sitting inside a timber frame for rigidity. Building in this way creates many advantages including excellent thermal stability whilst also being incredibly resistant to rain, wind and fire. Most importantly the onsite logistics mean that there is no electricity required when erecting the dwellings and the simple techniques used can be learned quickly allowing communities to join together in construction.

Cloud 9 Closer to home there are progressive steps being taken towards this way of living. ‘Cloud 9’ is an example company that will help you build your own eco house in an eco hamlet. The company has and is in the process of developing its own range of sustainable dwellings and habitable clusters which people can browse and choose for a specific site. The idea of the eco hamlet comes when purchasers find site choosing unsuccessful and join a combined group, put together by the company, who will look at finding a site for a multiple house development.

53.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture

examples

Images and Information from ‘www.weburbanist.com’ Adaptive Reuse: Brilliant Recycled Buildings

Transforming Container Home Module • • •

a working - if small - living space built-in couches and bedroom furniture as well as the basic daily necessities such as a bathroom and kitchen little shipping container home-on-the-go

54.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture

examples

Images and Information from ‘www.weburbanist.com’ Adaptive Reuse: Brilliant Recycled Buildings

Modular Container Housing Designs • • •

multi-unit residential cargo container housing smaller emergency and residential and larger commercial structures real-life experimentation with the possibilities of shipping con tainers used in architectural ways

55.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture

examples

Images and Information from ‘www.weburbanist.com’ Adaptive Reuse: Brilliant Recycled Buildings

Shipping Container Playground Design • •

architectural features are all rendered in the same material illustrates the amazingly varied possibilities of designing even with in the seemingly limited palette of a set of rectangular metal boxes

56.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


recycled architecture

examples

Images and Information from ‘www.weburbanist.com’ Adaptive Reuse: Brilliant Recycled Buildings

Recycled Glass Bottle Buddhist Monastery • •

over a million coloured glass bottles used to create every thing outside and within the monastic complex arranged in patterns one would hardly know from a distance that the structure was built from anything but the finest of custom-made materials

57.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


the vision My vision is to open up and evaluate the surrounding environment together with sustainable architecture to lead the way in eco-exploration. By creating an open topic with welcomed national invite to discuss, invent and develop, it allows for a relaxed atmosphere within which creativity will hopefully flourish. As a public resource, an area which aims to provide education, support, entertainment and jobs can progress working with communities to make ‘eco’ everyday rather than novelty. A creation that is worthy can change the future for good and by allowing an open arena for this constructional analysis will produce interest and involvement from professionals and the everyday man alike hopefully encouraging new strategies and products to assist the existing market. To create a snow-ball effect which raises awareness and provides people with a brief knowledge of eco sustainable architecture in everyday life and how this affects the earth would be seen as a success. If people began to take note of what footprint they leave and what they could do to combat it, they would have improved their own and neighbours’ lifestyles instantly. ‘a healthy place with healthy materials’

58.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


building brief

outline proposals

With waste being an ever increasing problem world wide, can we not take precedent from past local history and look to re-use as much of it as possible? Focussing on architecture and architectural materials there is extensive research and forward movement in recycled building materials from unwanted goods and the development of natural and recycled materials widening the range of sustainable construction systems.

I intend to respond to the site and Hull’s location and make use of its many assets. The site is great for utilising transportation links both on and off the water with the A63 and wide beam barge routes which stretch to London and Liverpool. Hull as a city has risen due to its success in trade importing and exporting which leaves no doubt that these activities can be carried out from this particular location.

My aim is to introduce a ‘Sustainable Construction Resource and Learning Centre’ to this particular area of Hull. The result should be a centre for experimentation using conventional construction materials and methods in unison with recycled waste and modern methods of construction, to lead the way in sustainability. The ‘Sustainable Learning Centre’ would aim to offer a bespoke educational programme which would involve learning about founded methods, materials and systems ready for trade and would also be giving the chance for innovators of the like to introduce their products/systems as an initial step. There could be potential for grants given to individuals who wish to explore their ideas who would be provided with the facilities and expertise to guide them through the process.

With Hull’s regeneration plans looming there will be the need for more jobs, whether working directly with the building as a professional or a technician or using the building as a resource to acquire skills in order to penetrate the work force. The intentions of the centre are in key with the present day and will offer the chance for citizens of Hull (and the North) to be the forefront and driving force in the future of building.

In essence the buildings function: • Explores, explains and evaluates cutting edge thinking in sustainable construction by introducing the use of sustainable practices and materials into mainstream construction industry (nationally and abroad). • Promotes energy saving and utilises a wide range of renewable energy systems. • Serves as a facility enabling people from throughout the North to access information on sustainable construction and see first hand products of the future. • Demonstrates the benefits of building alongside tidal rivers and how to utilise the environment for renewable energies. • Is used by the local community and wider regions as a hub to promote sustainable development in its widest sense. • Provides a wide range of resources and learning opportunities for schools, colleges and universities. • Offers access to the general public through open days and other events. • Creates both design and physical building opportunities to product/system designers. • Offers eco advice to anyone interested in reducing their carbon footprint. • Offers a range of bespoke eco-sustainable construction educational programs in construction and management. • Utilises the location for import/exporting of recycled goods.

