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ENGLISH FILE

Pre-intermediate Workbook with key

Clive Oxenden Paul Seligson with Jane Hudson

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ENGLISH FILE

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Contents 4

A

Where are you from?

43

A

How to...

6

B

Charlotte's choice

45

B

Being happy

8

C

Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy

47

C

Learn a language in a month!

10

PRACTICAL ENGLISH Hotel problems

49

PRACTICAL ENGLISH At the pharmacy

11

A

Right place, wrong person

50

A

I don't know what t o do!

13

B

The story behind the photo

52

B

If something can go wrong...

15

C

One dark October evening

54

C

You must be mine

17

A

Plans and dreams

56

A

What would you do?

19

B

Let's meet again

58

B

I've been afraid of i t for years

21

C

What's the word

60

C

Born t o sing

23

PRACTICAL ENGLISH Restaurant problems

62

PRACTICAL ENGLISH Getting around

24

A

Parents and teenagers

63

A

The mothers of invention

26

B

Fashion and shopping

65

B

Could do better

28

C

Lost weekend

67

C

Mr Indecisive

30

A

No time for anything

69

A

Bad losers

32

B

Superlative cities

71

B

Are you a morning person?

34

C

How much is too much?

73

C

What a coincidence!

36

PRACTICAL ENGLISH The wrong shoes

75

PRACTICAL ENGLISH Time to go home

37

A

Are you a pessimist?

76

A

Strange but true!

39

B

I'll never forget you

78

B

Gossip is good for you

41

C

The meaning of dreaming

80

C

The English File quiz

82

LISTENING


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3


Today is t h e f i r s t day o f t h e r e s t of your life. Anonymous

ere are you from? 1 GRAMMAR word order in a

2 VOCABULARY common verb phrases

questions

M a t c h the verbs a n d n o u n s .

P u t t h e w o r d i n t o t h e c o r r e c t place i n t h e

1 be b o r n

questions.

2 do

• • • • • • • • • m

3 listen t o

1 W h e r e y o u b o r n ? (were)

4 play

Where were you born?

5 read

2 D o have any b r o t h e r s or sisters? ( y o u )

6 speak 7 live

3 W h a t u n i v e r s i t y y o u go to? (do)

8 watch 9 g° 10 have

4 W h a t languages y o u speak? (can) 5 W h e r e y o u study E n g l i s h before? ( d i d )

a

7 H o w do y o u do exercise? (often)

?

t o the c i n e m a , o n holiday

g the guitar, basketball h a foreign language, E n g l i s h i

dance music, R & B i n K r a k o w , i n Poland

"<8 <s

A K

H P J

c

tree M C D

J

6

e

7

egg

egg

boot

N B F

X S K

Q 1 U

U n d e r l i n e t h e stressed syllables i n these w o r d s . 1 instrument 2 programme

?

3

(your birthday) 5 Where

tree G v R

5

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n again a n d repeat the letters.

?

4 When

thirteen

4 thirjty

?

5

(you / from)

university

6 weekend

6 Where ( y o u r f r i e n d s / go / holiday last year) 7 W h a t k i n d o f books

?

7

magazine

8

sister

9 language

( y o u / read) ( y o u / a n g r y yesterday)

train

?

( T V p r o g r a m m e s / y o u r g i r l f r i e n d / watch)

8 Why

train

CD

( y o u / do last n i g h t ) 3 What

f

4

( y o u / go t o u n i v e r s i t y ) 2 What

d exercise, s p o r t e a n e m a i l , a magazine

2

1

W r i t e q u e s t i o n s i n t h e present o r past s i m p l e . do you go to university

c t w o sisters, a pet

( O r c l e ) the letter w i t h a d i f f e r e n t v o w e l s o u n d .

8 W h e r e d i d y o u last weekend? (go)

1 Where

b i n a house, w i t h f r i e n d s

3 PRONUNCIATION vowel sounds, t h e alphabet

6 W h a t k i n d o f music do y o u listen? (to)

b

a M T V , a T V series

10

? d

address

fliTfyi

£ f t L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat the w o r d s .


4 SPELLING AND NUMBERS a

C o n t i n u e the series. twelve

eleven

1 n i n e , ten, 2 f i f t e e n , sixteen, 3 sixty, seventy,

4 ninety-eight, ninety-nine, 5 six h u n d r e d , seven h u n d r e d , 6 three h u n d r e d and f i f t y , f o u r h u n d r e d , . 7 one t h o u s a n d , three t h o u s a n d , 8 ten t h o u s a n d , t w e n t y t h o u s a n d , Listen and w r i t e the words. 1

6

parents

2

7

3

8

4

9

5

10

5 LISTENING a

* 2 s 3 ^ 3 3 ) L i s t e n t o a c o n v e r s a t i o n b e t w e e n t w o people at a p a r t y . W h y does B e n leave?

b

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1 Sandra is a nurse.

_T_

2 Ben is a d o c t o r . 3 Sandra likes dance music. 4 Sandra d i d n ' t go to the M u s e concert. 5 Sandra plays t e n n i s . 6 Ben plays f o o t b a l l .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. get i n t o u c h w i t h /get i n tAtJ w i 5 / go t o bed early /gao ta bed '3:li/ have (sth) i n c o m m o n /haev i n ' k u m a n / last weekend /la:st w i i k ' e n d / spend t i m e o n (sth) /spend t a i m somewhere nice

on/

/'sAmwea nais/

H o w o f t e n do y o u . . . ? Zhao b i n da j u / W h a t k i n d o f (music)...? / w o t ' k a m d ov/ W h e r e were y o u born? /'wea wa j u 'bom/

m m

\-*


A t r u e f r i e n d is s o m e o n e w h o is t h e r e for you w h e n he / she w o u l d prefer t o be s o m e w h e r e else. Len Wein, American

comic book

writer

rlotte's choice 1 GRAMMAR present simple a

2 VOCABULARY describing people Appearance

W r i t e negative sentences. 1 You get up early.

a

You don't get up early

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences.

2 I t rains a l o t here.

1 D o e s y o u r b o y f r i e n d have b r o w n eyes o r blue eyes?

3 W e live i n a f l a t .

2 Tanya's dad doesn't have any hair. He's

4 I play t e n n i s . 5 H e has a beard.

3 M y best friend's h a i r isn't str c

6 T h e y go to the g y m .

do

si

y o u r l a p t o p have a webcam?

3 What time

but n o w he's a b i t ov

y o u r m o t h e r w o r k f r o m home?

5 W h i c h websites 7

y o u r brother spend a l o n g t i m e o n Facebook?

C o m p l e t e the text w i t h the correct f o r m o f the verbs i n the box. not like

. A n d I'm

not short, I ' m m

y o u r g i r l f r i e n d l i k e action f i l m s ?

get on study have share want work

.

7 M y h a i r isn't b r o w n , it's r

y o u use most?

6

not come earn prefer not see

at a l l . I t h i n k you're quite

.

6 W h e n Jake was y o u n g , he was very t h

we need to leave?

4

and a

.

5 Y o u aren't f

y o u meet y o u r friends?

2

c

m

C o m p l e t e t h e q u e s t i o n s w i t h do o r does. 1 When

.

4 A n d y doesn't shave. H e has a b

7 She w r i t e s a blog. b

_. It's

b

h

M a t c h t h e q u e s t i o n s 1 - 6 w i t h t h e answers a-f. 1 W h a t d i d y o u look l i k e w h e n y o u were a child?

4 W h a t does y o u r sister l o o k like? 5 W h a t ' s G e o r g e like?

I am very d i f f e r e n t f r o m my b o y f r i e n d , Jamie. Jamie works

as a vet and he quite a lot

2

of money. I'm a student and 1

music at

3

university. I

4

to be a music teacher when

a

She's t a l l and s l i m w i t h l o n g b l o n d hair,

b He's very k i n d and quite h a r d - w o r k i n g , c

I had s h o r t c u r l y h a i r and I was overweight.

d He has s h o r t d a r k h a i r and a moustache, e

She's very clever and quite extrovert,

f

I was very t a l k a t i v e and a b i t lazy.

I finish. Jamie and 1

_ in a small house in the country,

5

6

a flat with some friends in the

_

city centre. We o f t e n flat, but Jamie

8

1

_. He's quite shy, so he

1

ii

11

3 generous

to be in a group.

4 friendly

Jamie much because he's usually busy.

But when we're together, we a l w a y s

12

really

well. Some people say that opposites attract, and for Jamie and me, it's true.

6

talkative

2 shy

being w i t h other people. I'm quite e x t r o v e r t so I

Personality Complete the opposites.

parties in our

7

5 hard-working 6

kind

7

serious

8 stupid

CH O â&#x20AC;˘

6 W h a t were y o u l i k e w h e n y o u were at school?

1

0

2 W h a t does y o u r h u s b a n d l o o k like? 3 W h a t ' s y o u r g i r l f r i e n d like?

live

.

quiet

CH


3 PRONUNCIATION final s / es a

ffiTfolfft

b

Listen and(arcle)the verb w i t h a different sound.

2 snake

^f

zebra

snake

works lives laughs thinks <^aTcheg> drinks

knows rains likes

1 T h e people w h o take p a r t i n 'Singles' D a y ' aren't m a r r i e d .

Viz/ Viz/

^ v

4

zebra runs starts goes

leaves dresses washes

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a g a i n . M a r k the sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). _T_

2 M a n y people register f o r the event o n the i n t e r n e t . 3 A l l o f the d a t i n g events are i n the t o w n h a l l .

teaches cooks misses

4 People w h o d o n ' t register f o r the event can't f i n d a p a r t n e r o n 'Singles' D a y ' . 5 Every year, there are m o r e single adults i n

b

L i s t e n again a n d repeat t h e w o r d s ,

c

U n d e r l i n e the stressed s y l l a b l e .

Shanghai. c

1 talkative

4

generous

7

2 extrovert

5

moustache

8 quiet

3 unfriendly

6

serious

9 overweight

meaning and pronunciation w i t h a dictionary.

curly

t H i f c ' c f f l L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat

U n d e r l i n e five w o r d s y o u don't k n o w . Check their

5 LISTENING a

ffiflfc^flfl

Listen to a radio p r o g r a m m e about

o n l i n e dating. H o w m a n y people call the

the w o r d s .

programme?

4 READING a

Read the article. W h a t happens o n 'Singles' D a y ' i n Shanghai?

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a t c h t h e callers w i t h t h e sentences A - F . 1 Alan

C

_

2 Kate

""_

_

3 Paolo

_

A H e / She doesn't have t i m e f o r a social l i f e . B H e / She made a m i s t a k e . C I Ie / She h a d a c h i l d w i t h the p a r t n e r he / she met online. D H e / She m a r r i e d someone w h o was m a r r i e d before. E H e / She doesn't like m e e t i n g n e w people. F H e / She is h a p p i l y m a r r i e d n o w , but doesn't have any c h i l d r e n .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES 11 November is 'Singles' Day' in Shanghai, and every year a dating event takes place where all the single men and women of the city have the chance to meet a partner. Last year, it was so popular that the organizers had to close online registration because there were no more places. Between 10,000 and 40,000 people attend the event every year. It's held in a district of Shanghai called Thames Town. At least 50 dating agencies take part. They set up stands in the town hall with billboards displaying cards with the height, birth date, education, and annual income of thousands of clients. People who did not manage to register for the event organize their own unofficial dating system by writing their names and phone numbers on bits of paper and attaching them t o the fence outside the town hall. More people take part in 'Singles' Day' every year because of the growing number of single adults in Shanghai. In the centre of the city, more than 24% of people over the age of 15 are unmarried.

L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases. guy /gai/ partner

pcutna/

single p e r s o n

'singl 'p3:sn/

smile / s m a i l / sociable

'saufabl/

be i n t o (sth) / b i 'inta/ feel like (doing s o m e t h i n g ) /fill l a i k / get o n w e l l ( w i t h ) /get o n w e l / go o n a date /gao o n a deit/ sense o f h u m o u r

sens ov ' h j u i m a /


A man paints w i t h his brain, and n o t w i t h his hands. Michelangelo,

nd Mrs Clark and Percy 1 VOCABULARY clothes a

Complete the c r o s s w o r d Clues d o w n

prepositions of place b

L o o k at t h e p a i n t i n g . C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h these p r e p o s i t i o n s . on the l e f t in- between in front of next t o 1 There are m a n y people

behind in

the

picture. 2 T h e r e are some boats o f the p i c t u r e . 3 T h e r e are t w o s m a l l a n i m a l s the w o m a n and m a n w i t h an u m b r e l l a . 4 A s m a l l g i r l i n a w h i t e dress is the w o m a n i n the m i d d l e o f the p a i n t i n g . 5 A black dog is the m a n w i t h a beard. 6 There is a w o m a n the t w o m e n s i t t i n g d o w n .

Italian painter

and

sculptor


3 PRONUNCIATION

2 GRAMMAR present continuous a

L o o k at the p a i n t i n g a g a i n . R e a d t h e m u s e u m guide's

a

d e s c r i p t i o n o f i t . W r i t e the verbs i n the present c o n t i n u o u s .

/a/and/a:/

W r i t e the w o r d s i n t h e c h a r t . cardigan fashion sweater trainers

b

prefer sandals shirt trousers T-shirt third

computer

bird

cardigan

prefer

skirt world

' __, L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n listen again a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .

S u n d a y Afternoon

on the Island

of La Grande

Jatte,

1 8 8 4 - 8 6 , G e o r g e s Pierre S e u r a t As you can see, the sun ' people

is shining

4 LISTENING a

in this picture, and the

Listen to an advert for an art e x h i b i t i o n . W h a t is special a b o u t t h e p i c t u r e s ?

(relax) by the river Seine in Paris. On

2

the right of the picture, a man and a woman

3

(walk) their dogs. On the left, a man on the grass. He looks like h e

(lie) (relax). In the

5

middle of the picture, t w o girls down. W h a t

(sit)

Listen again and answer the questions. 1 W h e r e is the D a v i d H o c k n e y e x h i b i t i o n ? 2 W h a t was the f i r s t p i c t u r e he d r e w o n his

(they / do)? Maybe they

7

b

iPhone?

(wait) for some friends? Or perhaps

8

they

(watch) the other people?

9

3 W h a t does he do w i t h his f l o w e r pictures?

On the right, near the trees, there is another girl. She 4 W h e n is the last day o f the e x h i b i t i o n ?

(play), but we can't see who w i t h .

10

5 H o w m u c h does the e x h i b i t i o n cost? b

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h t h e present s i m p l e o r present c o n t i n u o u s f o r m o f t h e verbs i n t h e b o x . drink

drive

like

listen

live

rain

1 Sorry. I can't hear y o u . I ' m listening 2 Charles always

sleep

study

wear

t o music.

3 ' S h h h h ! Be quiet! T h e c h i l d r e n 5 Fiona

.' .

f o u r cups o f coffee every day. this picture very much.

7 M y brother 8 K a t h y always

for Apple. jeans at h o m e .

9 They can't come to the theatre because they for the exam t o m o r r o w . 10 M y p a r e n t s .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases.

to w o r k .

4 W e can't play tennis today. I t 6 We

work

feet

Ti:t/

knee / n i : / portrait

'po:treit/

poster

paosta/

p r e g n a n t /'pregnant/ relationship unusual

/n'leifnjip/

/Aiiju^ual/

close together /klaos ta'geda/ i n a b i g house i n the c o u n t r y . C l M f c * FILE 1


glis

H(otel problems

1 CALLING RECEPTION

3 READING

C o m p l e t e the c o n v e r s a t i o n w i t h a phrase f r o m the b o x .

a

R e a d t h e a d v e r t a n d m a r k the sentences T (true) o r F (false).

I have a problem w i t h t h e Wi-Fi. I'll put you through t o IT. I'll send somebody up right away. I'm sorry to bother you again. There's a problem w i t h the shower. This is room 402. A

Hello, reception.

B

Hello.

A

How can I help you?

B

1

1 T h e Park C e n t r a l N e w Y o r k is i n the centre o f the city.

T_

2 It's near m a j o r t o u r i s t a t t r a c t i o n s 3 It's v e r y c o m f o r t a b l e . 4 A l l r o o m s have free W i - F i access. 5 T h e hotel's restaurant is n o t very expensive. 6 T h e h o t e l has a free car park.

This is room

402.

7 T h e s t a f f o n l y speak E n g l i s h .

Park Central New York Hotel

. There isn't any hot water.

2

A

I'm sorry, m a d a m .

B

Thank you.

A

Good morning, reception.

B

Hello.

A

How can I help you?

B

5

:

New York .This is room 402.

4

Our facilities • in-room safe • in-room Wi-Fi (surcharge)

. I can't get a signal.

A

I'm sorry, m a d a m . _

B

Thanks.

• electronic check-out

6

• parking garage (surcharge) • room service • on-site car rental

2 SOCIAL ENGLISH

• 9'ftshop

C o m p l e t e t h e m i s s i n g w o r d s i n the c o n v e r s a t i o n . 1

A So, here you are at last. B Yes. It's great to be here.

2

A Do you have a g v

?

B Yes. I can see the Empire State Building from my window. 3

A William is I to meeting you.

f

B Really? Who's William? A It's time to go. You m b

really tired.

B I guess you're right. 5

A

t

, it's great to

v.;

'Great location and service' Located in the heart of the city, the Park Central New York is in easy walking distance of Carnegie Hall, Broadway and the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA). Central Park is only three blocks away and Fifth Avenue, with its international boutiques and huge department stores, is only a ten-minute walk from the hotel. For guests who want to travel further away, there are seven subway lines located within three blocks of the hotel. The Park Central New York offers great service, great comfort and great value. The hotel's bistro, 'Cityhouse', provides the perfect setting for dinner before a concert or a Broadway show in the evening. Guests can enjoy the reasonably priced set menu while watching the world go by on Seventh Avenue through the bistro's oversized windows. There's also a bar in the lobby where guests can enjoy a cocktail after the show. Because of its central location, the Park Central New York is the ideal hotel for tourists visiting the city for the first time. Our multilingual staff on the front desk are always happy to provide tour assistance and answer any questions guests may have.

see you again. B Yes. It's great t o see you, too.

b

U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to look up their pronunciation and meaning.


A holiday is having n o t h i n g t o do and all day t o do i t . Robert

Orben, American

editor

ight place, wrong person 1 VOCABULARY holidays a

W r i t e the phrases.

as

â&#x20AC;˘

1

go

camping

2 go 3

2 GRAMMAR past simple: regular and irregular verbs

a f l i g h t s o n the internet

a

4 go 5

skis

6 go_ 7

argue invite

at n i g h t i n a hotel

8 go. 9

o n the beach

10 g o . b

W r i t e t h e past s i m p l e o f these verbs i n t h e c o r r e c t c o l u m n . begin arrive ask buy can rent say stay sunbathe

choose

Regular

Irregular

argued

began

eat

feel

_ f o r the weekend

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h a n a d j e c t i v e . 1 We loved our r o o m . I t was very

comfortable

2 The weather was w a r m and s_

every day.

3 There were a lot o f people everywhere. I t was very cr

.

b

4 We ate very w e l l . T h e f o o d was d 5 The staff i n the hotel were h o r r i b l e . T h e y were very unh

, and sometimes quite rude.

6 There wasn't much i n the a p a r t m e n t . I t was very b

. I t d i d n ' t even have a fridge.

7 T h e other people o n the t r i p were very fr

.We hope to meet some o f t h e m

again i n the future. 8 The t o w n was 1

M a k e t h e verbs negative. 1 W e stayed at a campsite. We didn't stay

i n a hotel.

2 T h e y b o u g h t postcards. any souvenirs. 3 T h e people were u n f r i e n d l y . very h e l p f u l . 4 I sunbathed o n the beach.

. A l l the houses

had f l o w e r s o n the balcony and were painted d i f f e r e n t

by the p o o l . 5 We h i r e d bikes.

colours. 9 I t was cl

and we d i d n ' t see the sun

a car. 6 H e spent a m o n t h i n Bangkok.

at all. 10 O u r f i r s t meal was d eat at the hotel again.

a week there. , so w e d i d n ' t

7 O u r r o o m was d i r t y . very clean.


:

C o m p l e t e the t e x t w i t h the past s i m p l e form o f the verbs i n the b o x . arrive

ask

book

cannot

decide

go (x2)

look

take

4

LISTENING L i s t e n t o five speakers t a l k i n g about

want

h o l i d a y s t h e y d i d n ' t enjoy. W h i c h speaker...?

The holiday that wasn't

b wasn't w i t h the people he / she w a n t e d

Four years ago, w e

c

1

decided

to go away for the weekend. We

to go to Portugal, so w e

a beautiful

;

apartment online. A week later, we airport. W e

a taxi to the

at the airport at t w o o'clock, and we

5

to check in. The woman at the desk

6

us f o r our passports. W e

7

to be w i t h

J_

chose a holiday d e s t i n a t i o n because o f the weather there

d w e n t o n holiday after a relationship ended e didn't feel well when he / she was o n holiday

in our bags, but we

8

find t h e m . So w e

9

1

a d i d n ' t have a very e x c i t i n g weekend

home!

1 0

Read the t e x t i n c a g a i n . C o m p l e t e the q u e s t i o n s . 1 When

did they decide

2 Where

to go away for the weekend? Four years ago. to 20? P o r t u g a l .

3 How

the apartment? T h e y b o o k e d i t o n l i n e .

4

When_

_ at the a i r p o r t ? A t t w o o'clock.

5

What_

_ ask for? She asked for t h e i r passports.

6

Where.

i n the end? T h e y w e n t back home. Speaker 4

\ PRONUNCIATION -ed endings, irregular verbs

Speaker 5

L i s t e n and(arcle)the verb w h i c h has a d i f f e r e n t -ed sound.

1 1 walked

asked

2 argued

wanted

stayed

3 booked

started

decided

4 arrived

invited

sunbathed

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES

(r^rned)

L e a r n these words and phrases. atmosphere

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat the w o r d s .

c

W r i t e these i r r e g u l a r past s i m p l e f o r m s i n t h e c o r r e c t circle. bought broke came caught drank drove rang fead said saw sat went wrote

gave

made

disaster hostels

/'aetmasfia/

di'zaista/ /'hostlz/

complain /kam'plem/ enjoy

/m'djDi/

flirt

/fb:t/

view

/vjii:/

breakup /'breik A p / feel s o r r y f o r (sb)

f i : l 'sDri fb:/

go w r o n g /gao r o n /

d

fflTEflŠ

L i s t e n and check. T h e n listen again and repeat the w o r d s .


P h o t o g r a p h s are p i c t u r e s t a k e n t o please t h e f a m i l y and bore t h e neighbours. Edmund

Volkart,

American

sociologist

e story behind the photo 1 GRAMMAR past continuous a

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h t h e verbs i n b r a c k e t s i n t h e past c o n t i n u o u s . 1 You

were laughing

(laugh) w h e n I t o o k the p h o t o .

2 It

(snow) w h e n o u r plane landed.

3 We

(not drive) fast w h e n the accident happened.

4 What

(he / do) w h e n his boss arrived?

5 Why

. ( y o u / c r y ) at the party?

6 I

(sit) o n the bus w h e n I saw m y b o y f r i e n d w i t h another g i r l .

7 They

(live) i n N e w Z e a l a n d w h e n t h e i r f i r s t c h i l d was b o r n .

8 He d i d n ' t call y o u because his m o b i l e phone b

W r i t e sentences w i t h when. U s e the past s i m p l e and past c o n t i n u o u s .

c

C o m p l e t e t h e s t o r y w i t h t h e past s i m p l e o r past c o n t i n u o u s .

1 They / argue / the waiter /

Last summer 1

b r i n g / the b i l l . They were arguing

(not w o r k ) .

went

(go) t o Los Angeles t o stay

w i t h my cousin for a few weeks. One a f t e r n o o n we

when

the waiter brought the hill

1

.

(have) lunch in a nice restaurant in the

2

centre of t o w n when my cousin

(get) a

3

call on her mobile phone and w e n t outside to talk. While 2 H e / f a l l / o f f his b i k e / cycle / home

she

(speak) to her friend, I suddenly

4

5

(notice) a man in a black hat who

6

(sit) at the next table. It was the actor

Johnny Depp! He was alone, and 1

to take my chance. So I got up a n d 3 The c h i l d r e n / play / video games / the visitors / arrive

(decide)

7

(go)

8

to his table. 'Excuse me, could I have my photo taken (say) yes, so I w i t h you?' asked. He 10 (stop) a waitress w h o

(pass)

11

by and gave her my camera. She

(take)

12

the photo of me and Johnny, I thanked them both, and then I returned to my table. When my cousin 4 We / have / a barbecue / it / start / to r a i n

back, 1

13

(come)

(smile).

14

'Why are you looking so pleased with yourself?' she asked. 'I had my photo taken with Johnny Depp.' 'Johnny Depp? Where is he?' 'He's sitting over there. Look!'

5 I / finish / my report / my computer / crash

She turned around to look and then started to laugh. 'That's not Johnny Depp!' 1 16

15

(look) at the man in the black hat - he (laugh) too.


VOCABULARY at, in, on

4 LISTENING

time

a

1 T h e results o f the election were announced 3 O u r f l i g h t is leaving

at

4 W e have an e x a m

b

the 2 0 t h century.

12 o'clock

the Thursday.

Monday morning.

n i g h t , g e t t i n g up early

the

1955, and he died

5 t h October, 2011. 8

Easter w e w e n t t o Portugal and we're g o i n g again the summer, probably the last t w o weeks

July.

place H e t o o k some great photos

2 I can't read a b o o k

at

i n the s p r i n g . i n the s u m m e r ,

c

i n the a u t u m n .

3 The man wanted to w i n . . . a

some money.

b

some f o o d ,

c

some jewellery.

the w a l l

4 M y f a m i l y are f r o m Ireland but w e live

c the l i v i n g the shelves.

New York,

the 11th f l o o r o f a t a l l b u i l d i n g . 5 I ' l l meet y o u

neighbours.

b friends, a car.

r o o m . We're g o i n g t o put a l l o u r o l d books

colleagues.

5 T h e m a n o n the s t a l l . . . a

t o o k the p h o t o .

b

asked f o r m o r e money f o r the p h o t o ,

c

d i d n ' t l i k e the p h o t o .

the bus stop.

6 T h e adults sat

chairs and the c h i l d r e n sat

the f l o o r . 7 T h e y spent the m o r n i n g for a w a l k

the m u s e u m and t h e n w e n t

the park.

8 I met m y b o y f r i e n d

school and w e split u p w h i l e we

university.

PRONUNCIATION sentence stress L i s t e n a n d repeat t h e d i a l o g u e . C o p y t h e r h y t h m . a

a b

a

the p a r t y .

the bus o r

3 W e w a n t t o put some shelves

were

M a t t ' s parents.

4 T h e o t h e r people i n the p h o t o were the man's...

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h at, in, o r on. 1

a

2 T h e p h o t o was t a k e n . . .

weekends.

7 Steve Jobs was b o r n

1 The photo shows...

(ÂŁ) M a t t ' s grandparents.

C h r i s t m a s D a y and N e w Year's Day. m o r n i n g , and w o r k i n g

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c h o o s e t h e best a n s w e r s .

b M a t t ' s aunt and uncle.

5 I n most c o u n t r i e s , banks and offices are closed 6 I hate d r i v i n g

the photo?

11 o'clock.

Wednesday at 9.30

evening and a r r i v i n g

Listen to a conversation between

M a t t a n d Jenny a b o u t a p h o t o . D o e s Jenny l i k e

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h at, in, o r on.

2 M o b i l e phones were invented

ffliT^ÂŁft

W h e r e were y o u at t e n o ' c l o c k l a s t n i g h t ?

b

I was at h o m e .

A

W h a t were you d o i n g ?

b

i was w a t c h i n g a f i l m .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. democracy

di'irmkrasi/

d e m o n s t r a t i o n /deman'streijn/ election

/l'lekfn/

freedom

/'friidam/

h o l d hands / h a o l d haendz/ peace realize

/pi:s/ /nalaiz/

T V screens / t i : ' v i : s k r i m z / upload

/Ap'taod/

screen saver / s k r i m 'seiva/


The driver is t h e m o s t dangerous p a r t of t h e car. Leo Campion,

French

humourist

ne dark October evening

w

1 GRAMMAR time sequencers and connectors

c

R e w r i t e t h e sentences u s i n g t h e w o r d s i n b r a c k e t s . 1 I d i d n ' t have any breakfast because I d i d n ' t have t i m e ,

a |]jrcle)the correct w o r d s or phrases.

(so) I d i d n ' t have t i m e

so I didn't have any

breakfast

2 I h a d a great holiday i n E g y p t a l t h o u g h I can't speak Arabic, (but) I can't speak A r a b i c 3 I d o n ' t really l i k e R y a n , b u t I w e n t o n a date w i t h h i m . (although) I w e n t o n a date w i t h R y a n , 4 I called the police because the d o o r to m y f l a t was o p e n , (so) T h e d o o r t o m y f l a t was o p e n 'The summer/(^ne summer), I decided to travel to Peru. I flew

5 Jim has a lot o f money, b u t he's really m e a n ,

to Lima, and then travelled to a town near Machu Picchu to spend

(although)

the night. Next day / Afterday, I climbed the mountain to visit 2

Jim's really mean,

the monument. I was quite t i r e d w h e n / t h e n I reached the top. 3

4

Sudden / Suddenly, I saw a man who was in my English class

6 M a r y c o u l d n ' t f i n d her w a l l e t so she cancelled her

back home. Two minutes later / Two minutes after, he came 5

c r e d i t cards, ( b e c a u s e )

over to speak to me and he was just as surprised as I was. 6

M a r y cancelled her credit cards

A f t e r t h a t / When, we decided to travel together. We had a

great summer, and we carried on seeing each other back home. In fact, we got married t w o years later, and we now have a

2 VOCABULARY verb phrases

beautiful daughter called Hannah.

a b

L o o k at each g r o u p o f sentences. C o m p l e t e each sentence w i t h so, because, but, o r

1 Jamie and B e t h m e t

although.

1 a L i n d a r a n to the s t a t i o n

because

b L i n d a was very late

2 H e played

she was very late,

3 She left

she r a n to

4 He waited

the station. c

5 She gave

L i n d a r a n t o the s t a t i o n , she was t o o

6 He invited

late and she missed the t r a i n . 2 a

7 H e t o o k her

we c o u l d n ' t go out, we had a really

8 T h e y had

g o o d a f t e r n o o n at h o m e . b It was r a i n i n g

b

we stayed at home.

c W e stayed at home last Sunday was r a i n i n g .

they

managed to sell t h e m a l l i n an h o u r , the tickets were really expensive, they sold t h e m all i n an h o u r , c T h e y sold the tickets q u i c k l y concert was very p o p u l a r .

the

m • • • • • • •

a her to dinner. b

for her at the d o o r .

c

a w o n d e r f u l evening.

d i n a club. e to a new restaurant. f

the club very late.

g her f a v o u r i t e song. h h i m her phone number.

Cover the right-hand c o l u m n . T r y to remember t h e sentences.

it

3 a T h e tickets were really expensive b

M a t c h the phrases.


3 PRONUNCIATION word stress a

W r i t e the w o r d s i n the chart. across evening

after

ajgain

invite

although

perfect

ffiiTTjflfr awful

restaurant

1 First syllable stressed

because

birthday

second

Listen to a radio p r o g r a m m e about

p e o p l e w h o h a d l u c k y escapes. M a r k the sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false).

2 Second syllable stressed

after

b

5 LISTENING

across

t U i T J j ! ^ L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat the w o r d s .

4 READING a

R e a d the s t o r y . N u m b e r t h e paragraphs i n the r i g h t order.

1 M a u r e e n Evason was o n holiday w h e n the accident happened.

A luckf escape

2 She was i n h o s p i t a l f o r f o u r m o n t h s .

Ten minutes later, it began to rain. Soon, Liz found it hard to see out of the f r o n t windscreen. There was a lot of water on the road, so she drove more slowly. Although Liz was an experienced driver, she felt afraid.

4 T h e l o r r y h i t the T V .

An hour later, fire f i g h t e r s cut Liz out of the car. She went to hospital, but the doctors sent her home because she didn't have any serious injuries. Her head was fine and she only had a few cuts and bruises. Her son went to collect the shopping f r o m the car and gave the loaf of bread to his mum. Now, she is going to keep it as a souvenir. H I One day last November, Liz Douglas decided to go shopping in Glasgow. She drove to the supermarket in the city centre and spent the morning doing her weekly shop. She paid f o r her shopping, went back to the car park, and put the shopping bags on the back seat of the car. Then she started to drive home. I I However, Liz was lucky. When she braked, a loaf of bread flew out of one of the shopping bags. The car t u r n e d over, and the loaf of bread landed between Liz's head and the roof of the car. It stopped her head from hitting the car roof. I I Suddenly, she lost control of the car. She saw a telegraph pole in f r o n t of her and braked. She closed her eyes and hoped that the airbags in the car would inflate. Unfortunately, they didn't.

b

L o o k at the h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s . W h a t d o y o u t h i n k t h e y mean? Check w i t h y o u r d i c t i o n a r y .

3 Joseph Rabadue was s i t t i n g o n the f l o o r w h e n the accident happened. 5 B a r r y M c R o y was d r i n k i n g coffee w h e n the f i g h t happened. 6 T h e D V D was i n his jacket pocket.

USEFUL WORDS AND

PHRASES

L e a r n these w o r d s a n d phrases. anniversary

/aem'v3:s3ri/

brake / b r e i k / perfect

p3:fikt/

as usual

az 'ju:3al/

cross the road H i g h Street

k r o s 5a r a o d /

/'hai stri:t/

happy e n d i n g

'tuepi 'endirj/

just i n t i m e /d3ASt i n ' t a i m / m a d l y i n love /'maedli i n Iav/ u n t i l the last m o m e n t

*5

SU

FILE 2

an'til Sa la:st 'maomant/


I'd like t o f l y . Then I w o u l d n ' t have t o w a i t in a i r p o r t s e c u r i t y lines.

I /

Jim Morris, American

baseball

player

Plans and dreams 1 GRAMMAR be going to (plans and predictions) a

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h going to + a v e r b f r o m t h e b o x . be

book

not fly

get

1 He's going to miss flight.

miss

the

need

not sleep

2 I online.

not stay

my flight

during

4 How

the f l i g h t .

to the airport?

5 T h a t plane today. b

i hotel.

C o m p l e t e the d i a l o g u e w i t h going to + the verbs. Jenny

Are you going to have

1

(you/have) a holiday

this summer? Philip Yes, b u t

(we / not / go) t o the

2

Mediterranean.

(we / go)

3

to Scotland! Jenny When" Philip In A u g u s t .

. (you / travel)? (we / be) there for

5

t w o weeks. Jenny W h a t

. (you / do) while you're

6

there? Philip

(we / stay) in Edinburgh for

7

a week, and t h e n

(we / rent)

8

a car and visit the Scottish Highlands. Jenny

(it / be) sunny in Scotland

9

2 VOCABULARY airports C o m p l e t e the text. Last summer, I flew to New York w i t h my boyfriend to visit some f r i e n d s . The flight l e f t f r o m terminal inside and looked for the upstairs to D

(it / not / rain) too much!

to take us We picked up our boarding

3

passes at the

ch

. Then we did some

shopping. After that, we made our way to the g 5

to board our plane. We had a good flight, but we were very tired when we landed at JFK A i r p o r t . There was a long queue at p _

and

6

they asked us a lot of questions at Immigration. Finally, 7

10

1, so

my brother d r o p p e d us outside the building. We went

we went to B

in August? Philip I don't know. But I h o p e

a trolley?

