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Endurance OFFICIAL MEMBERS PUBLICATION FOR ENDURANCE GB

VOLUME 15 ISSUE â„–1

JAN/FEB 2018

the

SUPREME CHAMPION Emily Cooke tells us her plans for 2018 - page 30 -

IN THIS ISSUE: 2017 ENDURANCE GB NATIONAL AWARDS WWW.ENDURANCEGB.CO.UK

COACH TRIP TO INDIA

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EDITOR’S COMMENT

CONTENTS 16

18

32

04

Views from the Chair

15

Rule Changes Voted in at the AGM

32

Coach Trip to India

06

News

16

More Rides Within Reach…

35

Endurance Riders’ Boost?: Ahiflower

08

Setting the Standard

18

How to Re-cycle a Racehorse

36

Standardbreds for Endurance?

10

Futurity Stars

20

Leading Rider Award

38

ICENI – Something for Everyone

12

Memories of Jim

22

2017 Endurance GB National Awards

40

Young Riders 2018

14

Auspicious Line up Planned for N.E.F

30

An Interview with Emily Cooke

42

Key Dates for 2018

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feel cheated!! There I was, gearing up for Christmas, getting organized, because I knew I would be away the last week of November and the first couple of weeks of December… had the most fabulous time in India. You can read about some of my experiences there, in this issue, came home and BAM!!! Got hit by flu…as did so many of my colleagues and friends! Almost missed Christmas, although we made up for that at New Year… but…where has the time gone? Being out of the country, I also missed the AGM and Awards evening; from the photos I have seen it looks as if everyone had a great time. Congratulations to all the Award winners! Special congratulations to Emily Cooke, supreme champion for 2017, who has given Endurance an interview, which is published in the issue. We also publish a full list of award winners, plus some photos from the evening. This issue focuses on the achievements of several committed riders; we have articles about the Leading Rider award winner, Fiona Griffiths, the Retraining of Racehorses award winner, Anna Collins, and a look at what the Futurity Graduates have been doing since they won their awards. Following the AGM, there have been some changes to the make up of the EGB Board, and the roles of each of the Directors, these have been listed in the Contacts section. Please also take the time to read the Chairman, Nicki Thorne’s, article about standards and welfare, even if you already had the email containing this message, it will bear re-reading. Finally, I would like to wish everyone a very successful 2018, and I look forward to seeing you out and about at events over the coming months.

Cindy Russell

Editor of Endurance

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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VIEWS FROM THE CHAIR

I

am delighted to greet you as your new Chair. It is a privilege to represent EnduranceGB. I am totally committed to endurance and to helping build and shape the future of endurance in the UK. On behalf of myself and the Board, I would like to say a huge Thank You to John Hudson, who has worked tirelessly during his time as Chair. He has been dedicated, enthusiastic and feels passionately about EnduranceGB. He will continue to be involved in many ways whilst hopefully having more time to ride. We wish John the very best of luck for the future. 2018 will be a time of change for EnduranceGB. We welcome two new Board members - Rebecca Kinnarney (Development) and Anna Williams (Marketing/PR). Rebecca will be in her element working on training programmes, coaches and Young Riders. Anna comes with a wealth of experience, previously working at the FEI, and will liaise with members and the wider equestrian world. Both

are great additions to our team. Our existing Board members have some changes to their roles and you can read about this further on. We have a great opportunity, due to the sponsorship with HPower, and are looking forward to working with such a high profile, professional events company, who organise the likes of the Royal Windsor Horse Show and Olympia. Our key focus, as always, is horse welfare. This remains the most important factor in the use of horses in sport. We will be working closely with World Horse Welfare, whose ethos is “Use not Abuse”, as well as the BEF and the FEI. They are each supporting specific research into the impact of training and competition on endurance horses. We fully support this research and the utilisation of the findings. This is one of many areas the sponsorship package will support. We will be releasing a full welfare programme detailing our 2018 plans. Our other goal is to increase membership, through a diverse

and professional offering. Our incredible team of volunteers will be working on our events programme. However, we want to hear from YOU - please be part of the future and contact your local Groups with ideas, and help in any way you can. Our Volunteers have great fun, learn new things, make new friends and are the backbone of our sport. We aim to deliver a wide range of events appealing to those new to endurance and seasoned experts, both young and old , Para and able bodied, from 16 kms to 160 kms. Please get involved in growing our membership and supporting endurance from Beginner to Winner. I am very excited about the future and look forward to an action packed 2018. It only remains for me to wish you all a successful and fun season with your horses.

Nicki Thorne

Chairman of Endurance

Endurance GB Board of Directors Chairman Nicki Thorne Tel: 07917 094752 Email: nickithorne@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2019 Vice Chairman Harry Ingram Tel: 07793 813083 Email: harryingram@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2018 Company Secretary Ann Dark Tel: 01380 818223 Email: anndark@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2017

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Finance Director Sue Box Tel: 07867 512673 Email: suebox@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2018

Esther Young Tel: 07454 929919 Email: estheryoung@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2019

SERC Representation Constance Newbould Tel: 07973 726001 Email: constance newbould@ endurancegb.co.uk

Kerry Dawson Tel: 07818 283144 Email: kerrydawson@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2019

Rebecca Kinnarney Tel: 07801 868481 Email: rebecca kinnarney@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2020

John Robertson Tel 07801 686959 Email: johnrobertson@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2019

Anna Williams Tel: 07572 543538 Email: annawilliams@ endurancegb.co.uk RETIRES – at the AGM 2020

Directors of Endurance GB are volunteers, so please be patient and considerate with any queries. Most Directors also work full time elsewhere and so are not always available for calls during working hours. No calls before 9am or after 9pm please.

Endurance OFFICE ADMINISTRATION Emma Darwood Endurance GB Office, Abbey Park, Stareton, Kenilworth, Warwickshire, CV8 2RP t: 02476 697929 f: 02476 418429 EDITOR Cindy Russell Green Farm Stables, Albyns Lane, Essex RM4 1RX t: 01708 688075 e: cynburstud@gmail.com PUBLISHER Matrix Print Consultants Ltd Unit C, Northfield Point, Cunliffe Drive, Kettering, Northants, NN16 9QJ t: 01536 527297 f: 01536 527294 e: info@matrixprint.com DESIGNER Matrix Print Consultants Ltd Josh Green ADVERTISING Matrix Print Consultants Ltd Catherine Baldock t: 01536 527 297 e: catherineb@matrixprint.com DEADLINES Copy Dates to Editor for future issues of Endurance: Issue Mar/Apr 2018 by 16th Feb Issue May/Jun 2018 by 16th Apr If you wish to advertise in the Mar/Apr 2018 issue, artwork deadline is 16th Mar. The views and opinions of the writers are not necessarily those of the editor, Matrix Print Consultants Ltd or Endurance GB. Endurance magazine is fully protected by copyright and nothing may be reproduced wholly or in part without the permission of Endurance GB and/or Matrix Print Consultants Ltd. COVER PHOTO EGB Supreme Champion, Emily Cooke, with Lady's Man. Photo courtesy of Celia Saunders Photography

Follow us on Social Media TWITTER @ENDURANCEGB FACEBOOK @ENDURANCEGB INSTAGRAM @ENDURANCEGBINSTA


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news

NEWS EQUESTRIAN SAFETY DAY RETURNS March 24th, 2018 heralds the return of National Equestrian Safety Day, a safety awareness day aimed specifically at the equestrian community. The day has been created by the Mark Davies Injured Riders Fund (www.mdirf. co.uk) a registered charity dedicated to helping those injured through riding, handling or working with horses. Now, for the second year running and tying in with the charity’s 30th anniversary, the charity are more keen than ever to

promote their work and safety around horses as Rosemary Lang, Administrator and Fund Co-ordinator explains: ‘As the clocks go forward, more riders return to the saddle and the competition season starts. This day is to remind equestrians to stay safe around horses at all times and also to raise awareness of our valuable work & the continuing need for equestrians to support us so that we can help you, should you ever need us.’

For further information on the charity & #nationalequestriansafetyday go to: www.mdirf.co.uk

WEDDING BELLS Congratulations to Lorna Kidson, who married Shane McCarthy on 28th December 2017

And congratulations to Anna Williams and Will Bridges, who were married on 6th January 2018

ACCESS AWARD Nick Skelton with Big Star. Photo courtesy of Jenny Abrahamsson

COMPETITION STALLIONS SHOWCASE Competition Stallions have announced a new stallion event, showcasing the very best stallions at stud in the UK today, including Olympic gold medal winner, Big Star making an exclusive UK appearance. The event will be held on at Addington Manor Equestrian Centre on Sunday 18th February, giving mare owners and the wider public an opportunity to see stallions perform in the arena as well as having access to the stable area. Studbooks and breeding organisations will be represented in the trade stand area. Organiser, Jane Skepper, has a wealth of experience in breeding and competition

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horses. A qualified AI technician who runs her family’s Heritage Coast Stud, Jane launched the Competition Stallions Guide in 2012. “This event fits perfectly with the Stallion Guide, and following widespread interest and support amongst the equestrian community, we are delighted to be able to announce this new date which we hope will become a regular fixture”. Among the 60 stallions on parade will be high profile sires from Stallions AI, Elite Stallions, Brendon Stud, The Dressage Company and Woodlander Stud. Olympic legends Jaguar Mail and Arko III will be on parade, along with many other stars including Britannia’s Mail, Ramiro B and T Movistar.

Essex Bridleways Association are pleased to announce they are the proud recipients of the British Horse Society Access Award for 2017. ‘Awarded for excellent service by an organisation in furtherance of enhanced equestrian access.’ EBA were invited to attend an awards ceremony at Saddlers’ Hall London on 24th November 2017. Julia Wilson and Jan Arthur attended the ceremony and were presented with the award by Martin Clunes BHS President.


news

ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL PARADE FOR ALL THE QUEEN'S HORSES The weather was kind, the crowds welcoming and for those equestrians who participated in the London New Year's Day Parade under the hugely popular 'All The Queen's Horses' section, it was certainly another fantastic event to remember. Eleven months of planning by the riders, helpers and organisers ensured that for two miles, through some of the most famous streets of London, the crowds were treated to a spectacle of colour and entertainment courtesy of 'All The Queen's Horses' with magnificent costumes for both equine and humans! The theme this year, ‘Circus & The Showman’, certainly offered plenty of inspiration for the 60 horses and equestrians who took part, introducing their unique interpretations to the delighted crowds that lined the streets. From colourful clowns, through to performing acrobats on horseback to lion and elephant inspired costumes, the level of commitment and passion from those who participated in this year's event was outstanding, as Caroline Marsh, organiser and

TAKE UP THE CHALLENGE! The Heart of England Group is pleased to announce the following 3 C's Challenge Awards for the following horse and rider combinations: Bronze Awards: Heidi Dangerfield and Corae Weyekin – 94km Pat Guerin and Cf Winter Amadeus – 128km Jo Mccormac and Clonlaras Dubh – 144km Jill Thorburn and Leesview Tobias – 104km Silver: Laura Graham and Surplus To Requirements – 170km The 3 C's Challenge was a new award programme for 2017 and based upon the Heart of England Group's 3 traditional rides; Cannock Chase, Clent Hills and Cirencester.

Courtesy of Jo Monk ‘A ll The Queen's Horses’ founder explained: ‘This year's event was our best yet. The horses, riders and helpers never cease to amaze me with their enthusiasm, support and creativity when it comes to their costumes. Months of hard work is over in a matter of hours, but the buzz we all get from being involved is so strong that as soon as we

head back to base camp after the parade, we are already talking about next year!’ ‘I need to thank everyone who helped us this year from my team of helpers, the riders, handlers, the transport drivers and our wonderful vet, Michael Byers from Shotters and Byers, all of whom, we couldn't do this event without!’

NATURES CROPS INTERNATIONAL WIN 2017 FOOD AND FARMING INDUSTRY AWARD Natures Crops International have been announced as winners of the Food Innovation of the Year award at the 2017 Food and Farming Industry Awards. Andrew Hebard of Natures Crops International was presented with the award at a prestigious ceremony, hosted by well-known political broadcaster John Pienaar at the House of Commons on December 1st. Natures Crops are a manufacturer of speciality oils for dietary supplements,

nutraceuticals, food, and personal care products. They produce oils from the highest quality crops, produced by growers who follow strict management protocols for sustainability and identity preservation. The Food and Farming Industry Awards are staged annually by Farm Business and Lewis Business Media to recognise excellence and innovation across the agricultural sector.

