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RANDOM

SUBJETC

cs ISSUE 2


Mean

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The interpretation of body language governed by physical gestures of the face and or body creating a non-verbal behavior related to movement.


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Hist Anthropology_ The science that deals with the origins, physical and cultural development,biological characteristics, andsocial customs and beliefs of humankind.

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Kinestics was a term first used (in 1952) by Ray Birdwhistell, an anthropologist

who wanted to study the communication of people through posture, gesture, stance and movement. Part of Birdwhistell’s study included creating a film of people in social situations and analysing them in order to evaluate and show the different levels of communication that were apparent in human behaviour but hidden by speech.


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Birdwhistell stated that kinetic communication conveys 65 to 70 percent of the information in a conversational interaction.

ory


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Facial and body mo say more


expressions ovement often then words.

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Ty There are five different types of kinesics, emblems, regulators, illustrators, affective display and adaptors.

EMBLEMS are non-verbal cues that have a verbal counterpart. For example,

EMBLEMS

REGULATORSare non-verbal signs that regulate, modulate and maintain

the flow of speech during a conversation. These can be both kinesic, such as the nodding of a head, as well as nonkinesic, such as eye movements. These might including the nodding of the head to indicate you are listening or understanding something, for instance, and you are encouraging the speaker to continue. Regulars are often associated with turn-taking in conversation, influencing the flow and pace of discussion. For instance, we might start to move away, signaling that we want communication to stop, or we may raise a finger or lift our head to indicate we want to speak, or perhaps show our palm to indicate we don’t want a turn at speaking.

REGULATORS

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the British sign for Victory as it is seen by some or peace if reversed ia a gesture that originally dates back to medieval times, forefinger and middle finger erect with fist closed.
 This emblematic gesture developed as the English archers were renouwned throughout the world, then when captured by the french they would cut of these fingers so a bow and arrow could no longer be used. The English archers would stick these two fingers up at the French to show them that their fingers were still intact and then they would begin the assault. Another example is the “ok” sign made by forming a circle with your thumb and forefinger and streching out the rest of the three fingers. This may be seen as an indication for zero or the number three in some countries although this is considered obscene in Australia. Emblems in this mannor can be confusing between different cultures and social groups.


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Ty ILLUSTRATORS Illustrators

ILLUSTRATORS 7

are used more consistently to illustrate what is being said. For example pointing to something that you are discussing about. People also use illustrators to indicate the size of an object or to draw a picture in the air or to emphasize a key word in what they are saying. These might include pointing to an object in the room or pounding on the table. The frequency of use of illustrators may vary by culture, but they are used widely. Use of illustrators can help indicate interest, efforts to be clear or enthusiasm for the topic being discussed.


AFFECTIVE DISPLAYS are body, or more frequently facial, movements that display a certain affective state, i.e. emotions.

ADAPTORS Adaptors are forms of nonverbal comm-

unication that often occur at a low level of personal awareness frequently made to allow a feeling of comfort or to perform a specific physical function or e m o t i o n Because adaptors are usually carried out at a low level of awareness, they are the most secretive yet informative getures that allow the true feelings and emotions of what your conversation partner really thinks to be be spoken to you silently. A slumped posure indicates that you have low spirits, fatigued or that you feel inferior.Whereas, an erect posture shows high spirits and confidence. If you lean foward it implies that you are open and interested. Leaning away shows disinterest and defensiveness. Maintaining a rigid posture may mean that you are defensive, while a relaxed posture may translate to openess. Crossed legs and arms shows unwillingness to listen while uncrossed arms and legs indicates that you are approcahable. Adaptors are not intended for use in communication, but rather may represent behaviors learned early in life that are somehow cued by the current situation and which may be increased 8 when the level of anxiety goes up in the situation.

ADAPTORS

AFFECTIVE DISPLAYS Our gait (bouncing, suggesting happiness for instance, or slouched and shuffling, suggesting depression), and our facial movements (breaking into a big grin, suggesting pleasure, or frowning suddenly indicating displeasure) send a message about our feelings. Affect displays are often spontaneous and thus they may send signals that we would rather not convey based on social norms or our goals for communication.