R

to pick up our bags. We needed a t r 8

this

time because of all our suitcases. Nobody stopped us at C 9

10

A

so we went straight to where our friends were waiting for us.


3 PRONUNCIATION sentence stress and fast speech ' 5 3 2 ^ 3 3 ) L i s t e n and repeat. C o p y the r h y t h m . 1 A r e they g o i n g to m e e t you at the a i r p o r t ? 2 I t h i n k were g o i n g to be l a t e . 3 I'm n o t g o i n g to f o r g e t my p a s s p o r t . 4 W h a t t i m e are you g o i n g to a r r i v e ? 5 She's g o i n g to t a k e the l i f t .

4 READING a

R e a d the t e x t . H o w m a n y a i r p o r t s is B e i j i n g g o i n g

The World's Biggest Airport

t o have i n 2 0 2 0 ? b

R e a d the text a g a i n . M a r k the sentences T (true) o r F (false). 1 M o r e t h a n 5 4 m i l l i o n people use A t l a n t a I n t e r n a t i o n a l A i r p o r t each year.

F_

2 A t l a n t a I n t e r n a t i o n a l isn't g o i n g t o be the busiest a i r p o r t i n 2 0 2 0 . 3 A new a i r p o r t was b u i l t f o r the 2 0 0 8 O l y m p i c Games. 4 B e i j i n g C a p i t a l A i r p o r t is t o o s m a l l . 5 I n the f u t u r e , Beijing's M e t r o is g o i n g to reach the new a i r p o r t . 6 T h e new a i r p o r t is g o i n g to have eight runways. c

L o o k at the h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s . W h a t d o y o u t h i n k they mean? Check w i t h y o u r dictionary.

5 LISTENING a

QC^tsŠ

L i s t e n t o f i v e c o n v e r s a t i o n s at t h e a i r p o r t .

M a t c h t h e speakers w i t h t h e places i n t h e b o x . Arrivals Customs Dialogue 1

Baggage reclaim Immigration

Check-in

Arrivals

Dialogue 2

The world's busiest a i r p o r t today is in the USA. Nearly 54 million passengers pass t h r o u g h Atlanta International Airport every year. However, by the end of the next decade there's going t o be a new airport even bigger and busier than Atlanta. The new airport is going to be in the capital of China: Beijing. Beijing already has t w o airports. The first is Beijing Capital, where an extra terminal was built for the 2008 Olympic Games. The second is Nanyuan Airport, which is mainly used by military planes .Just over 73 million passengers passed t h r o u g h Beijing Capital Airport last year, making it the second busiest after Atlanta. But the current airport is not big enough f o r all the Chinese passengers w h o want to travel by plane. This is why the government is going to build a new one. The new a i r p o r t is going to be in the suburb of Daxing, in the south of t h e city. Daxing is about an hour's drive f r o m the city centre. The government is going t o extend Beijing's M e t r o so t h a t passengers can reach it more easily. There are also plans for a high-speed train line. The airport is going t o have eight runways for commercial flights, and a ninth runway for military use. This is going t o make it the biggest and the busiest a i r p o r t in the world.

Dialogue 3 Dialogue 4 Dialogue 5 b

Listen again and answer the questions.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES

1 W h a t d i d the m a n eat o n the plane?

L e a r n these words and phrases.

2 W h a t ' s the Gate n u m b e r ? 3 W h a t ' s the friend's phone number? 4 W h a t c o l o u r is the suitcase? 5 W h a t d i d the w o m a n buy?

dreams /driimz/

b o a r d /bo:d/

facilities

delayed

fa'sitatiz/

/di'leid/

paradise /'paeradais/

free(Wi-fi) /fri/

passenger /'paesind3a/

connecting flight

security

/si'kjuarati/

traveller

/'trsevab/

/ka'nektirj f l a i t /


The f u t u r e belongs t o t h o s e w h o believe in t h e b e a u t y of t h e i r dreams. Eleanor

Roosevelt

at's meet again

hi

VV/I\VV

1 GRAMMAR present continuous (future arrangements) a

C o m p l e t e the t e x t w i t h t h e p r e s e n t c o n t i n u o u s f o r m o f t h e verbs i n b r a c k e t s . ' H i , I ' m Lisa, y o u r g u i d e , a n d I ' m g o i n g to t e l l y o u about the a r r a n g e m e n t s f o r your day t r i p to Paris. W e

1

're starting

(start) o u r t r i p i n about f i v e m i n u t e s , so

please make yourselves c o m f o r t a b l e . W e to Dover - w e

(drive) y o u s t r a i g h t

2

(not stop) f o r breakfast o n the way. W e

3

( g ) the 9.15 ferry, so we're i n a b i t of a h u r r y . W h e n

4

e t

we arrive i n France, w e We

(go) s t r a i g h t to Paris w i t h n o stops. (not take) y o u to the c i t y centre, because the t r a f f i c

6

is terrible. W e

(stop) i n Torcy, just outside Paris. W e

7

(arrive) i n Paris at about m i d d a y , so y o u have a l l

8

afternoon to go sightseeing and shop. W e

(pick) y o u u p f r o m

9

the station i n T o r c y at 5.30 i n the e v e n i n g . W e

(catch) the

10

ferry h o m e at 8.45, so please don't be late. N o w , any questions?'

b (Qircle)the c o r r e c t v e r b f o r m . I f b o t h f o r m s are possible, t i c k (â&#x20AC;˘) t h e sentence.

2 VOCABULARY verbs + prepositions C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t p r e p o s i t i o n s .

1

A Why are you looking so worried? B I'm s u r e ( f m g o i n g t o j j e p / I'm g e t t i n g lost.

2

4

3 I'm worried

B Yes, I'm going t o visit / I'm visiting my grandparents

4 They're w a i t i n g _ 6 I w a n t t o speak

B Really? Do you think it's going t o be / it's being cold?

7 Sarah's a r r i v i n g

B Oh. Do you think he's going t o g e t / he's g e t t i n g the job? 5

A What time's the train? B At 7.15. Don't worry. We aren't going t o miss / aren't missing it.

6

7

B r a z i l at 6 a.m. m y f l i g h t because it's s n o w i n g . A n n a . She's late. clothes. m y boss after l u n c h . the a i r p o r t t o n i g h t .

8 W h a t do y o u t h i n k

N u m b e r the dialogue i n the correct order. X

W o u l d y o u l i k e t o go away f o r the weekend? W h a t a b o u t n e x t weekend? W h a t are y o u d o i n g then?

A We're going on holiday next month.

A r e y o u free t h i s weekend? I love i t !

A How do you get to work? drive / I'm driving because the buses are on strike. A Your girlfriend drives too fast. B I know. I'm sure she's going t o have / she's having an accident one day.

the government's proposal?

PRONUNCIATION sounding friendly

B Are you? Where are you going t o go / are you going?

B I usually catch the bus, but tomorrow I'm going t o

8

you.

5 She spends a lot o f m o n e y

A I'm going to Poland next week.

A My brother has a job interview in London.

with

2 We're a r r i v i n g

A Do you have any plans for this weekend? on Sunday.

3

1 I completely agree

O K . Let's go t o D e v o n - t h e c o u n t r y s i d e is b e a u t i f u l ! S o r r y , n o . I ' m w o r k i n g o n Saturday. N o t h i n g . N e x t w e e k e n d is f i n e . I'd love t o . Great. D o you like walking? L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat t h e sentences. C o p y t h e r h y t h m .


4 READING a

R e a d t h e a d v e r t f o r a h o l i d a y . H o w m a n y n i g h t s does t h e t o u r last?

Tour of the Magic Triangle: Prague - Vienna - Budapest Visit these three beautiful capital cities and discover their historic monuments and lively atmosphere. Enjoy three wonderful cultural performances and return with unforgettable memories. P r a g i The tour starts in Prague, capital of the Czech Republic. A free bus takes you from the airport to your hotel, where you spend three nights. The price includes a tour of the city, a cruise on the Vltava River, a visit to a spa resort, and a performance at the Laterna Magika theatre. From Prague you travel first class by train to your next destination: Vienna.

Vienna

The Austrian capital has many spectacular monuments, which you can visit with the free 72-hour travel card which you receive when you arrive in Vienna. The price also includes a tour of the city, Viennese coffee and cakes at the famous Hotel Sacher, and a performance at the opera. After your three nights in Vienna you travel first class by train to your final destination: Budapest.

Budapest O

You spend your last three nights in Budapest, the capital city of Hungary, where there are plenty of places to explore. The city is divided into two parts: the old historic city of Buda on the hill, and the commercial city of Pest on the other side of the River Danube. The price includes a tour of the city with a visit to the Parliament building, a typical Hungarian dinner, a performance of classical music, and the return journey from your hotel to the airport.

At only â&#x201A;Ź1599, this is an opportunity you cannot afford t o miss!

R e a d t h e a d v e r t a g a i n . A n s w e r the questions w i t h P (Prague), V ( V i e n n a ) , or B (Budapest).

5 LISTENING a

I n t e r r a i l i n g h o l i d a y . W h i c h c o u n t r i e s is D a w n v i s i t i n g ?

I n w h i c h c i t y do c u s t o m e r s . . . ? 1 travel free o n p u b l i c t r a n s p o r t

0 5 3 ^ 2 3 ) L i s t e n t o t w o p e o p l e , C h r i s a n d D a w n , t a l k i n g a b o u t an

V_

2 have a t r a d i t i o n a l evening meal 3 go o n a boat t r i p

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c o r r e c t t h e sentences. 1 D a w n is going I n t e r r a i l i n g o n h e r o w n .

4 listen to a concert

with a friend

5 have a d r i n k a n d sweet snack

2 C h r i s went I n t e r r a i l i n g w h e n he was a c h i l d .

6 go t o a place t o relax

3 D a w n is going I n t e r r a i l i n g f o r a m o n t h .

Underline five words you don't know.

4 D a w n ' s first stop i n Italy is M i l a n .

Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y t o l o o k up t h e i r

5 D a w n wants to visit the E i f f e l T o w e r i n Paris.

meaning and pronunciation.

6 D a w n is spending most nights o n the t r a i n .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. (travel) arrangements /a'reinc^msnts/ conference /'kDiifarans/

still

/stil/

b o t h o f us /'baoG av as/ I'd love t o

/'aid T.w t u : /

news /nju:z/

forages

fix

H o w are things?

/fiks/

perhaps /pa hasps/ 1

/fb(r) 'eicbjiz/

/ h a o a 'Ginz/


W h a t is a rebel? A man w h o says no. Albert

Camus,

French

writer

hat's the word? 1 GRAMMAR defining relative clauses a

2 VOCABULARY expressions for paraphrasing: like, for example, etc.

M a t c h the b e g i n n i n g s a n d ends o f t h e sentences. 1 That's the hotel

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences f o r e x p l a i n i n g w o r d s .

ffl

2 I need a phone

1

mean

It's the opposite

cardigan

It's a k

o f generous.

3 M y m u m is the o n l y p e r s o n

2

4 I love the p i c t u r e

3

hire

It's s

t o rent.

4

slim

It's 1

thin, b u t it's m o r e p o l i t e ,

5

souvenir

It's s

y o u buy t o r e m i n d y o u o f

5 T h a t bus is the one

6 Benicassim is the Spanish t o w n 7 D a v i d H o c k n e y is the a r t i s t

o f jumper.

y o u r holiday.

8 That's the restaurant a w h i c h has a g o o d camera.

6

sunbathe

For e

7

pilot

It's s

, y o u do t h i s o n the beach. . w h o flies a plane.

8

campsite

It's s

. y o u can sleep i n tents.

b w h i c h m y b r o t h e r takes t o w o r k . c w h i c h serves fresh f i s h .

3 PRONUNCIATION pronunciation in

d w h o remembers m y b i r t h d a y . e w h o p a i n t e d Mr & Mrs f

a dictionary

Clarke.

where we spent o u r h o n e y m o o n .

a

g where they have a f a m o u s music festival.

dictionary.

h w h i c h is o n the w a l l o f y o u r r o o m . b

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h who, which, o r 1 D o y o u k n o w the m a n

who

2 That's the gallery

where.

lives next door? had the L e o n a r d o

da V i n c i e x h i b i t i o n . 3 A r e those the people

are selling

t h e i r house?

goes to the a i r p o r t ?

6 We w a l k e d past the school c h i l d r e n go.

their

8 I t o o k m y laptop back to the shop I bought it. 10 Is there someone y o u r class?

a

quite

— — —

can speak A r a b i c i n

b /hait/ a /J>:t/

b /Jb:ts/ a /'klaodi/

8 crowded cloudy

b /'sAiibeio/ a /weit/

6 height

shorts

b /suit/ a /'saitsi:/

7 shirt I l i v e d as a c h i l d .

b /sDks/ a /swi:t/

5 sightsee

weight

b /'kwarat/ a /Ju:z/

3 shoes

sweet

b /brad/ a /kwait/

2 quiet

sunbathe everyone is

t a l k i n g about.

9 A n t w e r p is the c i t y

a /baddy

beard bald

4 suit

is open o n Sunday night?

7 She's the w o m a n

1

socks

4 D o y o u k n o w a g o o d restaurant 5 Is that the bus

M a t c h the w o r d s w i t h t h e i r p r o n u n c i a t i o n . Use y o u r

b /'kraodid/

tHiTtreflfr L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i the w o r d s .


4 READING a

R e a d the d e f i n i t i o n s a n d c o m p l e t e t h e m w i t h these w o r d s . agritourism

chick lit

E-waste

fashionista

netiquette

sandwich generation

staycation

web rage

More new words i n English 1

Web rage

is the angry feeling you get because of

5

a problem with the internet. 2 A

The

is a group of people who look

after their parents at the same time as they're looking after their children.

is a person who always wears

the latest styles.

is a kind of holiday where people stay on farms and help with all the work.

is a kind of book which tells a story from a woman's point of view.

7

is all the electrical machines and devices which people throw away.

b

is a set of rules which explains how to be polite on the internet.

8 A

U n d e r l i n e five m o r e w o r d s y o u don't k n o w . Use y o u r dictionary to look up their meaning and pronunciation.

USEFUL WORDS AND

b

barista

" 2 ) L i s t e n t o a r a d i o p r o g r a m m e a b o u t t h e w o r d game Scrabble.

H o w m a n y d i f f e r e n t n a m e s has t h e g a m e had?

had a b o a r d and letter tiles.

3 B u t t s used a newspaper to c o u n t the frequency o f the letters i n E n g l i s h . 4 B u t t s gave the letters A , E , I , O , a n d U one p o i n t each.

latte /'laitei/ google

1 A l f r e d M o s h e r B u t t s was o u t o f w o r k w h e n he i n v e n t e d the game.

/ba'nsta/

gastropub /'gaestraupAb/ smartphone

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false).

2 T h e game o f Lexico

T_

text

/'smcctfaun/

/'gu:gl/

/tekst/

tweet / t w i i t / update

vpdeit/

r o a d rage /raud reid^/ toy b o y /'toiboi/

5 Butts gave 12 p o i n t s t o the m o s t d i f f i c u l t letters t o use. 6 Scrabble became p o p u l a r i n 1948. 7 Butts and B r u n o t sold the game to another manufacturer. 8 Y o u can buy Scrabble i n m o r e t h a n a h u n d r e d different countries.

PHRASES

L e a r n these words a n d phrases.

5 LISTENING a

is a holiday which you spend at home.

10*0

FILES


Restaurant problems VOCABULARY

4 READING

C o m p l e t e the sentences. 1 Can we have a table

a

. f o r t w o , please?

2 What's o n t h e m

1 H o w many restaurants are there i n new York? Over

today? is chicken soup or t o m a t o salad.

3 The st

4 I'll have the steak for m y m for another bottle o f water.

5 Let's ask the w 6 I don't w a n t a d

_, b u t I'd like a coffee. , please?

7 Can we have the b

Are you ready t o order?

B A B A

Still. Still or sparkling? Yes, please. And how would you like your steak? Rare, medium or well done? A baked potato, please. Can I get you something t o s t a r t with? Rare, please. Here's your steak, madam. Water, please. Would you like t h a t w i t h fries or with a baked potato? I'm sorry but I asked for my steak rare and this is well done. OK. And t o drink? No, thank you. Just a main course. I'd like the steak, please. I'm very sorry, madam. I'll take it back t o the kitchen. 15

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH any suggestions be great tell me t o go we have

my day

, Adam, what are your plans? , I'd like t o see the world.

A I'd like t o go sightseeing this afternoon. Do you have ? B How about going t o Central Park? I could take you. A That would

.

A Could the check, please? B Yes of course. Here you are. A Excuse me. I think there's B Oh, sorry. It's n o t . A It's very late. B Yes. Time

4 W h e r e is La Paella?

8 W h a t k i n d o f f o o d can y o u eat at A q u a v i t ?

E a t i n g o u t in

NY

New York City has over 20,000 restaurants serving all kinds of f o o d . However, eating out in the Big Apple can be very expensive. Here are some tips on how to save money during your stay.

Early Bird Menus These are meals served in some New York restaurants between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m., when they would normally be empty. If you don't mind having dinner early, you can enjoy a three-course meal for between $13 and $25 Cucina d i Pesce (87 E.4th St) serves great Italian food on its $12.95 Early Bird menu. If you prefer something Spanish, you can t r y the $16.99 Early Bird menu at La Paella (214 E.9th St).

Pre-Theatre Dinner Menus

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h t h e w o r d s i n the b o x .

tell me A So, B Well, to

3 H o w m u c h is the E a r l y B i r d m e n u at C u c i n a d i Pesce?

7 W h e n is i t cheapest t o eat i n a f o u r - s t a r restaurant?

A

1

2 W h a t t i m e d o restaurants serve Early B i r d menus?

6 H o w m u c h do they cost?

O r d e r the d i a l o g u e .

a mistake start with

20.000

5 W h i c h restaurants serve a Pre-Theatre D i n n e r M e n u ?

2 AT THE RESTAURANT

B A B A B A B A B A

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a n d a n s w e r the q u e s t i o n s .

.

These are similar to Early Bird Menus, but they are served in the Theatre District. Most of the restaurants here offer a set menu at a fixed price ranging from $30 to $45. The offer s only available before the show, and it starts at 5 p.m.

Four-Star Restaurants These are all very expensive at dinnertime, so why not have lunch there instead? That way you can get dinner guality food at lunchtime menu prices. Aquavit (65 E.55th St) serves fantastic Scandinavian food on a great lunch menu and Jean Georges (1 Central Park West) offers an excellent two-course lunch for only $28.

. today. b U n d e r l i n e five w o r d s o r phrases y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r dictionary to look up their m e a n i n g and pronunciation.


Few t h i n g s are more s a t i s f y i n g t h a n seeing your children have t e e n a g e r s o f their o w n . Doug Larson, American

journalist

rents and teenagers b

1 VOCABULARY housework, make or do? a

C o m p l e t e t h e e x p r e s s i o n s w i t h these v e r b s . clean

do

lay

make

pick up

i

pick up

put away

tidy

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences f o r each p i c t u r e . Use just + p r e s e n t p e r f e c t a n d a v e r b f r o m the l i s t .

take o u t

d i r t y clothes

2

the beds, l u n c h

3

y o u r r o o m , y o u r desk

4

the table f o r d i n n e r

5

the f l o o r , the b a t h r o o m

6

the r u b b i s h , the newspapers

7

the i r o n i n g , the w a s h i n g up the clothes o n y o u r bed

b

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h do o r 1 H e never forgets t o

do

2 I t r y n o t to

a noise w h e n I get u p early.

miss

done

fall

the w a s h i n g u p . _ o f f his b i k e . the c h a m p i o n s h i p .

4 'I

. the f l o o r . '

5 He

_ t h e table.

6 'Sorry. You

h o u s e w o r k o n Saturday m o r n i n g .

dinner.'

friends easily w h e n they go to school.

7 W h e n do y o u have t i m e to 8 S o r r y , I need to

win

3 They

lunch.

a course i n Portuguese before I go

6 Some c h i l d r e n

lay

2 He

to B r a z i l . 5 W e always

de

1 She's just

his h o m e w o r k after school.

3 M y husband doesn't o f t e n 4 I'm going to

clean

make.

3 PRONUNCIATION ,, /dy

sport? a phone c a l l .

a

W r i t e a w o r d c o n t a i n i n g the sound i n the pictures.

2 GRAMMAR present perfect + yet, just, already a

A d d already orjyet t o these sentences i n t h e c o r r e c t place. 1 a p e r s o n at u n i v e r s i t y

1 I've done the w a s h i n g . I've already done the washing

2 the opposite o f old

.

3 twelve months

2 Have y o u made any plans f o r the weekend?

4 a colour 5 special clothes f o r school

?

d3

3 We haven't f i n i s h e d l u n c h .

6 a k i n d o f short coat

4 D a n i e l has t i d i e d his r o o m .

7 a person b e t w e e n 13 and 19 years o l d

5 I've done the i r o n i n g .

8 s o m e t h i n g t h a t crosses a river 9 another w o r d f o r sweater

6 Have y o u been t o the supermarket? 7 I haven't cleaned the b a t h r o o m .

10 get pleasure f r o m s o m e t h i n g b

<JHiT^!ffc L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n again a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .

tea

8 E d w a r d has taken o u t the r u b b i s h .

student


4 READING a

b

R e a d t h e t e x t . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1 M e n and w o m e n d o n ' t always agree

Read the t e x t . W h i c h is the best title?

about h o u s e w o r k .

1 Having a cleaner house

JT

2 A d u l t s and teenagers t o o k p a r t i n the study.

2 E q u a l i t y i n the h o m e

3 T h e p a r t i c i p a n t s had t o w r i t e d o w n the t i m e they spent o n h o u s e w o r k .

3 Improving your relationship

4 T h e t i m e people spend d o i n g h o u s e w o r k has changed since the 1960s. 5 Today, w o m e n do m o r e h o u s e w o r k t h a n they d i d i n the 1960s.

_

6 I n general, people t h i n k it's n o r m a l f o r w o m e n to l o o k after the f a m i l y car. 7 F o r t y years f r o m n o w , m e n and w o m e n w i l l share the h o u s e w o r k . c

L o o k at t h e h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s . W h a t d o y o u t h i n k they mean? Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to look up their m e a n i n g and pronunciation.

Men and women all over the world have arguments about doing the housework, and it's usually the women who lose. However, a recent study by researchers at Oxford University shows that the situation is slowly improving. The researchers asked men and w o m e n aged between

5 a

LISTENING < ( 2 2 ^ 2 3 ) L i s t e n t o f i v e teenagers t a l k i n g a b o u t h o u s e w o r k . W h i c h speaker does the m o s t h o u s e w o r k ?

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a t c h t h e speakers w i t h w h a t t h e y say about housework. Speaker 1

J3

A W e a l l share i t .

Speaker 2

D M y m u m does i t a l l .

on housework each day. Then t h e researchers collected

Speaker 3

C W e pay someone t o do i t .

the diaries and analyzed t h e m .

Speaker 4

D There's one t h i n g I like d o i n g .

Speaker 5

E I do a l i t t l e every day.

20 and 59 t o keep a diary o f how much time they spent

These showed t h a t w o m e n in t h e UK today spend about four hours and 40 minutes each day doing housework. Men, on the other hand, spend t w o hours and 28 minutes doing the same things. Although w o m e n still spend more time doing domestic jobs, the figures show that the situation has improved. In the 1960s, w o m e n spent six hours a day on housework and men only 90 minutes. Researchers say t h a t w o m e n are still doing most of t h e housework because people still divide domestic jobs into t w o areas. They see cooking, cleaning, and looking

U S E F U L WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. carer

/'keara/

plate / p l e i t / reputation /repju'teifn/ teenager /'ti:neid33/

after children as 'women's work', and general repairs,

w a r d r o b e /"waidraub/

car maintenance, and work outside t h e home as

dry (your hair)

'men's work'.

k n o c k (on the d o o r ) / n o k /

So, in general, the results of the study bring good news

carry on (texting)

/drai/ k;eri d i i /

for w o m e n . The difference between t h e a m o u n t of time

s w i t c h o f f ( y o u r m o b i l e ) / s w i t j Df/

men and women spend on housework is g e t t i n g smaller

T V channel

t i : v i : 'tjaenl/

every year. This means that the time will come w h e n both sexes share domestic chores equally. However, w o m e n will have to be extremely patient, because t h e change won't be complete for another four decades!

25


I d o n ' t design c l o t h e s , I design dreams. Ralph Lauren,

m

American

fashion

designer

â&#x20AC;˘

ashion and shopping 1 VOCABULARY shopping a

b

Complete the text.

C o m p l e t e the crossword.

SHOPPING IN A

C c

SHOP OR STORE

O u

I usually go shopping in my lunch break, so I don't have time t o tr%

N

on clothes.

l

There's always a long queue f o r the 2

ch

r

, so I j u s t take

them straight t o the c h

t o pay.

3

I keep the r

so I can change

4

them if they don't s_

me.

5

Sometimes I get the w r o n g and the clothes don't f 7

8

t

T

things b

but t h e s h â&#x20AC;&#x17E; 9

6

s_ often to shops. don't

seem t o mind at all.

Shopping online Clues d o w n

^

1 W h e n y o u shop o n l i n e , y o u n o r m a l l y have t o create a n account w h i c h has y o u r p e r s o n a l details. 2 S o m e t h i n g y o u w a n t to buy is called an i t

.

5 eBay is an o n l i n e au site, w h i c h sells t h i n g s to the person w h o offers the most money. 7 A m a z o n is a p o p u l a r w

where y o u can buy t h i n g s

such as b o o k s , c o m p u t e r s , and clothes. Clues across 3 W h e n y o u f i n d s o m e t h i n g y o u w a n t t o b u y o n a website, y o u put it i n y o u r s h o p p i n g b . 4 Y o u can m a k e a p

i n d i f f e r e n t ways, e.g. using y o u r

credit card o r Paypal. 6 W h e n y o u are ready to buy s o m e t h i n g , y o u go to the ch . 8 Y o u have t o enter y o u r d y o u r t h i n g s to the correct place.

address so they can send


2 GRAMMAR present perfect or past simple?

3 PRONUNCIATION c and ch

a

a

W r i t e sentences a n d q u e s t i o n s w i t h t h e p r e s e n t p e r f e c t . Use c o n t r a c t i o n s w h e r e p o s s i b l e .

^22-^33) Listen and t^irde)the w o r d w i t h a different sound.

1 she / buy / a new jacket 1+1 She's bought a new jacket. 2 I / b r i n g / m y / c r e d i t card 0

customer

account (choose)

2

click

3

clothes

city

centre

4

receive

card

cinema

key

f

3 A n n a / go s h o p p i n g \jj

proceed

chemist's

key

4 your sister / ever w o r k / as a m o d e l LZ] ? 5 you / wear / y o u r n e w s h i r t

1

0

snake

6 I / ever t e l l you/ about m y holiday i n Greece \J\

g>

p

snake

7 the s h o p p i n g centre / never be / so c r o w d e d EE] b

L i s t e n again and repeat the w o r d s .

8 I / never use / eBay EB

4 LISTENING b

C o m p l e t e the d i a l o g u e s . U s e t h e present p e r f e c t o r past s i m p l e . 1

Have you ever bought

A

(you / ever / buy) any clothes

on the internet? have

A What

did you buy

2

bought

. (buy) a dress for a wedding, but it didn't fit! . (you / ever / sell) anything

A B Yes, I A What

. (you / sell)? . (not want) them any more.

B 5cne 2Ds.

2 H o w m u c h d i d the s h o p p i n g centre cost? 3 H o w m a n y d e p a r t m e n t stores a n d shops are there? 4 H o w m a n y cafes and restaurants are there? 5 H o w m a n y people w o r k at Westfield?

(you / ever / wear) any

A expensive jewellery? B No, I

4

Listen again and answer the questions. Sixyears

(you / buy)?

on eBay?

3

b

L i s t e n t o a n e w s s t o r y . W h a t is W e s t f i e l d ?

1 H o w l o n g has i t t a k e n t o b u i l d Westfield?

B Yes, I B I

a

6 H o w can y o u get t o Westfield?

. (you / ever / lose) your

A wallet? B Yes, I _

(leave) it in a

. I

7 W h a t d i d the r e p o r t e r w a n t t o buy? 8 W h y d i d n ' t the r e p o r t e r b u y the t h i n g she liked?

trolley at the supermarket. 5

, (you / ever / have) an

A

argument with a shop assistant? B Yes, I receipt, so I

.I

(not have) the . (not can) change some boots.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. bride

/braid/

/'fsej'n dizama/

bridegroom /'braidgruim/ leather /'leda/

h i g h heels / ' h a i h i : l z / w e d d i n g dress /'wedirj dres/

sew /sau/ bare feet /bea f i : t / fancy dress

f a s h i o n designer

/faensi 'dres/

take o f f ( y o u r shoes) /teik Df/


There aren't e n o u g h days in t h e weekend. Rod Schmidt,

American

writer

weekend 1 GRAMMAR something, anything, nothing, etc.

2 VOCABULARY adjectives ending-ed and -ing

Qirclg)the correct w o r d . 1 W e d i d n ' t do ( a n y t h i n g

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h an adjective e n d i n g -ed

n o t h i n g special last w e e k e n d .

o r -ing.

2 D o y o u k n o w a n y t h i n g / a n y o n e about the m e e t i n g today? 3 T h e r e isn't a n y w h e r e / n o w h e r e t o go i n the evenings.

1 I ' m r e a d i n g a really interesting

4 H e c o u l d n ' t f i n d his keys n o w h e r e / a n y w h e r e .

2 G o i n g t o a spa f o r the weekend is so r

book.

5 W e d i d n ' t k n o w s o m e o n e / a n y o n e at the p a r t y .

3 T h i s f i l m is really b

6 D a n i e l has s o m e t h i n g / a n y t h i n g t o tell y o u .

4 Helen's very d

7 I p h o n e d t w i c e , b u t a n y b o d y / n o b o d y answered.

5 M y c o u s i n is very i n

8 We need t o f i n d s o m e w h e r e / a n y w h e r e t o stay i n D u b l i n .

6 Congratulations! That's really ex

. T u r n the T V off. . She's just lost her job. i n archaeology. news.

9 L i s t e n ! I t h i n k s o m e b o d y / a n y b o d y is upstairs.

7 T h e news at the m o m e n t is a l l very d

L o o k at the p i c t u r e . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false).

8 We always feel v e r y r

1 T h e r e isn't a n y w h e r e t o sit.

9 M u m , I'm b

_E_

5 Someone is p l a y i n g w i t h the dog. 6 T h e m a n c o o k i n g doesn't have a n y t h i n g o n his head.

! I have n o t h i n g t o d o ! t o see us when

we came h o m e .

3 N o b o d y is d a n c i n g . 4 There's n o t h i n g o n the g r o u n d .

.

o n holiday.

10 The dogs were very ex

2 T h e m a n o n the r i g h t is e a t i n g s o m e t h i n g .

.

3 PRONUNCIATION a

7 T h e r e isn't a n y b o d y i n the s w i m m i n g p o o l .

ffiffoiiflfr

ld,lwljsl

L i s t e n a n d w r i t e t h e w o r d s i n the c h a r t .

anything clever clothes coat customer don't dress friendly funny gloves goes home lunch nothing photos something sweater website

3 . egg clever

b

phone clothes

up customer

L i s t e n a n d c h e c k . T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat the w o r d s .


4 READING a

b

C o m p l e t e the text w i t h the a c t i v i t i e s . Bake a loaf of bread Play board games Listen to some podcasts Startablog Learn how to juggle Take some photos Meet your neighbours Tidy your wardrobe Organize your shelves Visit a library

Ten things to do during a money-free weeke

Underline five w o r d s y o u don't k n o w . Use your dictionary to look up their meaning and pronunciation.

5 a

LISTENING t f d f c > : f l V L i s t e n t o four p e o p l e t a l k i n g a b o u t t h e i r w e e k e n d s . W h e r e d i d t h e y go? Speaker 1 Speaker 2 Speaker 3 Speaker 4

b

L i s t e n a g a i n . W h i c h speaker...? 1 cooked a meal 2 played w i t h c h i l d r e n 3 went to a different country 4 saw some i n t e r e s t i n g e x h i b i t i o n s 5 had a n a r g u m e n t 6 w o k e up early 7 had bad weather 8 gave someone a surprise

The weekend is the time when most people spend the most money. Here are some activities you can do if you want to save money.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. survey

/'s3:vei/

encourage / i n ' k A n d 3 / impress invent

im'pres/ in'vent/

lie (about sth) / l a i /

1

Vt5tt a library It doesn't cost anything t o b o r r o w a book and there may be some DVDs you want t o watch.

lie d o w n / l a i ' d a o n /

2

Throw away any clothes you never wear, or give them t o a charity.

press (the b u t t o n )

3

Many websites have interesting interviews you can listen t o f o r free.

l i f t b u t t o n / ' l i f t b/\tn/

4

This is a great way of spending time with the whole family.

5

You probably have the ingredients in a cupboard - the result is delicious!

6

All you need is three balls and a video showing you how t o do i t .

7

Invite them over for a coffee and a chat and get to know them better.

8

Decide which books, CDs and DVDs you want to keep and get rid of the rest.

9

Go for a walk with your digital camera. You'll be surprised at how beautiful your city is.

10

Not only is it f u n , but w r i t i n g improves your communication skills.

do p a p e r w o r k Ids 'peipaw3:k/ tell the t r u t h

fflff^S)

fll^

/pres/

tel 6a ' t r u : 6 /

FILE 4


Time is t h e coin o f your life. Only you can decide how t o spend i t . Don't l e t o t h e r people spend i t for you. Carl Sandburg,

GRAMMAR comparative adjectives and

2 VOCABULARY time expressions

adverbs, as...as...

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h these w o r d s .

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t c o m p a r a t i v e f o r m

in

o f t h e adjective / a d v e r b . more patient

2 P o l l u t i o n is

1

t h a n the o l d one. (patient)

i n cities t h a n it is i n the c o u n t r y .

3 W e aren't i n a h u r r y . Y o u can d r i v e

4

_ next t i m e , ( h a r d )

10

than Manchester airport.

H e a t h r o w a i r p o r t is

R e w r i t e t h e sentences u s i n g

time doing things you t i m e i f we go o n the

6 M y g i r l f r i e n d gets very stressed w h e n she's a hurry.

3 PRONUNCIATION word stress a

U n d e r l i n e the stressed syllable i n these w o r d s . 1 faster

as,..as.

2 centre

1 T h i s car goes faster t h a n t h a t one.

3 pa rents

T h a t car doesn't go as fast as this one

4 a|g° 5 children

2 H e r shoes were m o r e s t y l i s h t h a n her handbag. H e r handbag wasn't

6 patient

3 M y boss's office is bigger t h a n m i n e . 4

Don't

t h a n the A m e r i c a n diet.

(busy)

7 problem

M y office isn't

8 communication

Spain played better t h a n the N e t h e r l a n d s .