Awards are presented for total distance covered across the three rides for the same horse and rider combinations as follows: Bronze Award - A total of 80km (PR & GER distance allowed) Silver Award - A total of 160km (GER & CER distance only) Gold Award - A total of 200km (GER & CER distance only) Platinum Award - As per Gold Award but with completion of the 100km CER at Cirencester Park We shall run the awards again for the 2018 season and welcome you all to our Group rides and the Challenge. Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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welfare

SETTING THE STANDARD

DEAR MEMBER, Having recently been elected Chair of Endurance GB, I’d like to update you on some actions that we are taking to promote the sport in a positive and inspirational way. We have achieved some real progress for Endurance in the UK, and now we want to develop and build on these further. At the heart of our sport and a fundamental pillar for all of our activities is horse welfare. Safeguarding the future of Endurance in this country is pivotal for all of us and we hold horse welfare in the highest regard. We are justly proud of our excellent welfare record within the UK and we wish to reiterate Endurance GB’s firm commitment as a leader in welfare practices, with research, innovation and development driven from the UK. I hope that you will also be pleased to know that, each Board Director now has responsibility for horse welfare alongside their other operational areas. However, we cannot ignore the issues that Endurance, as a discipline, currently faces due to concerns around international horse welfare. Increasing speeds and instances of fractures and doping continue to be deeply concerning to us. Any issue concerning the

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injury or death of any horse is extremely upsetting and fundamentally not a part of the sport we wish to represent. We wish to be a part of leading by example and pushing for change, including regulatory aspects and at all times the welfare of horses. We wish to affirm our emphasis on welfare for 2018, working closely with our stakeholders and members. To help set the standard for our welfare focus now and moving forward, I have detailed our plans for 2018. As a backdrop, I have written to the FEI to highlight our concern with international horse welfare in relation to our discipline, but also to extend an offer to work more closely with the FEI, developing, testing and driving new initiatives within our sport. This has already been met with a positive response and has opened an ongoing dialogue to help bring these plans to forefront. These plans are as follows: • The extensive work that has been invested in developing the Leading Rider Award, an initiative that enables placings to be awarded based on set parameters, including recovery times, heart rate, an optimum speed and the condition of the horse, both during the competition and after, an initiative we believe holds great merit. The award

was trialled with great success in 2017 and Endurance GB plans to continue with this in the new season. • The focus on the Best Condition Award at Euston Park during the 2016 and 2017 seasons. We feel strongly there is an opportunity for the FEI to consider placing greater emphasis on these types of awards that reward clever riding, good management and horse welfare above all else. We have offered to share all our data with the FEI on these initiatives and support wherever necessary to see a positive change in this regard. • Working closely with HPG Endurance Ltd, we are implementing many measures at the Euston Park rides in 2018. More vets will be out on course and in the hold areas. Their role will be both to monitor the horses’ welfare and identify any rule breaches. We are confident that a greater presence of vets within our hold areas will encourage a consultative approach, providing the opportunity for athletes to seek advice and discuss any possible concerns in a more informal environment, ensuring any potential problems are recognised before they may become an issue for our horses.


welfare

• We will provide an excellent example of competing successfully and safely at Endurance events and can draw upon existing research and knowledge we have around us. We fully support the Global Injuries Study as instigated by the FEI to determine the impacts of Endurance training and competition, including their on-going support for this research to be continued and to include analysis of different speeds, on different terrain and distances.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MELANIE COTTLE-ASKEW

• We regularly conduct research into our own national results database to identify factors that may affect the longevity of horses’ careers. We are very proud of our 85% average completion rate and preliminary findings would suggest that taking time to develop and qualify young horses (i.e. over 4 years) pays dividends. These findings and attitude will be prominent in our training and development plans for the years to come and, in 2018, we plan to further this research with the appointment of Dr David Marlin, who will be tasked with developing concrete findings. Again, we have offered to share this data with the FEI. In the same vein we are putting in place an increased and more diverse training programme targeted at all levels of endurance. • We are delighted that Prof. Tim Parkin from Glasgow University will be presenting at our Welfare and Performance Seminars. We will be running a series of Horse Welfare Seminars and we are pleased that Roly Owers, CEO of World Horse Welfare has agreed to open the series with a talk on Welfare of the Competing Horse in line with their ‘use not abuse’ approach and also talk about the visibility of horses worldwide. • A sure route to driving change amongst the international sport is to ensure that our own riders uphold Endurance GB’s values on horse welfare. This is why, in 2018, we will be developing ‘British values for British riders’. We believe this will be an excellent foundation of an agreement between British riders abroad and Endurance GB. We will support and promote our riders competing abroad in 2018, but in return we expect engagement with our welfare programme, emphasis on a partnership with their mounts and an obligation that the welfare of their horse must, and will, come first at all times.

Sheikh Mohammed Cup (UAE). For clarity, our statement in February 2017 was in relation to the UAE winter season, 2016/17 and was taken with due consideration of the position and action of the FEI at that time. Our decision to endorse applications to ride in the HH Sheikh Mohammed Cup was based on assurances that the FEI would apply both good governance and the provision of welfare regulations to this race. We also feel that the Emirates Equestrian Federation has made some positive steps forward in the recognition of the current issues they face and have a clear plan to implement change. We look forward to seeing the positive changes promised by the UAE and will provide any support requested in this regard, as we would with any other National Federation. Endurance GB is clear that change is needed, and that this will be welcomed by our Membership. This is something that requires careful planning and clear vision which is something we are working on currently. We have recently received some correspondence from members who are keen to address this change and I would like to assure you that we take our members’ concerns extremely seriously; they are not simply dismissed, but carefully looked in to and discussed. We recognise that not every decision we make will be agreed with or be popular with all members, however we make these decisions by working within the rules of the sport while also keeping welfare central to any of those decisions. We continue to work extremely closely with the British Equestrian Federation and are grateful for their support to date. They

have, and continue to, represent our views directly to the FEI. We respect the position and decisions of the FEI as the International Governing Body – but equally, they must represent our sport in a responsible and appropriate manner. We cannot directly contravene directives from the FEI but, if we feel it appropriate, we can certainly make it clear that we do not agree and feel that change is required. We must lead by example within the UK and share our values and attitudes on horse welfare to the very forefront of our discipline, of our sport, of your Endurance GB. We maintain regular communication with the BEF, as the BEF does with the FEI. We have an objective to create an even stronger relationship and to ensure that Endurance is part of the conversation in meetings with the FEI and we are keen to receive feedback in particular, about the work being done to improve welfare practices globally and to minimise the instances of catastrophic injuries. We will keep you, the members, up to date as these discussions progress. I trust that this demonstrates our commitment to the sport and how we are proactively dealing with welfare issues and concerns here in the UK and abroad. I want you to know that we have big plans to drive the sport forward and look forward to sharing these with you, but in the meantime, we are keen to share our immediate plans with regards to welfare and the positive changes we plan to make.

Nicki Thorne

Chair of Endurance GB nickithorne@endurancegb.co.uk

I also want to address some questions around British riders competing in the recent Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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futurity

FUTURITY STARS

ENDURANCE GB FUTURITY GRADUATION AWARDS 2017 The BEF, in 2009, started to evaluate horses who would eventually make international endurance horses for the future. Rosemary Attfield looks at how these horses have progressed Words by Rosemary Attfield

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he evaluation takes place between late July and August, in nine different areas of Britain. The horses are evaluated from foals to three years old and are given a score out of ten. They are assessed and given a score by a vet. They are required to stand square for the vet to assess and then asked to walk and trot up on a hard surface. They then move to the indoor school to be judged for their conformation, (head, shoulder and neck, body, quarters, legs etc) movement and temperament. The horses are asked to walk in a triangle while led, then trot the triangle. They will then be let loose and asked to canter/gallop loose round the school, on both reins, before being caught to stand still in front of the evaluator for final assessment. All the other disciplines that are assessed have a graduation scheme. Jo Claridge and I felt it would be helpful for our endurance horses to be watched by EGB selectors from the start of their careers. The owners/jockeys could then be given help and advice on the horses training, exercise and competitions. Hopefully, this would give EGB a bank of

‘…it would be helpful for your endurance horses to be watched by EGB selectors from the start of their careers.’ horses for teams in the future. Jo, through her Phoenix Field Arabian Stud, decided to sponsor a rosette for every horse registered with EGB that had been BEF evaluated, from the successful completion of their first Novice ride, to when they succeeded in their Open (Intermediate) competition and finally, when they became Advanced. She sends the rosettes out at the end of each season.

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I felt it would be nice for the horses to be recognised with a top award in three categories each year. I have arranged for each category to be awarded a crystal glass trophy with an area for a photo of their horse to be added by them. It will give our selectors even more help to watch our up and coming horses that might make international teams. EGB annual points to count. As the board felt there were enough trophies awarded at the

national dinner and awards ceremony, it was decided these awards would be presented at the winners group dinner and awards evening. The three categories are as follows: Bronze – For six-year olds. The four best rides to count with no more than two rides between 50km and 64km to count. Silver –For seven to ten yearold horse or pony gaining the highest number of points in Endurance GB National competitive rides during the season who are not FEI registered– 5 best results to count. Gold – for horses seven to ten years of age registered with the FEI. Only FEI points to count.


futurity

2017 WINNERS BRONZE 1st - Nahzira Bint Chatanz ridden by Katie Bedwin with 346 points 2nd tied - Sylvan Illusion owned & ridden by Carol chapman with 64 points Lorna Kidson with Sheer Bliss at Haywood Oaks

Rachael Claridge with Silver Zenif at Red Dragon

2nd tied - Crystal Heartbeat owned & ridden by Ruth Whitby with 64 points

SILVER 1st - LVA Troy owned &ridden by Susan Scarborough with 1114 points 2nd - Silver Zenif owned & ridden by Rachael Claridge with 889 points 3rd - Grecian Moon owned & ridden by Larrissa Burnett with 596 points 4th - Bordersley Golden Ayanna owned and ridden by Camilla Mascell with 588 points 5th - Kaalif ridden & owned by Susan Hawes with 569 points Susan Scarborough with LVA Troy, at Vale of Belvoir

Linda Cowperthwaite with Egyptian Whirlwind at Cannock Chase

6th - Aberllwyd Ibn Phariz ridden & owned by Susan Higgins with 476.5 points

GOLD 1st - Peponi ridden and owned by Chris Wray with 84 FEI points 2nd - Sheer Bliss ridden by Lorna Kidson with 55 FEI points 3rd - Vlacq Journeyman ridden by Georgina Vaugan with 36FEI points 4th - Egyptian Whirlwind ridden by Linda Cowperthwaite with 34 FEI points 5th - Penhwnilys Samala de Mon owned by Mandy Yarnold, ridden by Katie Bedwin. With 33 FEI points 6th - Yawlhill Pollyanna owned by Kirstie Wiscombe with 32 FEI points.

Facing page, Susan Higgins with Aberllwyd Ibn Phariz at Red Dragon. Bottom left, KaChris Wray with Peponi. Bottom middle, Yawlhill Pollyanna, owned by Kirstie Wiscombe. Bottom right, Katie Bedwin with Penhwnilys Samala de Mon owned by Mandy Yarnold. Photos courtesy of David Saunders Photography.

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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jim kerr

MEMORIES OF JIM

MELANIE FAUSKE SHARES HER RECOLLECTIONS When you read the Obituary for Jim Kerr, his age, 92, may be a surprise to some as he was always coy about it and most people were generally 15-20 years out (me included!), given that he had more energy and zest for life than most people half his age.

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his isn’t an obituary, but memories. I first met him in the mid 1980’s when I started endurance and the side of him that I first knew was the veterinary one. As far as endurance was concerned, the knowledge he had about the sport and the equine participants was unmatched. I can say with certainty that if it hadn’t been for him, I wouldn’t have been able to achieve half of what I did. He freely offered and gave extensive advice on training, what to do and more importantly, what not to do – he was like that with anyone who had the good sense to listen. When he was vetting at rides, his eye for a

Jim also contributed more than his fair share to the organisation – organising rides as well as being on committees of the EHPS. He gave his time, a lot of it, to try to improve things for others. Some of the ideas he had ended up happening years later, so he succeeded in several ways. He didn’t get credit for the changes but that wasn’t why he did things. As I said, the help he gave me was immense in a lot of areas and, for those that didn’t know me, I am talking about with a £49 welsh cob followed by a pony of uncertain breeding…neither of which were exactly the ideal endurance horse! The year I won the Solstice was particularly satisfying – it was at

‘…he was full of warmth, friendliness, honesty, and he also happened to have one of the most infectious personalities…’ lame horse was second to none and although on occasion people couldn’t see it, you could guarantee that within a short time, the lameness would become more visible. But even as the participant got a little hot under the collar with the impending elimination, he would still offer cheery advice on why and how to stop it happening next time.