59.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


functional layout/reasoning

Diagramatic process of recycling

Diagram showing the process of the building function, comparing it to that of the recycling process

Building function in accordance with above diagrams

60.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


building function/spaces These conceptual forms relate to the different functional areas that the building will be categorised into showing their relationship with each other. I have positioned each component with rough connection to the site and surrounding context to explain thoughts and processes when considering noise, sun and other elements etc.

n

• The thick central band represents the split be tween design and practicing physical exploration. • The entrance area of the building is meant as an inspirational experience to lock people’s atten tion and encourage them to view the building and get involved. • The support leads off the inspiration whilst close to the design which helps these subjects to marry and build off each other giving users of recourses everything they need to progress forward. • The design exploration overlaps with the educational design areas to allow professionals to work with stu dents sharing resources and knowledge, working in unison. • The circulation is to link with all of the components allowing the building to function and the spaces to work in conjunction with one another. • The experimentation zone provides the rougher environment for which to test away from the educational areas due to noise and the dangerous nature of physical work. • The social interaction allows experiences with the safe areas of the experimentation zone while being closely linked to the other quieter areas of the building. • Goods in allows for imports, either via road or by barge that will dock in the reinstated dry dock. • Goods out is the position of exporting products/ systems via road or sea. Large exports will be transported from other areas/docks.

61.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


analysis of building/site

62.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


analysis of brief The brief in question creates opportunity to manipulate the site and exploit its rare characteristics in order to create a fully functional and unique building. The building is intended to embrace the public and portray the future of eco-sustainable architecture which this site can offer. With clear visibility from all around, there is opportunity to bring influential and attractive stature to its presence and give the area a strong identity. With the large scale regeneration work that is scheduled for the area, it lies within a potentially thriving area and could hold precedent for future developments in and around Hull. The fruit market region and sea front are a natural attraction which will work in the developments favour with an existing interest in the site’s surroundings. Being on the edge of a tidal river with little shade on the site the building will be able to maximise the use of tidal power and solar energy as well as natural day lighting for internal purposes which is key to the success of the scheme. The location is also perfect for the strong south-westerly winds that will assist in natural ventilation and generating power through turbines. By reinstating the dry dock, life with in the site boundary will once again flourish and create interest from residents and historians alike, who will undoubtedly interact with the new building.

63.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


schedule of accommodation Entrance lobby/foyer Reception Inspirational gallery Eco-advise centre + shop Foyer toilets CafĂŠ (part of social interaction)

General office/Reception Support meeting rooms X 2 Conference suite X 1 File archive

Library learning centre Class rooms X 2

Design studio Computer suite Toilets Kitchen Meeting room X 4 Photography suite

Technology workshop Storage Equipment storage First aid room Staff/user room

Goods in loading dock Goods out loading dock

Bins Service Plant Cleaner’s store X 2 General toilets

64.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


intentions/qualities Due to the nature of this build and the proposed intentions of its existence, it will be constructed using present day eco-sustainable resources and methods. The building needs to portray, in every sense, the validity and reasoning behind green building and the importance for the investigation into the future of eco construction. By constructing in this way the building becomes an advertisement in its own right and lays precedent before its function even comes into play. Because of the individuality of this building and range of services that it will offer, careful choice of finishes and form, will need to be in accordance with space and purpose in order to marry function with user. For example, educational areas would need to be inviting, work friendly, bright and comfortable, clean and simple. Workshop areas would need to be rugged, industrial but still minimalist in order to allow work to go unhindered. The spaces will be designed and finished with relevance to the purpose of the space, with no aesthetic exaggeration without any reason. As a public building the design marriage with quality and material choice will have to influence peoples approach towards it, meaning carefully processing design issues with the site and context. When designing with the intention of inviting visitors the charisma of aesthetics and composition of the buildings arrangement should be remembered, almost becoming iconic. Looking at the Deep aquarium across the estuary only requires one view and it is instinctively locked in the memory due to the uniqueness of its appearance and its justification to the site. It is important that, as the Deep does, the building reflects through its presence, quality and reflection of heritage that of the present day and what architecture represents in 2009. The building then will have right to its own identity in an area of rich historical value which is evident through the buildings located there.