9 traditional

The Netherlands didn't 5 I d r i v e m o r e carefully t h a n y o u . You don't 6 Laptops are m o r e expensive t h a n m o b i l e phones. M o b i l e phones aren't

b

Sally doesn't 8 H i s s h i r t was d i r t i e r t h a n his trousers.

10

around

11

seconds

12

better

N o w (circle) t h e hi s o u n d . 1

7 H a r r y looks m o r e relaxed t h a n Sally.

H i s trousers weren't

t i m e . M y dad

m o t o r w a y . There's m u c h less t r a f f i c .

t h a n me. (good)

t h a n a car. (dangerous)

about

more time

5 We'll

7 You can make the d i n n e r t o n i g h t . Y o u c o o k

(healthy)

take

d o n ' t enjoy.

t o m y parents' house t h a n it is t o m y

A m o t o r b i k e is

T h e f l i g h t to B e i j i n g is g o i n g to

waste

is m e e t i n g me at the a i r p o r t .

boyfriend's, (far)

9

take

3 I hope we arrive

the past, (hot)

8 T h e Japanese diet is

spend

studying.

. (slowly)

5 I failed the test. I ' l l w o r k

save

2 She needs t o

t h a n they were i n

4 T h e s u m m e r s here are

on

11 h o u r s .

(bad)

6 It's

poet

time for anything

mm

1 M y new boss is

American

c

fast(er) ffinjHJSBji

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n again

and repeat the w o r d s .


4 READING a

b

M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1 T h e f i s h e r m a n needed to catch m o r e f i s h .

Read the story.

_F_

2 T h e A m e r i c a n t h o u g h t he was very busy. 3 T h e A m e r i c a n w a n t e d h i m to w o r k harder. 4 H e t o l d the f i s h e r m a n to buy m o r e boats. 5 T h e A m e r i c a n said t h a t he c o u l d n ' t live in New York. 6 T h e A m e r i c a n p r o m i s e d the f i s h e r m a n a l o t o f money.

5 LISTENING a

ffllfocflit

L i s t e n t o f i v e speakers t a l k a b o u t

h o w t h e i r lives have c h a n g e d . W h o . . . ? 1 has just started w o r k i n g f r o m h o m e 2 has h a d a baby 3 has lost his / her j o b 4 has m o v e d t o a d i f f e r e n t c o u n t r y

The fisherman and the banker

A n American banker was on holiday abroad. H e was w a l k i n g o n a beautiful beach near a small village. H e saw a fisherman i n his boat w i t h a few fish i n i t . 'Great fish!' he said. ' H o w long d i d it take you to catch them?' ' N o t very long,' answered the fisherman. 'Why didn't you stay at sea longer to catch some more?' asked the banker. 'There are just enough fish here to feed my family,' answered the fisherman. Then the American asked, 'But what do you do the rest of the time?' ' I sleep late, I fish a little, I play w i t h my kids, and 1 relax. I n the evening, I go to see my friends in the village. We d r i n k wine and play the guitar. I ' m busier than you t h i n k . Life here isn't as...' T h e American interrupted h i m . ' I have an M B A f r o m H a r v a r d University and I can help y o u . You're not fishing as much as you can. I f you start fishing for longer periods of t i m e , you'll get enough money f r o m selling the fish to buy a bigger boat. T h e n w i t h the money you'll get f r o m catching and selling more fish, you could buy a second boat, and then a t h i r d one, and so o n . T h e n instead of selling your fish to shops, you could sell them directly to a fish factory, or even open your o w n factory. T h e n you'll be able to leave your little village for the city, and finally move to N e w Y o r k , where you could direct the company.' ' H o w long w i l l that take?' asked the fisherman. 'About 15 to 20 years,' answered the banker. 'And then?' ' T h e n it gets more interesting,' said the A m e r i c a n , smiling and talking more quickly. ' W h e n the moment comes, you can p u t your company on the stock market and you w i l l make millions.' 'Millions? But then what?' ' T h e n you can retire, live i n a small village by the sea, go to the beach, sleep late, play w i t h your k i d s . . . ' 5

_J_

5 has r e t i r e d b

L i s t e n a g a i n . W h i c h t w o p e o p l e are happiest a b o u t t h e changes?

Who

is the least happy?

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. abbreviations /abriivi'eijhz/ characters

/kaeraktaz/

nowadays

/'naosdeiz/

s t o r y /'sto:ri/ irritable

/'iritabl/

patient (opp impatient) queue

/kju:/

stressed

/strest/

stressful /'stresfl/ t i p s /tips/

/'peifnt/


A g r e a t c i t y is t h a t w h i c h has t h e g r e a t e s t men and w o m e n . Walt Whitman,

American

poet

Superlative cities 1 GRAMMAR superlatives

c

1 H e / rude w a i t e r / 1 / meet

(+ ever+ present perfect) a

He's the rudest waiter I've ever met

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e

2 T h a t / fast car / 1 / d r i v e

superlative o f an adjective f r o m the box. bad safe

exciting far ugly wet

friendly

3 I t / b e a u t i f u l b u i l d i n g / we / see

good

4 T h a t / healthy m e a l / he / eat

1 T h e t r a f f i c is a w f u l i n the t o w n centre. The

best

W r i t e sentences w i t h ever.

w a y t o travel a r o u n d is by 5 I t / g o o d p h o t o g r a p h / y o u / take

underground. 2 I t rains a l o t here i n the S p r i n g . T h e m o n t h is A p r i l . 3 The

6 T h i s / e x c i t i n g s p o r t / 1 / do

I've ever d r i v e n is

f r o m L o n d o n to E d i n b u r g h . I t t o o k me

7 T h a t / bad f l i g h t / we / have

eight h o u r s . 4 I t was the

h o t e l I've ever

8 T h i s / interesting city / 1 / visit

stayed i n . T h e service was a w f u l , so w e o n l y spent one n i g h t there. 5 The

b u i l d i n g s are i n the

n e w t o w n . T h e y really aren't nice t o l o o k at. 6 T h e streets are very dangerous at night. The

2 VOCABULARY describing a town or city a

C o m p l e t e the description o f Llandudno.

place to be

is i n the h o t e l . 7 The

part of our tour

was i n R i o de Janeiro. W e saw the f i r s t day o f the c a r n i v a l . 8 The

c i t y I've ever v i s i t e d

is Vancouver. I f o u n d the people v e r y helpful. b

(Circle) the c o r r e c t w o r d o r p h r a s e . 1 T h a t h o t e l has the d i r t i e r /(dirtiest) r o o m s I have ever seen. 2 It's the m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g / m o r e interesting museum in Edinburgh. 3 T h i s is the m o r e e x p e n s i v e / m o s t e x p e n s i v e souvenir I've ever b o u g h t . 4 T h a t restaurant serves the b e t t e r / b e s t pasta we've ever eaten. 5 T h e s u m m e r is the b u s y e s t / b u s i e s t t i m e o f year.

(pa

Llandudno is a town in the north

of Wales on the c

1

2

the Irish Sea. It is about 35 miles w

of

of Liverpool. It has a

3

of about 21,000, and i s L 5

as a seaside resort.


b

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h the o p p o s i t e o f the adjectives i n brackets.

4 LISTENING CES^S) L i s t e n a

1 Some o f the b u i l d i n g s i n the centre are quite modern, (old)

to a radio travel

p r o g r a m m e a b o u t the R e p u b l i c o f C r o a t i a . T i c k ( / ) t h e places t h a t

2 Los Angeles is a very p

city-

there are so m a n y cars, (clean)

are m e n t i o n e d i n the p r o g r a m m e . 1 Split

3 N e w Y o r k is a very s

city

these days, (dangerous)

4

0

2 Dubrovnik 3 Rijeka

I

I

Zagreb

5 Trogir

6 the islands

4 M u m b a i is an extremely n city, (quiet)

pla

5 Where's the m o s t b

you've ever been to? (interesting) 6 T h e subway i n T o k y o is v e r y c c

. (empty)

Orcle)the different word. 1

cathedral

church

(^Hoppin g; centrg>

2

mosque

temple

t o w n hall

3

market

castle

department store

4

statue

palace

museum '•7~]APR0LIN11A

3 PRONUNCIATION word stress a

ffififo<ffll

L i s t e n a n d u n d e r l i n e the

stressed syllable. 1

beautiful

1 Z a g r e b is an o l d city.

2 crowded

2 5 0 , 0 0 0 people live i n D u b r o v n i k .

3

dangerous

3 T h e palace is outside the city.

4

exciting

4 Y o u can get a f e r r y t o v i s i t the islands.

5 frightening 6

generous

7

interesting

8 polluted 9 b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d a n s w e r T ( t r u e ) o r F (false).

romantic

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .

5 T h e best t i m e to v i s i t is July and A u g u s t .

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases. architecture culture

/d:kitektja/

/'kAltfa/

inhabitants

in'haebitants/

w i t h o u t /wi'daot/ n i g h t l i f e /"naitlaif/ several

/'sevral/

f o r e i g n /'frjran/ romantic

/rau'mffintik/

rude / r u : d / pretend (to d o sth) / p n ' t e n d /

33


I've been on a d i e t for t w o weeks and a l l I've l o s t is f o u r t e e n days. Totie Fields, American

actress

ow much is too much? VOCABULARY health and t h e body

b (^ircie) the correct phrase. 1 I can't go t o the p a r t y . I'm(too)/ too m u c h i l l .

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h these w o r d s . anxious 1 I'm

bones anxious

brain

faces

illness

2 I ' m n o t very g o o d at basketball. I ' m n o t e n o u g h t a l l / tall enough.

prevent skin

3 I couldn't live i n the U K . I t rains too m a n y / too m u c h .

about m y uncle's h e a l t h because he's

4 I ' m n o t g o i n g t o f i n i s h m y h o m e w o r k . I don't have

been i l l f o r a l o n g t i m e . 2 People s u f f e r i n g f r o m a serious

enough time / time enough.

often

5 I can't sleep. I've eaten t o o m u c h / too m a n y

stay i n h o s p i t a l f o r a l o n g t i m e . 3 Y o u need t o cover y o u r

chocolate.

w i t h sunscreen

6 I can't c a r r y m y s h o p p i n g h o m e . I have too m u c h /

w h e n y o u sunbathe.

too m a n y bags.

4 Y o u can tell they've been i n the sun - t h e i r

7 I ' m really u n f i t . I d o n ' t d o e n o u g h e x e r c i s e / e x e r c i s e

are very r e d . 5 W h e n you're o l d , y o u r

enough.

can break m o r e

8 I ' m always t i r e d . I don't e n o u g h sleep / sleep e n o u g h .

easily. 6 C o f f e e can sometimes

you from

3 PRONUNCIATION /a/,/u:/,/ai/,/e/

sleeping. 7 M y g r a n d m o t h e r can't w a l k very w e l l , b u t her

Listen and w r i t e the w o r d s i n the chart.

is s t i l l active.

any diet enough few food much none quite too

GRAMMAR quantifiers, too, not enough C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h a few, a little, much,

many

o r a lot of. 1 She's quite o v e r w e i g h t because she eats

enough

a lot of

sweets.

up

2 C a n I ask y o u .

questions about y o u r diet?

IT

It w o n ' t take long. 3 H e r c h i l d r e n don't have a healthy diet - they d o n ' t eat

boot

vegetables. 4 How

sugar do y o u have i n y o u r coffee?

5 C o u l d I have

m o r e tea, please?

6 I d o n ' t eat. 7 How

healthy like

f r u i t - 1 need t o eat m o r e .

bike

hours do y o u spend i n f r o n t o f the

T V every day? t i m e i n the sun is g o o d f o r y o u , b u t n o

8

m o r e t h a n 15 m i n u t e s .

egg

9 He's i n his last year at school, so he gets. homework. 10 I o n l y d r i n k _ t w o or three.

. cups o f coffee a day - maybe

b

Listen again a n d repeat the w o r d s .

many


4 READING a

Read the n e w s p a p e r a r t i c l e . W h i c h o n e o f these f r u i t s and vegetables d o n o t c o u n t t o w a r d s y o u r f i v e a day? beans peaches carrots plums

b

• • • •

• • • •

potatoes cucumber peas pineapple

Five a Day

Read the a r t i c l e a g a i n a n d w r i t e T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1 The c a m p a i g n t o eat m o r e h e a l t h y f o o d i n the U K is called Six a Day.

JF_

2 Fruit i n a can isn't g o o d f o r y o u . 3 Frozen vegetables d o n ' t c o u n t t o w a r d s y o u r five a day. 4 O n l y 100% pure f r u i t juice counts as a p o r t i o n . 5 One m a n d a r i n orange c o u n t s as one p o r t i o n . 6 You have to eat many tomatoes to get one p o r t i o n . 7 A large s p o o n f u l o f vegetables doesn't c o u n t as a p o r t i o n . c

L o o k at t h e h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s . W h a t d o y o u t h i n k they m e a n ? C h e c k w i t h y o u r d i c t i o n a r y .

5 LISTENING a

flSifc^ffi

Listen to t w o people doing a quiz about

b o d y age. H o w o l d is A l i c e ? W h a t is her b o d y age? b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c o m p l e t e t h e sentences. 1 Alice walks

quite a lot

2 She does

every day. s p o r t o r exercise.

3 She doesn't eat 4 She eats

fast f o o d . f r u i t a n d vegetables. person.

5 She's a very 6 She's

stressed.

7 She sees

close f r i e n d s regularly.

8 She doesn't have

t i m e f o r herself.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. bones

/baunz/

skills

/skilz/

brain /brem/

skin

face /feis/

s u n l i g h t /'SAnlait/

illness /'ilnas/

sunscreen

prevent / p n ' v e n t /

anxious

<B5fn33> fB?$

FILE 5

/skin/ /"sAnskrim/ /'aerjkjas/

How much fruit do you eat every day? And how many vegetables? Food experts today think that we don't have enough of these foods in our diet and they say that we eat too much f a t and sugar. This is why the World Health Organization has started a campaign to encourage us to eat more fruit and vegetables. The campaign in the UK is called Five a Day.

Why eat fruit and veQetables? Fruit and vegetables are full of important vitamins and minerals which our bodies need t o be healthy. Scientific studies have shown that eating a lot of them can prevent some illnesses like diabetes and obesity. Also, fruit and vegetables don't contain much fat and they don't have many calories, so they help to keep us slim.

What counts? Nearly all fruit and vegetables count towards your five a day, except potatoes. The food can be fresh, frozen, or in a can, like peaches or peas. It can be raw, cooked, or even dried, like raisins or banana chips. A glass of 100% fruit juice with no added sugar also counts as one portion.

How much is a portion? A portion of fresh fruit or vegetables depends on the size of the food. In the case of small-sized fruit like plums or mandarin oranges, one portion is t w o pieces of fruit. A piece of mediumsized fruit like an apple, an orange, or a pear also counts as one portion. With larger fruit like melon and pineapple, one portion is a 5 cm slice. We use the same method for calculating portions with vegetables. In the case of salad vegetables, a medium-sized tomato or a 5cm piece of cucumber count as one portion each. For smaller, cooked vegetables like beans and carrots, one portion is three large spoonfuls of vegetables.


he wrong shoes VOCABULARY shopping

READING

M a t c h the p r i c e s .

Read the text. W h e r e c o u l d you...?

1

0

• • • •

79c

2 €30.49 3 $3.89 4 59p 5 £13.99

a f i f t y - n i n e pence

1

b

thirteen pounds ninety-nine

c

seventy-nine cents

3 4

e three dollars e i g h t y - n i n e

Fifth Avenue Shopping F i f t h Avenue is one of the most expensive s h o p p i n g streets i n the w o r l d . Most of the world's l u x u r y boutiques are located here, i n c l u d i n g Gucci, Prada, A r m a n i , a n d Cartier. I t is also home to huge d e p a r t m e n t stores l i k e L o r d & Taylor, Barneys, a n d B e r g d o r f G o o d m a n . Most shops open d a i l y f r o m 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., s t a r t i n g later on Sundays. H e r e are some of the most w e l l k n o w n :

C o m p l e t e the dialogue. Can I help y o u , madam

?

Yes, 1 b

this sweater yesterday.

1

2

Yes, I remember. Is there a pr

?

3

Yes, I'm af..

it's too smal

4

What s

is it?

5

It's a s

FAO SCHWARZ

Do you have a

6

T h i s w o r l d - f a m o u s toy store is p o p u l a r w i t h tourists a n d N e w Yorkers. The a m a z i n g G r a n d H a l l has more t h a n 20,000 coloured l i g h t s a n d there's also a giant dance-on piano k e y b o a r d and a n enormous candy store. Big kids can have lots of f u n i n the d o - i t - y o u r s e l f department, w h e r e t h e y can even design t h e i r o w n doll.

m

I'll go and s_

. Just a minute.

8

I'm s

. but we don't have this

9

sweater in your size. But we do have this one and it's the same price. Or you can have a 10

r

.

Erm...l'll take this one then, please. Can I t r y it on?

RICKY'S

Yes, of course. The c h u

r

T h i s u l t r a - f a s h i o n a b l e b e a u t y shop has b e e n s e l l i n g the latest cosmetics, h a i r a n d b a t h products for n e a r l y t w o decades. Products r a n g e f r o m t h e most expensive to t h e m o s t ecological, so there's s o m e t h i n g for everybody. Upstairs, check out the f u n c l o t h i n g and accessories. Y o u c a n also get t e m p o r a r y h e n n a tattoos.

are over there. Is everything OK?

Yes, this one f i t s perfectly. Good. Do you have the r 12

for

the other sweater? Yes, here you are.

TIFFANY & CO

Brilliant.

T h i s exclusive jeweller's has o c c u p i e d its c u r r e n t l o c a t i o n since 1940. Customers can a d m i r e t h e designer j e w e l l e r y o n the f i r s t f l o o r before t a k i n g the elevator u p s t a i r s to choose a n engagement r i n g . Y o u c a n b u y elegant table, glass, a n d s i l v e r w a r e o n the f o u r t h f l o o r , a n d there are less p r i c e y items o n the t h i r d floor.

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH O r d e r the dialogue. A

Have you had a good day?

B

OK. For what time?

A

Sure.

B

Can we make it a bit earlier? Say, seven thirty?

A

Schwarz

d t h i r t y euros f o r t y - n i n e

2 TAKING SOMETHING BACK TO A SHOP

7

FAQ

2

Why don't we go out for dinner? I could book

b

R e a d the text again. M a t c h the h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s to their meanings. 1 the set o f keys o n a piano 2 very expensive

a restaurant.

3 scarves, belts, gloves, etc.

B

OK. I'll go and have a shower t h e n .

4 an agreement to get m a r r i e d

A

Eight o'clock?

5 very b i g

B

Oh, you know. Working! But it was OK.

6 the activity o f m a k i n g things o n your o w n


A pessimist is someone w h o is pleased w i t h bad experiences because t h e y show he was right. Heinz Ruhmann,

German

actor and film

director

u a pessimist? 1 GRAMMAR will I won't (predictions)

2 VOCABULARY opposite verbs

C o m p l e t e the d i a l o g u e s w i t h will j won't a n d a v e r b

W r i t e t h e o p p o s i t e v e r b i n each space. Be c a r e f u l - use

f r o m the l i s t . Use c o n t r a c t i o n s .

the correct verb f o r m .

not remember

faU

not sell

forget

not win

miss

1

arrive You won't

2

leave

on time.

teach We're g o i n g t o

E n g l i s h i n Canada.

3 fail I d o n ' t t h i n k he

A I'm going climbing next weekend.

4

B It's very dangerous. You 'llfall

all o f his exams.

Push the d o o r t o open i t .

0

5

mend m y glasses.

I've 6

lend i p e n , pie

Can I

A I'm playing in the tennis final tomorrow.

7 win

B The other player is very good. You

the race.

I t h i n k he's g o i n g to

m

8 turn off Can you 9 A I'm going to study all evening.

get I

. anything

B It's a waste of time. You in the morning.

10

the l i g h t , please? m o r e t h a n 50 emails yesterday.

lose I've

some m o n e y !

0

3 PRONUNCIATION '11, won't ffif!T?3!ffl A I told Nick that it's Jane's birthday on Friday. B You know Nick! He

.

L i s t e n a n d repeat. C o p y the r h y t h m .

1 ill l e a r n a lot. 2 He'll m e e t somebody n e w . 3 Y o u ' l l have a g o o d t i m e . 4 She w o n ' t get the j o b .

>PLAyÂŁ%

5 They w o n ' t l e n d you the m o n e y . A I'm going to put my MP3 player on eBay. B It's too old. You

A I'm getting the 8.50 train. B It's leaving in five minutes. You.

it.

6 We w o n ' t a r r i v e on t i m e .


4 READING a

5 LISTENING

R e a d t h e h o r o s c o p e s for t h i s m o n t h . A n s w e r t h e q u e s t i o n s .

a

rÂŤ2]J) L i s t e n t o a conversation about h o r o s c o p e s . W h a t are M a t t a n d A m y ' s star signs?

Horoscopes AQUARIUS Jan 21-Feb 19 You'll be lucky in love this m o n t h ! You'll meet someone new at work, which will be the start of something special. The colour red will bring you good f o r t u n e .

PISCES Feb 2 0 - M a r 2 0 Close family will be i m p o r t a n t this m o n t h . Try t o spend more time w i t h t h e m and they'll be very glad t o see you. The colour green will bring you luck w i t h money. L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h A (Amy) or M ( M a t t ) .

ARIES M a r 2 1 - A p r 2 0 You'll have t o be very careful w i t h money this m o n t h , and avoid buying any clothes. However, you'll get a nice surprise at the end of the m o n t h . The colour blue will bring you luck.

fthjj

TAURUS Apr 21-May 21

You'll have a very busy social life this m o n t h ! Your friends will be taking you out all the time, and you'll make many new ones too. Orange will be your lucky colour.

EI

1

believes i n horoscopes.

2

doesn't believe i n horoscopes.

3

. has a p r o b l e m w i t h someone.

4

. is w o r r i e d about the horoscope.

5

. was b o r n i n January.

6

_'s horoscope is g o o d .

7

. has a m e e t i n g the next day.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES GEMINI May 22-June 21

You won't have a very good month at work. Your boss will give you some bad news, but don't worry: you won't be unemployed. Work hard and next month will be better. Purple will be your lucky colour.

L e a r n these w o r d s a n d p h r a s e s . o p t i m i s t /"optimist/ pessimist

/'pesimist/

( T V ) series /'srarbz/ stranger /'stremd33/

CANCER June 22-July 23

cheer up /'tfrar ,\p/

This will be a great month for going away! You'll win a holiday, so have your passport ready. You'll also travel a lot in your own country and you'll visit some old friends. Yellow will be your lucky colour.

d e f i n i t e l y (not)

/'defmatli/

probably (not)

/'prnbabli/

I d o u b t i t . /ai 'daut i t / I hope so. (opp / hope not)

a i 'haup sao/

I t h i n k so (opp J don't think so) /ai 'Oink sao/ 1 W h o w i l l do a l o t o f t r a v e l l i n g this m o n t h ?

Cancer

2 W h o w i l l have p r o b l e m s w i t h t h e i r job? 3 W h o w o n ' t go shopping? 4 W h o s e lucky c o l o u r w i l l be red? 5 W h o w i l l go out a l o t this m o n t h ? Underline five words y o u don't k n o w . Use your d i c t i o n a r y t o look up their meaning and pronunciation.


V o t e for t h e man w h o promises least he'll be t h e l e a s t disappointing. Bernard

Baruch,

American

political

adviser

o it later 1 GRAMMAR will I won't (promises, offers, decisions)

b

A r e these sentences p r o m i s e s (P), d e c i s i o n s ( D ) , o r o f f e r s (O)? 1 I ' l l drive y o u h o m e .

a W r i t e sentences u s i n g t h e p i c t u r e s a n d p r o m p t s . Use

_Q

2 I ' l l remember to tell her.

Shall I j I'll JI won't.

3 Shall 1 get y o u some water? 4 I ' l l help y o u clean y o u r r o o m , i f you like. 5 I ' l l have the chocolate cake, please. 6 I w o n ' t tell y o u r g i r l f r i e n d .

2 V O C A B U L A R Y verb + back C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h these v e r b s , eatt 1

come

give

pay

send

take

A Jack phoned while you were out. B Thanks. I'll

2

call

him back in a minute.

A Do you want t o borrow some money? B Yes, please. I'll

3

A The person you want t o see isn't here. She's at lunch. B That's OK. I'll

4

you back next week.

back later.

A It's a really nice top, but it doesn't fit me. B Don't worry. I'll

it back t o the shop and

change it. 5

A Have you finished t h a t book I lent you? B Yes. I'll

6

it back to you tomorrow.

A That toy car you bought on the internet doesn't work. B Doesn't it? I'll

1 call / y o u t o m o r r o w I'll call you

tomorrow

3 PRONUNCIATION two-syllable verbs a

(Q32^33)

it back, then.

word stress:

L i s t e n a n d u n d e r l i n e the stressed syllables.

Q r c l g ) t h e w o r d s w h i c h are stressed o n t h e s e c o n d

2 lend / y o u some money?

syllable. 3 have / the chicken 4 take / your coat? 5 t u r n o f f / air conditioning? 6 not / be late

b

1 wo rry

(relax)

2 decide

e mail

3

li sten

repair

4 boirrow

forget

agree

5

in vite

com plain

practise sunbathe

promise

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .


4 READING a

b

R e a d t h e t e x t . N u m b e r t h e sentences i n the right order.

R e a d the t e x t . W h a t d i d P a u l l e a r n f r o m h i s e x p e r i e n c e ?

a Paul w r o t e d o w n the man's contact details.

_

b T h e m a n explained his p r o b l e m . c T h e man's w i f e had his passport. d Paul a r r i v e d i n Paris.

J_

e Paul asked for the man's passport. f

A m a n started t a l k i n g to h i m .

g Paul d i d n ' t hear f r o m the m a n . h c

Paul gave the m a n some money.

U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to look up their m e a n i n g and pronunciation.

5 LISTENING a

Ijliifcl'tn

L i s t e n t o f i v e speakers d e s c r i b i n g

p r o b l e m s t h e y have h a d a b r o a d . W h a t d o t h e speakers have i n c o m m o n ? b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a t c h the speakers w i t h the sentences. Speaker 1

A n expensive lesson

D_

Speaker 2 Speaker 3 Speaker 4

M y name's Paul, and this happened to me when I was visiting a friend in Paris.

Speaker 5

I was getting o f f the Eurostar train at the Gare d u N o r d station

B I ' l l buy m y o w n i n f u t u r e .

when a man came up to me. H e was wearing a suit and he looked quite respectable. ' D o you speak English?' he asked. H e had a French accent, but he said he was a banker f r o m M o n t r e a l i n the French-speaking part of Canada. T h e n he told me he had a

A N e x t t i m e , I ' l l check before I go. C I w o n ' t let anyone i n another t i m e . D I w o n ' t do anyone any favours i n the f u t u r e . E I w o n ' t go out w i t h anyone I d o n ' t k n o w again.

problem. ' I ' m here i n Paris w i t h my w i f e and our three children, and we don't have enough money for a hotel. You see, my wife tried to get money f r o m a cash machine, but she couldn't remember our P I N number. She used the w r o n g number three

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES

times, so the machine kept her card. C o u l d you help me?' I wasn't

L e a r n these w o r d s a n d phrases.

sure, so I asked to see his passport. ' M y passport is w i t h my

hurt

wife. She's w a i t i n g i n a cafe w i t h the children. We only need â&#x201A;Ź65

previous / ' p r k v i a s /

for the night and I promise I ' l l pay you back.' By this time the man was actually c r y i n g , so I thought he was telling the t r u t h . I agreed to lend h i m the money and I wrote d o w n his name, email address, and phone number i n M o n t r e a l . T h e n we went to a cash

Ti3:t/

relationship

ri'leijnjip/

double p o r t i o n /'d/\bl po:Jn/ ice cream sundae

ais k r k m 'sAndei/

machine and I gave h i m the money. H e said thank y o u , gave me a

get engaged

big hug, and left. I never saw h i m or heard f r o m h i m ever again.

get i n t o u c h

I knew his story wasn't completely true. W h y d i d a banker have

i n t h e i r t w e n t i e s / i n Sea ' t w e n t i z /

only one bank card? W h y didn't he tell me h o w he w o u l d pay me back? Were his wife and children really i n the cafe, and d i d they even exist? But I was tired and in a foreign country, and I felt like I had to help h i m . I n o w k n o w to be very careful w h o I talk to when I arrive somewhere new!

/get m'geKbjd/ get

in

tAtf/


Only in our dreams are we free. The r e s t o f t h e t i m e w e need wages. Terry Pratchett,

British

writer

he meaning of dreaming 1 GRAMMAR review of verb forms: present, past, and f u t u r e a

b

C o m p l e t e t h e t e x t w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f t h e verbs i n brackets. Use c o n t r a c t i o n s w h e r e necessary.

C o m p l e t e the d i a l o g u e s w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f t h e verbs i n b r a c k e t s . U s e contractions where possible. A Are you going to go out t o go out tonight? (go out) B No, I'm really tired. I'm

going to go

to

bed early, (go) 2

. you usually

A What time

. to bed? (go) B At 10.30. Then I

for an hour

before I go to sleep, (read) A Do you think England tonight? (win) B No, I think they 4

A What

you at midnight last night? (do)

B I 5

(lose)

A

TV. (watch)

What colour are our dreams?

you ever that you were flying? (dream)

B No, I

never

that dream, (have) 6

A What.

. you It's 5 o'clock in the morning! (do)

B I can't sleep so I

1

. (read)

Do

we

dream

(do) a lot of research into this guestion. One of

2

7

A

well

you last night? (sleep)

B No, I

in the middle of

the night, and I couldn't go back to sleep, (wake up) 8

A What t i m e . tomorrow? (leave) B I'm.

you at 8 o'clock, (go)

(dream) in colour or in black and white?

People argued for many years about this guestion and scientists (work) at these scientists is a psychologist who Dundee University. Her name is Eva Murzyn, and right now she

. (study) the effect of television on our dreams.

Eva latest study.

Just

Sixty people

6

(publish) the results of her (help) Eva with her research. They

completed a guestionnaire and kept a diary of their dreams. She (choose) people who were either under 25 or over 55.

7

When Eva analyzed their diaries, she

(discover) that

the younger people usually dreamt in colour, whereas the older group often

9

(have) black and white dreams. Eva thinks that

this is because the older group

(see) programmes in

black and white when they were young. She believes that something happened to their brains while t h e y

11

(watch) TV

at that time.

mm


VOCABULARY adjectives

4 LISTENING

+ prepositions

a

ffifftreflTfr

L i s t e n to a r a d i o p r o g r a m m e about r e c u r r i n g

dreams. N u m b e r the dreams i n the o r d e r y o u hear t h e m .

(^Trcl§)the c o r r e c t p r e p o s i t i o n .

Y o u are f l y i n g .

1 Sleeping eight hours a n i g h t is g o o d (for)/ t o y o u .

1

2 She's a n g r y w i t h / at h i m because he f o r g o t

Y o u are r u n n i n g . Y o u can't escape.

her b i r t h d a y . 3 T h e village o f C h e d d a r is famous t o / for its cheese.

You are lost.

4 I ' m very bad i n / at d r a w i n g .

Y o u are f a l l i n g .

5 Be nice to / at me today because I ' m i n a bad m o o d .

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a t c h the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s w i t h

6 We aren't interested a b o u t / i n m o t o r racing.

the dreams.

7 M y l i t t l e sister is a f r a i d o f / t o b i g dogs.

Dream 1

8 T h e new boss is very d i f f e r e n t o f / f r o m o u r o l d one.

Dream 2 Dream 3

PRONUNCIATION t h e letters ow

fflJJSCS^

L i s t e n a n d (circlg) the w o r d w i t h a different sound.

2

blow

3

borrow

4

low

(know) snow

throw

You don't w a n t y o u r l i f e t o change. You don't w a n t t o face a p r o b l e m .

champagne /Jaem'pem/

how now

crowded

Your life has i m p r o v e d i n some way.

L e a r n these w o r d s a n d p h r a s e s .

owl brown

Dream 5

You can't change a d i f f i c u l t situation.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES

JgjL 1

Dream 4

You don't k n o w w h a t to do i n your life.

• • • •

flowers

town

o w l /aul/

psychoanalyst /saikau'aenalist/

show shower

window

'flauaz/

v i o l i n /vais'lm/ towel

down

freezing

/'frbzirj/

be f r i g h t e n e d o f / b i T r a i t n d ov/ d r e a m about / ' d r i i m abaot/ be successful / b i sak'sesfl/

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat the w o r d s .

fflSI^©

FILE 6


I love your daughter, Jack. I love her more t h a n a n y t h i n g . But f r a n k l y sir, I'm a l i t t l e t e r r i f i e d o f being your son-in-law. Greg in the film Meet the Parents, 2000

ow to... 1 GRAMMAR uses of t h e infinitive w i t h to a

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h the i n f i n i t i v e ( w i t h to) o f a verb f r o m the list. not do

find

not finish

d

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h a q u e s t i o n w o r d f r o m the l i s t , a n d to + t h e v e r b i n b r a c k e t s . how

rent

see

1 John's very p o l i t e . H e o f f e r e d

not tell

wash up

to wash up

after

the meal. 2 Thanks for coming. W e hope

you again soon.

3 She wasn't e n j o y i n g the lasagne, so she decided it.

how much

what

when

where

1 She gave me her address, but I don't k n o w

how to get

there, (get) 2 M y b r o t h e r is always busy so I don't k n o w h i m . (call) 3 M y m u m asked me to get some eggs, but she didn't say

. (buy)

4 We'd l i k e to travel a r o u n d the w o r l d , but we don't k n o w

4 M y b o y f r i e n d is u n e m p l o y e d . H e needs

first, (go)

a job.

5 She w a n t s to go to university, b u t she doesn't

5 I ' l l tell y o u w h a t she said, b u t please p r o m i s e

know

anybody. 6 I ' m sorry I shouted at y o u . I ' l l t r y

i t again.

a flat.

. (study)

6 W h o ' s g o i n g to be here for lunch? I have pasta, but I need to k n o w

7 They w a n t to live together. They're p l a n n i n g

b

how many

. (make)

2 VOCABULARY verbs + infinitive

W r i t e sentences u s i n g t h e adjective a n d the c o r r e c t f o r m o f the verb.

C o m p l e t e the text w i t h a verb f r o m the list i n the past tense.

1 nice / meet Hello! H o w

nice to meet

forget t r y offer plan

you.

2 difficult / talk D o you f i n d it

to m y m u m ?

Charlie wasn't happy at his work so h e

3 easy / b u y It's

presents for m y g i r l f r i e n d .

4 i m p o r t a n t / n o t say It's

the w r o n g t h i n g .

his boss, so h e

T h a n k s for calling. It was

from you.

6 f u n / be

t h a n k you

2 They're g o i n g to evening classes 3 We called the restaurant 4 He t o l d us a joke

he had a stomach ache, and h e

to go to the

5

to call him later to ask him

doctor's. His boss

to drive to the interview, but

7

and was very late, and h e

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h to a n d a v e r b . to say

to tell

3

there was a lot of traffic. In the end, he took the underground

him.