PASSION FOR ENDURANCE

His expertise caused the odd rift with some officials, as he did on occasion enquire exactly how a horse “a blind man could see was lame” was allowed to continue. Those who didn’t know him could think of him as controversial and confrontational, but he was a man who didn’t like injustice in any form and was mostly vocal in expressing his dissatisfaction with proceedings – if something was wrong, he would let people know. He had high standards and was frustrated when others didn’t live up to them. He cared about the sport and its participants, equine and human. Apart from his veterinary prowess,

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Ludlow, where Jim lived, and we stayed with him the night before the race. He crewed regularly for me, but on this occasion, he didn’t as he was involved in quite a heated version of one of the rifts with officials and he didn’t want that to hinder me. But my other half, Roger, was on the phone to him on and off throughout the day and Jim was there at the finish – proud as punch, although whether proud of the equine or human participants is another question. It was in part his victory, as without him it would never have happened.

PERSONALITY

Everyone knew the public side of him at rides but as those that knew him away from that will attest to, personally he was full of warmth, friendliness, honesty, and he also happened to have one of the most infectious personalities you could ever come across, not


jim kerr

to mention laugh. I was fortunate as Roger and Jim got on very well and shared a similar sense of, sometimes warped, humour, so we saw a lot of him away from rides and we did long after we both ceased to be involved in endurance, right up until the last few years of his life. The thing with Jim was that he really couldn’t care less who you were and, prince or pauper, if he liked you as a person, he liked you – there was no pretence, no hypocrisy, no falseness. He was, in a word, genuine.

CREWING

I mentioned crewing earlier – Jim came with us on several occasions, both in this country and abroad to France, Spain and Ireland. We went to Morlaix, where I was competing with Rockie, my welsh cob. That adventure is worthy of a book of its own – missing passports, giving a lift to a Spanish vet we met at the port (that was Ignasi Casas, “Iggy” as Jim decided to call him, and adventures with him over the years would have needed several books) amongst other entertainment. We went to Dublin with him, to the ELDRIC conference. Finding our way from the port to the venue, Jim decided that using a map was very mundane and quite frankly boring, so we relied on wits, sense of smell and nonsensical directions from the locals. Still, we got there…eventually, and with a lot of hilarity. It is those trips I will remember most fondly, the fun and friendship mixed with the serious business of the races. For the last fifteen years or so, we saw Jim and his wife Sue most years. For those that knew him years ago, you can rest assured that he never changed – he was always Jim, with that mischievous glint in his eyes. He and Roger spent hours putting the world to rights – they never quite succeeded, but it wasn’t through lack of trying! I didn’t see him during his illness for personal reasons but will remember him as he was, which is a blessing – a big man with a big personality and mind to match. My few thoughts can only touch on what Jim brought to life, but I have a mind full of memories. Fatalists say there is a reason people are in your life and he contributed so much that it would be impossible to ever thank him, not that he would want that. He taught me a lot, helped me, inspired me and, most importantly, he was my friend. Rest in peace Mr Kerr and thank you.

WILLIAM JAMES (‘JIM’) KERR M.R.C.V.S Long-time endurance and Badminton 3-day eventing vet William James (Jim) Kerr passed away in October 2017, aged 92. Jim was born on the 31 July 1925 to John and Elizabeth Kerr and lived on a farm in Paisley, a location that very early on fuelled his desire to be a vet, a desire that he had even at the tender age of 6. Right from the outset animals, and particularly horses, were a key part of Jim’s life. Times were rough as Jim grew up – the First World War was very recent history, the recession of the 1930’s was fast approaching, the political environment was being clouded by fascism and the Second World War was just around the corner. But he had a good childhood which he described as happy and safe, a tribute to his parents. With his mind set on a life in the veterinary field, Jim worked hard towards that goal at Paisley Grammar School, standing out as one of those children, much to the annoyance of others, who excelled both academically and in the sporting arena. He went up to the Royal Dick in Edinburgh in 1942 aged 17 and thrived on the freedom and challenge of University. He was awarded blues for both rugby and athletics and was also a Scottish trialist in both sports. Of course, the Second World War was in full flow at that time and Jim did his bit, receiving a commendation from the King for being in the Home Guard from 1942-45. He really was one of Captain Mainwaring’s men! He qualified in 1947, just before his 22nd Birthday and joined a practice in Scotland. Within 6 months he had moved south to work for Nipper Constance in the Beaufort Country. This was where he resumed his love of horses and started riding with the Beaufort hunt. He worked in the practice for 3 years before moving to a Redditch practice in 1950 where his salary was 15 shillings a week, plus a car. This is where he met Jill, his first wife, and they were married in 1951 before he moved to a practice in Ludlow which he subsequently took over and, within two and a half years had 3 children, Seumas, Carol, and William. Jim was the Ludlow rugby team’s captain and Ludlow is where he developed his passion for golf (something that would stay with him throughout his life) and within a short time he had a single figure handicap and was captain of the Ludlow golf club. Not content to rest on his laurels, he also went on to captain both the County and Midland teams. In the early seventies, Jim and Jill were divorced and, returning to Gloucestershire, he took over the practice he had worked for in 1947. This is where he resurrected his love of horses, serving as one of the vets at Badminton Horse Trials up to 1987 when he

gave up the practice and returned to Ludlow. His time at Tetbury also saw him become involved heavily in the sport of Endurance horse riding, something he carried on after moving back to Ludlow. Endurance, as a sport, was in its formative stage and Jim made his mark, not just through his role as a vet, but also in the organisation. He was involved with the Endurance Horse and Pony Society (EHPS) and served on the central committee as well as the finance sub committee. As a vet, he travelled far and wide with the sport, all over Europe and as far afield as the United States and Middle East. This was both as an FEI vet and team vet. He was also closely involved in drug testing of horses to ensure the sport stayed clean, something very important to him. Injustice was something Jim never tolerated in life and he carried the same ideals in endurance. Whilst some viewed him as controversial and outspoken, he was striving for a level playing field for all – he was not one to be at all concerned with whether someone’s face fitted, he judged everyone at face value and, to him, respect was something earned, not a given right. As a vet, both he and his opinion were valued – his equine knowledge was second to none. Unfortunately, due to some seeing him as a controversial character, the role as vet for the British team eluded him but, as it turned out, Britain’s loss was Sweden’s gain as he answered their call and served as their team vet for a substantial time, competing in both European and World championships. Incredibly enough, he still had time to devote to organising the Summer Solstice endurance race at Ludlow for many years and this event quickly became one of the blue riband events of the sport in the UK. He could also be seen from time to time crewing for competitors at various rides around the country as well as abroad – he loved the sport, he cared about those involved, and he gave back to endurance many times over. Jim eventually found the missing piece of his life’s jigsaw in 2002 when he met and married Sue, and they were together for the rest of his life and he was happy in the true sense of the word – he had finally conquered the professional and personal sides of life. It is a cliché, but, in his case, he really did live life to the full. He claimed never to have done a day’s work in his life which, given that he was busy for most of it, may seem a contradiction. But he lived it on his terms, he did what he wanted, so work never quite seemed like a work to him.

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forthcoming events

AUSPICIOUS LINE UP PLANNED FOR NATIONAL EQUINE FORUM The Forum brings together representatives from every section of the equestrian industry, with the aim of informing, educating and enabling the sharing of best practice.

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ith a first class line up of speakers and a popular central London venue the impending National Equine Forum (NEF), to be held on Thursday 8 March 2018, is shaping up to be an auspicious occasion for the equestrian world. Government officials, vets and equestrian industry leaders will share their wisdom and invigorate debate on some of today’s most germane equestrian topics including the latest on the central equine database, challenges facing small equestrian businesses, equine welfare in British racing, what’s new in equestrian safety and the latest news on rider weight research. The prestigious Sir Colin Spedding Award will also be presented and the annual memorial lecture delivered. The National Equine Forum brings together representatives from every section of the equestrian industry for friendly, unbiased debate. The aim is to inform, educate and help the industry to speak with the

equestrian businesses and the headaches that business rates, insurance, GDPR, health and safety can present. Nick Rust, Chief Executive of the British Horseracing Authority will speak about the vital role of equine welfare and its perception within British Racing. A session on safety of both horse and rider will involve Professor Michael Gilchrist of the University College Dublin presenting the latest in riding hat research. Alan Hiscox, Director of Safety at the British Horse Society will advise on the highly topical issue of riding on the roads and how to influence driver safety. The use of data to increase safety in equestrian sport will also be explored Dr Sue Dyson will be revealing the eagerly anticipated results of the latest phase of her study on the effects of different rider weights on horses. This groundbreaking piece of research was jointly funded by fourteen different organisations who are very keen to see this challenging issue investigated in a scientific way.

‘Government officials, vets and equestrian industry leaders will share their wisdom and invigorate debate…’ united strength of one voice on topical matters affecting the current and future management and wellbeing of the horse. The day will commence with the customary Defra view on the UK horse industry. Stewart Everett will then provide an update on the central equine database, before a briefing on the Defra/farming industry livestock improvement programme, which has been designed to replace all farm livestock databases, including equidae, to produce something more useful both for government and livestock keepers/owners for the future. Rt. Hon. Dame Caroline Spelman MP will chair the popular panel discussion this year, delving into the challenges facing small

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Jim Green, Animal Rescue Tactical Advisor, Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service and Director and co-founder of the British Animal Rescue and Trauma Care Association will present the Memorial Lecture on horse rescue. These lectures are given each year and link to past winners of the Sir Colin Spedding Award; Jim was last year’s winner. The winner of the Sir Colin Spedding Award will be announced and the award presented. This award was established in 2013 in recognition of the late Professor Sir Colin Spedding’s services to the equine sector – most especially founding the National Equine Forum and Chairing it for 19 years. Tickets are available to equestrian trade delegates and equestrian professionals. The first ticket purchased by an individual or organisation will cost £50; subsequent tickets for the same organisation will cost £100. The ticket price includes lunch and refreshments throughout the day. To apply or to find out how you could enjoy the privilege of becoming a Friend of the Forum please email info@nationalequineforum.com. For further information on the NEF visit http://www.nationalequineforum.com.


agm update

RULE CHANGES VOTED IN AT THE AGM The Endurance GB AGM was held on Saturday 25th November 2017. Following the meeting and the discussion of the various proposals, the following rule changes have been adopted for 2018:

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Horses that have completed more than two GERs on a Try Before You Buy or a Club Member basis prior to their first season are not eligible for the Novice Championship Mira Trophy.

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GERs of more than 100km may be run as ‘Elevator rides’. A rider may exercise the option to retire from the ride at any of the vet gates nominated by the Ride Organiser, providing they have successfully completed at least 60% of the advertised distance. They will then be credited with that distance if they: • are within the permitted time parameters AND • have passed the veterinary inspection including any compulsory re-examination

RULE CHANGES BROUGHT IN BY THE BOARD ON WELFARE, H&S, SAFEGUARDING OR EQUALITY GROUNDS:

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The escorting rules for junior and Paraequestrian Endurance riders have been brought into line with each other. The requirement for a parental consent form when escorting a junior has been brought into the rules, as has the requirement to formally transfer responsibility to a new escort when the first escort cannot continue for any reason.

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In consultation with the ParaEndurance committee, the Paraequestrian Endurance rules have been

simplified. The single 'Head Classifier' position has been expanded into an Endurance GB Para-Equestrian Classifying Committee, which will consist of a Technical Steward, a vet, and one or more medically trained individuals. The role of the Classifying Committee will be to agree the appropriate compensating aids where a Para-equestrian Endurance rider has requested an exemption to a particular Endurance GB rule.

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Rest periods: The definition of a 'multi day ride' for the purposes of working out a rest period has been expanded to include multiple classes at multiple events in the same five day period (ie where a horse completes 60km at one venue on the Saturday and then completes 40km at another venue on the Sunday)

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Hats: We will continue to accept VG1 hats (with or without Kitemark) into 2018. We are aware that the new EU hat standard is still awaiting approval, and any new standard hat will be accepted once approved by the appropriate regulators

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Retirements on Course: Any horse retiring on course must be seen by an official Veterinary Surgeon immediately on their return to the Venue, prior to travelling home. This rule has now been tightened up to clarify that this veterinary check must include an assessment of the horse's gait and metabolic health, to enable

any rest periods to be allocated to the horse as necessary.

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Corrals: Riders must take note of any guidance from the ride organiser re the layout of corrals

Busy vet/farrier/hold areas: Pets and very small children must be kept away from busy vetting, vet hold or farrier inspection areas

ADDITIONAL CHANGES

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Our insurance company has confirmed that they will cover Associate members to organise events on our behalf. We are therefore very pleased to announce that suitably experienced Associate members will be allowed to organise rides and to act as Technical Stewards.