65.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


genesis centre, somerset The Genesis Centre is part of the Somerset College of Arts and Technology in Taunton, and is a ‘Sustainable Construction Resource Learning Centre’ for the South West. Described as the ‘the most interesting development in the further education sector today’, it is a demonstration of how today’s conventional building materials and methods can be used in conjunction with recycled waste in order to save energy. It proves that contemporary architecture can be produced when using these materials and systems in construction. The award winning building, although part of the college, still offers a unique educational programme outside of the academic year open to the public as a resource. The primary goal to facilitate learning to a wide a range of people as possible. The building function is as follows:

• Continuing professional development for construction professionals and anyone interested in self-build or sustainability. • Explores the cutting edge design of combining sustainable construction with the mainstream construction industry. • Serves as a gallery enabling people from the South West to see good examples of sustainable construction in buildings and acts as an informational resource. • Offers short courses i.e. Construction and sustainable communities, Strategies for zero carbon construction, Sustainable water management in construction. • Has Primary and Secondary links with schools as well as FE and HE education offering resources and professional advice. • Available for hire for conferences, seminars and such similar events. • A shop which sells a range of publications and products including eco paints, varnishes, glues, recycled glass products, energy saving devices, books, periodicals, fact sheets and fair trade goods.

66.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


genesis centre, somerset The £2.5M project, consists of a series of pavilions constructed of earth, straw, clay and timber, with living roofs, and a water pavilion demonstrating the latest water-saving devices. Conceptually, the building was to demonstrate as many different materials and techniques in sustainable construction. It has a degree of flexibility in order to stay cutting edge by adapting the pavilions in the design and replacing them once they have served their purpose. These areas of the building are a living test against construction industry standards with the external parts fully finished and weather tight and the inside protruding areas exposed to show the make up. As well as promoting energy saving and utilising both solar and biomass forms of energy the project demonstrates the benefits of sustainable urban drainage systems, designed to regulate the flow of water into our rivers. Built on the recycled material from the demolition of a Dutch barn the wall plasters are earth and lime, with llama or horsehair binding and the surfaces of these are either flax boarded, finished with non-toxic paints or polished with beeswax. The insulation is equally intuitive being made from recycled materials, including newspaper, wood, and denim jeans. The floor coverings are marmoleum (a natural product made from linseed oil, wood flour, rosin, limestone and jute) and carpet tiles made from recycled materials including car tyres. The toilets incorporate systems for water conservation including waterless urinals and spray taps dispensing a mixture of air and water which wash your hands effectively with just 300cl of water. The vanity unit for the toilets consists of a collection of polished yogurt pots. The renewable energy systems include photovoltaic panels which provide electrical energy, and solar panels to heat the water. The waste wood and wood dust from the college’s own carpentry and joinery workshops help to fuel the biomass boiler. ‘From the outside, the building looks conventional, even concrete. But when you get inside you can see what it’s really made of. Far from conventional now, it aspires to be the convention of the future’. Association of Colleges, Success Stories. Architect: Architype Budget: £2.5M Client: South West Regional Development Agency Awards: Building Magazine’s ‘Sustainable Building of the Year’ Awards 2006

67.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


off-site 2007, breeam headquarters Offsite 2007 is an event which explores how modern methods of construction and advanced technologies are coming together to create altogether higher achieving buildings. Some of the main elements are: • Modern Methods of Construction (MMC) – such as off-site manufactured systems and innovative on-site construction methods • Smart technologies – control systems and sensors for monitoring; and intelligent technologies for whole building communication • Sustainable technologies – recycled building products and sustainable building materials; new products from natural resources and application of industrial by-products for construction Known as the ‘big build’, it offers the chance for some of the main contenders in the construction industry to exhibit their latest products and systems in working houses and projects. The outside of the Breeam headquarters turns into a 2 year long exhibition space housing full-scale real buildings and exhibits, including a demonstration area where innovative technologies and intelligent systems are on show to the public. Some of the main candidates and their exhibits are: •

Willmott Dixon: The Re-thinking School Building

Hanson: The Eco House

Osborne: Affordable Home

EcoTech: Sustainable Swedish Home

Stewart Miln: Innovative Timber Frame Houses

Kingspan: First Level 6 House

Spaceover: Volumetric House from a Live Project

68.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


conceptual thinking

Focussing mainly on the transition of unwanted materials, through the recycling process, into usable goods, I am investigating the visual random appearance of binned trash against single recycled products. The interwoven state of the discarded elements against the purity of a new product is a striking comparison and one of which can represent the process which will be evident through the function of the building. The forms seen in the comparison can be an initial step into the visual appearance of the building and will metaphorically be the basis of layout and comparison of spaces within.

69.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


conceptual thinking

Random

Irregular

Accidental

Pure Product

Clear

Odd

Complete Total

aluminium:

Purposeless

Slapdash

Unpremeditated

paper/card:

glass:

plastic:

70.

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes


bibliography books: sustainable architecture and urbanism

birkhauser

architecture now vol.2

philip jodidio

main websites: www.martin-waters.co.uk www.planetgreen.discovery.com www.eco-age.com www.offsite2007.com www.battlemccarthy.co.uk www.eviee.co.uk www.brighthub.com www.which.com www.greenspec.co.uk www.rockwool.com www.alupro.org.uk

design thesis proposal

leeds metropolitan university yr2 pgdp

matthew hayes

Post Graduate Diploma Architectural Thesis Proposal  

Indepth look into the site, location, building ideas and origins of the building design.

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