1 He gave t h e m some chocolates

to apply 2

to be ill. He told his boss that

4

a bit nervous. H e

7 k i n d / invite

c

started

1

how he was. Charlie was really hoping to get the job, so he was

w i t h your family.

Her parents were very

learn

for a new job. Soon, one company called him a n d to give him in an interview. Charlie

5 great / h e a r

It's

not w a n t promise pretend s t a r t need not remember

Chinese. a table

. us laugh.

to turn his mobile

8

phone off. Unfortunately, it rang while he was in the interview, but Charlie didn't answer it. However when his boss called later he

to act ill. The next morning, his boss said,

9

'I'd like to see you in my office'. Charlie

10

to

5 I went to a cash m a c h i n e .

_ some money.

6 D o you use y o u r phone _

apologize, but his boss was very angry and Charlie nearly lost

. photos?

his job. But h e

11

to his boss again.

an important lesson: not to lie


3

PRONUNCIATION linking, weak form of to

a

P r a c t i s e s a y i n g t h e sentences.

b

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a g a i n a n d choose the best answer. 1 W h a t d i d the study f i n d o u t about mothers-in-law? a M o r e m e n t h a n w o m e n have problems w i t h t h e m .

1 We w a n t to k n o w .

b M o r e m e n t h a n w o m e n tell jokes about t h e m .

2 They hoped to w i n .

© M o r e w o m e n t h a n m e n have problems w i t h t h e m . 2 W h a t advice do m o t h e r s - i n - l a w t r y to give their daughters-in-law?

3 H e p r o m i s e d to call. 4 I don't k n o w w h a t to do.

a

5 She f o r g o t to go.

b H o w to b r i n g up c h i l d r e n ,

6 It's i m p o r t a n t to remember. w w 7 I learned to s w i m . w 8 H e started to cry.

c

1

b

_

H o w to l o o k after t h e i r husband, H o w to do h o u s e w o r k .

3 A c c o r d i n g to the article, w h i c h s i t u a t i o n makes daughters-in-law angry? a W h e n their husband agrees w i t h his mother, b W h e n their husband talks to his mother,

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d

c

repeat t h e sentences.

W h e n their husband argues w i t h his mother.

4 W h i c h w o m e n make the best m o t h e r s - i n - l a w ?

4 READING a

a Those w h o are really close t o t h e i r son. b T h o s e w h o don't have a l i f e o f t h e i r o w n .

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e . Is the w r i t e r g e n e r a l l y p o s i t i v e o r negative a b o u t m o t h e r s - i n - l a w ?

The truth about mothers-in-law Although it's men who tell jokes about them, mothers-in-law are usually less popular with their daughters-in-law than with their sons-in-law. A recent study of 49 married couples found that « • '• M ^ ^ ^ B two thirds of wives interviewed said that their mothers-in-law caused them 'unhappiness and stress', compared with 15% of the husbands. There are a number of reasons for this. First of all, there is the guestion of experience. A mother-in-law has already brought up a family of her own, so she feels that she has a lot of knowledge to pass on. In this situation, it is very difficult for her to keep guiet. However, when a daughter-in-law is a new mother, she usually wants to find her own way of doing things. She often interprets her mother-in-law's advice as criticism, which can cause a conflict. Secondly, there is the case of the husband. Both women care for him, although each of them loves him in a different way. On the one hand, he is the mother-in-law's son and she obviously wants the best for him. On the other hand, he is the wife's partner, and she wants him to support her. Both women can get very upset if they see the man taking sides, and this can cause an argument. However, mothers-in-law actually have a lot to offer, despite their reputation for causing trouble. They are generally excellent babysitters, and they don't mind helping with the housework. As long as they have their own independent lives and help out only when needed, mothers-in-law can play a very useful role in any family. The important thing is that they should not get too involved in their sons' and daughters' relationship so that nobody feels bad.

c T h o s e w h o k n o w w h e n t o o f f e r help. c

U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to look up their m e a n i n g and pronunciation.

5 LISTENING a

Listen to a conversation between t w o p e o p l e a b o u t a b a n o n m o t h e r - i n - l a w jokes. D o they agree i n t h e end?

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d complete the sentences w i t h D (Dave) o r J (Jane). 1 J2 t h i n k s the ban is r i d i c u l o u s . 2

t h i n k s that the jokes are offensive.

3

t h i n k s that it's i m p o r t a n t t o have a sense o f h u m o u r .

4

makes a joke.

5

t h i n k s that the jokes don't show respect for parents.

6

m e n t i o n s a historical fact about m o t h e r s - i n - l a w .

7

quotes a historical joke.

8

says that the jokes are sexist.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these words and phrases. advice

ad'vais/

tactic /'taektik/ greet

/griit/

survive honest

ss'vaiv/ /"omst/

absolutely delicious be p u n c t u a l

/aebsaluitli di'lifas/

/ b i 'pArjktJual/

make conversation

/meik konva'seijn/

shake (sbd's) h a n d /J'eik 'hamd/ (make) the r i g h t i m p r e s s i o n

/5s 'rait i m p r e j n /


Happiness is w h e n w h a t y o u t h i n k , w h a t you say, and w h a t y o u do are all in harmony. Mahatma

Gandhi, Indian political

leader

eing happy GRAMMAR uses of t h e gerund

c

C o m p l e t e t h e t e x t w i t h t h e -ing f o r m o f these v e r b s .

(verb + -ing)

drive send

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e -ing f o r m o f

exercise get up stay take turn

go have w#te

imagine

leave

listen

read

the verbs i n brackets. 1 I hate

being

(be) c o l d . I f i n d i t really

depressing. 2 You spend too l o n g

(play)

video games. 3 We stopped

(study) French

because we d i d n ' t like the classes. 4 He's celebrating because he's finished ( w r i t e ) his b o o k . 5 I t started

(snow) d u r i n g the

night w h i l e w e were asleep. 6 I ' m bored. I feel like

(go)

for a w a l k . 7 M y parents have b o u g h t a house by a beach, because they love

(swim).

8 I don't m i n d

(get) up early i n

the m o r n i n g . 9 K a t h y really enjoys

(listen)

to her iPod. 10 T h e best t h i n g about the bus is

_ (use) (not drive) i n

busy t r a f f i c . M a t c h the sentence b e g i n n i n g s a n d e n d i n g s .

What makes you feel good?

1 D o y o u ever d r e a m o f

Here are some more texts from our readers.

2 A r e y o u interested i n 3 Please don't leave w i t h o u t 4 She isn't very g o o d at

O

5 We ended the evening by 6 I ' m really l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to

LJ I I

1

Writing

1

and t h e n

d t h a n k i n g everybody f o r c o m i n g . e saying goodbye to me. f

p a r k i n g her b o y f r i e n d ' s car.

a funny email or text message their faces when they

3

read it. 2 I really like

at night when there's no traffic,

4

to my favourite music. I feel completely free. in bed on Sunday morning a n d

b seeing y o u t o n i g h t . s t o p p i n g w o r k and r e t i r i n g ?

sending

to my friends. And of course,

a d o i n g some p a r t - t i m e w o r k ? c

2

7

very late a n d '

the newspaper. T h e n _ 8

my dog for a long walk. 4 I enjoy

to the gym and really

10

hard, t h e n

12

11

a long hot shower followed by a nice

cold drink. There's nothing better. 13

o f f my computer at the end of the day and

14

work! It's the best moment of the day. I love it!


d

C o m p l e t e t h e t e x t w i t h t h e c o r r e c t form o f t h e verbs i n brackets (-ing form o r i n f i n i t i v e ) .

3 PRONUNCIATION the letter / a

1

miss (^ninct) skin

ai

2

promise

hire

JSt

3

practise

finish

4

arrive

with

fish

Reading the digital way

M a n y of us w h o love reading (read) are changing our habits. Today, a lot of us have decided (use) e-readers, and so we've stopped (buy) t r a d i t i o n a l books. 1

kind

size

bike

2 3

E-readers have a n u m b e r of advantages. T h e y are v e r y easy (carry), so they are ideal for people who l i k e (travel). I f you're abroad, a n d y o u don't have a n y t h i n g (read), y o u don't need (look for) a bookshop that has books i n y o u r language - y o u can d o w n l o a d it as a digital book. I n a d d i t i o n to this, e-readers are v e r y private, so y o u don't n e e d (show) people w h a t y o u are reading. Finally, w h e n y o u f i n i s h (read) a book, y o u no longer have to f i n d r o o m for it o n a bookshelf.

(Circle)the w o r d w i t h a different sound.

service

surprise

fish

4

5

6

engine

invite

online

bike

7

b

.-

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n

a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .

8

9

However, there are some disadvantages. Some people say their eyes h u r t i f they spend a long t i m e (look) at the screen. Also, y o u have to be c a r e f u l (not lose) y o u r e-reader or y o u ' l l lose all y o u r books. As w e l l as this, i f a f r i e n d w o u l d l i k e (borrow) a book you've read, y o u can't offer (lend) i t to t h e m . W i t h a n e-reader, y o u can o n l y go o n (read) as l o n g as the battery lasts, so y o u have to remember (take) y o u r charger w i t h y o u a n d y o u mustn't forget (charge) the battery. 10

4 LISTENING a

w h e n a n d w h e r e t h e y s i n g . H o w m a n y o f the speakers d o n ' t e n j o y s i n g i n g ?

11

12

13

14

15

16

W^ltMcffil L i s t e n t o f i v e speakers t a l k i n g about

b

L i s t e n again a n d m a t c h t h e speakers w i t h sentences A - E . Speaker 1

C_

Speaker 2 Speaker 3 Speaker 4 Speaker 5 A H e / She does a l o t o f s i n g i n g at w o r k . B H e / She doesn't m i n d s i n g i n g b a d l y i n f r o n t o f other people. C I Ie / She enjoys s i n g i n g at h o m e . D H e / She likes s i n g i n g w h e n he/she is travelling.

VOCABULARY verbs + gerund M a t c h t h e sentences 1 - 6 w i t h d e f i n i t i o n s a - f . 1 H e hates d o i n g the h o u s e w o r k . 2 H e feels l i k e g o i n g for a r u n .

E H e / She was i n a c h o i r at school.

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases.

3 H e doesn't m i n d c o o k i n g a l l the meals.

soup /su:p/

4 He's stopped p l a y i n g f o o t b a l l .

leftovers / ' k t t a u v a z /

5 H e spends h o u r s c h a t t i n g o n l i n e .

a feel-good f i l m Is f i i l g u d f i l m /

6 H e loves being w i t h his f r i e n d s .

as soon as /az 'sum az/

a H e doesn't do i t any m o r e ,

breathe

b It's O K for h i m t o do i t . c

I Ie really doesn't l i k e i t .

d He does i t a l o t . e H e w a n t s to do i t n o w . f

H e really likes i t .

scales /skeilz/ /bri:3/

choir /'kwaia/ h i g h notes / h a i nauts/ magical bargain

/'nuedjikl/ 'bci:gan/


The l i m i t s o f my language are t h e l i m i t s o f my w o r l d . Ludwig

Wittgenstein,

Austrian

philosopher

earn a language in a month! 2 VOCABULARY modifiers: a bit, really, etc.

1 GRAMMAR have to, don't have to, must, mustn't a

L o o k at t h e p i c t u r e s . C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f have to.

O r d e r t h e w o r d s t o m a k e sentences. 1 t r a n s l a t i o n / u s e f u l / O n l i n e / aren't / sites / very Online translation

sites aren't very

useful.

2 t o / q u i t e / f i l m s / u n d e r s t a n d / It's / American / difficult 1

A

Do

teachers in your country

B Not very smart. They they 2

have to

3 n e w / fast / speaks / O u r / very / teacher

wear formal clothes, but

Our

look tidy.

4 o f / b i t / those / u n f r i e n d l y / a / students /

. go t o university?

British taxi drivers

A

It's

look smart?

Some / are

Someone told me that. B No. We

pass a special test, but w e .

Some

go

5 is / E n g l i s h / idea / b o o k s / a / really /

to university. 3

Reading / good cook meals?

I

A

Reading help

do the cooking, but y o u .

B No. You .

6 h a r d / i n c r e d i b l y / Chinese / t o / It's / l e a r n

the children t o eat. 4

A B No, he

It's__

your husband

travel abroad in his job?

travel abroad, but he

speak

foreign languages. b

W h a t d o these signs m e a n ? W r i t e sentences w i t h must o r

3

PRONUNCIATION mustn't

must,

L i s t e n a n d repeat. C o p y t h e

mustn't. rhythm

1 You mustn't take photOS.

must make the exam easier. 3 She mustn't drive a car. 4 He must be early. 5 We mustn't talk in the library. 6 You must take one pill-every day. 2 They

1

You must

pay i n cash.

2

t u r n left here.

3

make a noise.

4

use y o u r m o b i l e phone.

5

stop here.

6

play f o o t b a l l here.

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h mustn't o r don't have to. 1 T h e m u s e u m is free. Y o u

don't have to pay.

2 Y o u have t o wear smart clothes. Y o u

w e a r jeans. . d r i v e faster.

3 T h e speed l i m i t is 120 k m / h . Y o u 4 Y o u r hours w i l l be 9 - 5 M o n d a y t o Friday. Y o u _ w o r k at weekends. 5 T h a t river is dangerous. Y o u 6 It's a very s m a l l f l a t . Y o u

swim init. clean i t every day.


4 READING a

b

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h the people's names.

R e a d the o p i n i o n s a b o u t l e a r n i n g l a n g u a g e s . W h i c h d o y o u t h i n k

1

are t h e t h r e e best ideas?

Marit

t h i n k s that l i s t e n i n g to songs

helps her p r o n u n c i a t i o n . says that reading can i m p r o v e y o u r vocabulary. has contact w i t h an o n l i n e teacher. t h i n k s that speaking is more i m p o r t a n t than grammar. likes m e e t i n g and p r a c t i s i n g w i t h other students.

What's Learn a language This week we ask students from all over the world for their ideas. Josef, Czech Republic I think it's really hard t o learn a language if you don't have anyone t o talk to. I've joined a social networking site where I can chat in English t o lots of other people like me. I'm more interested in using English t o communicate than anything else, so I don't mind if my grammar isn't perfect.

Paolo, Portugal I don't have time t o go t o an English class, but there's a great site on t h e internet which has classes in the f o r m of podcasts. Every week, I download a few of these onto my phone, so t h a t I can listen t o the class when I'm going t o and f r o m work. I find the words and phrases t h a t I have t o listen t o and repeat incredibly useful.

Marit, Norway I'm a big fan of English pop music, so I spend a lot of time listening t o different songs at home on my iPad. I've downloaded a new app t h a t puts the lyrics on the screen and translates the song for you at the same time. I really enjoy learning English like this, and it's very good for my pronunciation, too.

Kiko, Japan I can't a f f o r d t o pay for one-to-one English classes, but I've f o u n d a great course online. I have to watch a short video, and then learn the grammar and vocabulary in it. If I have any guestions, I can contact my online t u t o r who's very friendly. I'm really enjoying the course, and I've learnt a lot f r o m it.

Luis, Spain I love books, and in my opinion, you can learn a lot of new words by reading in English. My journey t o university is guite long, so I usually read books on my e-reader. You can click on difficult words and get a translation, which is very helpful.

Gloria, Brazil My favourite way to learn a language is to go to a language school and join a class. There are classes for many levels of English, whether you're a beginner or you've been learning for a long time. It's great when you have other students in the class and you can learn and practise together, and of course having a teacher to help you is really important. It's good to do your homework too!

j

practises E n g l i s h mostly

by l i s t e n i n g .

5 a

LISTENING <2S2r "3) i

Listen t o a radio programme

about the C h e r o k e e language. O n w h a t gadgets c a n t h e C h e r o k e e people use t h e i r language t o d a y ?

L i s t e n again a n d a n s w e r t h e questions. 1 H o w many languages exist i n the w o r l d today? Nearly

6.000

By 2100, h o w m a n y w i l l disappear? H o w many m e m b e r s o f the Cherokee tribe could speak C h e r o k e e w h e n the plan started? H o w many Cherokees were there? W h e n d i d A p p l e release i O S 4.1 w i t h Cherokee as a n o f f i c i a l language?

USEFUL WORDS AND PHRASES L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases. experiment

/ik'sperimant/

fees / f i : z / voicemail

/'vaismeil/

permitted /pa'mitid/ obligatory

/a'bhgatri/

complete b e g i n n e r

/ k a m ' p l k t bi'gma/

entrance fee /'entrans f i : / intensive course

in ten si v ka:s/

against the rules /'ageinst 6a r u : l z /

GStt^S)

FILE 7


At the pharmacy VOCABULARY feeling ill

READING

C o m p l e t e the sentences.

M a t c h t h e signs 1 - 9 w i t h t h e i r m e a n i n g A - I .

1 D a n feels t e r r i b l e . H e t h i n k s he has

flu

(ULF).

2 1 need to buy some tissues. I have a

(LCDO).

Do not exceed the stated dose

3 T h a t f i s h wasn't v e r y nice. N o w I have a (DBA OCHMSTA). 4 Y o u feel very h o t . I t h i n k y o u have a (EMRETUPETRA). 5 Please t u r n t h a t music d o w n . I have a

Keep out of reach of children

(CHAEHEDA). (OGUHC).

6 Kate smokes too m u c h . She has a

2 GOING TO A PHARMACY C o m p l e t e t h e d i a l o g u e w i t h these w o r d s . allergic better every symptoms take well

have

Good afternoon. How can I I'm not feeling v e r y What are y o u r I have a bad cough. Do y o u No, I don't. Are y o u No, I don't think so. Take this cough medicine. It'll How much do I have t o Ten m l Sorry? H o w

help

much

often

help

2

3

4

5

m

_ a temperature? _ t o any drugs? make you feel

May cause side effects

E

7

8

9

. six hours. ?

Every six hours. OK, thanks. H o w

10

_

is that?

Not to be taken by infants

That's $4.50, please.

Take twice a day with a meal

A Y o u m u s t keep t h i s m e d i c i n e where c h i l d r e n can't find it.

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH

B Y o u m u s t n o t give t h i s medicine to s m a l l c h i l d r e n .

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences.

C Y o u m u s t n ' t d r i n k t h i s water. A That was a I B I'mgl

meal. . you enjoyed it.

A C I have some more coffee, please? B There isn't any more. Anyway, drinking too much coffee isn't good f you. A I think I sh B Shall I take you home? A No, I'll walk. I'm s

go now. I'll be fine.

D Y o u m u s t take t h i s m e d i c i n e at breakfast and d i n n e r . E Y o u s h o u l d be c a r e f u l n o t to take t o o m u c h o f this medicine. F Y o u should be c a r e f u l i f you feel i l l after t a k i n g t h i s medicine. G Y o u m u s t n ' t smoke here. H Y o u s h o u l d be c a r e f u l or y o u m i g h t f a l l over. I

Y o u have t o t u r n y o u r m o b i l e o f f .

-


Advice is w h a t you ask for w h e n you already k n o w t h e answer b u t wish you didn't. Erica Jong, American writer

1 G R A M M A R should

M a t c h t h e sentences w i t h t h e p i c t u r e s . C o m p l e t e t h e m w i t h should o r 1

She

should

eat her vegetables.

2 She

c

A I f i n d it really d i f f i c u l t to get up i n the m o r n i n g , and

QD

I ' m o f t e n late for w o r k . M y boss has n o t i c e d and she's

wear a coat.

3 'You

quite a n g r y w i t h me. W h a t should I do?

eat so m u c h salt.'

4 He

It d i d n ' t seem very serious at the t i m e , b u t n o w m y f o o t

get some glasses.'

6 She

c a r r y heavy bags.

has gone black. W h a t is y o u r advice?

Id

C o m p l e t e t h e advice w i t h should J shouldn't

call

drink

1 Y o u shouldn't buy

and it's exactly w h a t I ' m l o o k i n g for. T h e o n l y p r o b l e m is it's an M and I ' m an L . W h a t d o y o u t h i n k I should do?

give

go

see

O

C I've seen the perfect suit o n sale i n m y f a v o u r i t e shop and

a verb f r o m the box. buy

\3j

B Yesterday, I h u r t m y foot w h i l e I was p l a y i n g f o o t b a l l .

d r i v e to w o r k .

5 'You

R e a d t h e p r o b l e m s A - G . M a t c h t h e m w i t h t h e advice i n b.

shouldn't.

tell

i t because i t w o n ' t f i t y o u .

O

D I really l i k e one o f m y colleagues at w o r k , and I t h i n k she likes me, t o o . I'd really l i k e to go o u t w i t h her, but I don't k n o w h o w t o ask her. A n y advice?

2 You

coffee a l l day.

E I have three c h i l d r e n and they all have terrible problems

3 You

t o bed earlier.

w i t h t h e i r teeth. We're always at the dentist's and each

4 You

a doctor immediately.

5 You

her h o w y o u feel.

6 You

t h e m any sweets.

7 You

her and invite her to dinner.

O

visit costs a l o t o f money. A n y advice? F I've always been very nervous, b u t n o w it's g e t t i n g worse. I don't have t i m e to eat at w o r k , so I have five or six coffee breaks d u r i n g the day. W h a t should I do?

Q

G I've had an a r g u m e n t w i t h m y g i r l f r i e n d , and I don't k n o w w h a t to do. I feel very s t u p i d and I really w a n t to see her again. W h a t do y o u t h i n k I should do?

LJ


4

2 V O C A B U L A R Y get C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f get a n d one o f these w o r d s .

a

LISTENING *T*.f"'" d 5 L i s t e n to f i v e speakers t a l k a b o u t a p e r s o n t h e y discuss t h e i r p r o b l e m s w i t h . H o w many o f them talk to members o f their family?

divorced f i t home tickets worse up

lost

t e x t message

on

school

1 Her parents aren't happy together, so they're g o i n g to

get

divorced

.

2 A r e y o u r c h i l d r e n i n bed w h e n y o u r husband f r o m work? 3 O u r satnav wasn't w o r k i n g a n d we o n the way t o o u r f r i e n d s ' house. 4 I ' m g o i n g to the g y m because I w a n t to 5 T h e p a i n i n m y neck w a s . so I w e n t t o the d o c t o r . 6 This morning I

. f o r the

concert o n l i n e . T h e y ' r e very g o o d ones at the f r o n t ! 7 H o w w e l l do y o u

w i t h your

brothers and sisters? 8 I've just

from my boyfriend

a

saying he's g o i n g t o be late. 9 I don't feel l i k e

today. I ' m

going to stay i n bed. 10 I o f t e n

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a t c h t h e speakers w i t h t h e sentences A - E .

to

late, a l t h o u g h it's

very near where I l i v e .

3 PRONUNCIATION

Speaker 1

CL

Speaker 2 Speaker 3 Speaker 4 Speaker 5 A has had some s i m i l a r experiences t o t h i s person.

I d and I m l

B also gives advice t o t h i s person.

a (^irclg) the w o r d i n each g r o u p w h i c h has a d i f f e r e n t s o u n d .

C is i n a r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h someone he/she met t h r o u g h t h i s person.

1

pull

2

could

(food)

D doesn't always agree w i t h t h i s person.

would

E f i r s t met t h i s person w h e n he/she was very y o u n g

bun u :

you

U S E F U L WORDS AND P H R A S E S

soon

boot

L e a r n these words and phrases. 3

woman

wouldn't

soup

bull

instead 4

book

do

two

/in'sted/

avoid somebody /a'void SAmbadi/ be w o r t h (doing)

boot fflifcniffi

risk (verb) /risk/ m a c h o /"martjau/

Ufj

b

attend (a conference) /a'tend/

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat

the w o r d s .

/bi ws:0/

change y o u r m i n d /tfemd3 j o : m a i n d / go for (sth) Iqso fo:/ keep i n t o u c h ( w i t h sbd) /ki:p i n tAtf/


If e v e r y t h i n g seems t o be going well, you have obviously overlooked s o m e t h i n g .

Murphy's Law

something can go wrong... G R A M M A R if+ present, + w/!! + infinitive (first conditional) M a t c h t h e sentence halves.

Here are six more examples of Murphy's Law: 1 I f you lose s o m e t h i n g , 2 I f you arrive early at a party, 3 I f you make an appointment w i t h the doctor,

c

C o m p l e t e t h e texts w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f the v e r b i n brackets. T h e n r e a d a n d m a t c h t h e texts w i t h t h e c o r r e c t p i c t u r e s , A - G .

Traditions and Superstitions 1 Giving a knife EE If a friend

friend a coin in return, your friendship

^Q2!2^H| (last) forever.

4 I f you don't do y o u r h o m e w o r k , 5 I f you buy a n e w carpet, 6 I f you get i n t o a h o t b a t h ,

(give) you a knife as a

present and you | B < i ^ 9 | (give) your

2 Horseshoe • If you |

| (hang) a horseshoe

a y o u ' l l feel better before y o u see h i m .

above your door, it |

b y o u ' l l d r o p s o m e t h i n g o n i t the f i r s t day.

good luck t o you and your family.

| (bring)

c y o u ' l l f i n d i t i n the last place y o u l o o k . d the phone w i l l r i n g .

3 Ladders

e everyone else w i l l be late.

If you

f

b

I

|

y o u r teacher w i l l ask y o u f o r i t .

(^ircle)the correct f o r m . 1 I f the plane arrives late t o n i g h t , I ^ T U r n i s S ) / m i s s the last bus. 2 I f you see / w i l l see an accident, call the police!

(walk) under a ladder,

| (have) bad luck.

4 Throwing a coin in a fountain If you

| (throw) a coin into a well

|

| (make) a wish.

or fountain a n d | the wish |

| (come) true.

3 T h e y w o n ' t get lost, i f they u s e / w i l l u s e their satnav.

5 Falling leaves

4 W e don't get / w o n ' t get t o the cinema i n t i m e i f we don't leave n o w . 5 I f you d o n ' t t a k e / w o n ' t t a k e an u m b r e l l a , it'll definitely rain!

'

| (be) the first day of | (catch) a falling

autumn, and you | leaf, you |

B(not be) ill all winter.

6 I f m y phone d o e s n ' t w o r k / w o n ' t w o r k here, can I use yours? 7 K a t h y i s / w i l l b e disappointed i f she doesn't get the job. 8 I f there i s n ' t / w o n ' t b e m u c h t r a f f i c w h e n w e leave, i t w o n ' t take l o n g t o get there.

7 Spiders I If you

|

watch it carefu (run) down the on a trip soon.

| (see) a spider on its web, spider

|

(go)


2 V O C A B U L A R Y confusing verbs C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t verbs i n

4

LISTENING

a

t 3 Listen to a radio p r o g r a m m e about natural

$5

the c o r r e c t tense.

disasters. H o w m a n y t i p s does t h e e x p e r t give?

1 look, look like You

look

look like

very s m a r t i n t h a t suit. I n fact, y o u a businessman!

2 lose, m i s s I

m y ticket, so I

the t r a i n and I was late f o r w o r k . 3 say, t e l l M y son doesn't o f t e n

lies, b u t

i f he does, he always

sorry.

4 hope, wait I'm

f o r the bus. I

i t ' l l come soon because it's r a i n i n g . 5 l o o k at, w a t c h O u r friends enjoyed

the v i d e o

o f o u r w e d d i n g , b u t they d i d n ' t w a n t to the p h o t o s o f o u r h o n e y m o o n . 6 know, meet She's

h i m since the summer. She h i m o n a safari.

7 borrow, lend

b

I f you need t o _

some money, I can

you 5 0 euros.

1

C a n y o u avoid n a t u r a l disasters?

No. you can't.

2 A t w h a t t i m e o f year s h o u l d y o u

8 f i n d , l o o k for

not go to the C a r i b b e a n ?

W e were

a cheap a p a r t m e n t o n

the i n t e r n e t and w e

the perfect

place.

3 W h a t w i l l travel insurance p r o b a b l y pay for? 4 W h y is i t i m p o r t a n t n o t to panic?

9 carry, wear

5 W h o s h o u l d y o u contact as s o o n

He was

a b i g coat and

a heavy suitcase.

as possible? 6 W h a t s h o u l d y o u ask y o u r a i r l i n e when you book your flight?

10 b r i n g , t a k e I'll

Listen again and answer the questions.

. y o u t o the a i r p o r t i f you me back a souvenir.

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S 3 PRONUNCIATION a

linking

<if*ifc«:fflf L i s t e n t o h o w t h e w o r d s are l i n k e d i n each sentence. 1 I f I w a l k , I ' l l arrive late. w w 2 I t ' l l be hot i f you go i n A u g u s t . 3 I f it rains, I ' l l get a t a x i . W WW 4 She'll get angry i f we don't invite her.

b

L e a r n these words and phrases. blizzard

bh/od

cyclone

/'saiklaun/

earthquake flood

/'3:6kweik/

/TlAd/

forest f i r e /'forist fara/ monsoon tsunami

/mon'suni/ /tsu:'na:mi/

s p i l l (coffee) /spil/

5 I f we getuioearly, we can go t o the m a r k e t .

p a r k i n g space /'paikirj speis/

6 I f I don't understand the menu, I ' l l ask the waiter. W W W W L i s t e n a g a i n . P r a c t i s e s a y i n g t h e sentences.

n a t u r a l disaster

••"nsetfral di'zuista/


Mine is b e t t e r t h a n ours. Benjamin Franklin, US Policitican

must be mine 1 G R A M M A R possessive pronouns a

2 VOCABULARY adverbs of manner

Complete the questions a n d answers i n the chart. Whose...?

Possessive adjective

Possessive pronoun

1 Whose hag is that?

It's my bag.

It's mine

2 Whose books are those?

They're your books.

They're

3

It's his laptop.

It's

4

They're her keys.

They're

5

It's our car.

It's

6

They're your coats.

They're

7

It's their house.

M a k e adverbs f r o m t h e adjectives i n t h e b o x a n d c o m p l e t e t h e sentences.

calm dream lazy quiet serious slow 1 Please w a l k m o r e

2 Sorry? I can't hear y o u . You're speaking very

.

3 M a r y h a r d l y ever laughs. She takes

It's

things really b

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h a possessive a d j e c t i v e (my,your, p r o n o u n (mine,yours,

1

A Are those B No. they're

he said

.

5 ' I ' d love t o retire early and live

glasses?

his .

.

4 ' I don't feel l i k e d o i n g a n y t h i n g today,'

etc.) o r

etc.)..

my

. You're

slowly

going t o o fast!

o n a t r o p i c a l island', M a r k

Yours

said

are in your pocket!

.

6 A l t h o u g h all the passengers were w o r r i e d , the f l i g h t attendant spoke a n d explained the

2

A Whose coats are these? Are they ? B Yes, they're . Thanks a lot.

problem.

3 a

3

A Is that your boyfriend's car? It looks like . B No, it isn't. car is bigger than that.

PRONUNCIATION word stress U n d e r l i n e t h e stressed syllable.

detective distance doillar advantage enjoy com plete ly

4

A Whose cat is that? It isn't

re mem ber 8 promise

B I've seen it in the neighbours' garden. I think it's .

9 suspicious ffllr^ifft

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n

l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat t h e w o r d s .

A Is that a new phone?. old one was black. B No, it's my sister's. is broken, so I'm borrowing


b

4 READING a

Read the article again and answer the questions. W r i t e H,D,J,N,orG.

Read t h e a r t i c l e a b o u t f i v e f a m o u s B r i t i s h chefs.

Who...?

D o y o u r e c o g n i z e any o f t h e m ?

1

Heston Blumenthal is an English chef w h o is f a m o u s f o r

JV

3 had a completely different job w h e n he / she left school

preparing f o o d scientifically. After

4 uses c h e m i s t r y i n his / her c o o k i n g

f i n i s h i n g s e c o n d a r y school, H e s t o n

5 t h i n k s y o u n g people should eat better

w e n t t o France and t a u g h t himself t o cook. He now owns t h e Fat Duck

ate i n restaurants and read books i n his / her f i r s t job

2 isn't very patient w i t h people w h o are learning to cook

c

Restaurant in Bray, Berkshire, UK,

U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r dictionary to look up their meaning and pronunciation.

w h i c h has t h r e e Michelin stars and has t w i c e been v o t e d Best Restaurant in t h e UK. He has had a number o f TV shows and has also published several b o o k s .

Delia Smith is one

5

LISTENING fg|f^33)

a of Britain's

Listen t o a conversation about an experiment

o n a T V programme. W h i c h question did the

oldest cooks and she's the UK's best-

e x p e r i m e n t h o p e t o a n s w e r ? W a s i t successful?

selling cookery author. She s t a r t e d her career as a hairdresser at 16, but changed t o cooking when she was 21. For 12 years, she w r o t e about cooking and famous chefs around the w o r l d before her f i r s t television appearance. She eventually had her o w n programme, where she

b

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1

T h e p r o g r a m m e was o n i n the evening.

2 T h e r e were three cooks. 3 T h e rules f o r each course were that they h a d t o use the same i n g r e d i e n t s .

explained carefully t o viewers how t o make basic dishes

4 T h e r e were t w o judges.

for the whole family.

5 T h e cooks were professional restaurant c r i t i c s .

Jamie Oliver is one of Britain's best-loved television chefs. His programmes have been broadcast

6 E w a n o n l y r e m e m b e r s t w o dishes because the judges f o u n d i t very d i f f i c u l t t o decide w h o made t h e m .

internationally in countries like t h e USA, South Africa, Australia, Brazil, Japan, and Iceland, and his books have been translated i n t o t h i r t y languages. Jamie is most famous f o r his campaigns

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases.

to encourage British and American schoolchildren t o eat

advantage /ad'vcnntids/

healthily. He's married w i t h f o u r children.

expenses /'ik'spensiz/

Nigella Lawson is a popular

e x c l a i m /ik'skleim/

f o o d w r i t e r and journalist who s t a r t e d

t r u s t /tr,\st/

w o r k as a book reviewer and restaurant

suspicious

critic. She has always been interested

calmly

in f o o d and cookery, but she has never trained as a cook. Despite this, she has successfully hosted her own cooking shows on TV, especially in the USA, where she had almost t w o million viewers. She also has

/sa'spifas/

/"kaimli/

dreamily

/'drnmili/

m a s t e r f u l l y /"mctistafali/ the suburbs /5s 'sAb3:bz/ somebody else /'sAmbsdi els/

her own range of products called Living Kitchen.

Gordon Ramsay is one of Britain's t o p chefs and he has w o n sixteen Michelin stars in t o t a l . He owns

A

m

restaurants all over t h e w o r l d , but he also helps other restaurant owners who are having problems w i t h their business. Gordon is probably most famous as the host of the TV reality

show Hell s Kitchen, where he o f t e n shouted angrily at the participants when they made a mistake.

$B3&&GÂŁlÂŁ

FILES

T_


All animals are equal - but some animals are more equal than others. From Animal Farm by George Orwell, British writer

would you do? 1 GRAMMAR if+ past, would + infinitive (second conditional) a

M a t c h t h e sentence b e g i n n i n g s a n d e n d i n g s . 1 I f m y sister were older,

C D a i f he c o u l d s w i m .

2 M y parents w o u l d buy a bigger house

b you'd be really scared.

3 H e ' d go s a i l i n g

EH

c i f they c o u l d n ' t w a t c h T V ?

4 W h a t w o u l d people d o

â&#x20AC;˘

d i f it wasn't r a i n i n g .