VOTING ON BOARD MEMBERS There were two new faces elected to the EGB board, Anna Williams and Rebecca Kinnarney (pictured). Anne Dark was re-elected to serve another term of office.

ANNA WILLIAMS

REBECCA KINNARNEY Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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scottish endurance riding club

MORE RIDES THE CAIRNGORM 100 TRAIL: WITHIN REACH… A 4-DAY CHALLENGE The SERC ride calendar 2018 is full of variety and interest, from beaches and hills to fields and tracks, with distances to suit all levels of ambition. Here we highlight one major event from each of the eight Branches. Words by Alison Wilson

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he SERC ride calendar has been published and it promises a great year of enjoyable rides for all, with plenty of challenge if that’s what you want. Looking at some of the larger events, Dumfries Branch are running a weekend of classes from 2 day 60 to Pleasure at Tinwald on 29 and 30 April. Not far off the M74, Tinwald offers wonderful views of the pretty Dumfries countryside as well as routes to suit all tastes. Border Branch are offering the ever-popular Eildon Hills ride over the weekend of 19 and 20 May. With distances from 2 day 80k to Pleasure, this ride is easily accessible from the A68 and A7, and is a varied route with hills, moorland, spectacular views, and woodland, plus a large venue field just outside the town of Newtown St Boswells. A week later, at the other end of the country, Highland Branch are putting on the Red Rock Premium ride. On 26 and 27 May, at Dores near Inverness, the Branch are holding classes from 2-day 80k to Pleasure over varied terrain on the southern shores of the fabled Loch Ness. On 1, 2 and 3 June, Grampian Branch are hosting one of SERC’s nine 80k classes

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planned for 2018 at their Mergie ride, near Stonehaven on the Aberdeenshire coast. Also offering 60k to Pleasure classes, this ride focuses on forestry, and would be a good warm-up for the Club event at Seacliff on 15, 16 and 17 June. Seacliff is now a hugely popular ride, featuring both FEI 1 and 2 star and National classes over the weekend, and using attractive flowing routes round fields, woodland, minor roads and the gorgeous Tyninghame beach (above). The flagship class is SERC’s only one-day 160km, and if this is one of your ambitions, Seacliff is definitely the place to try it. The location on the east coast between Edinburgh and Berwick-upon-Tweed is easy to get to. See www.seacliff160km.webs.com for further information. Another popular event, but lower-key, is Lothians Branch’s Broughton ride, being held over the weekend of 29 and 30 June and 1 July. This village venue offers different routes on each day, with hills contrasting with flat disused railway lines, wonderful views, and a sense of remoteness (left). Classes run from 2-day 80k to Pleasure, with the focus being on fun and a relaxed atmosphere. Five weeks later, and by way of contrast, Glasgow Branch are running a Pleasure

weekend on 4 and 5 August on the very scenic Douglas & Angus Estate. Not far off the M74, this easy access ride promises grassy tracks and fields – a gentle precursor to the Brodie Festival of Endurance two weeks later. Another coastal ride, but of a different kind, is Argyll Branch’s Argyll Challenge ride on 8 and 9 September. This can’t claim to be a short-haul ride for most of the endurance community, but it is well worth the journey. It embodies all that makes Scotland’s west coast so spectacular, and the Branch welcome is legendary. Tayside Branch’s big ride of the year is on 14 October, at Tentsmuir. This is another perennial favourite, featuring virtually weather-proof routes through open woodland on sandy and grassy tracks. Classes run from 80k downwards, and this event is balloted as parking can be tight. Located on the south shores of the Firth of Tay, just across from Dundee, this is another venue that is easier to get to than it looks on the map, being motorway and dual carriageway most of the way from wherever you are on the east side of the country. All dates and details are subject to change – keep up to date with the SERC website – www.scottishendurance.com


scottish endurance riding club

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CASTLES ON THE COAST

ow that 2018 is here and you are planning your ride season, be sure to include the premier Scottish event – the Festival of Endurance incorporating the Championships (and this year the Home International and Celtic Challenge) over the weekend of 17, 18 and 19 August. This will be a fantastic weekend of endurance riding for all – it doesn't matter if you intend to ride pleasure classes, are aiming for the Scottish teams, are riding middle distances or going for the longer two-day classes – the emphasis is on fun over fabulous endurance routes. The venue is based at Brodie Castle, Forres, the striking 16th century former seat of the clan Brodie that forms a backdrop to the vetting area. Travelling to Brodie is easy: for those in the south of Scotland it’s a straight run up the A9 to Inverness and then along the main coast road to Brodie. EGB members in the north of England can come up the A1, the A68 or the M74 to pick up the M90 and then A9. A few miles to the west of Brodie is the town of Nairn, with a handy Sainsbury’s and filling station. Despite this being a Highland location, the routes do not feature testing climbs and descents. There are two sides to the Brodie routes: to the north of the venue lies the coastal section, Culbin Forest, featuring undulating sandy tracks and glimpses of the Moray Firth between the tall pines.

South of the venue is a different landscape, Darnaway Forest, with grassy tracks winding between broadleaf and conifers and opening into sudden clearings. Here the route passes the imposing gates of Darnaway Castle, home of the Earls of Moray. Longer routes will use both forests. Facilities will include camping, corralling and stabling. There will be catering on site all weekend with suppers offered on Saturday and Sunday evenings. Classes have been agreed and as well as the popular ‘normal’ classes some new ones are being introduced, eg Brodie 100km (30+40+30), Brodie Days (30+30+30) and of course the increasingly popular Brodie Triple Challenge (20+30+30). The organising committee are grateful to the following companies for their early commitment to supporting the event - Top Spec, Equidgel, Harbro and Performance Equestrian. See the website for full details – www.scottishendurance.com We also look forward to hosting the Home International and Celtic Challenge team events and welcoming riders from England, Wales, Ireland and Cornwall to compete in these events. This could be an opportunity to combine a holiday in the beautiful north of Scotland with a weekend of full-on endurance. There is much to see, from dolphins to distilleries, mountains to moorland – plenty to tempt you to take a couple of days’ break before travelling your horse home. Mark the date in your diary now!

The open conifer plantation vistas of Culbin Forest (left) contrast with the green tracks and denser woodland of Darnaway Forest (top), with the gates of Darnaway Castle making an imposing backdrop. All photos Kris Clay Photography.

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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retraining racehorses

HOW TO RE-CYCLE A RACEHORSE Cheshire Group rider, Anna Collins, (46) and Karactacus Potts, (10), from Nantwich, are the proud winners of the 2017 RoR Elite Endurance Award.

Left, Anna was presented with the award at the prestigious Jockey Club in New Market by Clare Balding and Luke Harvey. Photo supplied by Anna Collins. Facing page, Mr P. at Kelsall. Photo courtesy of Ruth Saunby, IndiePics.

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nna has only known Mr.P or Potty (as he is known at home) for 2 years. He was 7th in his first novice season of endurance in 2016. Mr P didn’t excel as a racer and was rehomed to Anna by Sara Walker and Paula Hush, who provide pre-training and rehabilitation services for race syndicates, Diamond Racing, near Leighton Buzzard. Anna has competed with Endurance GB, the national governing body for endurance riding, since 2010 and has already achieved great success with her previous recycled racehorse, Diamond Destiny having been placed 2nd and 3rd.

AIMS AND AMBITIONS

Anna said, “I always wanted to win the Elite Award but thought it was beyond my ability. I work full time, but still manage to spend

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long hours training Mr P to be fit enough to complete the distances at the fitness level required by EGB. Horse welfare comes first in this sport and it is as much about the relationship and bond between the two of us, as we spend so many hours together, as it is about competing.

OVERCOMING SET BACKS

The season hasn’t been without its trials and tribulations, but it’s not called endurance for nothing. The challenge in retraining an ex-racehorse for any discipline, especially endurance, includes teaching them to ride in a

‘…Mr P decided that being tied up wasn’t for him; he pulled back and broke his bridle just minutes before the start time.’ I collected Mr P on Halloween 2015 and he really can be spooky but he’s got an amazing personality and loves his new job. I am so proud that I have been able to give him a second career. The opportunity to ride in amazing countryside, all over the country, is the main reason I love endurance.”

rhythm or cadence that works them efficiently. Learning simple schooling manoeuvres that will get you safely through a gate, or out of a tricky situation, is important. Some racehorses aren’t used to being tied to a trailer or standing still whilst their jockey mounts from the ground.


retraining racehorses

At one event, Mr P decided that being tied up wasn’t for him; he pulled back and broke his bridle just minutes before the start time. A quick fix with cable ties, and 40km later the bridle was still in place. Apart from occasionally getting lost and inclement weather conditions at The Red Dragon, the pair were re-shod on course on several occasions and Anna even fell in a ditch, re-mounted and rode on at Lindum, before completing the Wold’s Challenge. They met pigs on route, enjoyed the company of The Cirencester Ride’s aerobatic display, the Red Arrows, saw motorcycle scramblers and cycle race pelotons. Anna added, “for me, the endurance isn’t the riding, it’s weekends of packing for the two of us, travelling long distances, sleeping in my trailer, making sure Mr P is well fed and safe, passing the rigorous vet inspections before and after the ride, then cleaning everything when I get home. I also manage a long-term health condition, which can be

difficult, and I shouldn’t really be able to ride for 3+ hours at a time, let alone win the Elite Award. That’s why it means so much to me.”

WHY AN EX-RACEHORSE?

Thoroughbreds typically have bags of stamina, a very low heart rate when fit, are used to travelling long distances to an event and are brought up from an early age to understand the routines of every day handling, shoeing, clipping and good stable manners. The ex-racehorse will have trained in a string and will know how to behave when riding out in company. When introduced to endurance, they can be a little uncertain of their surroundings at first as they will probably not have crossed rivers, dodged under low hanging branches or scrambled over uneven terrain, but they soon get the hang of it and seem happy that they have a new job and the freedom to enjoy themselves.

FACTS

Karactacus Potts a 16.2hh bay gelding. Bred in Ireland by W.J.Burke, he Point to Pointed before coming to GB in 2012. He didn’t excel, placed 5th highest and has a ‘fell’ and ‘pulled up’ on his race card. Potty’s grandsire was Saddlers Wells and his great grand sire Northern Dancer. Anna and Potty completed 559km in 10 competitive rides during the season and travelled as far as Cumbria, Norfolk, Cirencester, Lancashire and Lincolnshire. Anna and Potty were also members of the North West Team who retained their title as winners of the Inter-Regional Championship trophy in 2017. Anna said, “this is only my second competitive season with Karactacus Potts and what a way to get to know him. He is a wonderful horse with so much to give. I was delighted to be recognised by RoR for all the hard work that goes into retraining a thoroughbred for a second career.” Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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annual awards

LEADING RIDER AWARD Fiona Griffiths received her award at the Endurance GB AGM for becoming the highest scoring British Rider under the Leading Rider criteria, scoring 92.58% of the points available to her at the Royalties 80km FEI CEI*, riding Balishia Words by Fiona Griffiths

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wo thousand and seventeen was a bit of an eventful year, we had a new farrier in the autumn of 2016 and he did some remarkable remedial work, but this meant Goofy (Balishla) had a lot of time off, not even getting to a ride until Cirencester (40k) just to see if the new feet were working, then a steady 80k. But there were still problems; cracking and pinching, more cement needed, but we were happy he was good to go to Royalties. I like Royalties, always a warm welcome and a good atmosphere, the new venue was great and the marking was some of the best I’ve ever seen. There were lots of entries, which is always good, I set off in the leading group with the plan of doing over 16kph, Georgina set a good pace and off we went. Goofy was feeling very good and a bit too keen, so I pulled back from the front to try and settle him before the first vetting. We

arrived and no one had presented, so it all went a bit pear shaped as everyone was milling about. He was quite excited and his heart rate went back up so we had to represent. This meant we went back out behind the leaders so we cracked on, closing the gap, quietly maintaining a steady speed; he settled on his own and got on with the ride. The last loop saw us 5 mins behind and I was happy, he could catch Georgina but it was more important to finish (also my crew said if you race I will never crew again) which obviously had no effect. So we set off keeping our steady pace, seeing Georgina just in front all the way, but we were good and didn’t race, finishing just behind her. We went in to vet just as she passed and she waited to see how we got on. Second was a great way to finish what had been a fab day. If I hadn’t messed up the first vet gate we may have raced, it was a lovely field.... but he presented well all day good heartrates and metabolics. So a wonderful end to a wobbly year.