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18 Ways to


Your Body Language

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(Kinesics)

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Imp 1. Don’t cross your arms or legs

2. Have eye contact, but don’t stare

3. Don’t be afraid to take up some space

4. Relax your shoulders

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5. Nod when others are talking 6. Don’t slouch, sit up straight

7. Lean, but not too much

8. Smile and laugh

9. Don’t touch your face


1. You have probably already heard you shouldn’t cross your arms as it might make you seem defensive or guarded. This goes for your legs too. Keep your arms and legs open. 2. If there are several people you are talking to, give them all some eye contact to create a better connection and see if they are listening. Keeping too much eye-contact might creep people out. Giving no eye-contact might make you seem insecure. If you are not used to keeping eye-contact it might feel a little hard or scary in the beginning but keep working on it and you’ll get used to it.

8.lighten up, don’t take yourself too seriously. Relax a bit, smile and laugh when someone says something funny. People will be a lot more inclined to listen to you if you seem to be a positive person. But don’t be the first to laugh at your own jokes, it makes you seem nervous and needy. Smile when you are introduced to someone but don’t keep a smile plastered on your face, you’ll seem insincere. 9.it might make you seem nervous and can be distracting for the listeners or the people in the conversation.

3. Taking up space by for example sitting or standing with your legs apart a bit signals selfconfidence and that you are comfortable in your own skin. 4. When you feel tense it’s easily winds up as tension in your shoulders. They might move up and forward a bit. Try to relax. Try to loosen up by shaking the shoulders a bit and move them back slightly.

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5. nod once in a while to signal that you are listening. But don’t overdo it and peck like Woody Woodpecker. 6. but in a relaxed way, not in a too tense manner. 7.If you want to show that you are interested in what someone is saying, lean toward the person talking. If you want to show that you’re confident in yourself and relaxed lean back a bit. But don’t lean in too much or you might seem needy and desperate for some approval. Or lean back too much or you might seem arrogant and distant.

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Imp 10. Keep your head up

11. Slow down a bit

12. Don’t fidget

13. Use your hands more confidently

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14. Lower your drink. 15. Realise where you spine ends

16. Don’t stand too close

17. Mirror

18. Keep a good attitude


10. Don’t keep your eyes on the ground, it might make you seem insecure and a bit lost. Keep your head up straight and your eyes towards the horizon.

16. one of the things we learned from Seinfeld is that everybody gets weirded out by a close-talker. Let people have their personal space, don’t invade it.

11. this goes for many things. Walking slower not only makes you seem more calm and confident, it will also make you feel less stressed. If someone addresses you, don’t snap your neck in their direction, turn it a bit more slowly instead.

17.lighten up, don’t take yourself too seriously. Relax a bit, smile and laugh when someone says something funny. People will be a lot more inclined to listen to you if you seem to be a positive person. But don’t be the first to laugh at your own jokes, it makes you seem nervous and needy. Smile when you are introduced to someone but don’t keep a smile plastered on your face, you’ll seem insincere.

12. and try to avoid, phase out or transform fidgety movement and nervous ticks such as shaking your leg or tapping your fingers against the table rapidly. You’ll seem nervous and fidgeting can be a distracting when you try to get something across. Declutter your movements if you are all over the place. Try to relax, slow down and focus your movements.

18.it might make you seem nervous and can be distracting for the listeners or the people in the conversation.

13. instead of fidgeting with your hands and scratching your face use them to communicate what you are trying to say. Use your hands to describe something or to add weight to a point you are trying to make. But don’t use them to much or it might become distracting. And don’t let your hands flail around, use them with some control.

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14. Don’t hold your drink in front of your chest. In fact, don’t hold anything in front of your heart as it will make you seem guarded and distant. Lower it and hold it beside your leg instead. 15. many people (including me until recently) might sit or stand with a straight back in a good posture. However, they might think that the spine ends where the neck begins and therefore crane the neck forward in a Montgomery Burns-pose. Your spine ends in the back of your head. Keep you whole spine straight and aligned for better posture.

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kinestics b  

RANDOM SUBJETC ISSUE 2 T IT L E The interpretation of body language governed by physical gestures of the face and or body creating a non-ver...

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