5 I f y o u saw t h a t h o r r o r f i l m ,

EH

e i f they had m o r e money.

6 I'd go f o r a w a l k

EJ

f

she c o u l d go t o the p a r t v w i t h me.

2 V O C A B U L A R Y animals

O r d e r t h e w o r d s t o c o m p l e t e the sentences a n d q u e s t i o n s . 1 car / w o u l d / 1 / i t / to / w o r k / d r i v e / a / h a d If I

had a car. I would drive it to work

C o m p l e t e the c r o s s w o r d .

.

2 y o u / f o u n d / do / a / y o u / m i l l i o n / w o u l d / i f / euros What

?

3 i f / i t / he / c o u l d / a / a f f o r d / one / p h o n e H e ' d buy

.

4 caviar / i t /1 / eat / gave / m e / w o u l d n ' t I f someone

.

5 say / c o u l d / t a l k / i f / to / y o u / the / w o u l d / president / y o u What

?

6 job / f o r / y o u / a /1 / n e w / i f / l o o k / were I'd

.

C o m p l e t e t h e second c o n d i t i o n a l sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f the verbs i n b r a c k e t s . 1 I f a bee

flew

(fly) into my bedroom. I

would

open

(open) the w i n d o w . 2 I f m y sister she 3 We

(see) a mouse i n the k i t c h e n , (scream). (not have) a dog i f we

(not have) a garden. 4 I f my brother he 5 If I

(not be) allergic to a n i m a l s , (get) a cat. (live) i n the c o u n t r y , I

(learn) t o r i d e a horse. 6 What dog

you (attack) you?

(do) i f a dangerous

C l u e s across [ 2 1 ^ â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I :


3 PRONUNCIATION word stress

5

U n d e r l i n e the stressed syllables. j

a

1

butterfly

a

5 dolphin

9 lijon

2 camel

6 elephant

10 monkey

3 chicken

7 giraffe

11 mosquito

4 crocodile

8 jellyfish

12

man

b

1&J" *ÂŁ3 Listen and check. Then listen again and repeat the words. :

5 3 2 ^ 3 3 ) L i s t e n to a news story a b o u t a s h a r k a t t a c k . H o w d i d the

13 spider 14 tiger

rabbit

LISTENING

survive?

L i s t e n again and answer the questions. 1 W h e r e is E r i c N e r h u s f r o m ? 2 W h a t was he d o i n g w h e n the shark

4 READING

attacked?

Read the first p a r t o f t h e t e x t a n d t i c k (/) the t h i n g s y o u w o u l d d o .

a

(ROCOWIE ATTACK! If you were swimming at the edge of the water in Southern Florida, USA,

3 W h i c h parts o f his b o d y were i n the shark's m o u t h ? 4 W h a t was Eric's vest made o f ?

and you saw a crocodile coming towards you, what would you do? 5 W h o rescued Eric? 'I'd run away fast.'

T d pretend t o be dead.'

'I'd t r y t o open its m o u t h . '

Yd put my fingers into its eyes.' [_

Yd make a loud noise.'

O

Yd t r y t o f i g h t i t . '

6 H o w d i d E r i c get t o hospital? Q 7 W h a t i n j u r i e s d i d he have?

b

N o w r e a d the rest o f t h e a r t i c l e . W h i c h sentence is t h e best s u m m a r y ? 1 There's n o t h i n g y o u can do i f a crocodile attacks y o u .

8 H o w b i g was the shark?

2 There are lots o f t h i n g s y o u can do i f a c r o c o d i l e attacks y o u . 3 There's o n l y one t h i n g t o d o i f a crocodile attacks y o u .

Well, most of these are possible - the best thing to do depends on where the crocodile is at the time. If it comes towards you on land, experts say you should turn around and run away a s fast a s possible. Crocodiles can run faster than humans over a short distance, but they soon get tired. If they miss their first chance to catch their victim, they usually start looking for something else. If you're in the water, then splash around t o make a noise so t h a t the animal gets confused. If this doesn't w o r k , push your t h u m b or fingers into the crocodile's eye. This is the most sensitive area of the crocodile's body and it is the place where you can cause the animal the most pain . It will also be very surprised by your attack and it's quite possible t h a t i t

U S E F U L WORDS AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases. pockets

"pokits/

backwards

/'baekwsdz/

b i t e /bait/ f l o a t /fbot/ shout /Jaot/ s t i n g /stm/ suck /sAk/ tie /tai/

will decide t o leave you alone. Don't t r y and open the crocodile's mouth

wave Aveiv/

because the muscles are so strong t h a t this is nearly impossible.

keep s t i l l / k i : p 'stil/

However, if the crocodile is in a bad m o o d , it's possible t h a t it will carry on fighting. Your final o p p o r t u n i t y is t o p r e t e n d t o be dead. If the crocodile thinks t h a t its victim is dead, i t opens its mouth f o r a f e w seconds t o move the body into its t h r o a t . This can give you your last chance t o escape, but it's a very dangerous plan. Our final advice? It's much better to avoid crocodiles than t o do any o f the things above... c

L o o k at the h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s o r phrases. C h e c k t h e i r m e a n i n g a n d pronunciation w i t h your dictionary.


I am not afraid of death, I just don't want to be there when it happens. Woody Allen, American film director

afraid of it for years 1 V O C A B U L A R Y phobias and words related to fear a

b

C o m p l e t e t h e t e x t w i t h / b r a n d since.

Complete the phobias w i t h the missing vowels. T h e n m a t c h t h e m w i t h the definitions. fl_g_o_r^fl_ph_o_bj_ _o_ cl

str p h b _ r

gl

chn ph b _ ss

cr

LH • •

• •

ph b ph b

a fear o f spiders b fear o f o p e n spaces c fear o f heights d fear o f closed spaces e fear o f p u b l i c s p e a k i n g

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h a s u i t a b l e w o r d . 1 A r e y o u frightened

o f snakes? A l o t o f people are.

2 I ' m quite sc

o f spiders. I d o n ' t l i k e

them much. 3 I f y o u suffer f r o m a f

of flying, you

can't travel by plane. 4 M y sister is te

o f b i g dogs. She always

crosses the r o a d i f she sees one. 5 M y c h i l d r e n don't like s w i m m i n g . T h e y ' r e a

o f water.

6 Olga has a p h

o f insects. She never

goes t o the c o u n t r y .

G R A M M A R present perfect + for and since (^]irclg)the c o r r e c t w o r d , / o r o r since, t o c o m p l e t e

A celebrity's life

Kristen Stewart, actress

Kristen Stewart has been a famous actress

for

1

about five years now. She has been an actress she was eight years old, when her

2

each sentence.

agent saw her performing at school. Her first role was in a

1 Jess hasn't f l o w n o n a plane(for)/ s i n c e m a n y years.

film where she didn't speak, b u t

2 I haven't seen m y parents f o r / s i n c e m y b i r t h d a y .

she has been in many films. She is probably best known for

3 H e hasn't r i d d e n a horse f o r / s i n c e he f e l l o f f one w h e n

playing Bella Swan in TheTwilightSaga, a part which she has

he was twelve.

played

then

3

four years.

4

4 We've h a d o u r rabbit f o r / s i n c e six m o n t h s .

Kristen has lived in Los Angeles

5 M y g r a n has agoraphobia. She hasn't left the house

was born. Because she was acting at a young age, she

for / s i n c e t w o years. 6 I've been a f r a i d o f dogs f o r / s i n c e I was very y o u n g .

she

5

couldn't go to school, so she studied online. then, she has completed high school.

6

7 O l i v e r is i l l . H e hasn't eaten f o r / s i n c e t w o days.

She is now one of the best-paid actresses in Hollywood.

8 We haven't been back there f o r / s i n c e the accident

Something many people don't know about Kristen is that

happened.

she has equinophobia, or a fear of horses. She has had this problem

most of her life, but her fans

7

have only known about i t

8

2012, when she

was filming with horses. Kristen explained that she has been scared of them

9

she was nine years old,

when she had a terrible fall during a horse-riding accident.


c

C o m p l e t e the q u e s t i o n s a b o u t K r i s t e n S t e w a r t . Use How long o r When a n d t h e v e r b i n b r a c k e t s . 1

When did

Kristen Stewart

start

acting? (start)

4 a

she

the p a r t o f Bella Swan?

(play) i n Los Angeles? (live)

Since she was b o r n . equinophobia? (have)

For m o s t o f her l i f e .

( b ) someone i n her f a m i l y , 2 The dog b i t . . . a the n e i g h b o u r ,

fans

about her phobia? (hear)

I n 2012. d

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c h o o s e t h e c o r r e c t answers.

c her p h o b i a .

Kristen.

5

b

a her pet. Kristen _

4

Listen to a radio call-in programme

1 T h e caller is w o r r i e d a b o u t . . .

For f o u r years. 3

ffiTfcii!ffi

a b o u t p h o b i a s . W h a t is c y n o p h o b i a ?

W h e n she was eight. 2

LISTENING

b the caller, c

R i g h t (/) o r w r o n g (*)? C o r r e c t t h e m i s t a k e s i n t h e b o l d

the caller's son.

3 T h e caller w a n t s some

phrases.

advice a b o u t . . .

1 G i l l h a t e s f l y i n g since she was a c h i l d .

a p r e v e n t i n g a phobia, b k e e p i n g dogs,

Gill has hated flying 2 H o w l o n g t i m e has y o u r b r o t h e r an actor?

c treating a phobia. 4 T h e psychologist tells the caller... a to keep her son away f r o m dogs.

3 W e ' v e b e e n m a r r i e d since 2 0 0 0 .

b t o t a l k about her son's experience w i t h h i m . c to let her son play w i t h a friend's dog.

4 He's been i n the U S A f o r F e b r u a r y . 5 H o w l o n g d o y o u h a v e y o u r dog?

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S

6 He's h a d t h i s job s i n c e e i g h t y e a r s .

L e a r n these words and phrases.

7 I've had f o u r cars s i n c e I l e a r n e d t o d r i v e . 8 S h e ' s k n o w n S a l l y since they were at school.

cure /'kjoa/ d r u g /drAg/ heights /haits/ overcome ( a fear) /aova'kAm/ panic /'pajnik/

3 PRONUNCIATION <tWn&3!fft

sentence stress

L i s t e n a n d repeat t h e sentences. C o p y t h e

rhythm. 1 H o w l o n g have you w o r k e d h e r e ? 2 H o w l o n g have they b e e n

married?

3 H O W l o n g has she k n o w n him? 4 W e ' v e l i v e d here for s i x m o n t h s . 5 I've s t u d i e d E n g l i s h for t h r e e

years.

6 He's had a p h o b i a s i n c e he was a c h i l d .

afraid

/a'freid/

frightened

fraitnd/

r a t i o n a l (opp irrational) scared

/"rasfanal/

/skead/

terrified

/'terifaid/

affect sbd / s t h (verb)

a'fekt/

have an effect o n sbd/sth

hasv an f f e k t on/


In films the director is God; in documentaries God is the director. Alfred Hitchcock, British film director

3orn to sing 1 V O C A B U L A R Y biographies

W r i t e t h e verbs i n t h e past s i m p l e o r p r e s e n t p e r f e c t . Use c o n t r a c t i o n s w h e r e necessary.

C o m p l e t e the phrases. 1 M y g r a n d a d was He went H e fell H e left H e started T h e y got 7 They had 8 H e retired

• • • • • • •

a o n his 6 5 t h b i r t h d a y .

A How long have you studied English? (study) B Since I was little. I started learning it at school. (start)

2

A Are Tom and Gill married? B Yes, they are. A When they

b i n love w i t h m y g r a n at school. c b o r n i n 1945. d t o school w h e n he was five. e w o r k w h e n he was 17. f

school i n 1960.

h

married? (get) together for about

B Last year. But they ten years now. (be)

g three c h i l d r e n . m a r r i e d i n 1968.

A B A B

2 G R A M M A R present perfect or past simple (2)? a

1

(^fhrj^) t h e c o r r e c t v e r b f o r m s .

Is that man the new accountant? Yes, he is. How long he Only for two months. He (finish)

A How long (have) B A longtime! I

. here? (work) . university in June.

you

. your car?

it in 2005,1 think, (buy)

A When . Sandra boyfriend? (meet) B When she was at university. She. three years now. (know).

her

A How long (live) B Not long. I

_ in London?

. you.

. him for

. six months ago. (arrive)

3 PRONUNCIATION word stress My mum was born in Plymouth in 1948. When (sheleft)/ she's 1

left school, she started work in an office in Plymouth. Later, the

a

award children divorced married musician primary retire secondary separate (verb) successful

company sent / has sent her to a different office in Bristol, 2

where she met / she's met my dad. They fell / They've fallen 3

W r i t e the words i n the correct g r o u p .

4

in love, and they got / they've got married in 1970. They had / 5

6

They've had three children - I'm the youngest. 7

They moved / They've moved back to Plymouth again when

1 Stress on 1st syllable

2 Stress on 2nd syllable

children

award

my dad retired. They bought a very nice house and they lived / 8

they've lived there for two years now. My dad just put / 9

has just put a greenhouse in the garden for growing vegetables 10

he was / he's been a keen gardener all his life. My parents

11

made / have made a lot of new friends and they're very

happy in their new home.

b

Listen and check. Then listen again and repeat the w o r d s .


4 READING a

b

(QiÂŁcle)the c o r r e c t v e r b form i n t h e q u e s t i o n s . 1 W h e n ( w a s ) / h a s b e e n John L e n n o n born?

Read the t e x t a b o u t John L e n n o n . O r d e r the p a r a g r a p h s 1-7.

2 W h a t did his mother buy / has his mother b o u g h t for h i m ? 3 H o w l o n g w e r e / h a v e b e e n T h e Beatles together? 4 H o w d i d J o h n L e n n o n die / h a s J o h n L e n n o n died? 5 H o w many albums d i d Julian L e n n o n m a k e / has Julian L e n n o n made? 6 W h i c h instrument d i d S e a n L e n n o n play / h a s S e a n L e n n o n p l a y e d w i t h d i f f e r e n t bands? c

Underline five words y o u don't k n o w . Use your d i c t i o n a r y t o check t h e i r m e a n i n g a n d p r o n u n c i a t i o n .

5 a

LISTENING fflifcHiflit

Listen t o a radio p r o g r a m m e about the

A m e r i c a n actress a n d singer Judy G a r l a n d a n d

John Lennon and his sons

her daughter, L i z a M i n n e l l i . H o w old were they w h e n t h e y f i r s t p e r f o r m e d o n stage?

H Z ] On 8 December, 1980, one of John Lennon's fans shot him outside his apartment. Since then, both o f his sons have become musicians. Julian Lennon has made six albums and Sean Lennon has sung and played bass guitar w i t h a number o f different bands. So far, however, neither of them have been as successful as their father. John Lennon was born in Liverpool on 9 October, 1940. His parents separated when he was five, so he went t o live with an aunt and uncle. However, he stayed in contact w i t h his mother, who played him Elvis Presley records and t a u g h t him how t o play the banjo. H I Before The Beatles broke up in 1970, John met the Japanese artist, Yoko Ono, and he divorced his first wife. He left the band and continued making music both on his own and with Yoko. Their son, Sean, was born on 9 October, 1975 and John stayed at home t o look after him. When John was 15, his mother bought him his first guitar. He formed his first band called The Quarrymen while he was still at school. When he left school, he started a course at A r t College, but the band t o o k up a lot o f his time, so he didn't finish t h e course. The band released their first single 'Love Me Do' in October, 1962. They started touring t h e country. John married his first wife, Cynthia, in secret, and his first son, Julian, was born while they were away. Fans went mad wherever The Beatles played and all of their albums reached t h e number one spot in the charts. H ! I The singer-songwriter and guitarist John Lennon is one of the greatest musicians of all time. Songs like Givepeacea chance and Imagine made him famous all over the w o r l d . John met Paul McCartney at the second performance of The Quarrymen and he soon joined the band. Later, George Harrison joined them as lead guitarist. In 1960, they became The Beatles and they started looking f o r a drummer. Ringo Starr replaced their original drummer, Pete Best, in 1962.

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). Both women... 1 were b o r n i n the U S A .

T_

2 changed t h e i r names. 3 started p e r f o r m i n g w h e n they were very young. 4 w o n Oscars. 5 sang together at the L o n d o n P a l l a d i u m . 6 had problems. 7 got m a r r i e d m o r e t h a n once. 8 had three c h i l d r e n .

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases. award /a'woid/

talented /'trebntid/

c a p t a i n /'kaeptm/

be i n f l u e n c e d b y

f u n e r a l /'fjumaral/ injure /'ind3a/

/bi 'nfluanst bai/ ( f o l l o w i n sb's) footsteps

eldest /'eldist/

/'fotsteps/

respected /n'spektid/

f o r m a band /fb:m a baend/

FILE 9 61


Getting around directions

1 VOCABULARY

4

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a n d a n s w e r these q u e s t i o n s .

C o m p l e t e the directions. To get to the- hotel you need to Hum the roundabout 6to V

left and go htr

on until you get to

the roundabout and take the third e and t

5

the second turning on

u

. The hotel is called The ting's Head and it's on the r 8

n

.

4

Then turn right at the traffic l the l

READING

.

1 H o w far is i t f r o m the a i r p o r t to M a n h a t t a n ? 2 3

15mUes

H o w l o n g does i t take t o d r i v e there outside the r u s h hour? H o w m u c h does A i r T r a i n JFK cost f o r t w o people one way?

2 A S K I N G HOW TO G E T T H E R E C o m p l e t e t h e d i a l o g u e w i t h t h e m i s s i n g sentences.

How do I get to SoHo on the subway? OK. Thanks. See you later. OK. And then? How many stops is that? Could you say that again? Where is it? How do I get to SoHo on the subway? A B Go to the subway station at Grand Central - 42nd Street. Take line 6 towards Brooklyn Bridge - City Hall. Get off at Spring Street. A B OK. Take line 6 from Grand Central - 42nd Street to Spring Street. A B Seven. A B Then you can walk to the restaurant. A B Come out of the subway on Spring Street. Go straight on for about 80 yards and the restaurant is on the right. It's called Balthazar. A B And don't get lost

4 H o w m u c h does a t a x i cost f o r f o u r people? 5 H o w m u c h d o taxis charge per suitcase? 6 W h a t t i m e is the earliest bus to M a n h a t t a n ? 7 H o w m u c h is the fare f o r a n adult a n d a small child?

1

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH Complete the dialogue w i t h the w o r d s i n the box. don't

A B A B A B A B

feel

long

mean

said

s o stay

think

so sorry I'm late. I missed the bus. I'm But you're always late. :

I m sorry. Why don't you leave home earlier? Look, w h y we order? I'm really hungry. No. I don't want t o here any more. OK. Why don't we go for a walk? I can get a burger or something. I don't like a walk. It's been a day and I'm tired. A Listen. I'll take you home now. And tomorrow I'll make dinner for you at my house. What do y o u ? B OK. I suppose that way you can't be late! 3

;

4

5

6

7

JFK

International

r

•••• -4

JFK (John F Kennedy) International Airport is the largest of the three airports serving New York City. It is located in Southeast Queens, about 15 miles (24km) from Manhattan. Travel time to Manhattan by car during rush hour can be over an hour; at other times it's about thirty to forty minutes.

Getting into town from the airport Although AIRTRAIN JFK does not travel directly to Manhattan, it connects passengers to New York's subway and bus networks. The journey costs $7 and takes about an hour, depending on your destination. If you don't mind carrying your own luggage, this is probably your best option. TAXIS are available outside every terminal in the airport and there's a $45 flat fee to any location in Manhattan. Taxis will take up to four passengers and there is no additional charge for luggage. NEW YORK AIRPORT SERVICE EXPRESS BUSES run every 15 to 30 minutes from 6.30 a.m. to 11.10 p.m. from each of the airport terminals. The fare is $13, but you can save money by buying round trip tickets online. One free child under 12 is included in the fare. You can choose to get off at Grand Central, Port Authority or Penn Station and the ride takes about an hour. U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s o r phrases y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y t o l o o k u p t h e i r m e a n i n g a n d pronunciation.


Necessity is the mother of invention. Anonymous

e mothers of invention 1 V O C A B U L A R Y verbs: invent, discover, etc.

2 G R A M M A R passive a

O r d e r t h e w o r d s t o m a k e sentences.

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h t h e past participle o f these verbs.

1 discovered / were / G a l i l e o / Saturn's rings / by /

base call design discover give invent open play show use

Saturn's rings were discovered by Galileo

1 The L o n d o n Olympic Stadium was

by the a r c h i t e c t u r a l

designed

2 is / o n / o f / life / the film The Iron Lady / the / based / Margaret Thatcher

company, Populous. 2 T h e Statue o f L i b e r t y was to the people o f the U S A as a present f r o m the French people.

3 A p p l e / invented / m o b i l e phones / by / weren't

3 G o l d was first _

i n California

i n 1848. 4 Lemons and sugar are _

to

make lemonade.

4 isn't / p e t r o l / lead / i n / used / nowadays

i

5 The game o f rugby was f i r s t _ at Rugby School i n the U K . 5 sold / low-cost f l i g h t s / o n l i n e / are

6 The first public m o v i e was to an invited audience i n I n d i a n a i n 1894. 7 The river that f l o w s t h r o u g h W a s h i n g t o n D . C . i n the U S A is

the

Potomac.

6 an / were / architect / by / Petronus Towers /

T h e first games console was _

designed / the / A r g e n t i n i a n

by Ralph H . Baer. 9 Heathrow airport's T e r m i n a l 5 was by the Queen i n 2 0 0 8 .

7 wasn't / Steven Spielberg / Avatar j by / directed

10 M a n y characters i n Somerset M a u g h a m ' s books are

o n real people. company / by / made / M i n i s / B r i t i s h / aren't / a / any more


4

W r i t e sentences i n t h e present o r past passive. 1 w h a t / y o u r new baby / call ?

What is your new babv called

a

LISTENING (QJJT^S) L i s t e n t o a r a d i o p r o g r a m m e a b o u t t h i n g s t h a t have b e e n i n v e n t e d b y accident. M a t c h the

2 contact lenses / invent / a Czech chemist

inventions 1 - 3 w i t h the inventors a-c. 1 T h e m i c r o w a v e oven

3 where / olives / g r o w

\h\

2 T h e X-ray

?

3 Crisps

4 the V W Beetle / design / i n the 1930s

a George C r u m b Percy Spencer

[_J

c W i l h e l m Roentgen

5 diamonds / f i n d / i n m a n y d i f f e r e n t colours 6 w h e n / v i t a m i n s / discover ?

7 Spanish / speak / i n Spain and m a n y parts o f South America 8 where / the Lord of the Rings f i l m s / make ?

R e w r i t e t h e sentences i n t h e passive. 1 A factory i n C h i n a makes these toys. These toys

are made by a factory

in China

b

2 People o f all ages wear jeans.

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c o r r e c t the sentences. 1 T h e discovery that microwaves heated f o o d was

Jeans

made i n 4 9 5 4 . 1945

3 M i c r o s o f t d i d n ' t invent laptop computers.

2 T h e m i c r o w a v e s melted a bar o f chocolate o n the table.

L a p t o p computers

3 The m a n w h o discovered the X-ray machine was American.

4 Does a computer c o n t r o l the heating?

4 H e discovered t h a t electrical rays c o u l d pass t h r o u g h

Is 5 Stieg Larsson w r o t e The Millennium The Millennium

w a t e r and air.

Trilogy.

5 T h e image o n the f i r s t X-ray is o f the man's h a n d .

Trilogy

6 People don't use cassette recorders very m u c h today. Cassette recorders

6 T h i n f r i e d potatoes are called crisps by A m e r i c a n s . 7 T h e i r i n v e n t o r was a waiter. 8 T h e crisps were f i r s t called 'Saratoga potatoes'.

7 Picasso d i d n ' t paint The Scream. The Scream 8 D i d the same person direct all the H a r r y Potter films? Were a l l

U S E F U L WORDS A N D P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases.

PRONUNCIATION - e d MJiT^!ÂŁrV L i s t e n a n d (circle) t h e past p a r t i c i p l e w i t h a d i f f e r e n t -ed s o u n d .

2

/id/

dog called discovered (paintecT)

3 4

/id/

opened wanted designed

# tie

dog checked invented pretended

5

rained started directed

Listen again. Practise saying the w o r d s .

decided produced based

hairdryer

/'headraia/

hammer

Incmo

k n i f e /naif/ logo

/'bogao/

t i n opener

/'tin aupna/

z i p /zip/ b u l l e t - p r o o f vest

/'bolit p r u : f vest/

disposable nappies /dispaozabl 'naepiz tinned food

tind fu:d/

w i n d s c r e e n w i p e r s / ' w m d s k r i m waipaz/


The beautiful thing about learning is that no one can take it away from you. B B King, American musician

B Could do better V O C A B U L A R Y school subjects M a t c h t h e s c h o o l subjects a n d t h e q u e s t i o n s . 1 Foreign languages 2 Geography 3 History 4 Literature 5 Maths 6 Physical E d u c a t i o n 7 Science 8 I n f o r m a t i o n Technology 9 Art

2 G R A M M A R used to a

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e c o r r e c t f o r m o f used to a n d t h e verb phrase.

0 • • • • • • • •

1 LH Didyou

7 •

athletics track? Musicians?

h W h a t ' s the capital o f Sweden? W h a t ' s the c h e m i c a l s y m b o l f o r water?

M a t c h the questions i n a w i t h the answers. Stockholm Pablo Picasso schbn

1,485 W i l l i a m Shakespeare 2

4 0 0 metres 8 C l i c k o n the icon. 9 1901

(be) a

6 \+\ H e r school same-sex school, b u t n o w it's m i x e d .

H o w m a n y metres is one lap o f a n

H Q

(not study) I T

Pupils _ w h e n I w e n t t o school.

• • • • • • • •

(not play) basketball

We inPE.

(your teachers / give) y o u

m a lot o f homework?

e W h e n d i d Q u e e n V i c t o r i a die?

Danke

( A l e x / have) a n i c k n a m e at school?

5 •

d H o w do y o u select a p r o g r a m ?

i

(wear) a u n i f o r m

4 m

Macbeth?

g W h o p a i n t e d Three

(behave) very w e l l .

at school.

c I l o w do yy oouu say sav ' T h aannkk y' o u ' i n G erman? lh

f

( y o u / be) a g o o d student?

3 [+J We

a W h a t ' s 15 t i m e s 99? b W h o wrote

use to be

2 EH I

b

C o r r e c t t h e m i s t a k e s i n t h e h i g h l i g h t e d phrases. 1

l o s e t o sit at the back o f the class.

2

H e used go t o school o n Saturday m o r n i n g s .

3

W e d i d n ' t used t o u n d e r s t a n d o u r G e r m a n teacher.

4

D i d y o u used t o go t o school by bus?

5

School use t o start at 9.00 b u t n o w i t starts at 8.30.

6

D i d y o u r f r i e n d s use help y o u w i t h y o u r h o m e w o r k ?

/ used to

3 PRONUNCIATION used to / didn't use to IjMi&i'fTi 1

L i s t e n a n d r e p e a t t h e sentences. C o p y t h e r h y t h m .

i u s e d to be g o o d at m a t h s .

2 W e u s e d to h a t e the t e a c h e r . 3 she d i d n ' t u s e to l i k e s c h o o l . 4 They d i d n ' t u s e to w e a r a u n i f o r m . 5 D i d you U S e to play

football

in P E ?

6 D i d y o u r s c h o o l use to o p e n in the h o l i d a y s ?

65


4 a

READING

b

R e a d t h e i n t e r v i e w a g a i n . M a r k t h e sentences T (true) o r F (false).

Read the interview. W r i t e the questions i n the

1 H e t h i n k s it's i m p o r t a n t t o w o r k together w i t h others. _T

c o r r e c t place.

2 D a v i d d i d n ' t always enjoy his f i r s t school.

D i d y o u have a f a v o u r i t e teacher?

3 D a v i d wanted to be a tennis player w h e n he left school.

W h e r e d i d y o u go t o school?

4 H e a n d h i s b r o t h e r used t o behave w e l l .

D i d you ever behave badly?

5 I n the past, the headmaster could hit pupils w i t h a stick.

W h a t ' s the most i m p o r t a n t lesson y o u learned at school?

6 D a v i d d i d n ' t use t o be a very g o o d student.

W h a t d i d y o u w a n t t o d o w h e n y o u left school?

7 H e o n l y got i n t o W e l l i n g t o n because he was g o o d

W h a t subjects were y o u g o o d at?

My schooldays

at s p o r t . 8 M r S t o r r taught m a t h s and coached the tennis team. c

L o o k at t h e h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s . U s e y o u r d i c t i o n a r y t o look up their meaning and pronunciation.

D A V I D S U C H E T , actor, played Hercule Poirot in the T V series of Agatha Christie murder mysteries. Intci vicu />\ Tim

Oglethorpe

5 a

LISTENING G ÂŁ t ^ 3 3 ) L i s t e n t o t w o p e o p l e t a l k i n g a b o u t language l e a r n i n g i n s c h o o l s . W e r e T o n y a n d A m y g o o d at

1

l a n g u a g e s w h e n t h e y w e r e at school?

Where did you go to school?

Grenham House, a boarding school in Kent, and Wellington School, a private school in Somerset.

2 One thing my schooldays did teach me was the importance of teamwork. At boarding school, I was an outsider and I was really, truly unhappy there. When I started playing sport at Grenham House, I became a member of a team, and I felt a lot better about myself. Like sport, acting is also nearly always a team event and you rely just as much on other people as they do on you.

3 Yes, I did. My brother and I both went to the same school and sometimes, we used to break the rules. In private schools at that time, a common punishment used to be 'the cane': a long stick which the head teacher used for hitting naughty boys. Both of us were caned on several occasions.

b

L i s t e n a g a i n and(^ircl^)the c o r r e c t a n s w e r . 1 A m y studied ( ^ e r m a n ) / F r e n c h the longest. 2 A m y can r e m e m b e r one language m o r e t h a n the others because she p r a c t i s e d it o n h o l i d a y / s t u d i e d it a t university. 3 Adults remember some numbers / some adjectives f r o m t h e i r language classes. 4 A c c o r d i n g t o Tony, some people are t o o b u s y / t o o u n c o m f o r t a b l e to speak a f o r e i g n language. 5 G e r m a n / I t a l i a n is more p o p u l a r t h a n Spanish. 6 I n the future, schools w i l l offer m o r e E u r o p e a n languages / m a k e younger pupils learn languages.

4 Well, I wasn't very academic at all, really, and I was very bad at maths. Luckily for me, I was really good at sport and that's the only reason they accepted me at Wellington. I was in the school rugby team, and I also played tennis. I played at Wimbledon once, in the junior tournament, and I got through to the second round.

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases. b e h a v i o u r /bi'heivja/ m a r k s /marks/ n i c k n a m e /'nikneim/

Although I was good at sport, I never really considered taking it up professionally. Once I left Wellington, I wanted to become an actor and I didn't play nearly as much sport when I left school. 6

Yes, my favourite teacher was Mr Storr, head of the school tennis team, and also my English teacher. One day, when I was 14 or 15,1 had to read in class. After the class, he said to me, 'The way you read suggests you might enjoy acting. Would you consider playing Macbeth in the school play?' That was the beginning of my acting career, and I've never looked back since.

d i s o r g a n i z e d Alis'oigsnaizd/ e m o t i o n a l Zi'msojanl/ p r i m a r y school /'praimari sku:l/ secondary school /'sekandri skuil/ express y o u r s e l f /ik'spres joiself/ be g o o d (bad) at /bi ' g o d s t /


The first step to getting what you want out of life is this: Decide what you want. Ben Stein, American writer

r Indecisive

V / I V

M a x a n d S a m are t e l l i n g a c o l l e a g u e a b o u t t h e i r p l a n s

2 V O C A B U L A R Y word building: noun formation

for n e x t w e e k e n d . C o m p l e t e t h e t e x t w i t h might a n d a

a

1 GRAMMAR might (possibility) a

verb f r o m the b o x . be

eat go have

invite

make

rain

Complete the chart w i t h the correct n o u n or verb.

1

we haven't decided w h a t t o do yet. I t

1

so w e

for a walk in the

country on Saturday. W e

might be

sunny.

A

4

,

5

so we won't be able to go out. In t h a t case, we some friends f o r dinner

6

confusion

3

decide

some sandwiches w i t h us.

death

educate

5

6

election

imagine

7

8

information

on Saturday. W e

7

dinner

invite

9

ourselves, or w e

8

out, we're

10

life

opt

ii

12

organization

13

success

not sure. Everything depends on the weather, really.'

b

2

3

lunch in a restaurant, or w e

On the other hand, i t

choice

choose

confuse

'We feel like doing something special next weekend, but 2

Noun

Verb

take

C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h might o r might not a n d a verb f r o m the box. be

come

fail

b

g e t go go-out

1 I ' m really t i r e d so I

have

might not go out

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h verbs o r n o u n s f r o m a . 1 A f t e r the

miss tonight.

the job w i t h the A m e r i c a n company.

3 They're g o i n g t o flu.

to o u r p a r t y - they're

t h i n k i n g o f going on holiday then. together any m o r e .

6 I f the t a x i doesn't come soon, w e

8 Sue hasn't practised m u c h so she her d r i v i n g test.

4

at school depends o n h o w h a r d passengers t h a t the

5 We're s o r r y t o .

14.30 t r a i n t o B i r m i n g h a m is delayed. 6 He

the t r a i n . for o u r next holiday.

all t h e i r f r i e n d s

to t h e i r p a r t y . you work.

5 I haven't seen Johnny w i t h Vanessa f o r a l o n g t i m e .

7 We love s k i i n g , so we

to c o n t i n u e

s t u d y i n g w h e n I l e f t school. I loved university.

3 I f y o u have a temperature, y o u

They

o f m y grandfather, m y

2 I made the r i g h t

2 M i g u e l doesn't speak E n g l i s h , so he

4 M y parents

death

g r a n d m o t h e r came t o live w i t h us.

to study h i s t o r y instead

o f geography at school. t o the A l p s

7 Can you.

a world without

electricity? T h e d o c u m e n t a r y was about the o f the author, Charles D i c k e n s .


3 PRONUNCIATION a

Let me sleep on it

diphthongs

T i c k ( / ) the p a i r s o f w o r d s w h i c h have

For m a n y years, people have said that a good night's sleep often helps w h e n y o u have to m a k e a n i m p o r t a n t decision. R e s e a r c h done recently b y a n A m e r i c a n U n i v e r s i t y has s h o w n that this idea is actually true.

the same s o u n d a n d cross (X) the p a i r s that don't.

b

1 might

science

2 may

fail

3 know

now

4 where

were

5 here

there

6 tourist

Europe

7 show

cow

8 noisy

boy

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

The researchers used a card game for their experiment and 54 students between the ages of 18 and 23 took part. The scientists d i v i d e d the participants i n t o t w o groups. Both groups were given a short lesson i n h o w to play the card game, either i n the m o r n i n g or i n the evening. The lesson was very short, not long enough for either group to learn exactly h o w the card game worked. A l l of the students were asked to come back 12 hours later. The 28 students w h o had the class i n the afternoon went home to a n o r m a l evening and their usual n i g h t of sleep, w h i l e the 26 w h o received the class i n the m o r n i n g came back after a day of n o r m a l activities w i t h o u t h a v i n g a sleep.