Pre ride heart rate: 43 straight As First vet gate: 70 (4min 7sec) represent 52/51 (3.45) straight As Second vet gate: 64/60 one b rest As, no time on vet sheet sorry Finish: 55/48 (3.29) As Speed 18.64 It came as a great surprise to win the leading rider award, which I have to say is going to raise the bar for glamping at rides. I am very proud of our score and will try harder next year. I’m sure it was all down to the crewing and management of the horse over the day and could never be achieved without Sam -the voice of reason when the red mist descends! I think that if more people strive to win the leading rider at each ride, it will raise horse welfare across the board, keeping a steady, regular speed and presenting quickly, with a horse that is fit for purpose, will benefit all. Roll on the new season.

Above left, Fiona accepting the Leading Rider award from Esther Young. Above middle, Fiona on the way to 2nd place at Royalties. Photo courtesy of West End Photography. Above right, At the vetting during the Lindum. Photo courtesy of Esther Young.

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Ride in Rajasthan, India

www.plasequestrian.co.uk tel: 01267 253251 / 07450199627

Forts * Palaces * Marwari * Fairs * Festivals Well done Emily and Taz on your fantastic result this year. The bank of mum and dad is now officially empty.

www.horseindia.com

ADVERTISE IN Endurance GB If you are reading this, so are your potential customers!

Contact Catherine at Matrix 01536 527297 catherineb@matrixprint.com

Can I have my horse back yet?


The Gala Dinner took place at the Daventry Court Hotel, following the AGM on Saturday 24th November. There was a fantastic response to tickets this year and we sold nearly 20% more than 2016, a fantastic step up. Awards were presented to the winners by outgoing Chair, John Hudson. It was an evening of real mixed emotions, with great thanks going to John for all his hard work and unfaltering commitment to EGB over the past years. There was also a standing ovation for Kate Atkinson's horse HS Prosper who was sadly lost this year. The evening's big winners were Senior Champion Sarah Rogerson and Supreme Champion Emily Freya Cooke.

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1: And so it begins‌championship rosettes ready for presentation 2: Lisa Hayworth, being awarded the Sam Weller Trophy 3: John Hudson presents the Emily Cooke with one of her many awards

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4: Anne Brown presents Maddie Pomeroy with her AHS PPS rosette 5: Sarah Rogerson, winner of the Adonis Trophy 6: The Talisman Award was presented to Carrie-Ann Dark 7: Louise Rich receiving her AHS PPS Award 8: The Young Rider Award winners

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9: Caitlin Birkett, winner of the Novice Championship 10: Junior Championship Winner and reserve Ella Pomeroy and Jamie Shores 11: Kate Atkinson was awarded the Premier DE Award 12: EGB always has a multitude of Trophies to Award! All photos courtesy of Will Bridges

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ARAB HORSE SOCIETY PREMIUM PERFORMANCE SCHEME ENDURANCE AWARDS Top ten horses sired by AHS Premium Stallions 1st

Horse

Stallion

Ridden by

Lady’s Man

Chatanz

Emily Cooke

2nd

Mirjana

Imad

Gill Plumbley

3rd

Cumbria Khafifa

Al Sood

Mary Stockdale

4th

Druimghigha Lantana

Oberlix

Andrea Champ

5th

Zarkhuv

Dhruv

Constance Newbould

6th

Aurontes

Aurelian

Judy Holloway

7th

Zaferan

Wrzos

Madison Pomroy

8th

Oakleaze Farm Czamak

Czarus

Louise Rich

9th

Evermore Artistic

Kayeed

Carina Kane

10th

Silvakhira

Silva Dollar

Jill Calder

Leading novice endurance horse sired by a PPS stallion Tannasg Vantage

Psyches Boy

Sue Oliver

Anne Brown presenting Emily Cooke with the AHS PPS Award

Afon Class - High Point Young Rider and Horse Combination 1st

Cerys Hill

Gauffron Spring Boy

524.5

2nd

Jo McCormac

Clonlaras Dubh

272

High Point Welsh Rider

FEI highpoint horse sired by a PPS stallion Warrens Hill Chayze

Chatanz

Harry Ingram

Leading premium performance scheme endurance stallion 2016 Chatanz

Owned by Lesley Dunn

Ferishal Trophy - It is to be presented to a registered pure bred Arab Endurance horse, whose owner is a member of the Arab Horse Society. Mirjana

Ridden by Gill Plumbley

Owned by Diana Whittome

THE WELSH CHAMPIONSHIP RESULTS The Welsh Championship was re-launched in 2014 and was a Competition comprising All Rides held in Wales and based on National points. Coed Class - High Point Horse & Rider Combination counting Rides up to 50km only

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1st

Zoe Powell

Cherry Cottage Lad

357

2nd

Kerry Carson

Prince of Hope

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Young Rider

Cerys Hill

Senior Rider

Fiona Valentine

Mynydd Class - High Point Rider and Horse Combination 1st

Cerys Hill

Gauffron Spring Boy

524.5

2nd

Fiona Valentine

Arranberg Mai

382.5

Endurance GB International Performance Recognition Award to: Seniors for competing in the World Championships at Brussels, Belgium 16

Warrens Hill Chayze

Harry Ingram

17

Tannasg Psyches Realm

Racheal Atkinson

DNF

LM Bolena

Nicola Thorne

DNF

HS Bellini

Caroline Cowley

DNF

Fantom

Annie Joppe

Endurance GB International Performance Recognition Award to: Young Rider/s for competing in the European Championships at Verona, Italy DNF

DNS Ronaldo

Kate Atkinson


Pleasure Pairs Trophy - Awarded to a pair of horse/ rider combinations registered for the competition which gains the most points in national Pleasure Rides run by Endurance GB or SERC. 1st

Rushwood Sunseeker

Lesley Owens

194

1st

Merlins Magic

Christine Myers

194

Boston Bay Cup - Awarded to the horse registered at Wetherbys gaining the most points in all types of rides

Pickreed Masterpiece Trophy - Awarded to the Veteran Rider aged 60 or over gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Aurontes

Judy Holloway

2481.5

2nd

Reba

Lesley Caswell

2358

3rd

Sachiya

Mary Stubbs

2167.5

Collee Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony and Junior Rider combination in their first year of competition, gaining most points in all Graded Rides.

1st

Arabian History

Claire Freeman

1974

2nd

Magic Powers

Valerie Anne Bradshaw

1354

1st

Anderwood Rosie

Jamie Shores

560

1229

2nd

Heatherglen’s Madeliene

Lois Cooper

391

3rd

Pizwell Nessy

Sidney Stanley-Whitley

308.5

3rd

Harmonized

Chloe Delaney

Ross Trophy - Awarded to the most successful horse / pony bred by its current owner who must be an Endurance GB member 1st

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

2288

2nd

Mirjana

Gill Plumbley

1932

3rd

Zaferan

Madison Pomroy

1762

Pitchford Trophy - Awarded to the registered pure bred British Native Pony gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Ballydoolagh Alfie

Jeni Gilbert

1710.5

2nd 3rd

Kildromin Trump

Lesley Caswell

675.5

Cobra

Wendy Gover Fromm

638

Sam Weller Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony gaining the most points in Graded Rides of 45km or less. Points from longer rides do not count. Novice horses are not eligible. 1st

Kilteeven Ginger Mist

Lisa Hayworth

725

2nd

Zim Nazka

Carolyn Cummings

638.5

3rd

Nagbers Gold

Jane Wyatt

585

Peter Ball Trophy - Awarded to the Junior Rider gaining the most points riding more than one horse 1st

Sandy W & Sulan Electric Prince

Lily Gibbons

767

2nd

Heatherglen’s Madeliene & Sequoia Finale

Lois Cooper

619

3rd

Anderwood Rosie & Bo Busk Cleo

Jamie Shores

565

Snowflake Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony and Junior Rider combination gaining the most points in Graded Rides of 45km or less 1st

Anderwood Rosie

Jamie Shores

2nd

Heatherglen’s Madeliene

3rd

Sequoia Finale

Royal Lord Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony, 7 years old and over, competing in their first season at Open level, and gaining the most points in Graded Rides of 65km or less. 1st

Star Hill Sapphire

Claire Mellor

1382

2nd

George Bush

Dominic Smith

1181.5

3rd

Leesview Tobias

Jill Thorburn

906.5

Cotswold Trophy - Awarded to the pony (14.2hh and under) and Senior Rider combination gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Reba

Lesley Caswell

1904

2nd

WLA Elektra

Gail Jupp

1853

3rd

Druimghigha Lantana

Andrea Champ

1751

Jasper Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony gaining the most points in their three best Graded Rides. Points from all classes at Golden Horseshoe do not count. 1st

Reba

Lesley Caswell

1158

2nd

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

1146

3rd

Aurontes

Judy Holloway

1126

Ragham Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony ridden by Young Rider(s) gaining the most points in Graded Rides. 1st

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

2288

2nd

Hathek

Keighley Pomroy

1283

3rd

Zaferan

Madison Pomroy

1252

Regent Trophy - Awarded to the unregistered horse / pony gaining the most points in all types of rides.

490

1st

Reba

Lesley Caswell

1904

Lois Cooper

331

2nd

Argentina

Rosemary Henderson

1362.5

Lois Cooper

303

3rd

Firebird

Lesley Diane Nott

1342

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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Cairo Trophy - Awarded to the Part Bred Arabian gaining the most points in all types of rides. (All riders are listed) 1st

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

2288

2nd

Evermore Artistic

Carina Jane Kane

1668

3rd

Vlacq Flint Accolade

Heather Weston

1623

Mesaoud Trophy - Awarded to the Pure Bred Arabian gaining the most points in all types of rides. (All riders are listed) 1st

Warrens Hill Rubyn

Sarah Rogerson

1994

2nd

Aragorn

Ruth Chadwick

1958

3rd

Mirjana

Gill Plumbley

1932

Talisman Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony achieving the fastest speed in a 1-day 160km Competitive Endurance Ride in the current season (FEI 3* 160km, HH Cup, Dubai, UAE) Bey Sahli

Carri-Ann Dark

Ptolemaeus

1st

Asia De Bozouls

Gemma Parkin

1030

2nd

Golden Dream

Stephanie Cole

922

3rd

HS Jamal

Lauren Mills

850

Jeffmaur Trophy - Awarded to the horse and male rider combination gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

George Bush

Dominic Smith

118.5

2nd

Kambel De Fignols

Robert Newall

1102

3rd

Ricco Esta Artisan

Robert Blane

940.5

Distance Rider Trophy - Awarded to the Senior Rider gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides in the current season riding more than one horse.

1st

Oakleazefarm Czamak, Oakleaze Farm Cziko, Oakleaze Farm Czelo & Oakleazefarm Czelection

Louise Rich

2nd

Oakleaze Farm Czarko, Crystal Magic Star, HS Jamal & G Elinore

Lauren Mills

1890

3rd

Vlacq Journeyman, Polaris, SG Anesstasia & CD Bellatrix

Georgina Vaughn

1578

2198

Karen Jones

Mellor Young Rider Trophy - Awarded to the Young Rider gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides riding more than one horse. 1st

DNS Ronaldo, HS Prosper & CFS Eros

Kate Atkinson

2240

2nd

Krayaan Nasser, Waleed Bin Goudah & Bonanza Bin Shuwaimeh

Katy Mellor

858

3rd

Tannasg Psyches Grace, Reena Screena Star & Mas’s Sambuca

Ollie Holman

798

16.2

Windard Best New Horse Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides in its first CER season.

Senior Grand Prix Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony & rider combination gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides in the current season. 1st

Warrens Hill Rubyn

Sarah Rogerson

2nd

Druimghigha Lantana

Andrea Champ

1438

3rd

Warrens Hill Farah

Laura Graham

1350

Young Rider Grand Prix Trophy - Awarded to the horse and Young Rider combination gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides in the Endurance GB Ride Programme. Best three scores to count. 1st

Tinkerbell’s Image

Nikki Brown

1370

2nd

HS Prosper

Kate Atkinson

1210

3rd

Ben Shah

Rachel Judson

918

Teams of Three - Awarded to the team of 3 horses gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st Sue Gregg

Simply Dennis

332.5

Bridie Lydon-Towle

Simeric Cassini

747.0

Hannah Lydon

Bizout

916 1995.5

Tania Fitton

LTF Jjewell C

392.5

Sarah Bamber

Miss Kitty

304.5

Karen Corr

Delfyw Squwiggle

619.0 1316.0

3rd

Offa’s Dyke Trio Nicola Davies

Hendrewen Pirate

316.0 668.0

1st

Warrens Hill Rubyn

Sarah Rogerson

1498

Belinda Stewart

Penny Clawd

2nd

Druimghigha Lantana

Andrea Champ

1438

Abigail Tennant

Barik

3rd

Tinkerbell’s Image

Nikki Brown

1370

endurancegb.co.uk

1498

2nd

Adonis Trophy - Awarded to the horse / pony gaining the most points in Competitive Endurance Rides in the current season. Three best scores to count.