_

<WiTara!fl^ L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat.

4 a

O n t h e i r second v i s i t , the students played the game for l o n g enough to l e a r n that t a k i n g cards f r o m the four d i f f e r e n t packs gave d i f f e r e n t results. T w o of the packs h a d cards w h i c h helped players w i n more o f t e n w h i l e the other t w o packs had cards w h i c h made t h e m lose. The object was to avoid losing the game.

READING R e a d t h e t e x t . W h a t was t h e a i m o f the e x p e r i m e n t ?

b

I n the e x p e r i m e n t , the students w h o had had a n o r m a l night's sleep chose cards f r o m the w i n n i n g packs four times m o r e t h a n those w h o h a d spent the 12-hour break awake. The students w h o h a d slept also u n d e r s t o o d better h o w to play the game.

R e a d the t e x t a g a i n a n d (circle) t h e c o r r e c t answer. 1 T h e p a r t i c i p a n t s i n the e x p e r i m e n t

These results show that sleep helps a person make better decisions. The researchers t h i n k that this has something to do w i t h rapid-eyemovement or REM sleep, w h i c h is the creative period of our sleep cycle. The experiment shows that there is a connection between REM sleep and decision m a k i n g , b u t researchers do not yet k n o w w h a t the connection is.

were allcSfunTversitJ)/ a t w o r k . 2 T h e t w o groups were s h o w n the card game i n d i f f e r e n t p l a c e s / at d i f f e r e n t t i m e s . 3 T h e p a r t i c i p a n t s had t o go back s o m e t i m e l a t e r / the n e x t day.

5

4 S o m e / A l l o f the p a r t i c i p a n t s w e n t t o bed between the t w o visits.

a

6 T h e cards i n the packs were the s a m e / different. 7 T h e g r o u p w h o were taught i n the m o r n i n g w o n / lost more often than the other g r o u p . 8 T h e experiment helped researchers f i n d

ffi'^JTrt

L i s t e n t o f i v e speakers t a l k i n g a b o u t d e c i s i o n s they have

m a d e . H o w m a n y o f t h e m m a d e g o o d decisions?

5 There were t w o / f o u r packs o f cards i n the card game.

LISTENING

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d m a t c h t h e speakers w i t h t h e sentences. Speaker 1

C_ A H e / She thought time was m o r e i m p o r t a n t than money.

Speaker 2

B H e / She d i d n ' t get a p r i z e .

Speaker 3

C I Ie / She d i d n ' t arrive o n t i m e .

Speaker 4

D H e / She d i d n ' t enjoy a special occasion.

Speaker 5

E H e / She d i d n ' t accept an i n v i t a t i o n .

a c o n n e c t i o n between b e i n g c r e a t i v e / R E M s l e e p and m a k i n g decisions. c

H i g h l i g h t five w o r d s you don't k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y t o l o o k u p t h e i r m e a n i n g and p r o n u n c i a t i o n .

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases. p r o d u c t s /'prodAkts/

make a decision

dissatisfied /dis'sastisfaid/

miss an o p p o r t u n i t y

/'mis ten opa'tjumati/

indecisive /indi'saisiv/

pick somebody up (= i n a car) /'pik SAmbadi Ap/

electrical gadgets

p i c k sth /'pik/

/ i l e k t n k l 'gsed3its/ be able t o /bi 'eibl ts/

A H * Š 68

/'meik 3 di'si3n/

e * k *

file i o

take sth seriously /teik 'sisrissli/


A lifetime of training for just 10 seconds. Jesse Owens, American athlete and winner of Olympic 100m in 1936

Bad losers 1 V O C A B U L A R Y sports, expressing movement

2 G R A M M A R expressing movement

a

a

C o m p l e t e the sentences. 1 The player t o o k t w o shots to h i t the g o l f b a l l i n t o the hole 2 I n athletics, the r u n n e r s r u n r o u n d a t r 3 It was m

p

.

.

L o o k at the p i c t u r e s . C o m p l e t e the sentences w i t h the past s i m p l e o f t h e verbs a n d t h e c o r r e c t p r e p o s i t i o n . rrrr

, and everyone was

very tense, b u t his first s

went i n t o the net.

4 The g o l f player had to t r y and h i t the b a l l out o f the b

.

5 T h e athletes were r u n n i n g fast towards the f i n i s h i n g line because they were o n the last 1 6 W h e n y o u take a p

. , y o u have to k i c k the b a l l

past the goalkeeper. 7 The player w h o t o o k the c

kicked the b a l l to a

team mate, w h o headed i t i n t o the goal. b

U n d e r l i n e the p r e p o s i t i o n s o f m o v e m e n t i n a.

c

C o m p l e t e the c r o s s w o r d .

Clues across â&#x20AC;&#x201D;^

cycle go hit kick run throw across into over through under tip I n the ideal city... 1 They

cycled

2 T h e boy

up

the h i l l . ball

3 The train 4 He

the t u n n e l . the b a l l

5 The children 6 She

the goal. the road.

the b a l l

the net.


b

PRONUNCIATION sports

L o o k at the p i c t u r e , read t h e s t o r y , a n d c o m p l e t e i t w i t h the p r e p o s i t i o n s .

L o o k at the p h o n e t i c s a n d w r i t e t h e s p o r t .

across into out of past round through to towards under along (x 2)

1 /'futboil/

football

2 /'voliboil/ 3 /'maota 'reisirj/ 4 /'skkirj/ 5 /'wmds3:firj/ 6 /'saiklirj/ 7 /'ba:skitba:l/ 8 /'rAgbi/ 9 /aeG'letiks/ b

tfJjJ2T^ÂŤ!35

L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n a n d repeat

the w o r d s .

4 a

LISTENING d f f i ^ 2 3 ) L i s t e n t o f i v e p e o p l e t a l k i n g a b o u t b a d losers. W h i c h games or sports do they mention?

Listen again. W h o . . . ?

Last day at school for boy with dirty shoes! Last Wednesday started as normal for 15-year-old Michael Brewster at Hove Park School. A t 10.30 a.m., M i c h a e l ' s class w e r e j o g g i n g 1

t h e g y m . B u t w h e n Charles D u f f ,

round

t h e s p o r t s teacher, t o l d M i c h a e l to c l e a n h i s d i r t y t r a i n e r s , h e got r e a l l y a n g r y . H e r a n c h a n g i n g rooms w h e r e he f o u n d M r D u f f ' s keys. F r o m there, h e w e n t park, g o t

t h e car

3

M r Duff's Ford

4

M o n d e o , a n d s t a r t e d t h e car. T h e n h e d r o v e the r o a d ,

5

the b r i d g e , and

8

6

the security guard,

7

t h e s c h o o l gates. T h e n

he t u r n e d left a n d d r o v e

the

9

r o a d f o r about 100 m e t r e s

1 0

the

m a t h s teacher's house. T h a t w a s w h e n h e lost c o n t r o l . H e t r i e d to stop, b u t i n s t e a d w e n t 11

2 is i n a t e a m w i t h someone who's a bad loser 3 has a parent w h o is a bad loser 4 used t o let one o f t h e i r c h i l d r e n w i n 5 has a colleague w h o is a fanatical sports f a n

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases. coach /kaotf/ corner

t h e g y m , a n d b a c k to t h e

2

1 lost a f r i e n d after p l a y i n g sport w i t h h i m / her

a field a n d crashed into

a tree. M i c h a e l has n o w l e f t H o v e P a r k School.

/'kaina/

hole /haol/ lap hep p e n a l t y /'penalti/ beat b i : t crash race

/kraej/ /reis/

referee

refa'ri:/

score a goal /'ska:(r) a gaol/

Speaker 2


Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head. John Lennon and Paul McCartney, British

songwriters

re you a morning person? 1 V O C A B U L A R Y phrasal verbs a

2 G R A M M A R word order of phrasal verbs

C o m p l e t e w h a t t h e p e o p l e are s a y i n g i n each p i c t u r e .

Q i r c l e ) t h e c o r r e c t phrases. I f b o t h are possible, t i c k (/) t h e sentence. 1 Please t u r n o f f the l i g h t s / t u r n the l i g h t s o f f before y o u go t o bed. / 2 T h a n k s for the money. I ' l l pay it b a c k / pay b a c k it t o m o r r o w . 3 I can't f i n d m y keys. C a n y o u help me l o o k for t h e m / l o o k t h e m for? 4 W h y don't y o u t r y o n t h a t d r e s s / t r y t h a t d r e s s o n ? I t h i n k i t ' l l suit y o u . 5 M y m u m usually l o o k s a f t e r m y k i d s / l o o k s m y k i d s a f t e r w h e n w e go out. 6 I f you've f i n i s h e d playing, please p u t the 1 Turn

down

toys a w a y / p u t a w a y the toys.

t h e r a d i o ! It's v e r y l o u d !

2 D o n ' t w o r r y ! T h e m a t c h w i l l be

soon.

R e w r i t e t h e sentences w i t h a p r o n o u n .

3 W e need someone w h o c a n l o o k

our dog while

C h a n g e t h e w o r d o r d e r i f necessary.

we're o n holiday. 4 Take

1 y o u r shoes before y o u come i n !

5 Can you f i l l 6 Put looks a w f u l ! b

Can you write d o w n y o u r email address? Can you write it down

t h i s f o r m , please?

?

2 She'll give back the e x a m s o n Friday.

a d i f f e r e n t jacket! T h a t one 3 A r e you looking forward to y o u r party?

?

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h these v e r b s .

find out get on with give up go out look forward to take back throw away try on turn up 1 C h r i s called the s t a t i o n t o 2 I never

find out

look up

4 I called back m y m o t h e r w h e n I got home. 5 W e don't get o n w i t h o u r n e w n e i g h b o u r s .

the times o f the t r a i n s .

e m p t y j a m jars. I wash t h e m a n d t h e n

re-use t h e m .

6 Shall w e t u r n o n the T V ? . the heating?

3 It's very c o l d i n here. C a n y o u 4 T h e teacher t o l d us to

the w o r d s we d i d n ' t

understand. 5 W e love t r a v e l l i n g , so w e always

our holidays.

I don't really like my sister's new b o y f r i e n d . I d o n ' t . h i m at all. 7 They o n l y .

on F r i d a y o r Saturday n i g h t s

because they start w o r k early d u r i n g the week. 8 It's best t o

clothes before y o u buy t h e m .

9 We're g o i n g to

o u r n e w coffee m a c h i n e

because i t doesn't w o r k properly. 10 Anna's g o i n g to m o n t h t o t r y to lose w e i g h t .

sweets a n d chocolate f o r a

3

PRONUNCIATION linking fliiL,'<ffii

L i s t e n a n d repeat t h e sentences.

Try to l i n k the words. 1 T h r o w i t: ;away WW 2 T u r n it up! WW * 3 Write it down! w 4 Put i t away! WW ' 5 Give i t back! w 6 Fill it i n ! WW


4 a

READING R e a d t h e a r t i c l e . C o m p l e t e t h e gaps w i t h these p h r a s a l verbs. find out get up give up turn on write down

b

go out

put on

tired!

takeoff

& m m"Tl 1 T\ cr? IKZ IIJAJJ i Five tips for getting a ~ jetter night's sleep

Read the article again. T i c k (/) the people w i t h good h a b i t s a n d cross (X) t h e b a d o n e s . 1

I go to bed every n i g h t at 11 o'clock.

2 I sleep for six h o u r s d u r i n g the week and t e n h o u r s at

:

the weekend. 3 I always have l u n c h at m y desk to save t i m e . 4 I always wear sunglasses. 5 M y b e d r o o m is sometimes t o o c o l d . 6 I sometimes w a t c h a f i l m to help me to go t o sleep. 7 I usually have d i n n e r at 7.30 p . m .

flHHHHilHHK-'-

8 I o f t e n have a cup o f coffee before I go to b e d .

Sleep at the same times

9 I keep a n o t e b o o k by the side o f m y bed. 10 c

I sometimes meditate i f I can't sleep.

Find out how much sleep you need and make sure that

1

you get i t . Go to bed and

L o o k at the h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s o r p h r a s e s a n d guess

at the same

2

time each day and you will have more energy than if you

their m e a n i n g . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to l o o k u p t h e i r

sleep the same number o f hours at d i f f e r e n t times.

meaning and pronunciation.

Make sure you are exposed to light during the d

5

LISTENING

Your body needs natural light t o produce the hormone melatonin, which regulates your sleeping and waking

Listen to an interview w i t h G r a h a m , a taxi

cycle. Don't stay inside all day -

d r i v e r w h o u s u a l l y w o r k s at n i g h t . I s he p o s i t i v e o r

lunch break , f o r example for a short walk. On a sunny day

negative a b o u t h i s j o b ?

your sunglasses f o r at least half an hour

4

b

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a r k t h e sentences T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1

to let light onto your face.

G r a h a m goes t o sleep i m m e d i a t e l y after g e t t i n g home f r o m w o r k .

in your

3

Create a relaxing routine before going to bed

j

Have a hot bath. Then

2 T h e f i r s t meal he has w h e n he gets up is l u n c h .

your pyjamas and

3 H i s c h i l d r e n w a k e h i m u p i n the a f t e r n o o n .

make sure your bedroom is at the right temperature. Don't

4 H e never feels t i r e d w h e n he wakes u p .

watch TV in bed, as it will stimulate rather than relax you.

5 H e eats three times a day.

_

6 H e doesn't m i n d his w o r k i n g h o u r s .

_

Avoid stimulants Don't eat big meals or drink coffee late at night.

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases.

Avoid drinking alcohol before you go t o bed and 6

number of sleep problems.

buzz /b,\z/ energetic

Getting back to sleep

/enao^etik/

live (adjective)

/laiv/

sleepy /'sliipi/ w i l d (night) < w a i l d / b o w l ( o f cereal) /'baol/ any t i m e social l i f e

/'eni t a i m /

If you wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back t o sleep, t r y a relaxation technique like meditation. If t h a t doesn't w o r k ,

the light and

read a book. If you're w o r r i e d about something, 8

your problem on a piece of paper so

t h a t you can deal w i t h i t in the morning.

/'saujl laif/

set ( y o u r a l a r m clock) /set/ stay i n bed /'stei i n bed/

72

smoking! Cigarettes can cause a

If the tips above don't help, you might n to see a sleep doctor.


Coincidence is God's way of remaining anonymous. Albert Einstein, German physicist

hat a coincidence! 1 GRAMMAR so, neither + auxiliaries a

2 V O C A B U L A R Y similarities

C o m p l e t e t h e c o n v e r s a t i o n w i t h the p h r a s e s

Complete the text w i t h w o r d s f r o m

f r o m the b o x .

the box.

Neither did I Neither have I Neither was I So am I So do I So would I A

as both identical similar so

like

neither

Hi, Tom. Do you ever watch Who do you think

People t h i n k m y best f r i e n d Sue and

you are? You know, that TV series about

I are sisters, because we're very

celebrities who find out about their families?

1

B

Yes, I do. But I didn't see it last night.

A

1

B

2

Neither did I

each other. W e _

very

. But I usually watch it

4

like shopping,

and we have the same taste i n clothes. I usually wear trousers

every week.

and tops, a n d

I think it's really

skirts a n d

interesting. I'd love to find out about my family. . I'm thinking about

4

me, and we l o o k

town'

. I wasn't at home.

B

. Sue's f r o m the same

similar

wearing

5

does Sue. She doesn't like short _ d o I . Once we w e n t t o a p a r t y together

6

clothes!

7

looking for some information on the internet. . But I haven't done

5

3 PRONUNCIATION sentence stress, word stress

anything about it yet.

C s 2 ÂŤ 3 ) L i s t e n t o t h e sentences.

a b

r

1

R e s p o n d t o the s t a t e m e n t s w i t h So o r Neither,

S o did I .

t o say t h a t y o u are t h e same.

2 S o can I .

1 I ' m going out tonight.

3 S o have I .

So am I

4 N e i t h e r am 1 .

.

2 I enjoyed the party.

5 N e i t h e r do I . 6 N e i t h e r was I .

3 I haven't done the h o m e w o r k . 4 I was late today.

b

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d r e p e a t the sentences. C o p y the r h y t h m . ffliiJHiffl

c

L i s t e n a n d u n d e r l i n e t h e stressed syllable.

T h e n listen again and repeat the w o r d s . 5 I ' m not hungry. 6 I can't d r i v e .

1 i|den|ti|cal 2

similar

3

coincidence

4 amazing 7 I'd love t o travel r o u n d the w o r l d . 8 I don't have any pets.

5 discover 6

everywhere

7

personality

8 definitely


4 a

READING

b

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a n d m a r k the sentences T (true) or F (false). 1

R e a d the a r t i c l e a n d c h o o s e t h e best t i t l e .

Parents don't usually have t w i n s i n I n d i a .

X

2 A century ago, there used to be more t w i n s i n K o d i n h i .

1 A t o w n w i t h a mystery

3 D r S r i b i j u t h i n k s that there are a l o t o f t w i n s because

2 The problems o f having t w i n s

o f the p o l l u t i o n i n K o d i n h i .

3 W h y couples have t w i n s

4 D r S r i b i j u t h i n k s that couples w h o w a n t c h i l d r e n c o u l d l e a r n f r o m the villagers o f K o d i n h i . 5 It can be a health risk for w o m e n i n K o d i n h i to have t w i n s . 6 T h e President o f T A K A has a t w i n brother. c

L o o k at t h e h i g h l i g h t e d w o r d s a n d phrases a n d guess t h e i r m e a n i n g . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y t o l o o k u p t h e i r m e a n i n g and pronunciation.

5 a

LISTENING CS2^23) Listen to a radio p r o g r a m m e about famous t w i n s . M a t c h t h e t w i n s ( 1 - 3 ) w i t h the h e a d i n g s ( a - c ) .

T

oday, t h e r e are t w o t h o u s a n d families living in the village o f K o d i n h i in s o u t h e r n India.

A m o n g t h e m , t h e r e are 2 2 0 sets o f t w i n s , w h i c h is six times the global average. What makes this even more unusual is t h a t India has one o f t h e lowest b i r t h rates o f t w i n s in t h e w o r l d . Nobody can explain the reason why the village has so many t w i n s . Some people say the cause might be genetic, but local doctor, Dr Sribiju, doesn't t h i n k so. He says t h a t there haven't always been t w i n s in Kodinhi - parents suddenly s t a r t e d having them about sixty or seventy years ago. Neither does he believe t h a t a new kind o f p o l l u t i o n has caused

1 R o m u l u s and R e m u s

a criminal twins

2 The Kray Brothers

b celebrity t w i n s

3 T h e Olsen T w i n s

c

historical twins

the twins to be b o r n . In t h a t case, he argues,

R e a d t h e sentences. L i s t e n a g a i n a n d w r i t e R R ( R o m u l u s

there would be more t w i n s w i t h

and Remus), K B (the K r a y Brothers) or O T (the Olsen T w i n s ) .

malformations.

Luckily, most o f Kodinhi's t w i n s are b o r n healthy. Dr Sribiju thinks t h a t the t w i n s are born because o f something the villagers eat and drink. He wants t o discover just what t h a t is, so t h a t he can use it t o help other couples who can't have children. Having t w i n s in this p a r t o f India can be a big p r o b l e m f o r a family. It's expensive, and i t can

1 T h e i r parents d i d n ' t w a n t t h e m .

RR

2 T h e y were B r i t i s h . 3 T h e y ' r e s t i l l alive. 4 T h e y m e t some very famous people. 5 T h e y h a d a serious a r g u m e n t . 6 T h e y became famous very y o u n g .

be d a n g e r o u s f o r t h e mother's h e a l t h . That's why t h e villagers o f K o d i n h i have s t a r t e d a support group . The g r o u p is called the Twins

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S

and K i n * A s s o c i a t i o n , or TAKA f o r s h o r t . The

L e a r n these words and phrases.

president o f the g r o u p is 5 0 - y e a r - o l d

tastes /teists/

adopt (a child) /adopt/

identical t w i n s

by coincidence /bai kau'msiadns/

Pullani

Bhaskaran, w h o has t w i n sons of his own . He wants all t h e t w i n s in K o d i n h i t o j o i n t h e g r o u p so t h a t t h e y can help each o t h e r . W i t h t h e 220 pairs o f t w i n s in t h e village and t h e o t h e r people in t h e i r families, TAKA c u r r e n t l y has 600

/aidentikl ' t w m z / security g u a r d

great to meet y o u /greit ta ' m i : t j u / go to college ( A m E )

/si'kjuarati qa:d/

l o o k exactly like

members.

Glossary

j kin = family member

ÂŽ^33>

FILE 11

/gao ta 'kohds/ lok ig'zaektli laik


1 Time to go home 1 ON T H E P H O N E

3

Complete the dialogues. 1

A Hello, can I speak B This

a

2 T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t difference between B r i t i s h and

is Oliver.

3

A m e r i c a n E n g l i s h is the vocabulary.

your call.

3 Travellers d o n ' t have p r o b l e m s u n d e r s t a n d i n g B r i t i s h and

A Hi Amy. B I'm s wr

American English.

, you have the number.

British and American English

A Hello, this is reception. How can I help you? B Good morning. Mr Clarke, please. A I'm sorry, the I B OK, can 11

is b am

?

A Yes, of course. B Can you tell him Fiona called? I'll c b 4

If you've learnt British English and you're travelling in t h e States, or if you've learnt American English and you're travelling in Britain, you'll notice some differences. An obvious difference is the accent, but most travellers f i n d t h a t they don't have t o o many problems w i t h this. There are some grammatical differences, but they shouldn't make i t d i f f i c u l t t o understand people, or t o communicate. That leaves differences in vocabulary, which can cause misunderstandings. Sometimes the difference is only the spelling, f o r example, in British English centre, colour, and travelled, and in American English center, color, and travelled. But sometimes the w o r d is completely d i f f e r e n t in British and American English, so it's a g o o d idea t o be prepared.

later.

A Good morning, London 24seven. B Hello, can I speak to Alison, please? A Just a second, I'll p

you through.

2 SOCIAL ENGLISH C^rcle)the correct w o r d o r phrase. 1

A Does your girlfriend know you're here? B No, I'll (caUher)/call to her now.

2

A I've got a new job! B That's great news / a great news.

3

A I've got something to tell you. B Me, too. But you do first / go first.

4 5

R e a d the t e x t . W h i c h sentence is t h e best s u m m a r y ? 1 B r i t i s h and A m e r i c a n E n g l i s h are almost exactly the same.

to Oliver, please?

A Hi Oliver, this is Mark. I'm returning 2

READING

b

M a t c h the B r i t i s h E n g l i s h w i t h the A m e r i c a n English. 1 bill

0

cab

2 chips

J

cell phone

3 chemist's

A What are you doing here? B I'll explain after / later.

4 around floor

A Is everything alright? B Never better / Ever better.

6

5 lift

check elevator •

mobile

fries

7 petrol 8

line

queue

9 toilet

the subway •

pharmacy rest r o o m

10

shop

I j

11

taxi

I ]

12

trainers

13

the u n d e r g r o u n d

first floor

store 1 sneakers

m gas

U n d e r l i n e f i v e w o r d s o r p h r a s e s y o u d o n ' t k n o w . Use y o u r dictionary t o look up their m e a n i n g and pronunciation. M a k e sure y o u c a n say t h e m i n B r i t i s h a n d A m e r i c a n E n g l i s h .


For truth is always strange; stranger than fiction. Lord Byron, British poet

range but true! 1 G R A M M A R past perfect a

c

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e past p e r f e c t

1 W e b o u g h t some souvenirs. T h e n we w e n t back t o the hotel.

f o r m o f the verbs i n brackets. 1 T h e streets were w h i t e because i t . had

A f t e r we had bought some souvenirs, we went back to the hotel

snowed

2 M a x d i d the i r o n i n g . T h e n he p u t the clothes away.

the n i g h t before, (snow)

After Max

2 I suddenly r e m e m b e r e d that I .

3 T h e y w a t c h e d the news. T h e n they t u r n e d o f f the T V .

the w i n d o w s before I left the house, (not close)

After

3 W e got t o the c i n e m a ten m i n u t e s after the f i l m

4 I read the b o o k . T h e n I gave i t back.

. (start)

When

4 T i n a felt nervous because she

5 R u t h t r i e d o n the t o p . T h e n she w e n t t o the checkout.

before (not f l y )

After Ruth

5 Paul lent me the b o o k after he it. (read)

6 W e h a d d i n n e r . T h e n we d i d the w a s h i n g up.

6 T h e y missed the f l i g h t because they

After

the announcement, (not hear) b

M a k e these t w o sentences i n t o o n e . U s e t h e past p e r f e c t a n d t h e past s i m p l e .

d

(^irde) the correct verb.

W r i t e q u e s t i o n s i n t h e past p e r f e c t .

1

A I drove my boyfriend's car this morning. B you / drive it / before Had you driven it before

2

A My friends ate sushi in Japan. B they / eat sushi / before

3

A My brother won a gold medal. B he / win a medal / before

?

Last week my neighbour was on holiday. One night I '(heard) / had heard a strange noise in her house. 1 opened / had opened the 2

? 4

door to have a look, and I found that someone broke / had broken 3

into the house.

A The children made a cake yesterday. B they / make a cake / before

Luckily, he (or she!) already left / had already left when I got 4

there, and they didn't steal / hadn't stolen much as far as I could 5

5

A My sister ran in the London marathon last weekend. B she / run a marathon / before

6

A We went to Brazil on holiday. B you / be there / before

see - just the TV.

7

I was looking for my mobile yesterday morning, but I couldn't find it. I was sure 1 didn't lose / hadn't lost it, because 1 saw / had 6

7

seen it twenty minutes before. Then I realized that 1 left / had left 8

it in my trouser pocket, and 1 put / had put my trousers in 9

the washing machine! 76


2

PRONUNCIATION contractions:

had I hadn't

4 a

W r i t e the sentences w i t h c o n t r a c t i o n s . 1 He had f o r g o t t e n i t .

He'd forgotten

LISTENING ^5ff""33J L i s t e n t o four t r u e n e w s stories. N u m b e r the p i c t u r e s i n t h e o r d e r y o u hear t h e stories.

it.

2 We had lost i t . 3 You had seen her. 4 It had been a terrible day. 5 I had n o t sent i t . 6 She had n o t done i t . 7 They had not told me. b

^HiT?iiÂŁft N o w l i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a n d repeat the sentences. C o p y t h e r h y t h m .

3 V O C A B U L A R Y verb phrases C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h t h e past s i m p l e o r past p a r t i c i p l e o f t h e verbs f r o m t h e b o x .

get on get out of free realize put goon have leave be belong 1 H e was re-arrested 24 hours after he had been freed

from prison.

2 The check-in clerk

m y suitcase o n

the belt and gave me m y b o a r d i n g pass. 3 This ring

t o m y m o t h e r w h e n she

was young. 4 She wasn't w o r r i e d because she had

L i s t e n a g a i n a n d c o r r e c t t h e m i s t a k e s i n t h e sentences.

the baby w i t h her m o t h e r . 5 M y parents weren't at home because they had holiday a few days before. 6 A f t e r we had

the p o o l , we sunbathed

for a w h i l e . 7 We w e n t to the beach and

a swim.

8 W h e n I got to m y class, I

that I had

f o r g o t t e n m y books. 9 He

i n p r i s o n w h e n his son was b o r n .

10 T h e t r a i n left a few m i n u t e s after they had it.

1 D e n n i s L e i g h t o n was g o i n g t o visit his sister,

daughter

2 H e had been i n his car f o r 13 h o u r s . 3 E r i n L a n g w o r t h y was o n holiday i n Kenya. 4 She was taken to h o s p i t a l after she had w a l k e d t o safety. 5 Lena Paahlsson lost the r i n g w h i l e she was d o i n g the washing up. 6 Today the r i n g is t o o b i g f o r her. 7 T h e c r o c o d i l e had gone i n t o Jo D o d d ' s k i t c h e n . 8 M r s D o d d called the C r o c o d i l e M a n a g e m e n t C e n t r e .

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these w o r d s and phrases. wave /weiv/

close to (adj) /'kbos ta/

arrest /a'rest/

outdoor

belong

fortunately

hi Inn.

/aotdo:/ /'fbitfanatli/

realize /'nalaiz/

net net/

steal /still/

r o b ( a bank) /rob/

77


Gossip is what no-one claims to like, but everybody enjoys. Joseph Conrad, Polish writer

ossip is good for you 1 G R A M M A R reported speech a

C o m p l e t e the r e p o r t e d speech. Reported speech

Direct speech 1 ' I w a n t to leave h i m . '

She said t h a t she

2 ' I don't l i k e her parents.'

H e t o l d me t h a t he

3 ' I ' m getting divorced.'

She t o l d me that she .

4 'I've been t o the police station.'

H e t o l d me that he

5 ' I haven't met his g i r l f r i e n d . '

She said that she

6 ' I saw James w i t h another w o m a n . '

H e said t h a t he

7 ' I can't cook.'

She t o l d me t h a t she.

8 ' I w o n ' t t e l l anyone.'

H e said t h a t he

9 ' I ' l l speak to her t o m o r r o w . '

She said t h a t she.

10

Tvegotalotofworktodo.'

H e t o l d me t h a t h e .

W r i t e t h e sentences i n d i r e c t speech. 1

She said she was busy. She s a i d : '

I'm busy

.'

2 Jane said t h a t she w a n t e d a cup o f coffee. She s a i d : ' 3 T h e y t o l d me that they h a d n ' t seen the new neighbours yet. They said:'

.'

4 Steve t o l d me t h a t he d i d n ' t w a n t t o go t o the cinema. He said:'

.'

5 Helen and Paul said they w o u l d go to the party. They said:'

.'

6 H e said that his c o m p u t e r had just b r o k e n . He said:'

.'

7 She t o l d me t h a t the c i t y was very o l d . She s a i d : '

.'

8 T h e y said t h a t they w o u l d v i s i t me. They said:'

wanted to leave him

.'


2 V O C A B U L A R Y say or tell? a ( ^ h c ^ t h e correct w o r d s .

4 a

Her husband (sakf)/ t o l d t h a t he was w o r k i n g late. She s a i d / t o l d me that she wasn't happy. They s a i d / t o l d us that they were g e t t i n g m a r r i e d . You s a i d / t o l d that she d i d n ' t l i k e m e n w i t h beards. I s a i d / t o l d y o u that I had a new g i r l f r i e n d . We s a i d / t o l d that we were g o i n g t o be late. A n n a s a i d / t o l d y o u t h a t she d i d n ' t have a car. 8 I s a i d / t o l d her that John was busy. 9 He s a i d / t o l d that we had to do exercise f i v e . 10 You s a i d / told that she had called M i k e t h i s m o r n i n g . C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h said o r told. 1 She

said

2 We

that she had been t o a friend's house. o u r parents we w o u l d n ' t be h o m e

b

LISTENING C E P ^ S ) L i s t e n t o A l a n a n d Jess d i s c u s s i n g a survey. D o t h e y b o t h gossip at w o r k ? L i s t e n a g a i n a n d w r i t e T ( t r u e ) o r F (false). 1 Jess and A l a n t h i n k t h a t w o m a n gossip m o r e t h a n m e n . X 2 A c c o r d i n g to the results o f the survey, Jess and A l a n are r i g h t . 3 T h e survey was done by a newspaper. 4 N o b o d y was surprised by the results o f the survey. 5 O v e r 5 0 percent o f the m e n i n the survey said they gossiped at w o r k .

for l u n c h . I They _ He You_ James. I 9 We

y o u that the m a n wasn't her b r o t h e r . t h a t they were g o i n g o n holiday. me t h a t he d i d n ' t have a g i r l f r i e n d . t h a t y o u weren't g o i n g o u t t o n i g h t . that he was busy t o n i g h t . t h a t the f i l m started at eight o'clock. t h e m t h a t his sister was o n holiday.

10 O l i v i a

6 Less t h a n 50 per cent o f w o m e n said they gossiped. 7 T h e m e n i n the survey t a l k e d about topics related to w o r k . 8 T h e w o m e n talked about t h e i r male colleagues.

me t h a t she had called Jack t h i s

morning.

3 PRONUNCIATION double consonants a

L o o k at t h e p h o n e t i c s a n d w r i t e t h e w o r d s . 1 /'gosip/

gossip

U S E F U L W O R D S AND P H R A S E S L e a r n these words and phrases. genes /d3i:nz/ gossip /gosip/

2 /"masrid/

share /Jea/

3 /'lets/

a c c o r d i n g t o /a'koidirj ta/'

4 /'midl/

feel g u i l t y /fill 'gilti/

5 /'hAri/

i n general /in d3enral/

6 /difrant/

pass o n

7 /'sDri/

social s k i l l /"saojl skil/

"pa:s Dn/

8 /'sAma/ 9 /'mesid3/ 10 /'hajpi/ L i s t e n a n d check. T h e n l i s t e n a g a i n . Practise s a y i n g the w o r d s .

79


How many roads must a man walk down before you can call him a man? Bob Dylan, US singer and songwriter

ngiish File 1 GRAMMAR questions without auxiliaries a

2 V O C A B U L A R Y revision

(^ircle) t h e c o r r e c t q u e s t i o n .

a

(Qircle)the w o r d o r p h r a s e t h a t is d i f f e r e n t . Say w h y it's d i f f e r e n t .

1 a W h o d i d p a i n t The Kiss? b ( W h o p a i n t e d The

q u i z

1 curly

KissT)

2 friendly

b W h i c h i n s t r u m e n t plays A n g u s Y o u n g o f A C / DC?

hair.

generous

kind

overweight

3 bracelet

earrings

necklace

tracksuit

b H o w m a n y lives have cats i n the U K ?

4 a course

exercise

a phone call

housework

5 crowded

polluted

dangerous

exciting

6 market

shopping

t o w n hall

b W h a t happened i n Japan o n 11th M a r c h

2011?

b W h i c h A m e r i c a n singer d i e d o n 2 5 t h June 2 0 0 9 ? 6 a W h o d i d Beyonce m a r r y i n 2008? b W h o Beyonce m a r r i e d i n 2 0 0 8 ? 7 a W h a t a n i m a l caught a t r a i n f o r 5 0 kms?

b

b W h a t a n i m a l d i d catch a t r a i n f o r 5 0 kms?

7 decide

finish

forget

pretend

get o l d

get f i t

get lost

9 bee

butterfly

bat

mosquito

C o m p l e t e t h e sentences w i t h o n e w o r d .

March 24th,

It has a hole.

5 Y o u ' l l have to speak.

M i c h a e l Jackson.

e Jay-Z.

6 I'm looking

f

7 The children ran

Tinned food.

g T h e guitar.

to g o i n g away at the weekend. the r o a d w i t h o u t

l o o k i n g . L u c k i l y , there wasn't m u c h t r a f f i c .

h A dog.

8 They arrived

C o m p l e t e the questions for the answers.

9 We carried

made Mark Zuckerberg

2 When

L o n d o n at m i d n i g h t . w o r k i n g u n t i l i t was t i m e

to go h o m e .

famous?

10

made M a r k Z u c k e r b e r g f a m o u s .

Spain w o n the f o o t b a l l W o r l d C u p i n 2010.

c together?