26

Broadstone Chirade Trophy - Awarded to the horse gaining most national points since first registered with EGB at least 10 years ago and competing in the current season. The horse must be registered for the current season and will have competed in at least one graded or competitive endurance ride.

392.5 1074.0


Green Dragon Lane Team Award - Awarded to the team of 4 horses, of which one nominated horse will only count rides of less than 48km, gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Rosettes Direct Award - An award to the “Unsung Hero”, that is someone who has given unfailing service to Endurance GB by way of help at rides or assistance in any other way or ways. Steve Bates

Offa’s Dyke Team Nicola Davies

Hendrewen Pirate

395.0

Abigail Tennant

Barik

1556.0

Fiona Griffiths

Echo I

1130.0

Sue Loveridge

Bright Dawn

987.5

Young Volunteer of the Year - An award for a Junior or Young Rider aged 21 or under who has given unfailing service to EGB by way of help at rides or assistance in any other way. Alicia Reeves

4068.5

2nd

Lindum Imps Bridie Lydon-Towle

Simeric Cassini

852.0

Hannah Lydon

Bizout

1716.0

Susan Scarborough

LVA Troy

1409.0

Helen Ganney

Wisespares Tempo

John Yeats Memorial Bursary - A £100 bursary to be presented annually to a Young Rider to have reached 14 years but not to have attained his/her 19th birthday on 1 January in the relevant competition year.

0.0

Ollie Holman

3977.0

3rd

Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing Christine Smyth

Al Raad Bin Jesra

1368.0

Susan Hawes

Remynisce

848.0

Katie Bedwin

Elayla

548.0

Trilby Herrioyy

Red House Shamil

383.0 3147.0

Phoenix Field Endurance Futurity Trophy - Presented by Dr & Mrs P Claridge. Awarded to the Endurance GB Member whose horse (foal to 3-year-old) receives the highest score in the Endurance Discipline of the British Equestrian Federation (BEF) Futurity Evaluations during the year. 1st

ELM Avicci

Emma Mooney

9.21

2nd

HW Tamim

Amanda Crompton

8.54

2nd

DD Nadhira Khalifa

Ann & Carri Ann Dark

8.54

3rd

Royal T

Elizabeth Rowland

8.08

The Whitbridge Merlin Memorial Trophy - Awarded to the highest placed horse / Young Rider combination, UK based (living and training in the UK) in the FEI World Young Rider rankings. 190

Tinkerbelle’s Image

Nikki Brown

The Vlacq Khamul Memorial Trophy - Awarded to the highest placed horse / rider combination, UK based (living and training in the UK) in the FEI World Open Rider rankings. 134

Warrens Hill Chayze

Harry Ingram

Alec McGuiness Memorial Trophy - An award to the “Unsung Hero”, that is someone who has given unfailing service to Endurance GB by way of help at rides or assistance in any other way or ways. Sue Taylor-Green

Retraining of Racehorses Endurance Championship - Awarded to the horse registered at Wetherbys and with Retraining of Racehorses gaining the most points in all types of rides. Horses must have raced at least once to be eligible. 1st

Karactus Potts

Anna Collins

1245

2nd

Against The Rules

Elaine Wallbridge

1072

3rd

Aganippe Flyer (Worth The Stretch)

Rebecca Northover

653

Retraining of Racehorses Pleasure Competition - Awarded to the horse gaining the most points in Pleasure rides, maximum distance of 35Km and sound after completion, best 10 results to count. Magic Beat

India Hall

G Putnik Trophy - Awarded to the ex-arab racehorse gaining the most points in all types of rides. The horse must have raced at least once to be eligible. 1st

Golden Dream

Stephanie Cole

1553.5

2nd

Mahbubti

Sally Mcllwaine

1137.5

3rd

CS Corinthian

Claire Richards

715.5

Borthwick Back-up Trophy - Awarded by the Board of Directors to the most competent back-up crew or person in the current season. Stephen Vaughan

National Assistance Award - A perpetual award to the “Unsung Hero”, someone who has given unfailing service to Endurance GB by way of help at rides or assistance in any other way or ways. Allan Quinney

Senior Championship winner, Sarah Rogerson. Photo courtesy of Will Bridges.

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

27


Endurance GB FEI Championship - Awarded to the horse / pony and rider combination gaining the most points in FEI classes run under the auspices of Endurance GB.

Junior Championship – Merrie Trophy (Reserve Zarpa Trophy) Awarded to the champion horse / pony ridden by Junior Rider(s) gaining the most points in Graded Rides.

1st

Oakleazefarm Czamak

Louise Rich

1340

1st

Redwings Milky Way

Ella Pomroy

1085

2nd

HS Prosper

Kate Atkinson

1210

2nd

Anderwood Rosie

Jamie Shores

560

3rd

Warrens Hill Farrah

Laura Graham

1060

3rd

Sandy W

Lily Gibbons

487

4th

Heatherglen’s Madeliene

Lois Cooper

391

5th

Pizwell Nessy

Sidney Stanley-Whiteley

308.5

6th

Sequoia Finale

Lois Cooper

303

Platinum DE Award presented by Ann Dark - Awarded to the senior rider gaining the most points in UK FEI rides on more than one horse, UK-based and training in the UK. Only one ride of 80km to count, the remainder to be 120km or over. Oakleazefarm Czamak & Oakleaze Farm Cziko

Louise Rich

1650

Premier DE Award presented by Ann Dark - Awarded to the young rider gaining the most points in UK FEI rides on more than one horse, UK-based and training in the UK. Only one ride of 80km to count, the remainder to be 120km or over. DNS Ronaldo, HS Prosper & CFS Eros

Kate Atkinson

1740

Veteran Championship – Silverling Flint Memorial Trophy Awarded to the champion veteran horse / pony (18 years and over) gaining the most points in all types of rides. Winner receives prizes kindly donated by Pure Feed Company. (Winners of Manar & Annual Points Award Shield are ineligible) 1st

Bizout

Hannah Lydon

Young Rider Championship – Nippa Trophy (Reserve Pixie Trophy) - Awarded to the champion horse / pony ridden by Young Rider(s) gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

2288

2nd

Tinkerbelle’s Image

Nikki Brown

1874

3rd

Zaferan

Madison Pomroy

1762

4th

HS Prosper

Kate Atkinson

1443

5th

Hathek

Keighley Pomroy

1283

6th

Ben Shah

Rachel Judson

1204

Senior Championship - Awarded to the champion horse / pony, ridden by senior member(s) gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Warrens Hill Rubyn

Sarah Rogerson

1716

2nd

Arabian History

Claire Freeman

1974

3rd

Aragorn

Ruth Chadwick

1958

2nd

Syrus

Samantha Bowkett

1471.5

3rd

Magic Powers

Valerie Anne Bradshaw

1354

4th

Mirjana

Gill Plumbley

1932

CF Winter Amadeus

Pat Guerin

1915.5

Reba

Lesley Caswell

1904

4th

Firebird

Lesley Diane Nott

1342

5th

5th

Ben Shah

Rachel Judson

1298

6th

6th

Oakleaze Farm Czarko

Lauren Mills

1105

The Saddlers Award - Presented by the Worshipful Company of Saddlers. Awarded to the high point young rider 25 and under during the current season. Best 8 rides to count. The winner receives a saddle and a head collar. 1st

Tinkerbelle’s Image

Nikki Brown

2548

Novice Championship – Mira Trophy (Reserve Max Shield) Awarded to the champion novice horse / pony gaining the most points in GERs in their first season entering in rides of no more than 45km. 1st

Mistletoe

Caitlin Birkitt

2nd

Worth The Stretch

Rebecca Northover

646

3rd

Apache

Jo Mccormac

625

4th

Cobra

Wendy Gover Fromm

621

5th

Silver Serendipity

Kath Lomas-Button

585

6th

Wainstones Dainty Lady

Bethany Clarkson

580

Overall Champion – Manar Trophy (Reserve Annual Points Award Shield) - Awarded to the overall high point horse / pony of the year gaining the most points in all types of rides. 1st

Lady’s Man

Emily Freya Cooke

2288

2nd

Warrens Hill Rubyn

Sarah Rogerson

1994

3rd

Arabian History

Claire Freeman

1974

As ever, Endurance GB is extremely grateful to all our sponsors, not only for their support throughout the year, but also for their support at the Annual Awards.

670

Red Sands Award - Awarded to the highest place horse in the Novice Championship ridden all season by a novice rider in their first season of competition with Endurance GB. 1st

28

1994

Cobra

endurancegb.co.uk

Wendy Gover Fromm

621

Rachel Judson. Photo courtesy of Will Bridges.


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profile

AN INTERVIEW WITH… EMILY COOKE, EGB SUPREME CHAMPION

Following a great year with her phenomenal 13.2 pony, Lady's Man, Emily was awarded the Manar Trophy as Supreme Champion at the Endurance GB Awards in November. Cindy Russell asked Emily about her plans and ambitions for 2018

B

ased just outside Carmarthen, in West Wales, on the edge of Brechfa Forest, Emily turned 15 just before the Awards and AGM, and has just started her GCSE courses at Queen Elizabeth high school in Carmarthen. This means she has to leave home at 7.45 in the morning, not getting back again until 4.30 in the afternoon. Emily is studying Art, Geography and Triple Science, a portfolio that leaves her future options for study very flexible, although she has yet to establish what she wants to do as a career. One goal that she has set her sights on though, is to emulate her mother, Lise Cooke, and win the Man V Horse competition! Lise won this on Lady’s Man’s (Taz)dam. Emily also plans to do higher mileage race rides, and probably enter FEI classes.

sales(Llanybydder) as a two year old for the grand sum of £60.00 and went on to win the Man V Horse. Taz does everything, including giving me kisses. We are also Pony Club endurance league champions this year. Taz does several things, polocrosse, games, racing, jumping, cross country, hunting, and obviously endurance.

Q

Q

WHAT IS YOUR DAILY ROUTINE?

Q

ARE YOU SPONSORED?

WHAT GOT YOU INTO ENDURANCE?

Mum has been doing it for years and got introduced to it by Jan Lloyd – Rogers, who used to ride Cawdor Honey. My first ever ride was on Daisy 111 at the Red Dragon in 2013. We did 36k and I was hooked.

Q

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT IT?

Q

WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST ACHIEVEMENT BEFORE WINNING THE MANAR?

The training. It gives me the excuse to spend hours in the forest and on the mountain, with my pony.

Taz and I were Junior Champions last year (2016). This year we also went to the Royal Welsh as part of the Amman Valley Pony Club games team; as well as winning our maiden race at Ascot in the pony racing. Taz and I have been on the Welsh Endurance Team for four years running.

Q

TELL ME ABOUT LADY’S MAN.

He will be 10 this year. So still only a baby. He is a Part Bred Arab. His sire is Chatanz and his mum was my mums endurance mare, Gifted Lady. She came out of our local horse

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Q Q

DO YOU HAVE OTHER HORSES? We have 12 horses altogether.

WHAT ARE THEY DOING?

They are mainly unbroken, plus a couple who are retired. We do Pony Club and Hunting. I hope to get my Section D going in harness when I break him in this year. Plus get a couple of novices out with the help of my mum.

Sleep. I am a teenager! In the winter we ride at weekends and when there is enough light we ride most nights.

I’m sponsored by Equidgel, Torq and Plas Equestrian, as well as my farrier (who has also lent me his racing silks). I was using both Torq and Equidgel before I became champion and they offered to sponsor. I am very grateful to both companies. All our horses are fed EquidGel while Edwin and I use the Torq products.

Q

WHAT’S YOUR TRAINING STRATEGY?

Q

WHO CREWS FOR YOU?

I am very lucky as we have lots of hills and can go for long training rides; over 60k without any roadwork to speak of. I believe in making it fun for the horses. I definitely make it a priority to cover lots of varied going so they are used to everything, including hacking them through the local villages so they get road work and see some traffic.

My big brother, Edwin, he is the best crew

and is very calm around the horses. He puts up with me bossing him around very well! My Mum also crews for me, and my Dad and Grandparents look after everything at home when we have to be away for events.

Q

HOW WILL YOU BE STARTING OFF THE YEAR?

Q

HOW DID YOU PLAN THE 2017 SEASON?

Q

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR 2018?

We generally put the horses straight into normal work, as they have only had 4 -8 weeks off, and they retain a lot of fitness. We don’t start off with lots of walking, except when we are starting new horses.

As Taz was only 9 we had no major plans. Just to gradually increase the distances and his experience in the sport. I have always been taught that it takes at least three years to get them properly fit for a 100 mile ride.