R E M stayed together for 31 years. Jack Sparrow i n Pirates of the

Johnny D e p p plays Jack Sparrow i n Pirates of the

Caribbean? Caribbean.

5 How

?

A m y W i n e h o u s e died f r o m alcohol p o i s o n i n g . 6 Where

C a n y o u please pick

?

Polar bears live i n the A r c t i c .

C o m p l e t e t h e m i s s i n g verbs. 1

go

Twelve roads j o i n at the A r c de T r i o m p h e i n Paris. i n the w o r l d ?

sightseeing

2 s_

at a campsite

3

i n love w i t h somebody

L

4 m

a mistake

5 d_

the s h o p p i n g

6 I_

m o n e y to somebody

7 s_

hours doing something

at the A r c de T r i o m p h e i n Paris?

I n d i a produces the m o s t bananas i n the w o r l d .

that r u b b i s h f r o m

the f l o o r ?

the football W o r l d Cup?

3 H o w long

8 W h i c h country

_ the manager about

your complaint.

d Gustav K l i m t .

7 H o w many

m y o l d jeans. I s t i l l

wear them.

b A n earthquake and a t s u n a m i .

4 Who

1996. to the shop.

4 Please d o n ' t t h r o w

_3_

Facebook

t h a t dress?

3 I ' l l have to take m y new t o p

M a t c h the q u e s t i o n s i n a w i t h these a n s w e r s .

1 What

on

2 She was b o r n

b W h a t d i d Peter D u r a n d i n v e n t i n 1810?

c

store

8 get up

1 W h y don't you t r y

8 a W h a t i n v e n t e d Peter D u r a n d i n 1810?

a Nine.

department

centre

5 a W h i c h A m e r i c a n singer d i d die o n 2 5 t h June 2 0 0 9 ?

80

straight

3 a H o w m a n y lives do cats have i n the U K ? 4 a W h a t d i d happen i n Japan o n 11th M a r c h 2011?

c

(sHm)

ft'5 not used to describe

2 a W h i c h i n s t r u m e n t does A n g u s Young o f A C / DC play?

b

long

. o n w e l l w i t h somebody 9 e_ 10

f

a salary a job


3 PRONUNCIATION

revision

a O r c l e ) t h e word w i t h a different sound.

cap

book

4 a

A survey of 2,000 parents has discovered that two thirds of them are unable to answer their children's questions about science. See if you can match the ten most common questions with their answers below.

push school

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

bull lose hope suit boot gloves sunny

lazy

safe bald

R e a d t h e a r t i c l e a n d m a t c h the q u e s t i o n s t o t h e a n s w e r s .

Don't ask me!

hat (want)

turn

READING

up

Why is the moon sometimes out in the day? Why is the sky blue? Will we ever discover aliens? How much does the Earth weigh? How do aeroplanes stay in the air? Why is water wet? How do I do long division? Where do birds and bees go in winter? What makes a rainbow? Why are there different times on Earth?

_E_ _

A Bees stop flying and birds stay together in groups or migrate.

train

B People decided to have 'time zones' so that it would be light during the day everywhere on Earth. If there weren't time zones, some people would have midday

towel goat

in the middle of the night!

throw

C The Earth weighs 6,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000kg. D Because of their chemistry, some liquids can be absorbed by solid things. E The moon can be lit up by the sun, depending on where it is in the sky. If it reflects the sun's

kind shy thin

rays, we can see it, even during the day. It all depends on its angle towards the Earth.

bike

F Multiply the single numbers and the tens separately, then add them together.

cow

G Sunlight arrives on Earth in every colour, but it hits particles in our air that 'shine' blue.

horse mouse

H Planes have special wings which push air down. This pushing action is stronger than

owl

gravity, and so the plane goes up in the air.

boring awful word horse

b

ear

5 hair scared fear

11

Sunlight going through water drops in the air 'separates' into all the colours.

J

No one knows. U n d e r l i n e five w o r d s that y o u don't k n o w . Use y o u r d i c t i o n a r y to l o o k up their meaning and pronunciation.

beard earrings wear

10

I

LISTENING

a

ft^rf?i?TÂŤ

L i s t e n to five people t a l k i n g about q u i z shows.

C o m p l e t e the names o f the shows.

chair

1 Master

crowded city

12

across

2 A Question of 3

my

Bluff

4 Who wants to be a 5

church beach chemist's

13

b

chess

?

Quiz

L i s t e n a g a i n . M a t c h s o m e q u e s t i o n s w h i c h c o u l d have b e e n o n these q u i z s h o w s w i t h t h e speakers.

14

d3

large forget

jazz b

< 2 2 ÂŁ r * ! 3 ) L i s t e n a n d check.

giraffe

Speaker 1

A W h o sang Every breathyou

Speaker 2

B W h o painted

take?

Sunflowers?

A Picasso B Van G o g h

C Cezanne D M o n e t

Speaker 3

C H o w m a n y t i m e s has B r a z i l w o n the W o r l d Cup?

Speaker 4

D W h a t does ' w i l l y n i l l y ' mean?

Speaker 5

E W h e n was Charles D i c k e n s born?


I

1 A») B e n Great party. S a n d r a Yes, it is. B e n S o r r y . . . h i . . . m y name's Ben. S a n d r a I'm Sandra. B e n What do you do, Sandra. S a n d r a I'm a nurse. H o w about you? B e n Me? O h , I'm a student. S a n d r a A student? Really? W h a t university do you go to? B e n Manchester. I go to Manchester University. I'm in my second year o f medicine. S a n d r a D o you like it? B e n Yes, I do. I like it very m u c h . . . B e n W h a t do you t h i n k o f the music, Sandra? D o you like it? S a n d r a N o , not really. B e n W h a t kind o f music do vou listen to? S a n d r a I like rock music. B e n D o you? Who's your favourite band? S a n d r a Muse. I really like Muse. B e n Me, too. D i d you go to the concert last month? S a n d r a N o . I didn't. Was it good? B e n Yes, it was excellent. I ' m sorry you missed it. B e n Do you do any sport or exercise. Sandra? S a n d r a Yes, I play tennis. B e n A h , nice. I play rugby. I ' m i n the university team. S a n d r a Are you? B e n Yes, l a m . But I play tennis, too. Perhaps we can play together one day. S a n d r a Maybe. But I usually play w i t h my boyfriend. B e n Your boyfriend? S a n d r a Yes, here he is. Wayne, this is Ben. Ben, Wayne. W a y n e Hello. Nice to meetyou. B e n H i . U m , look at the time. U m , must go - some friends are waiting for me. U m , bye Sandra. S a n d r a Bye.

1 B») Presenter Hello and welcome to Love Online. Today, we'd like you, the listeners, to call i n and tell us about your experiences o f online relationships. A n d - o h my! - that's quick! - we already have our first caller. Hello? A l a n H i , my name's A l a n . Presenter Hello, A l a n . Can you tell us about your experience o f internet dating? A l a n Yes, o f course. I'm quite shy, you see, and I'm not very good at talking to girls I don't know. So one day, I registered on an online dating agency and I met Susan. Presenter A n d what happened? A l a n We got on really well. I n fact, after four months, we bought a house together. A n d now we've got a beautiful little boy called Sam. Presenter Congratulations. A l a n ! Thanks for calling. Now, I think we have another caller. Hello? K a t e H i , I'm Kate. Presenter Hello, Kate. W h a t can you tell us about love online? K a t e Well, 1 decided to try a dating site because I w o r k long hours and I don't have time to meet new people. Presenter So what happened? K a t e Well, I met some guys, and then I met Craig. Presenter Who's Craig? K a t e Well, now, he's my husband. A n d we're very happy together. Presenter That's great news, Kate! It looks as i f it is possible to find love online. Now, who's our next caller. Paolo Paolo.

P r e s e n t e r H i , Paolo. D i d you m a r r y someone you met on the internet? Paolo Yes, I did, but it was the worst t h i n g I ever did. Presenter O h . Why's that? Paolo Because she didn't really love me. Presenter H o w do you know that? Paolo It was in the newspaper. There was an article about a woman who contacted men online, married them, and then left w i t h all their money. A n d there was a photo o f my wife next to the article, w i t h her ex-husband. Presenter O h , I'm sorry to hear that, Paolo. A n d I ' m afraid that's all we've got time for today. Join me next week for another edition o f Love Online...

i c») A n d now for the latest news i n the art w o r l d . I f you're i n Paris this weekend, you m i g h t like to visit the new D a v i d Hockney exhibition called Fresh Flowers. As the name suggests, most o f the pictures depict flowers. However, these are no ordinary flower pictures, because Hockney uses his iPhone or his iPad to draw them. Hockney started p a i n t i n g o n his iPhone d u r i n g the winter o f 2 0 0 8 . A t the time, he was staying at his home i n the N o r t h o f England where he has a beautiful view out o f his bedroom window. One m o r n i n g , he picked up his iPhone, and used his fingers to paint the sunrise. He was very pleased w i t h the result, and started experimenting w i t h other pictures. Now, he sends his friends a different flower picture every morning. They love it! Fresh Flowers is o n at the Fondation Pierre Berge, Yves Saint Laurent in Paris u n t i l January 30th. The exhibition shows the drawings Hockney made o n an iPhone, and the pictures he drew o n an iPad. The gallery is open f r o m 11 a.m. to 6 p . m . f r o m Tuesday to Friday, and admission costs €5. D o n ' t miss this show; it w i l l be a bright moment i n your day.

2 A))) S p e a k e r 1 W h e n I was 17,1 went o n holiday w i t h my parents to Brittany, in France. M y parents rented a lovely house o n the beach, and the weather was great. We went for a delicious meal for my birthday, but I was miserable. I wanted to be w i t h my friends and I didn't smile once i n t w o weeks! S p e a k e r 2 A few years ago, I went to visit an old school friend, but I didn't enjoy the weekend at all. A t school we got o n really well, but now she has t w o small children so she didn't want to go out. I spent a very boring t w o days i n her house watching TV. I don't t h i n k I'm going to visit her again. S p e a k e r 3 It's really hot where we live, so we always try to go on vacation where it's cool. Last year, we booked a vacation i n Sweden, but we arrived i n the middle o f a heat wave. It was awful because there was no air-conditioning anywhere. We just sat i n cafes and argued all day. We can do that at home! S p e a k e r 4 W h e n I finished university, I went o n a cruise around the Mediterranean w i t h some friends f r o m my course. We wanted to celebrate the end o f our exams. As soon as we left the p o r t , I started feeling seasick. I spent the whole week i n bed, and I hated every m i n u t e o f the cruise. S p e a k e r 5 Three years ago, I broke up w i t h my boyfriend, so I decided to go o n an expensive vacation on my o w n to the Seychelles. Unfortunately, the travel agent didn't tell me that the islands were popular w i t h couples on their honeymoon. Everywhere I looked, there were people holding hands and I felt very lonely.

2 B») Jenny W h a t shall we do this afternoon, Matt? M a t t I know! Let's have a look at that box o f photos my aunt gave me yesterday... Here it is.. .Oh, look at that! Jenny Who's that? M a t t That's my grandfather. A n d that's my grandmother behind h i m on the right. She's the one in the flowery dress. It was just after they got married, but before they had any children. M y aunt told me all about this photo a few years ago. Jenny So, where are they? M a t t Well, as you know my dad is Spanish. M y grandparents lived i n the centre o f M a d r i d , and this photo was taken in the district where they lived. Jenny What's going on exactly? M a t t Well, there's a festival there called 'La Paloma'. It takes place i n the middle o f August every year, and it still happens now. There are lots o f stalls selling food and also stalls where you can w i n a prize. Jenny So, what was your grandfather t r y i n g to win? M a t t He was t r y i n g to w i n a bracelet for my grandmother. He was shooting at a target on the stall and all those people were watching h i m . Jenny Do you know any o f the other people in the photo? Matt N o , I don't. But I t h i n k they all lived near my grandfather. Jenny W h o took the photo? M a t t The man on the stall. The photo was included in the price. You had three chances to hit the target and you got the photo for free. Jenny It's a lovely photo. I t h i n k your granddad was very good-looking! M a t t That's what everyone says!

2 C))) P r e s e n t e r Hello, and welcome to the programme. Today, we're looking at lucky escapes, and Nick W i l l i a m s f r o m the news desk is here to tell us some amazing stories. Nick? N i c k H i Gloria. Well, my First story is about a tourist who fell i n t o a volcano. Maureen Evason was walking at the top o f the Teide volcano i n Tenerife, when she tripped and fell. She fell 27 metres u n t i l she hit a tree, which stopped her fall and saved her life. The rescue operation took nearly four hours, and after that Maureen spent t w o months i n hospital before she could go home. Presenter Lucky Maureen! W h a t else have you got for us? N i c k Joseph Rabadue had a lucky escape when he was at home watching TV. Joseph was sitting on the floor, so his dad told h i m to go and sit o n the sofa. Five minutes later, a lorry crashed into their living room, and threw the family television into the air. The T V then landed on the exact spot where Joseph had been on the floor before. P r e s e n t e r What a lucky escape! D o you have any more? N i c k Yes, just one more for now. One Saturday m o r n i n g , Barry McRoy was leaving a cafe when two men came i n . The men were fighting, and one o f them had a gun. The man fired, and the bullet hit Barry in the chest. Luckily, he had a D V D i n the pocket o f his jacket at the time, and the D V D stopped the bullet. Barry McRoy is a very lucky man. Presenter Absolutely! So, now it's time for you, the listeners, to call i n and tell us about your o w n experiences. A n d here's our first caller.

J


3 A))) Dialogue 1 Woman John! Man H i , Jane. You look well. Woman You, too. H o w was your flight? Man We took o f f a bit late, but it was fine. Woman 1 Are you hungry? Man 1 No, I had a sandwich on the plane. Woman 1 Well, let's go and f i n d the car. It isn't far. Man 1 Great! Dialogue 2 Ground staff Hello. Where are you f l y i n g to? Passenger To Bristol. Ground staff Can I see your passport, please? Passenger Here you are. Ground staff Thanks. Can I see your hand luggage? Passenger Yes, just this bag. Ground staff O K . Here's your boarding pass. The flight is boarding at 16.50 f r o m Gate B28. You're i n Group B. Passenger Thanks a lot. Ground staff Enjoy your flight.

D a w n Italy and France. We're starting i n Venice, then we're going to Verona, and then M i l a n . We're stopping o f f in Paris on the way back, because I want to visit the Louvre. C h r i s W hat about sleeping arrangements? Are you sleeping on the train like all the students do? D a w n No, only on the night train from Paris to Venice. We have a two-bed sleeping compartment. A n d we're having dinner i n the dining car o f the train. Apart f r o m that, we're sleeping i n hotels. They're already booked. C h r i s Well, it sounds like a different kind o f t r i p to the one we went o n as students. D a w n Absolutely. It's going to be different, but I'm sure we're going to have lots o f f u n .

3 O)) P r e s e n t e r Hello and welcome to The World ofWords. Today, we're going to look at word games, so let's start w i t h the most popular o f them all: Scrabble. Ricky (ones from the National Scrabble Association is here to tell us all about it. Ricky, who actually invented the game?

Immigration O f f i c e r What is the purpose o f your visit, M r Green? Passenger I'm going to stay w i t h a friend. Immigration O f f i c e r A n d how long are vou going to

R i c k y Well, it was an American called A l f r e d Mosher Butts. Butts was an unemployed arch itect, and i n his free time he did a lot o f crosswords. These crosswords gave h i m the idea for a game which he called Lexico. The game had the same letter tiles as Scrabble, but no board. Players used the letter tiles to make words. They scored by adding up the points o n each o f the letter riles. Later, Butts introduced a board, and a set o f rules and changed the name to Criss-Cross Words.

stay i n San Francisco? Passenger For three weeks.

P r e s e n t e r H o w did Butts decide how many points to give each letter?

Immigration O f f i c e r Can I have a contact telephone

R i c k y He counted how many times each letter appeared on the front page o f the New York Times. Then, depending on the frequency o f each letter, he gave it between one and ten points. The most common letters, like the vowels, got only one point because they are easier to use. There are more o f these letters i n the game. There was only one tile for each o f the least common letters, for example Q and Z , which got ten points.

Dialogue 3 Immigration O f f i c e r Can I see your passport please, sir? Passenger Here you are.

number, please? Passenger Yes. M y friend's number is 415 673 702. Immigration O f f i c e r Thank you, M r Green. Enjoy your stay. Dialogue 4 Woman 2 Look! There's a grey case. Is it ours? Man 2 No, it's too big. Ours is much smaller. Woman 2 It's taking a long time to come o u t . . . Man 2 Yes. The first one came out really quickly. Woman 2 Look! There it is! A t last! Man 2 You stay here w i t h the other bags. I'm going to get it. Woman 2 O K . I ' l l wait for vou here. Dialogue 5 Customs O f f i c e r Excuse me, madam. Can vou come this way, please? Passenger Yes, o f course. Customs O f f i c e r Have vou got anything to declare? Passenger No, I don't t h i n k so. I bought some chocolate in the Dutv Free Shop, but that's all. Customs O f f i c e r Can I check your bag, please? Passenger Sure. G o ahead. Customs O f f i c e r O K . . .That's fine. You can go o n through. Passenger T h a n k you.

3B») Chris H i , D a w n . I hear you're going to be on holidav next week. Dawn Yes, I am. A n d I'm really looking forward to i t . Chris What are you going to do? Dawn I'm going Interrailing w i t h a friend. Chris Interrailing? I did that when I was a student. I travelled around Europe w i t h very little money, not much food, and no sleep. It was f u n , but I don't want to do it again. Dawn A h , but you see Interrailing as an adult is very different. Chris Really? In what way? Dawn Well, you can travel first class now, and you don't have to go for a whole m o n t h . Chris How long are you going for? Dawn I wanted to go for t w o weeks, but work's so busy at the moment... so just a week. Chris A n d which countries are you visiting?

P r e s e n t e r So, when did Butts' original game become the modern game o f Scrabble? R i c k y Well, i n 1948, Butts met a businessman called James Brunot, who designed a new board and changed the name o f the game to Scrabble. Then i n 1952, the president o f Macy's, the famous New York department store, discovered the game on holiday, and loved it so much he placed a large order. Butts and Brunot knew they couldn't produce enough Scrabble sets for Macy's, and so they sold the rights to the game to another manufacturer. Today, Scrabble is sold i n 121 countries i n 29 different languages. P r e s e n t e r W h a t a story, Ricky! T h a n k you for sharing it w i t h us. R i c k y M y pleasure.

4 A))) S p e a k e r 1 Housework? Me? N o , that's my mum's job. She on ly goes to work t w o days a week, so she has enough time to cook and clean and things like that. I go to school and then I see my friends, so I'm too busy to do housework. M y dad goes out to work every day, so he doesn't have time either. S p e a k e r 2 Well, I try and help my m u m when I can. I make mv bed when I get up i n the m o r n i n g and I always lav the table for dinner. I usually tidv my room, but mv m u m is the one that cleans it. Apart f r o m that, I ' m not at home very much, so I don't do anything else. S p e a k e r 3 O h yes, everyone i n my family helps w i t h the housework. There are four o f us and we're all very busy. D u r i n g the week, my m u m or my dad cook the dinner, and my brother and I do the washing up. We do the cleaning together on Saturday mornings. S p e a k e r 4 It's true - 1 don't do much housework, but I love cooking. I don't have time to cook d u r i n g the week, but I do all the cooking at the weekends. M y m u m does all the cleaning, though. She says she doesn't m i n d i t .

S p e a k e r 5 We have a cleaning lady who comes i n every day and she does all our housework. She makes the beds, cleans the floors, and tidies our rooms - she even does the ironing! I'm not sure who does the shopping, but the fridge is always full. That's the important thing!

4 B») Presenter Those listeners who enjoy going shopping w i l l be interested to hear our next news story. It's taken six years and 1.45 b i l l i o n pounds to build, but at last the Westfield shopping centre has opened i n Stratford, i n East London. We sent our reporter, Juliet Redditch, over to take a look at what is now Europe's largest urban shopping centre. Juliet, what's it like in Westfield right now? Juliet Well, Terry, there are crowds o f people everywhere, especially outside the stores w h i c h have special opening offers. Some shops have called security staff to help them control the queues. P r e s e n t e r Just how big is Westfield, Juliet? Juliet O h , it's really very big! There are t w o enormous department stores, a huge supermarket, and 300 smaller shops. You can spend all day here i f you want to. I haven't decided where I'm going to have lunch, but there are 70 different places to eat - it's amazing! P r e s e n t e r W h a t effect has the shopping centre had o n the local area, Juliet? Juliet Well, this is an area where there are many people out o f work. The shopping centre has created 10,000 new jobs, so it has really helped. Presenter H o w did vou get to Westfield today? Juliet I came by car. There's an enormous car park w i t h space for 5,000 cars. But you can also get here by bus, train, and by the underground - it's the best connected shopping centre i n the country. P r e s e n t e r Now, Juliet, the big question is.. .have you bought anything yet? Juliet N o , I haven't. I was just looking around, really. I saw some trousers I liked, but I didn't buv them. There were too many people i n the changing rooms to try them o n ! P r e s e n t e r O K , thanks Juliet, and now onto a news story o f a different k i n d . . .

4,C») S p e a k e r 1 Last weekend was really awful. M y boyfriend and I went camping i n the Lake District w i t h some friends, and it rained the whole time. It was really depressing. We had to stav i n the tent and play cards all day, which was O K to begin w i t h , but then my boyfriend got bored. He started complaining about the weather, then about our friends, and finally about me! We had a terrible argument, and i n the end we came home o n Saturday night. I'm never going camping again! S p e a k e r 2 M y weekend was fantastic. I took my wife to Paris, which is somewhere she has wanted to visit her whole life. We stayed i n a wonderful hotel, i n a beautiful old b u i l d i n g overlooking the river. The viewwas incredible. We ate some really great food, and although it was quite cold, we had a very nice walk around the city. The best bit was that it was a surprise for my wife: I met her after work on Friday and we drove straight to the airport. She had no idea where we were going! S p e a k e r 3 I haven't got much money at the moment, so I didn't do anything special this weekend. But actually I had a really good time! I visited a local museum w i t h some friends. A l l the museums here are free, and they have some interesting exhibitions about places like Egypt, Rome, and India. We then watched t w o o f my favourite D V D s on Saturday night, and o n Sunday I invited my parents to my flat and I cooked dinner for them. N o t a bad weekend, really. S p e a k e r 4 M y brother and his wife stayed w i t h us this weekend. They have three children, and we spent the whole time playing w i t h them. We took them s w i m m i n g , we went to the zoo, and on Sunday we


went to the park. They have so much energv! A n d they're really noisv - especially i n the m o r n i n g when they wake up, which is usually around 6 o'clock. I was completely exhausted bv Sunday night, but it was lovely to see them.

5 A)))

P r e s e n t e r So, w h e n is the best t i m e to visit Croatia, Paula?

A m y I hope so. Matt Anyway, what about me? What does my

P a u l a T h e m a i n t o u r i s t areas are very crowded i n julv and August, so it's better to go i n May or |une, w h e n

horoscope say? A m y Let me have a look. Your birthday's January 5th, so that makes you.. .Capricorn. M a t t That's r i g h t . . . . So, what does it say? A m y It says.. .oh! Listen to this! It says you'll be lucky

it isn't as busy. P r e s e n t e r Thank vou tor that, Paula. Croatia certainlv sounds like a very interesting holiday destination.

Speaker 1 Well, I haven't been here long, so I haven't had time to make many friends yet. A f t e r I get home from work, I spend most o f the evening online chatting w i t h friends and family back home. Twice a week, I have classes to try and learn the language. Most o f my colleagues speak reallv good English, but I haven't been out w i t h them yet. Speaker 2 I guess vou could say I'm a bit depressed at the moment. Time goes reallv slowly when vou've got nothing to do. I spend more time sleeping now, and I have a lot o f time to do the housework. It doesn't take all day to make the bed and clean mv r o o m , so I get quite bored. I hope I f i n d another job soon because I really need the money.

Now, let's look at a different type o f holiday ...

5 C))) D a v e Hey A l i c e . Let's do this q u i z . It says y o u can f i n d out vour bodv age. A l i c e Body age? OK.. D a v e You f i r s t . So...we start w i t h your real age, w h i c h is 3 5 . . . A l i c e D o n ' t tell everyone. on your answers to the questions. G o t that? A l i c e Yes.

tomorrow. Perhaps she'll offer you a better job! M a t t Amy. vou're being far too optimistic. It's only a

D a v e R i g h t . First question. H o w much do you w a l k a day?

S p e a k e r 4 O h no, I never get bored. There's always so much to do! I like to get up early and read the newspaper while I'm having breakfast. Then I like to go for a walk and do a bit o f shopping. A f t e r lunch. I go and pick up my grandchildren f r o m school. We spend an hour i n the park until their m u m comes to get them. I'm really enjoying life right now.

guess that means none. D a v e N o sport or exercise. A d d t w o years. T h a t

P r e s e n t e r Hello and welcome to The Travel

D a v e Q u i t e a lot. O K , so we subtract one year, w h i c h leaves us w i t h 34. Next question. H o w much sport and exercise do you do? A l i c e O h I hate sport. A n d I don't do any exercise. I

makes 36. H o w much fast f o o d do you eat? A l i c e N o n e . I don't eat any. D a v e Great! Subtract a year. We're back on 35 again. How many portions o f fruit and vegetables do you eat? A l i c e A lot. I have more than five every day. D a v e A l o t . Subtract t w o years. That's 33. N e x t one. H o w w o u l d you describe yourself mentally? A l i c e U r n . what do you mean? D a v e W e l l , are you a positive person, or a negative person? A l i c e O h , right. U m , I think I'm a very positive person. D a v e O K . Subtract three years.. .Now you're on 30. Next question. H o w would you describe your stress level? A l i c e M m m , I w o u l d say I ' m a l i t t l e stressed...but it's

Programme.

Now, one o f the most popular t o u r i s t destinations these days is the Republic o f Croatia i n the Balkans. Paula W i l c o x f r o m the N a t i o n a l Tourist Board is here to tell us all about it. Paula, what's so special about Croatia? P a u l a O h , there's just so much to see and do there. First o f all, there are historic cities like Zagreb - the capital - and D u b r o v n i k to visit. P r e s e n t e r Let's start w i t h Zagreb. W h a t is there to see there? P a u l a W e l l , Zagreb is i n the n o r t h o f the c o u n t r y on the River Sava. It's b o t h an old citv and a m o d e r n one at the same t i m e . There are lots o f elegant restaurants and fashionable shops there, and the city has lots o f museums - the most i m p o r t a n t one is the Archaeological M u s e u m . P r e s e n t e r W h a t about D u b r o v n i k ? P a u l a D u b r o v n i k is much smaller than Zagreb - the population is only about 4 3 , 0 0 0 . It's i n the south o f Croatia o n the A d r i a t i c coast. Inside the old citv walls there are palaces, churches, and a Baroque cathedral to visit. I n my o p i n i o n , D u b r o v n i k is one o f the most beautiful cities i n the w o r l d . P r e s e n t e r A p a r t f r o m the cities, w h a t else w o u l d vou recommend? P a u l a The beaches and the islands. There are wonderful beaches on the Adriatic Sea - Croatia's coast is very long - and it has more than a thousand islands. P r e s e n t e r H o w can vou get to the islands? P a u l a Well, the best place to get a ferry is Split, another city on the coast which is larger than Dubrovnik, but also has some wonderful monuments. There are a number o f ferries, which take you to many different islands, where you can do water sports or just relax on the beach.

A m y Perhaps she'll give you a pay rise!

D a v e Sorry.. .then we add or subtract years depending

A l i c e W e l l , I always go f o r a walk at lunch t i m e . So ... quite a l o t .

5 BÂť)

ticket! A m y No. wait a minute. Let's think about this. You've got a meeting w i t h your boss tomorrow, haven't you? M a t t Yes. Why? M a t t O h , Amy! Really! You're taking this far too seriously! I don't believe a word o f it! A m y Well, I do. I t h i n k your boss w i l l put up your salary

Speaker 3 M y life has changed a lot now that I don't have to leave the house to go to work. Things aren't so stressful first t h i n g i n the m o r n i n g now. I just get up, make a cup o f tea, and switch on my computer. It's strange communicating with colleagues online and not seeing them face-to-face. Sometimes it gets a bit lonelv.

Speaker 5 This is the best t h i n g that has ever happened to me! She's so beautiful that I seem to spend all day looking at her! I don't have time to see friends now, so I keep i n touch w i t h everybody by phone or online when she's asleep. We go shopping together and I do more housework and cooking, but I don't get much sleep anymore!

w i t h money next week. Matt Reallv? Perhaps I should go out and buv a lottery

under c o n t r o l . D a v e O K , so we don't have to add or subtract a n y t h i n g . You're s t i l l o n 30. H o w many close friends do you see regularly? A l i c e M m m . A few. I don't have m u c h t i m e . D a v e Right.. .we don't add or subtract anything again. Last question. How much time do you have for yourself? A l i c e N o t enough. I ' m always reallv busy. D a v e Add a year.. .That makes 31. W h i c h means that you are 35 but your body is only 31. W h a t do you t h i n k o f that? A l i c e 31? That's great news! N o w it's your t u r n . . .

6 A))) M a t t What are you reading? A m y Nothing, just my horoscope. Matt Reallv? W h a t star sign are you? A m y Virgo. M y birthday's on September 15th. M a t t So, what does it say? A m y It says that people w i l l talk about me next week because o f something I've done. M a t t But you don't really believe that, do you? A m y Well, actually I do. Because I have done something that w i l l make people talk about me. M a t t O h . W h a t have vou done? A m y I sent an email to my boss yesterday complaining about my new colleague. She's really lazy and she never does any w o r k . Matt Did you? A m y Yes. So my boss w i l l ask the other people i n my office about this new person and he'll probably ask about me, too. So, my horoscope is right. People w i l l definitely talk about me next week. M a t t Well, don't w o r r y about it. I ' m sure everything w i l l be alright.

horoscope, for goodness' sake!

6 B))) S p e a k e r 1 I was on holiday, and I was looking round a famous palace, when a man came up to me and asked me to take a photo o f h i m . He gave me his camera, but it wasn't w o r k i n g properly. W h e n I gave it back to h i m . he dropped it on the floor and it broke. I picked it up and went to give it to the man, but he was gone. Then I discovered my wallet was missing. S p e a k e r 2 W h e n I went abroad last vear for a business trip, I didn't have time to get any local monev before I left. So after I landed, I went straight to the bank to get three hundred euros. 1 was i n a hurry because 1 had a train to catch. The cashier slowiv counted out the notes and when he stopped, I picked them up. W h e n I got to the train station I realized later that 1 only had a hundred euros. S p e a k e r 3 W h e n we were o n holiday, t w o men knocked on the door o f our apartment. They were wearing u n i f o r m s and they said they were police inspectors. One o f them came i n to look around while the other stayed bv the door. Unfortunately, while we were talking to the first man, the second man took our wallets and cameras f r o m the bedroom. S p e a k e r 4 I was having a problem using the ticket machine in the metro, when someone came up to help me. He told me how much money I needed and then offered to put it i n the machine for me. I counted out the money, but he said it wasn't enough. I gave h i m some more money and I got my ticket. Unfortunately, I paid ten times the price for it! S p e a k e r 5 1 was waiting at a bus stop, when this beautiful w o m a n came up to me. We got chatting, and she invited me to go to a club w i t h her. We had a few d r i n k s together and then the w aiter brought me an incredibly expensive bill. I started to complain but then I noticed four big men at the door who were looking at me. O f course I paid the bill.

6 CÂť) Presenter Hello and welcome to the programme. Do you ever have the same dream night after night? These dreams are called 'recurring dreams', and psychologist D r W i l l i a m Harris is i n the studio today to tell us all about them. G o o d morning, D r Harris. D r H a r r i s Hello. Presenter D r Harris, which is the most common recurring dream? D r H a r r i s Well, top o f the list is the dream where someone or something is running after you. Either it's a person or a dangerous animal, like a bull or a lion. The dream means that there is something i n your life that you don't want to face. It can be a feeling, a conflict or a memory, for example, but whatever it is, it's something that you don't want to deal w i t h . Presenter Right. What's the next dream on the list? D r H a r r i s It's the one where you are falling for what seems like a very long time. Falling is a definite sign


that you are out o f control. You have lost direction in vour life and vou don't know what to do. Presenter Yes, I've had that dream before. Not recently, though. Anyway, what other recurring dreams are there? Dr Harris This is another fairly common dream. You're trying to get somewhere but you get lost on the way, and vou don't know where you are. People often have this dream when they're going through a period of change. It show s that thev don't want to accept the new situation. Presenter O K , D r Harris. Have you got any more recurring dreams for us? Dr Harris Yes, there are two. The first dream is a good one. Some people have a recurring dream that they are flying through the air. They are enjoying it, and enjoying looking down on the world below. This shows that they are feeling free, possiblv because they have solved a problem thev had, or they have escaped from a difficult situation in their life. Presenter A n d the last dream? Dr Harris This one isn't so good. It's a feeling o f being trapped. Maybe vou are in a lift that is trapped between floors and you can't get out. This dream means that there is something in your life that is making you feel unhappy, and you feel that vou cannot change it. Presenter D r Harris, that was verv interesting. Thank you for talking to us. Dr Harris You're welcome.

7 A))) Dave Oh. that's ridiculous! Jane What is? Dave They've decided to ban jokes about mothers-in-law! Jane Who has? Dave The council, o f all people. They've w r i t t e n a leaflet for workers who have to deal w i t h the public, and it savs that mother-in-law jokes are 'offensive'. Jane Well. I suppose they are, reallv. I mean, there are a lot o f mothers-in-law out there, and the jokes are about them. Dave No, but it's just a bit o f fun, isn't it? I mean, I think it's reallv important to have a sense o f humour. It's good for you - it makes you feel better. Jane That's easy for you to say, isn't it? You're a man, so vou'll never be a mother-in-law. I w i l l , one day. Dave Yes, but you won't be my mother-in-law, w i l l vou? Sorry, I was only joking! Jane Ha ha.. .Doesit sav anything else about the jokes? Dave Yes. It says thev show 'disrespect for parents*. Jane O K . Well, mavbe thev do. Young people are healthy, fit, and attractive. It's easy for them to laugh at older people, don't you think? Dave Oh, come o n ! These jokes about mothers-in-law have been around since Roman times. Jane Where did you get that idea from? Dave It savs here that there's a Roman writer called hang on a minute - called 'Juvenal' who said in the first century A . D . - wait, listen to this - 'it's impossible to be happy when one's mother-in-law is still alive'. Ha ha! That's classic! Jane U m . Dave A n d all the best comedians tell jokes about mothers-in-law, too. 1 t h i n k they're funny. Jane Like I said, that's because you're a man. A n d the comedians you're talking about are also men. It's just another example o f the sexist world we live i n . I mean, there aren't many jokes about fathers-in-law, are there? Dave O h , for goodness'sake!