I hope to get some of the youngsters going and hopefully do a 160k with Taz. It just all depends how it goes and how the horses enjoy it. Unfortunately we won’t be doing games this year as I am now too old for the Pony Club team. Because we are so far west it is a long way to travel to many of the major rides so we will soon be sitting down to look at the ride map for 2018. At this point I asked Emily if she has any other interests; does she take part in any other sports? It transpires that she used to do some acting, runs on a regular basis, is interested in archery, and hopes to take up Horseback Archery, but needs a different bow, as the one she has is not compatible. She also has an interest in stage combat training and stunt work. Emily has also been elected to the Young Rider Committee. You may remember, early in the interview, Emily mentioned that, being a teenager, she likes to sleep – I have no idea where she finds the time for that!


xxxxxx

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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coaching

COACH TRIP TO INDIA Receiving an email on April 1st, I was not entirely convinced that I was genuinely being contacted by The Indigenous Horse Owners Association, but that was just the beginning of a fabulous experience! Words by Cindy Russell

O

pening my emails on April 1st, I was surprised to see correspondence from the Secretary of the Indigenous Horse Owners Association (India), asking about coaching in endurance, and requesting a meeting as he was “passing through the UK in the coming week”. Thinking it was possibly a scam or a joke, I did nothing for a couple of days, but was galvanized into action when the sender of the email, Ajay Nensee, telephoned me to organize a visit! That was the start of an amazing experience that culminated in me spending two weeks in India, coaching endurance riders to prepare them for an event that is being held over the last weekend of January 2018.

PLANNING

Following my meeting in April, with Ajay and the Chairman of the Association, Khushru Patel, where we discussed endurance around the globe, types of events, types of horses,

‘The riders were so eager to learn; happy to share their own experience, and what a range of experience…’ rider and horse qualification, equipment, training, distances and many other aspects of the sport, we kept in touch and started to plan how and when an endurance coaching camp could be organized. Over the summer months more plans were put in place, and the itinerary for the camp was gradually consolidated. Ajay visited the UK on a couple of occasions, to observe endurance events here. The camp took place at the end of November through to the first week of December. Two three-day sessions were set up, with around 20 riders attending each camp.

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THE TRAINING

The venue for the camp was the beautiful home of Khushru Patel, and his family, in the hill station of Lonovala, a couple of hours drive from Mumbai. Khushru encourages people to take up riding, and has a small school there. A huge sand arena, and fantastic out-riding over a dry lake bed (out of monsoon season!) as well as tracks and mountains. Miles and miles of level cantering opportunities; plus the challenge of scaling the rocks and hills. With a ridden session each morning, taking place at around 6.30 am, we worked on

rider position, speed and rhythm, tempo, recovery rates, riding in groups, riding alone, control of the horse and understanding the horse’s way of going. Back at the house, following breakfast, there were theory sessions and demonstrations throughout the rest of the day and into the evening. Topics covered included: using heart rate monitors and stethoscopes, bio-mechanics of horse and rider, history and evolution of the sport of endurance, saddles and saddle fit, schooling exercises, fitness for horse and rider, feeding, hydration of horse and rider, core strength and stability…just to mention a few! The riders were so eager to learn; happy to share their own experience, and what a range of experience was on offer! People who breed the fabulous Marwari horses, who do dres-


coaching

ABOUT MARWARI HORSES

Facing page, Travel in India is an education in itself. This elephant was being transported to a wedding.Above left, The views from the roof of Castle Mandawa. Above right, Mandawa is a town of painted buildings, although most are in need of restoration.

The author with Marwari horse, Becky. I rode Becky on several occasions; she did very well in the endurance event held in 2017.

The Marwari horse breed is one of five recognised indigenous horses of India. The name derives from its homeland the Marwar region of Rajasthan. These horses are capable of covering long distances with good speed by virtue of their strong limbs and hooves. They can withstand intense heat and adverse climatic conditions. Marwari are known for their intelligence, spirit, stamina, endurance, alertness, loyalty, elegance, beauty, and animated gait. They average between 14.2hh 15.2hh, are naturally lean, but the most recognised feature is their unique lyre shaped ears that rotate 180* as well as touch at the tips. Their conformation, adapted for desert conditions, gives them an unequaled grace and balance, this in turn enables them to excel as sports and performance horses. They are ideally suited to desert safari, endurance and tent pegging (skill at arms). Marwari were bred by the ruling classes (Hindu Rajput) as the war horse of choice,a symbol of loyalty and power, and the breed served these families and the warriors of feudal India in times gone by. Currently, since the year 2000, these horses are on the restricted list for export - just another reason to ride them with us in their homeland!

Above left, Practical session off horse covered many topics, here we are looking at conformation and saddle fit. Above right, Another off horse practical session, this time covering crewing and cooling the horses.

Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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coaching

sage and jumping with them at national and international level, people from the Army, vets, doctors, riding instructors, Marwari breed enthusiasts…the list went on!

OPPORTUNITIES

The two camps offered quite different opportunities, partly because of differences in those attending them. The first three days, getting to know the horses, the area and discovering more about the plans for the event in January, there was a lot of discussion about the logistics for the event, and how best to impart knowledge and information to the students, especially with the language differences, although all the riders had excellent English skills! The second three days, with different riders, many of whom were competitive in

‘Stunning scenery and the unique beauty of these horses made this a trip very special.’

Above left, At the close of each camp, the riders were awarded a certificate of attendance, signed by the organiser and myself. Above right, The certificates were a work of art in themselves and I was honoured to receive a beautiful brooch to commemorate my visit.

their outlook, and wanted specific training for the event, engendered other topics for discussion, as well as opportunities to visit other equestrian complexes in the area, including the stud farm owned by Ajay Nensee, and the well respected riding centre at Japloupe. The two weeks was filled with a variety of experiences! There was also the addition of a Yoga session on the final day of the second camp; Tim, the father of one of the younger participants, is studying Yoga locally, having travelled to India from Holland with his family. There is something very special about lying

The first group of riders at the camp, following successful completion. The view is typical of the area around Lonovala.

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on grass in the sunshine, learning which Yoga poses can improve you as a rider! In between the training camps, I was sent off to Jaipur in order to see some more of this beautiful country. From Jaipur I travelled up to Mandawa, and was fortunate to visit another Marwari stud, at Castle Mandawa. Here it was a pleasure to be able to handle the foals and youngstock, be introduced to the older generations of brood mares and meet the beautifully behaved, very characterful stallions! Stunning scenery and the unique beauty of these horses made this a trip very special. My hosts also took me to visit the Flying Anvil Farriery School, at Dundlod, where I met the School’s founder, Bernard Duverney, was given a tour of the school and information about the work that is done there to train farriers. (There will be more about this Foundation in a future issue of Endurance) This trip came out of the blue, and I am so glad I was able to take up the offer. With kind, generous and hospitable hosts, Khushru and his wife Mehru, as well as Ajay and his wife Anita, I was made welcome and looked after the entire time, and it was a privilege to work with such open and genuinely interested riders and students; I hope I return to India in the future!


supplements

ENDURANCE RIDERS’ BOOST?: FASTER POST-EXERCISE RECOVERY WITH NEW AWARD WINNING PLANT-BASED OMEGA SUPPLEMENT Boosts long-chain omega-3 levels up to 10x higher than linseed oil

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new omega-3-6-9 dietary oil for horses—and their human owners—is now available to the endurance riding community in the UK. Grown solely on British farms, oil is pressed from the harvested seeds of a native plant known as corn gromwell, and the refined oil that results is called Ahiflower® Complete Equine Omegas. This new, highly palatable oil has been used to date by UK, American and Canadian horse professionals, trainers, and riders—who see visibly better post-exercise mobility, joint health, and skin/ coat health in their horses. Ahiflower benefits include the support of: • • • •

Joints Cardiovascular Health Muscles Coat lustre

The owners of D&L Performance Horses in the UK report, “We have been trialing Ahiflower Equine Omegas for the past few months and been really impressed the results. The horses are supple and focused on their work. It has been the most important change we have made to their feed and nutrition. We liked it so much we have started taking it ourselves!” Ahiflower oil was clinically studied in Standardbred racing horses in summer 2016 by researchers at the Atlantic Veterinary

College in Prince Edward Island (Canada). The researchers, led by Dr. Mary McNiven, found far greater long-chain omega-3 fatty acid bioavailability vs. flaxseed oil and corn oil, measuring up to 10x more EPA & DHA in circulating cells vs. flaxseed oil. They also found significantly lower inflammatory eicosanoid biomarker levels in the cohort fed Ahiflower oil. The randomized controlled trial gave 40 ml per day for 10 weeks to each of 3 cohorts of 10 horses each. Ahiflower oil is the first new 100% plantbased omega-3-6-9 dietary oil in a generation, and recently won the Food Innovation category at the Food and Farming awards held at the House of Commons on December. It provides a balanced 4:1:1 ratio of omega-36-9 fatty acids and is the richest non-GMO source of omega-3 stearidonic acid (SDA, 18-20%) combined with omega-6 gamma linolenic acid (GLA, 5-7%). Both of these essential fatty acid derivatives metabolize more efficiently than omega-3-6-9 fatty acids found in flax, chia, camelina, and pumpkin seed oils. Not coming from fish oil, horses find it highly palatable and do not reject it. In humans, Ahiflower oil has been clinically studied and found to promote the body’s natural anti-inflammatory response after immune challenges and/or strenuous exercise, making it ideal as a support mechanism for hard working Endurance horses. Like

humans, horses can become omega-3 deficient with continual exercise and/or pro-inflammatory stimuli (e.g., constant riding, seasonal allergies, arthritis) in their bodies. Corn and soy oils commonly used in equine feed amendments have little or no omega-3 fatty acids. Ahiflower Equine oil’s total omega-3 content is greater than 63%. Horses at Endurance event host Biltmore Equestrian Center (BEC) in Asheville, NC were among the first in the USA to try Ahiflower Equine Oil under observation from AERC veterinary official Ann Stuart, DVM. Noting significant improvement in one of their horses, Program Manager Elizabeth McLean wrote, “Misty has suffered from several skin ailments for the past few summers. Omega 3s were recommended to us for their anti-inflammatory benefits. She has been on them for the past couple of years and while we saw improvement in her skin, her issues continued. However, after having her on the Ahiflower oil we’ve seen a marked improvement and great hair regrowth! We haven’t treated her with any steroids all summer and have discontinued any topical treatments.” UK Competitor comments include ‘I have been using Ahiflower equine now for the past two months. Really noticed the difference in my competition horse, it smells great and is highly palatable for my fussy eaters!

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Endurance Jan/Feb 2018

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breeds for endurance

STANDARDBREDS FOR ENDURANCE? STAGBI (Standardbred breed society) are trying hard to raise the awareness of these versatile horses, much as Retraining of Racehorses (RoR) have successfully done, and promote their second careers after racing. Grace Trueman has worked with Sarah Thomas (STAGBI president) to produce this article, as they knew nothing about each other’s sport.

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hen it comes to promoting second careers for Standardbreds who have Harness raced, there is one question guaranteed to come up: what is pacing? This was the question I asked when a friend of mine suggested that I take hers on loan. So I did a little research: To put it simply pacing is a two beat gait like trotting, however, unlike the trot, the legs move in lateral rather than diagonal movements. Standardbreds can also trot, the pace is an additional gait not a replacement. I also, like many others, thought that perhaps the horse was “forced” into this movement as I had seen them race with straps around their legs. The straps are

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called hopples. Hopples are worn to help balance the pace in a harness racing horse, but do not force the movement. The ability to pace comes from a mutation in the horses genes, similar to Icelandic horses that Tolt.

TRYING ENDURANCE

Long story short - Laska (racing name Howard’s Express) came to me on loan and I subsequently bought her. She has always struggled with cantering as due to the nature of harness racing, cantering means disqualification. However, with the right amount of encouragement these horses can learn that you are asking for the canter. I had done endurance riding in the past although not for a few years, but decided

‘…I would have never considered a horse from a harness racing background. However, now I couldn’t recommend them enough.’


breeds for endurance

that endurance was the sport we would try. So along with field companion, Lloyd the cob, we set off to try their first novice season. Turns out that she was a natural for the sport and that pacing is not an issue – this is the gait she finds most comfortable at speed. We competed for our local riding club team, Ellen Valley Riding Club, and qualified for the finals at the Lion’s tail. We also qualified for the National Novice championships. Before meeting Laska I would have never considered a horse from a harness racing background. However, now I couldn’t recom-

They are generally quick learners and most adapt easily from being driven to ridden; they respond well to praise and are very eager to please once they know that they are doing something right. Many Standardbreds have made a smooth transition from racing to a variety of other disciplines, with some competing in multiple disciplines alongside their racing careers. For those often competing away from home, Standardbreds are well used to travelling relatively long distances to race without expending any unnecessary energy during

‘They are generally quick learners and most adapt easily from being driven to ridden…’ mend them enough. Many are looking for a good home after racing and this can be difficult to find due to perceptions of the breed.

the journey, and most settle away from home in new surroundings easily, due to stabling away from home for major race meetings.

WHAT MAKES THE STANDARDBRED THE PERFECT ENDURANCE HORSE?

2. A strong frame Standardbreds come in all shapes and sizes, with some being of the old-type heavier bone and others being lighter-framed; either way, Standardbreds are known to be good weight carriers and generally more robust than their Thoroughbred counterparts. Typically they are stockier at the shoulder and longerbacked. This sturdiness is evidenced in the

1. Willing & eager, but calm Standardbreds, as a rule, have a great work ethic. They seem happiest when going about their work, whether it be daily slow miles in the jog cart, or fast work/racing in the race sulky at the track.

fact that they commonly race on a weekly basis, with some racing twice on the same day. 3. Good movement Standardbreds come in two different varieties: trotters and pacers. Trotters move diagonally like all other breeds, whereas pacers have a two-beat lateral movement (similar to Icelandics) in addition to the diagonal trot. As with their shape and size, Standardbreds can come with a variety of movements (some lifting higher at the knee, with some having a very low action almost hinged at the fetlock). Trotters can be trained to transition to canter so as to move at faster speeds; and whilst pacers can be trained to do the same, sometimes riders find the pacing action to be more comfortable and equally as fast as, or faster than, a canter. The level of comfort of the pace is dependent on the individual horse and indeed the rider; whereas in other disciplines (such as dressage) it can be a nuisance and require extensive training to ‘remove’, for endurance it can be a blessing in disguise. Whatever the preference of the rider, Standardbred trotters and pacers can be trained to use whichever gait the rider chooses – some may take longer to ‘forget’ their racing gait than others, so be patient. As an aside, Standardbreds seem to be very sure-footed at speed and are natural athletes.

Facing page, She's Some Deal in her racing days. Left, Howards Express and Lloyd Ulnes at Walton Charity Ride 2017. Right top, Howards Express in training. Right bottom, She's Some Deal out hunting.

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group report

ICENI – SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE Many of you will already be familiar with our Iceni rides, and some will already be members of our group, but if you haven’t yet experienced a trip to Iceni country I’d like to recommend you make 2018 the year you pay us a visit! Words by Rosie Marsh

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overing the counties of Essex, Suffolk and Norfolk we may not have the hills of Red Dragon or the spectacular views of Golden Horseshoe, but we still offer stunningly beautiful, varied and challenging rides. The tree lined grassy tracks through Thetford Forest and Kings Forest have virtually no road work (especially popular with ‘barefoot’ riders); sandy lanes through the gorse lined heath and native woodland of the Suffolk coast offer a great ‘all weather’ surface and the grassy field margins throughout all three counties, courtesy of our supportive farmers, provide some beautiful scenery – of special note for me are the glorious fields full of poppies and other wild flowers on the organic farm that so generously hosts the North Norfolk ride.**

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This year a brand new pleasure ride over the Spains Hall Estate in Essex provided a great start to our season, with, for a lucky few, the added bonus of magnificent white fallow deer crossing our paths. Plans are afoot to hold a competitive ride from this lovely venue at some future date. The international rides of Kings Forest and Euston Park were exciting and well attended - the inclusion of national graded and pleasure rides this year at Euston gave participants the opportunity to experience of the buzz of international competition at this superb venue before deciding whether to take the plunge and take a stab at FEI starred rides. Euston also hosted this year’s Junior and Young Rider Camp, which was greatly enjoyed.

‘Perhaps I am slightly biased…but the organisation of Iceni rides always seems excellent and I find the route marking second to none.’


group report

Left, Riders enjoying the grassy fields of Boyton Hall. Above, Iceni Chairman, Heather Weston, best placed rider at 2017 Golden Horeshoe, on her other horse, Durriyah, competing at Poplar Park. Photos courtesy of Event to Event Photography.

NEW DEVELOPMENTS

An exciting new development for next season is that FEI 1* classes will be included at two more Iceni venues, namely Lavenham (formerly known as Boyton Hall) and Woodbridge (formerly known as Poplar Park) A huge bonus for us this year has been the weather. East Anglia is known as the driest area in the country and 2017 was one of our driest years ever. Whilst the rest of the country was cancelling rides because of waterlogged fields, our organisers were more concerned about hard going! Luckily however, the heavens always seemed to open sufficiently before each ride to soften the ground just enough for near perfect conditions. Perhaps I am slightly biased, being an Essex Girl, but the organisation of Iceni rides

always seems excellent and I find the route marking second to none. I know we are all supposed to be able to read a map, but as a rider of senior years I do not find it easy to deal simultaneously with fishing for magnifying glasses, squinting at a flapping map and trying to control a fit, keen horse. Clear arrows, often colour coded, at every conceivable route deviation make for a far less stressful and much more enjoyable event.

IT’S NOT ALL FLAT!

Finally, special mention and congratulations must be given to our Iceni Chairman Heather Weston who is living proof that riding in East Anglia provides plenty of challenges for getting our horses fit, as she won at the Golden Horseshoe in 2017 –

Suffolk is hillier than you might think! So, if you haven’t visited us before, make sure you try to include at least one Iceni ride in your 2018 calendar. You will not be disappointed. ** Please help this fabulous ride to continue - Anna Kidd who has organised North Norfolk for several years is taking a well earned break. We are enormously grateful for her dedication and hard work - THANK YOU Anna! Anyone who would like to consider stepping into her shoes, please contact Iceni asap, Anna is happy to give the new organiser/s help and support so you will not be on your own.

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YOUNG RIDERS 2018

EGB's Young Riders are once again proving they are a force to be reckoned with, with a new Committee for 2018, they are the riders to watch for the future. Words by Katie Bedwin

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T

here was an excellent turnout at this year’s AGM for young riders and juniors. It was the perfect time to discuss the 2017 season, and how we can improve the young rider experience in 2018. The summer camp held at Euston Park in August was a great success with activities ranging from a trip to Newmarket Equine Hospital, to training rides around the park. In 2018, in addition to the summer camp we hope to run training events and socials in different parts of the country. At our meeting we also had to elect a new committee, and thank our chairman, Beth Stokes, for all her hard work over the past few years. This years’ committee is really excited about the 2018 season and really welcomes any ideas you may have regarding young riders and juniors.


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ELLA BUNTING, 20 – SOUTH REPRESENTATIVE

I only have two seasons left of being in young riders, so I want to make the most of them! I am lucky enough to have two wonderful Arabian horses on loan; EAS Boadicea (Eba) who has taken me from novice to 2* before I sadly had to retire her (but don’t worry she still thinks she’s a racehorse and regularly lets me know it!) and Aly’s Estrella De Rock (Rocky) who has come from open to 1* with me I’m hoping our journey won’t be stopping there. My aim for 2018 would be to compete in a 2* with Rocky and if we’re lucky get ourselves qualified for the Europeans and also to encourage more young riders to get involved with endurance!

KATIE BEDWIN, 19 – CHAIRMAN

I have been competing in endurance for 12 years with various horses, up to 3* level. I’m very lucky to have two horses at FEI level to compete in 2018, with my dream being to travel to the European Championships. I am currently in my second year at university, studying paediatric nursing – so I understand the struggles of combining studying and horses! I have learnt so much working with the other young riders in my role as the representative for the south over the past 2 years, I think I am ready for the challenge of being chairman. I really hope to increase the junior and young rider membership levels and have more events for our members in 2018.

THE 2018 YOUNG RIDER AND JUNIOR COMMITTEE CAITLIN BIRKITT, 20 – NORTH REPRESENTATIVE

EMILY COOKE, 15 – WALES REPRESENTATIVE

I have 12 horses but most people know me for riding my little, grey, PBA pony called Lady’s Man (Taz, or just Pony for some). I am very proud of Taz as we are Supreme Champions for 2017, and we hope to complete our first 160k next year. I also plan to break in my Welsh cob youngster over this winter. I am the young rider area representative for Wales and I am happy to help. This picture is of me and The Red Barron (Noddy) last year at Cirencester.

HANNAH MASKELL, 18 – MIDLANDS REPRESENTATIVE

During my years of competing in Endurance, I have won many awards and competed abroad three times. Reggie is my part bred Arab who is FEI 2* qualified and Exus is a pure bred 6 year old arab with whom I am planning on doing his first 80km ride this coming season. Next year I am aiming to go to the European Young Riders Championships with Reggie.

Horses: Llanfylin Roseanne - aka Sophie (Welsh D, 18 years old) and Mistletoe (New Forest /arab x 6 years old). I started competing in endurance through Pony Club having previously ridden a few pleasure rides. It is a great confidence giver! This year I was thrilled to win the PC championship at Royalties on Sophie. Over the year as a challenge for me and Mistletoe, I decided to have a go at the Novice Championship. 10 rides, 9 grade 1's and a completion later she has proved to be an absolute star with a love of endurance, by winning the Novice Championship. Mistletoe will have a fairly easy 2018 although I might try and qualify her for the Pony Club champs. I hope to upgrade Sophie to advanced level in 2018 and compete her in the riding club teams. I would like to encourage younger riders and promote endurance within Pony club, around studying to be a physiotherapist.

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diary dates

KEY DATES FOR 2018 Annual General Meeting Daventry Court Hotel 24th November Daventry, NN11 0SG, 12:15pm (unless otherwise advised) Receipt of Members’ Proposals for AGM In writing to Company Secretary at Stoneleigh Office by 5pm on Friday 28th September Nominations for the Board of Directors In writing to Company Secretary at Stoneleigh Office by 5pm on Friday 28th September Nominations for Unsung Hero, John Yeats Bursary & Young Volunteer of the year awards 26th October Receipt of FEI & Major Ride Proposals 30th August Receipt of National Ride Proposal Forms 12th October Claims for Distance Awards 19th October Board of Directors Meetings 20th/21st January 17th March 5th May 21st July 13th October 24th /25th November Volunteers Conferences (For Ride Organisers, Health, Safety, Welfare and Safeguarding Representatives, Safeguarding Officers, Technical Stewards, Group Volunteers, etc.) North – 27th January Midlands – 10th February South – 17th February Groups Meeting 20th October Ride Fixtures meeting 21st October

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2018 MAJOR RIDES 31/03/18 – 01/04/18 Haywood Oaks FEI CEI1* FEI CEI2* FEI CEI3* National 160km National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes 13 – 15/04/18 Kings Forest Spring FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes 05 – 06/05/18 The Woodbridge Ride FEI CEI1* National 80km Supporting national classes 11/05/18 Royal Windsor FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 40km 19 – 20/05/18 Golden Horseshoe National 160km National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes 26 – 27/05/18 Cranwell (courtesy of Beeswax Farms) National 144km National 128km National 100km National 80km Supporting national classes 09 – 10/06/18 Belvoir Castle FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 80km Supporting national classes 09 – 10/06/18 Boconnoc National 80km Supporting national classes 09 – 10/06/18 Three Rivers (Southern Championships) National 162km National 136km National 111km National 82km Supporting national classes

16/06/18 Seacliffe (SERC) FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 160km National 80km Supporting national classes 23 – 24/06/18 Euston Park 1 FEI CEI3* FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* 24/06/18 New Marske (Northern Championships) National 80km Supporting national classes 06 – 08/07/18 Kings Forest Summer (Young Rider Championships) FEI CEI3* FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 160km National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes 13 – 15/07/18 Cirencester (Inter-Regional Championships) National 160km National 130km National 100km National 80km Supporting national classes 14 – 15/07/18 Euston Park 2 FEI CEI3* FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* 25 – 29/07/18 Emerald Green Feeds Lindum Spirit National 170km National 122km National 82km Supporting national classes 04 – 05/08/18 Euston Park 3 FEI CEI3* FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 80km National 40km 11 – 12/08/18 Barbury Castle National 80km Supporting national classes

11/08/18 Lowther Castle FEI CEI1* Supporting national classes 17 – 19/08/18 Euston Park 4 (inc Pony Club Championships) FEI CEI3* FEI CEIO2* FEI CEI1* National 80km Supporting national classes Pony Club Championship Classes 17 – 19/08/18 Brodie (Home International and Celtic Challenge) (SERC) National 160km National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes 1 – 02/09/18 The Lavenham Ride (Boyton Hall) FEI CEI1* National 80km Supporting national classes 28 – 30/09/18 British Horse Feeds Red Dragon (National Championships) (British Riding Clubs Championships) National 160km National 122km National 80km Supporting national classes 36km Riding Club Championship 05 – 07/10/18 Royalties (supported by Beeswax Farms) FEI CEI2* FEI CEI1* National 172km National 120km National 80km Supporting national classes


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