7 B)))

the window, and sing along to whatever comes o n . I don't do this in the middle o f t o w n , o f course; only i f I'm d r i v i n g through the country, but I must say I find it really relaxing. S p e a k e r 3 I've always really enjoyed singing w i t h the kids I teach - I ' m a p r i m a r y school teacher. Young children love singing, and they like it even more i f the songs have actions. It's amazing how much they learn f r o m songs - there are alphabet songs, counting songs, and all sorts. We always have lots o f f u n when we're singing together. S p e a k e r 4 Actually. I can't sing very well at all, so I'm always really embarrassed i f I have to sing i n public. W h e n I was at secondary school, I had to be i n the school choir, but I never actually sang. I just mouthed the words and pretended to sing. S p e a k e r 5 W h e n I ' m out w i t h my friends, we sometimes go to a karaoke i n the centre o f t o w n . It's one o f my favourite places, as we always have a good time. We spend most o f the evening singing together and nobody seems to m i n d i f we do it badly. In fact, it's better i f we do sing badly as it makes everybody laugh.

7 O)) P r e s e n t e r ... A n d here's some good news for one o f the world's endangered languages. There are nearly six thousand languages in the world today, and experts say that nearly half o f them are dying out. That means that around three thousand languages w i l l disappear in the next century or so. One language in danger o f dying out is the Cherokee language, spoken by the Cherokee people o f N o r t h America. Or at least it was in danger u n t i l the leaders o f the tribe decided to do something about it. They got worried when they realized that only 8,000 o f the 290,000 Cherokee people i n the world today actually spoke the language and thev came up w i t h a plan. They got in touch w i t h the electronics company, Apple, and asked them to include Cherokee on the official list o f languages used on their products. A t first, it seemed impossible that Apple w ould take any notice o f the Cherokee, as their products already had fifty languages on them. The big surprise came in September 2006, when the Apple iOS 4.1 operating system was released w i t h Cherokee on the official list o f languages. Since then, the Cherokee people have been able to use their language o n all Mac computers, iPhones, the i Pod touch, and the i Pad. These devices were popular w i t h the younger members o f the tribe from the start, but now the older members are taking an interest, too - especially those who use mobile phones So, it looks as i f the Cherokee language won't die out just yet after all. A n d i f the language stays alive, the culture w i l l stay alive, too, something that the leaders o f the tribe w i l l be very happy about.

8 A))) Speaker 1 I don't usually talk about my problems, but i f something's going w r o n g , I sometimes mention it to Phil. He's o n my basketball team, and we get along O K . In fact, he's the one who introduced me to the girl I'm dating at the moment. S p e a k e r 2 The person who I talk to most is my sister. We don't look like each other at all, but we both have very similar personalities. She's a really good listener, and she always gives me good advice. She sometimes tells me her problems too, and I try to help her. S p e a k e r 3 M y friend Jennv is on my course at university, and I tell her absolutely everything. We're quite different, which means we often think in different ways. Sometimes we argue, but we're never angry w i t h each other for long - just until one o f us apologizes.

Speaker I like singing while I'm having a shower. The bathroom is a great place to sing because nobody can hear you - at least, 1 hope nobody can hear, because I sing really loudly! I usually sing very old classic songs, which I'd never sing in public!

Speaker 4 The person who understands me most is my friend John, w h o lives next door. We've grown up together, so he knows me very well. M y main problem at the moment is mv job, which 1 hate. John thinks I should look for a new one, and he's probably right.

Speaker 2 I always feel like singing when I'm alone i n my car on a summer's day. I t u r n up the radio, open

S p e a k e r 5 M y gran lives w i t h us, and I spend a lot o f time talking to her. Although she's older than me, she's

always interested i n what I have to say. We've got quite a lot i n common, and some things that have happened to me also happened to her when she was young.

8 B))) P r e s e n t e r Now, everyone loves travelling, and we all enjoy telling stories about the places we've been to. But what happens i f there's an earthquake while you're away? Travel expert, Monica Fields, is here i n the studio w i t h us today to give us some tips on what to do in a natural disaster. First o f all, Monica, is it possible to avoid them? M o n i c a Well, no, actually, it isn't. Nobody really knows exactly when a disaster like a forest fire or a blizzard w i l l happen, so you can't really avoid them. What you can do, however, is be prepared. Presenter H o w can you do that? M o n i c a Well, first o f all, i f you plan to visit a region where there are natural disasters at certain times o f the year, try not to go at that time. For example, there are often bad storms, hurricanes, or cyclones in the Caribbean in May and June, so don't go there then. Presenter That sounds sensible. What else can you do? M o n i c a It's really i m p o r t a n t to buy travel insurance before vou go. This w i l l pay for extra nights in a hotel, for example, it you can't fly home and have to stay in your resort longer than you had planned. I never understand why some people don't take out travel insurance. Presenter Right. So, what should vou do i f a natural disaster actually happens while you're abroad? M o n i c a The first thing vou should do is to stay calm and be patient. Presenter That sounds easy, Monica, but natural disasters can be very frightening, can't they? M o n i c a Yes, o f course, but i f you panic, things w i l l only get worse. Secondly, you need to contact your family and friends at home as soon as possible. I f they hear about the disaster on the news, they'll be incredibly worried. Presenter Yes, I can see that. What else should you do? M o n i c a Well, it's always a good idea to know what your airline w i l l do i f there's a natural disaster. I f you are f l y i n g to a country where natural disasters are frequent, you should ask your airline when you book vour ticket it they w i l l change your ticket i f vou need to leave the country quickly, or i f you have to stay longer because there is a natural disaster. Presenter Thank you for joining us, Monica, and thanks for your useful advice.

8 CÂť) E w a n D i d you watch T V last night, Helen? H e l e n No, 1 didn't. What was on? E w a n There was a reallv interesting cooking programme on after dinner. H e l e n Was there? W h a t made it so good? E w a n Well, it was a sort o f experiment, really. They were t r y i n g to answer the question: do men and women cook differently? H e l e n Reallv? So what did they do to try to find the answer? E w a n Thev invited a male cook and a female cook to prepare five different courses of a meal. Both cooks had to use the same main ingredient for each course, but thev didn't have to make the same dish. Then, thev served the dishes to a panel o f judges, who tasted them, and decided i f they were made by the man or the w o m a n . H e l e n W h o were the judges? E w a n Well, there were two men and t w o women. They were all food experts - either chefs themselves or restaurant critics. H e l e n W h a t about the cooks? Were they professionals, too? E w a n Yes. They were f r o m t w o o f the best restaurants i n the country. H e l e n A n d what sort o f things did they cook? E w a n A l l kinds o f things really, but the only ones I remember are a meat dish w i t h garlic and a bright pink dessert.


H e l e n What was so special about those t w o dishes? E w a n 1 remember them because the judges had real problems in deciding i f thev were made bv the male chef or the female chef. I n the end, they all got it w r o n g ! H e l e n So, did they manage to answer the question, then? D o men cook differently f r o m women? E w a n N o t really. The only conclusion they came to was that it was impossible to tell i f a particular dish was made by a man or a w o m a n . That's all, reallv. H e l e n So, it was a bit o f a waste o f time then, really. E w a n N o , it wasn't! I really enjoyed the programme, even i f they didn't answer the question!

9 A))) Newsreader A n d our final story o n tonight's programme is about an Australian diver w h o has survived a shark attack. 46-year-old Eric Nerhus was fishing o f f the coast o f Cape Howe, New South Wales, when a great white shark attacked h i m . He was under the water at the time, and he didn't see the animal s w i m m i n g towards h i m . M r Nerhus's head, shoulders, and one o f his arms ended up in the shark's mouth, but, fortunately, he was wearing a heavy metal vest. W h e n the shark tried to bite the man i n half, its teeth hit the vest and not his body. M r Nerhus knew he had to do something, so he felt for the shark's eye w i t h the hand o f his other arm. W h e n he found it, he surprised the animal by pressing his fingers into its eye. The shark reacted by opening its mouth, giving M r Nerhus a chance to escape. Despite his injuries, Eric managed to s w i m up to the surface o f the water. His son pulled h i m onto his boat, and took h i m quickly to the shore. Meanwhile, another friend called the emergency services. M r Nerhus was f l o w n to hospital by helicopter. He had deep cuts all over his body and a broken nose, but he was very lucky to be alive. Attacks by great white sharks usuallv result i n death because o f their size and strength. The shark that attacked M r Nerhus was over three metres long.

Now, Judy Garland's real name was Frances Ethel G u m m , and she was b o r n on June 10th, 1 9 2 2 i n G r a n d Rapids, Minnesota. Her parents ran a theatre and Judy first appeared on stage singing a Christmas song w i t h her t w o older sisters when she was t w o years old. W h e n she was 13, Judy joined the f i l m company M e t r o G o l d w y n Mayer and at the age o f 16, she plaved Dorothy in The Wizard ofOz. The f i l m was extremely successful, and she w o n a children's Oscar for her performance. M e t r o G o l d w y n Mayer terminated her contract i n 1950 because o f her problems w i t h alcohol and drugs. However, she continued to perform, and i n 1964 she did a series o f concerts at the London Palladium. I n fact, it was i n London where Judy Garland was found dead after she took a drug overdose i n 1969. Judy got married five times and had three children. One o f these children was Liza M i n n e l l i w h o was 23 when her mother died. Liza was b o r n i n H o l l y w o o d , California, o n March 12th, 1946. She grew up i n f i l m studios, and, like her mother, made her first stage appearance at the age o f t w o . She was only five when her parents got divorced. A f t e r p e r f o r m i n g successfully w i t h her mother at the London Palladium i n 1964, Liza became a professional nightclub singer. She made several albums, and later starred as a singer i n the 1972 f i l m . Cabaret, a role for which she w o n an Oscar. Despite her successful singing and acting career, Liza has had similar problems to her mother. She has been to rehab clinics several times because o f her addiction to drugs and alcohol. She has also been married four times, but, unlike her mother, she never had children. Today, Liza M i n n e l l i is i n her sixties, but she still makes occasional television appearances.

10 A))) P r e s e n t e r Hello, and welcome to the programme. Today we have scientist, D o u g McLeod, i n the studio w i t h us. He's going to tell us about some o f the everyday things we know and love that were invented by accident. Doug? r

9.B>))

!

Presenter Hello, and welcome to the programme. Today, we've got psychologist, D r C h r i s Hopper, i n the studio w i t h us to answer your questions about phobias. Hello, Chris. C h r i s Good m o r n i n g . Presenter A n d our first caller is Cynthia Sharp f r o m Dundee. What's your question, Cynthia? C y n t h i a U m , hello, D r Hopper. U m , my question is actually about our son, James. He's six years old, and he had a bad experience w i t h a dog last night. C h r i s I'm sorry to hear that, Cynthia. W h a t exactly happened? C y n t h i a Well, we were outside a neighbour's house, and, u m , I was chatting w i t h the m u m when one o f their dogs ran out. It was a big dog, u m , and it came r u n n i n g out o f the house barking. James panicked, and tried to hide behind me, but the dog jumped o n h i m and bit h i m . It wasn't a serious injury, but we're very worried that he'll be afraid o f dogs now. We don't want h i m to get a phobia. W h a t should we do? C h r i s Well, Cynthia, you're quite right to be worried about this incident because, cynophobia, that is, a fear o f dogs, is often caused by a bad experience w i t h a dog as a child. The best t h i n g you can do is to give your son a positive experience w i t h a different dog as soon as possible. I f you have any friends w h o have a quiet and friendly dog, go and visit them. Let vour son touch the dog i f he wants to and don't remind h i m about his bad experience. Presenter That sounds like good advice, Chris. A n d our next caller is M a r i o n Williams from Cardiff. Marion?

9 CÂť) Presenter Hello and welcome to those o f you w h o just joined us. C o n t i n u i n g o n our theme o f celebrity families, the focus o f today's programme is actress and singer, Judy Garland, and her daughter, Liza M i n n e l l i .

D o u g Hello, Janet. Well, I'm going to start w i t h the microwave oven. I n 1945, an engineer called Percv Spencer was testing some new radar equipment. He had a chocolate bar i n his pocket, and while he was standing i n front o f the machine, it melted. A f t e r that, he also tried using the microwaves f r o m the radar equipment to cook popcorn. Percy realized that microwaves could heat and cook food, and so the microwave oven was b o r n . P r e s e n t e r H o w interesting! W h a t else have vou got for us, Doug? D o u g Next is something that is found i n hospitals all over the world: the X-ray machine. In 1895, a German physicist called W i l h e l m Roentgen was experimenting w i t h electrical rays in a dark r o o m . He was directing them through a glass tube covered w i t h black paper. Suddenly, he saw a light on a screen on the wall and he realized that the rays could pass through the glass and the paper. After that, he experimented w i t h his o w n hand, and found that he could see the bones. The first X-ray ever made was an image o f Roentgen's wife's hand - you can even see her wedding r i n g ! P r e s e n t e r That's fascinating, Doug. We've got time for one more. D o u g M a n y different kinds o f food were discovered by accident, Janet, and I've chosen something that we call 'crisps', but Americans call 'potato chips'. These were invented by a chef called G eorge C r u m , w h o was w o r k i n g i n a restaurant near Saratoga Springs, New York. A customer complained that the chips he was served were too thick. The chef was angry about this, so he fried some very t h i n potatoes and covered them w i t h salt. The customer loved them, and after that 'Saratoga chips' became popular all over the USA. Eventually, they were produced for people to eat at home. P r e s e n t e r That was all verv fascinating, Doug. Thanks for joining us.

10 B))) T o n y Amy, did you study foreign languages at secondary school? A m y Yes, I did. Actually, I used to be quite good at languages. T o n y W h i c h ones did you study? A m y Well, I did French for five years, then I did German for six years, and I studied Spanish for a year i n my lunch break. T o n y A n d how much French can you remember? A m y N o t much! But I can remember my German, because I did it for my degree at Cambridge. W h y all the questions, Tony? T o n y Well, I've just read this article about the state o f language learning in schools i n the U K, and it isn't looking good. It says that adults only remember about seven words f r o m the languages they studied at school. A m y O n l y seven words? That isn't verv good, is it? W h a t sort o f words do they remember? T o n y C o m m o n words, like Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thankyou,

beer, one, two and three, and the question

Doyou speak English? A m y So, what happens when people are abroad? D o they practise the language? T o n y N o t at all. I n fact, the article suggests that people often choose not to go o n holiday to countries where they have to w o r r v about language problems. A m y That's probably because they're too lazy to learn a language. T o n y N o , it isn't that. The article says it's because they're too embarrassed to t r y and speak it. A m y O K . So which languages do pupils study at school today? T o n y Hang on a minute, there's a list here somewhere... Here it is. It says 65% o f pupils study French, 25% study German, 22 % Spanish, and 2% Italian. Polish is becoming more popular, too. A m y And what are schools going to do about the problem? T o n y Well, first of all. they're going to introduce language classes for children in primary schools. And then they're going to start offering languages f r o m outside Europe. for example Mandarin Chinese and Urdu. A m y That sounds quite d i f f i c u l t . Anyway, Tony, which languages did you use to study at school? T o n y O n l v French. A n d I was terrible at it!

10C))) Speaker 1 I made a bad decision once when I was travelling home to Plymouth f r o m university i n Manchester, a journey o f nearly 450 k m . The choice was going by t r a i n or by bus, and I opted for the train as it was quicker. Unfortunately, the train broke down on the way, so i n the end I took t w o hours longer than I expected. Speaker 2 The worst decision I ever made was giving my son a skateboard for his tenth birthday. O n the morning o f his birthday, we went down to the park to try it out. Sadly, he fell o f f the board as soon as he got on it, and broke his a r m . We had to cancel his birthday party, and we spent the whole day i n hospital instead. S p e a k e r 3 I had t w o interviews and both companies offered me a job. In the first job, thev offered me more money, but it was a long way from where I live - an hour travelling every day The second job was less money, but it was very near my house. In the end, I chose the second job instead, and I ' m very happy I did, because last m o n t h the first company closed down. Speaker 4 O n one occasion, I had to decide once between a good friend o f mine and a boy 1 really liked. I was going to a concert w i t h my friend, and then this boy asked me to go to the cinema w i t h h i m on the same night. I n the end, I said no to the bov, and went to the concert w i t h my friend. I found out later that the boy already had a girlfriend, so I think I made the right decision. S p e a k e r 5 You won't believe what happened to me! I used to play the lottery w i t h some colleagues at work. One day, I decided that I was fed up w i t h never


winning, so I stopped playing. M y colleagues carried on without me, and just one week later, they had the winning numbers! They won a lot o f money, and I didn't get any o f it!

11 A))) Speaker 1 The worst loser I know is my m u m . We often used to play cards together when I was little, and i f my mum was losing, it was safer to stop playing. She was always happy when she was w i n n i n g , but when she was losing, you could see her getting angrier and angrier until she exploded. Sometimes, she used to go out of the room, because she was so upset! Speaker 2 i once had a friend who was a bad loser at tennis. In fact, we stopped talking to each other because o f a tennis match. We were about twenty at the time, and on this occasion we were arguing over a point. I said the ball was out and she said it was i n . I n the end, she just threw her racket into the net and left. We've never spoken since. Speaker 3 I have to be very careful at work when we're talking about football. I have a colleague who gets really upset when his team loses, and he hates it i f you make a joke about it. I tried it once, and he just stood up, walked out, and closed the door w i t h a bang. He didn't speak to me for days after that, so I don't t h i n k I'll try it again. Speaker 4 M y son is a very bad loser, i n fact he always has been. He's 12 now, but he still hates losing. We used to play board games together when he was little, but he always used to cry i f he didn't w i n . I had to choose between letting h i m w i n all the time, or making h i m upset i f I w o n . I n the end, I stopped playing that kind o f game w i t h h i m . Speaker 5 One o f the guvs who plavs basketball w i t h me gets incredibly upset d u r i n g games, and he spends most of the time shouting at the other players. He's a really nervous person at the best o f times, but when we're losing, it really is too much. The referee throws him off the court at least twice a m o n t h , and once our coach told h i m to go home.

11 BÂť) Interviewer Can I ask you about your job, Graham? G r a h a m Yes, o f course. G o ahead. Interviewer What time do you go to bed? G r a h a m Well, I don't often get home before six o'clock in the morning, and it usually takes me a little while to relax. It's probably about seven by the time I go to sleep. Interviewer A n d what time do you have to get up again? G r a h a m I usually get up at one o'clock, to have lunch w i t h my family. A f t e r that, I go back to bed again for an hour or so. u n t i l about three o'clock. Interviewer D o you need an alarm clock to wake up? G r a h a m No, I never use one. I wake up the first time when my children come home from school for lunch. The second time, my wife wakes me up. That's when I get up properly. Interviewer H o w do you feel when you wake up? G r a h a m It depends on the day, really. I f I've only worked for a day or two, I'm full o f energy, but i f it's after the fifth or sixth night in a row, I'm absolutely exhausted. That's when 1 find it really hard to get out o f bed. Interviewer What do you do about meals, Graham? G r a h a m Well, like I said, my first meal o f the day is what you would call lunch. Then, I have dinner at about midnight w i t h some other drivers i n a cafe. W h e n I get home i n the morning, I have something light, like a ham sandwich or some toast before I go to bed. Interviewer Would you like to change your w o r k i n g hours, Graham? G r a h a m I f I changed my w o r k i n g hours, I wouldn't earn as much money! There's a lot more work at night, because people go out for dinner and to the theatre or clubs, and then it's late and they need to get home, and they don't want to drive because they've usually had a drink or two. I quite enjoy my job, really, because I meet lots of interesting people.

UO))

12 B)))

Presenter A n d to finish o f f today's programme, we're going to take a look at some famous twins. Let's start w i t h probably the earliest set o f t w i n s i n history: Romulus and Remus. Now, the legend says that they were abandoned by their parents, because twins were thought to b r i n g bad luck. Fortunately, they were found bv a female wolf, who looked after them when they were babies. According to legend, the boys grew up, and later founded the city o f Rome. A f t e r some time, they began to argue, and eventually Romulus killed Remus. As Romulus was the only brother alive, the city was called Rome after h i m .

A l a n W h o do you think gossips more, Jess? M e n or women?

Let's move o n i n history to the 1950s, when a set o f twins called the Kray Brothers caused a lot o f trouble in London's East End. Ronnie and Reggie Kray were both nightclub owners. They had expensive lifestyles, and through their nightclubs they met several American stars like Frank Sinatra and Judv Garland. However, they were also incredibly violent gangsters, and they became the leaders o f organized crime i n the city. They were i nvolved i n many robberies and murders, u n t i l they were eventually arrested i n 1969. They were both sent to prison for life, and they both died when they were i n their sixties. O n a happier note, the youngest twins ever to become famous are the Olsen twins. M a r y Kate and Ashley Olsen were given the same role on the American T V series Full House when they were only six months old. They played the part o f a little girl, and they played the same part for eight years. The producers used both sisters to play the same part, so that they didn't break the law o n the number o f hours a child could work. The show was very popular w i t h American audiences. Today, the twins have g r o w n up, and they have a fashion business. A n d I'm afraid that's all we have time for. Join me, Roy T h o m p s o n , at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon for another t w o hours o f Thompson's Choice. Bye for now.

12 A))) N e w s r e a d e r A n d now it's time for the news. Police have found the 82-year-old man w h o went missing last Monday evening. Dennis Leighton was found i n his car on the M 2 5 motorway. He had left home o n Monday m o r n i n g to drive to his daughter's house, a distance o f about 90 kilometres. However, M r Leighton had got lost, and he had spent 30 hours d r i v i n g round i n circles t r y i n g to f i n d the right exit. M r Leighton had stopped at several service stations to sleep, but he then carried o n driving. A f t e r being treated i n hospital for hypothermia, he has finally been reunited w i t h his family. A tourist had a lucky escape yesterday while she was doing a bungee j u m p o f f the Victoria Falls i n Zambia. Twenty-two-year-old E r i n Langworthy fell into the river because her bungee rope had broken when she jumped. She landed i n the water w i t h her feet still tied to the broken rope, and then she swam to safety. M s Langworthy was taken straight to hospital after the accident, but had no serious injuries. A Swedish woman has found the white gold wedding ring that she lost over 16 years ago. Lena Paahlsson had taken o f f the ring while she was cooking w i t h her daughters. W h e n she went to put it back o n again, it had disappeared. That is. u n t i l yesterday, when she was picking vegetables i n her garden, and she found the ring around a carrot. The ring doesn't fit M r s Paahlsson any more, but she is going to have it made bigger. A n Australian woman had a frightening experience last night, when she discovered an adult crocodile i n her living room. Forty-two-year-old Jo Dodd got out o f bed when she heard her dog barking. When she opened the bedroom door, she saw a crocodile in the middle o f the room. M r s Dodd woke her husband, who called the local Crocodile Management Centre, and a crocodile catcher came to take the animal away. The crocodile had escaped f r o m a nearby crocodile farm earlier i n the week. A n d that's all for now. I ' l l be back again at 9 o'clock for the next news bulletin.

Jess Well. I gossip quite a lot w i t h my female colleagues at w o r k , so I suppose that women are the biggest gossips. W h a t do you think? A l a n Yes, that's what I thought too, but it says here that it's actually men who are the biggest gossips. That's what the results o f this survey say, anyway. Jess W h a t survey? A l a n This one here i n the newspaper. It says the survey was carried out by a telecommunications company. They wanted to do research into gossiping for a new service they're offering. The aim o f the survey was to f i n d out what sort o f people enjoy gossiping, and how much time thev spend doing it. Jess So what did they find out? A l a n Well, they had quite a big surprise. The study showed that a f i f t h o f the men they interviewed said they spent at least three hours a day gossiping. Jess Wow! That's a lot! A n d where do they usually gossip? A l a n Most o f them said they usually gossiped at work. Hang o n . . .1 can give you the exact figures. Yes, .. .55 per cent o f the men said they gossiped at work compared to 46 per cent o f the women. Jess Goodness! I didn't realize men had so much to say! D i d they tell the researchers what they usually talked about? A l a n Yes. They said that their main topics o f conversation were their women colleagues, and who i n the company would get the next promotion. Jess The bit about women colleagues doesn't surprise me i n the least. So, what about the women i n the survey? D i d they say what they talked about? A l a n Yes, they did. Thev told the researchers that they talked about the problems they were having i n their families. They also chatted about what was happening i n their favourite T V series. Jess O K . So what about you, Alan? D o you ever gossip at work? A l a n What? Me? N o , never! I wouldn't dream o f it!

12 CÂť) S p e a k e r 1 I used to watch a quiz show called Mastermind. It was a very serious show, and the quizmaster was Magnus Magnusson. Each o f the four contestants had to answer t w o rounds o f questions: firstly, on their specialist subject, for example, Dickens, or the Second World War, and then on general knowledge. The thing I remember most is the quizmaster's catch phrase, 'I've started, so I'll finish.' S p e a k e r 2 M y favourite quiz show is A Question of Sport. It's been o n T V for years-since 1968, i n fact, and, although I don't watch it any more, it's still very popular. There are t w o teams w i t h the same captain each time, and all o f the guests are sportsmen and women. The teams have to answer questions about sport, and the show is quite amusing, actually. S p e a k e r 3 I used to watch Call my Bluff; a quiz show about words. There were alwavs t w o teams made up o f a captain and t w o celebrities. Each team was given a word, a very unusual word, and the three team members had to give a different definition - one was true and the other t w o were false. The other team had to guess the correct definition. It used to be quite funny. S p e a k e r 4 I've always enjoyed the quiz show. Who wants to be a Millionaire? It started i n the U K i n 1998, and it's still on T V today. In each show, one contestant is asked a series o f questions, and they have to choose the right answer out o f four possible options. It's quite exciting, really, as the contestant can w i n up to a m i l l i o n pounds i f they're good. S p e a k e r 5 M y favourite quiz show when I was a teenager was Pop Quiz. It wasn't on for long - only a couple o f vears - but I used to love it. There were t w o teams made up o f a captain, who was the same person each time, and some guests, who were all pop stars. The teams had to answer different questions about pop music and musicians, and I used to watch it every week.


vM

b

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

b

D o you have any brothers or sisters? W h a t university do y o u go to? W h a t languages can y o u speak? W h e r e d i d y o u study E n g l i s h before? W h a t k i n d o f music do you listen to? H o w o f t e n do y o u do exercise? W h e r e d i d you go last weekend?

2 VOCABULARY 2d

3i

4g

5e

6h

7b

8a

9f

10c

3 PRONUNCIATION a

2P

3R

4M

5B

6K

71

c 2 programme 3 thirteen 4 thirty 5 university 6 weekend 7 magazine 8 sister 9 language 10 address

4 SPELLING AND NUMBERS a

b

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

seventeen, eighteen eighty, ninety one hundred, one h u n d r e d and one eight hundred, nine h u n d r e d four hundred and f i f t y , five h u n d r e d five thousand, seven thousand t h i r t y thousand, f o r t y thousand

2 exercise 3 breakfast 4 f a m i l y 5 cinema 6 thousand 7 teacher 8 university 9 weekend 10 i m p o r t a n t

5 do

6 Does

a

2 bald 3 straight, curly 4 beard, moustache 5 fat, s l i m 6 t h i n , overweight 7 red, m e d i u m height

b

2d

3e

4a

5b

5 lazy

1 watches 2 lives 5 leaves 6 cooks

3 likes

c 2 extrovert 3 u n f r i e n d l y 4 generous S moustache 6 serious 7 curly 8 quiet 9 overweight

4 READING b 2T

3F

4F

5 LISTENING a

three

c

IE

1 VOCABULARY a D o w n : 2 leggings 3 trousers 4 shirt 6 tracksuit 7 cap Across: 3 trainers 5 belt 8 coat 9 dress 10 tie 2 on the left 3 i n f r o n t o f 5 b e h i n d 6 between

4 next to

2 drives 3 are sleeping 4's r a i n i n g 5 d r i n k s 6 like 7 w o r k s 8 wears 9're s t u d y i n g 10 live

1 GRAMMAR a

2 3 4 5 6 7

It doesn't r a i n a lot here We don't live i n a f l a t I don't play tennis He doesn't have a beard They don't go to the g y m She doesn't w r i t e a blog

2 SOCIAL ENGLISH 2 good view 3 l o o k i n g f o r w a r d 4 must be 5 By the way

2T

3T

4F

5T

6F

7F

1 VOCABULARY

b

6F

There's a problem w i t h the shower. I ' l l send somebody up right away. I ' m sorry to bother you again. I have a problem w i t h the W i - F i . I ' l l put you t h r o u g h to IT.

2A,F 3B,D

2 are relaxing 3 are w a l k i n g 4 is l y i n g 5 is relaxing 6 are sitting 7 are they doing 8 are w a i t i n g 9 are watching 10 is playing

5T

2 3 4 5 6

a

2 GRAMMAR

4T

1 CALLING RECEPTION

3 READING

5T

a

3F

D a v i d Hockney used his iPhone and iPad to draw them, b 1 I n Paris. 2 T h e sunrise. 3 He sends them to his friends. 4 30 January. 5 Five euros.

4 starts

b

2F

a

3 PRONUNCIATION a

a Because some friends are w a i t i n g for h i m . / Because Sandra's b o y f r i e n d arrives. IT

4 LISTENING

6f

c 2 extrovert 3 mean 4 u n f r i e n d l y 6 u n k i n d 7 f u n n y 8 intelligent

b

5 LISTENING

88

4 Does

2 VOCABULARY

2 d i d you do last night 3 T V programmes does vour g i r l f r i e n d watch 4 is your b i r t h d a y 5 are you f r o m 6 d i d your friends go on holiday last year 7 do you read 8 were you angry yesterday

a

3 do

c 2 earns 3 study 4 w a n t 5 lives 6 share 7 have 8 doesn't come 9 doesn't like 10 prefer 11 don't see 12 get o n

1 GRAMMAR a

2 Does 7 Does

3 PRONUNCIATION a Is!: fashion, sandals, sweater, trainers, trousers h'J: s h i r t , s k i r t , T - s h i r t , t h i r d , w o r l d

a

2 for, w a l k 3 book 4 abroad 5 hire 6 out 7 stay 8 sightseeing 9 sunbathe 10 awav

b

2 sunny 3 crowded 4 delicious 5 u n h e l p f u l 6 basic 7 friendly 8 lovely 9 cloudy 10 disgusting

2 GRAMMAR a

Regular: arrived, asked, i n v i t e d , rented, stayed, sunbathed Irregular: bought, could, chose, ate, felt, said

b

2 3 4 5 6 7

They d i d n ' t buy The people weren't I d i d n ' t sunbathe We d i d n ' t hire He d i d n ' t spend O u r r o o m wasn't

c 2 wanted 3 booked 4 took 5 arrived 6 went 7 asked 8 looked 9 couldn't 10 went d 2 3 4 5 6

d i d they w a n t d i d they book d i d they arrive d i d the w o m a n at the desk d i d they go


3 PRONUNCIATION a 2 wanted

3 booked

PRONUNCIATION

4 invited

a

c 1 caught, saw 2 rang, sat 3 drove, w r o t e 4 said, went 5 gave, made

4 LISTENING a2

c3

d5

b

1 a w f u l , birthday, evening, perfect, restaurant, second 2 again, although, because, i n v i t e

a

8 she's going to have

2,5,1,4,3

IT

2B

2 VOCABULARY

a 2 was snowing 3 weren't d r i v i n g 4 was he doing 5 were you c r y i n g 6 was sitting 7 were living 8 wasn't w o r k i n g b 2 He fell o f f his bike w h e n he was cycling home 3 The children were playing video games when the visitors arrived 4 We were having a barbecue w h e n it started to r a i n 5 I was f i n i s h i n g my report w h e n my computer crashed c 2 were having 3 got 4 was speaking 5 noticed 6 was s i t t i n g 7 decided 8 went 9 said 10 stopped 11 was passing 12took 13came 14wassmiling 15 looked 16 was laughing

4 on 5 on 8 At, in, in 4 in, on

5 at

6 on,

6T

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

b

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

we aren't going to go We're going to go are you going to travel We're going to be are you going t o do We're going t o stay we're going to rent Is it going to be it isn't going t o r a i n

a

three

b

2T

3F

4T

5T

a 2 Next day 3 when 5 Two minutes later

c 1 2 3 4 5 6

so I d i d n ' t have any breakfast but I had a great holiday i n E g y p t although 1 don't really like h i m so I called the police although he has a lot o f money because she couldn't f i n d her wallet

2 VOCABULARY a2g

3f

4b

5h

a

Dialogue Dialogue Dialogue Dialogue

c

1 a sandwich 2 B28 3 415 673 702 4 grey 5 some chocolate

4 Suddenly 6 A f t e r that

b l b so l c A l t h o u g h 2a A l t h o u g h 2b so 2c because 3a but 3b A l t h o u g h 3c because

6a

7e

8c

5 on

6 to

7 at

8 of

I'd love to. A r e y o u free this weekend? Sorry, no. I ' m w o r k i n g on Saturday. W h a t about next weekend? W h a t are y o u d o i n g then? N o t h i n g . Next weekend is fine. Great. D o you like walking? I love i t ! O K . Let's go to D e v o n - the countryside is b e a u t i f u l !

4 READING a

nine

b

2B

3P

4B

5V

6P

5 LISTENING a

Italy and France

b

2 a student 3 a week 4 Venice 5 the Louvre 6 i n hotels

2 3 4 5

1 GRAMMAR a

2a

b

2 which 6 where 10 w h o

6F

5 LISTENING 1 GRAMMAR

4 for

2 VOCABULARY

4 READING

5a

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

' m going to book isn't going t o sleep 's, going to get isn't going to f l y 're going to be ' m not going to stay A r e , going to need

3 about

3 PRONUNCIATION

1 GRAMMAR a

4 LISTENING 4a

5F

2 l i f t 3 Departures 4 check-in 5 gate 6 passport c o n t r o l 7 Baggage R e c l a i m 8 trolley 9 Customs 10 A r r i v a l s

a Yes. 3c

2 in 4T

3A

2 VOCABULARY b 2 on, i n 3 o n , i n , o n on 7 at, i n 8 at, at

3F

a

1 GRAMMAR

a 2 in 3 on, i n , at, on 6 at, i n , at 7 i n , on

2F

/

7 â&#x20AC;˘

5 LISTENING

b 2b

6

4 READING e4

2 / 3 it's going to be 4 he's going to get the job 5 aren't going t o miss

Check-in Immigration Baggage reclaim Customs

3d

4h

5b

3 who 7 who

6g

4 which 8 where

7e

8c

5 which 9 where

2 VOCABULARY 2 k i n d 3 s i m i l a r 4 like 5 something 6 example 7 someone 8 somewhere

3 PRONUNCIATION a

2 a quite, b quiet 3 a shoes, b socks 4 a sweet, b suit 5 a sightsee, b sunbathe 6 a weight, b height 7 a shirt, b shorts 8 a cloudy, b crowded

4 READING 1 GRAMMAR a

2're d r i v i n g 3 aren't stopping 4're getting 5 're going 6 aren't t a k i n g 7 're s t o p p i n g 8 're a r r i v i n g 9 're p i c k i n g 10 're catching

a

2 f a s h i o n i s t a 3 Chick l i t 4 E - w a s t e 5 sandwich generation 6 Agritourism 7 Netiquette 8 staycation

5 LISTENING a

three

b 2F

3T

4T

5F

6F

7F

8T

89


1 VOCABULARY 2 menu 3 starter 5 waiter / waitress

a 2 b 4 m a i n course 6 dessert 7 b i l l

2F

Speaker 2 E , Speaker 5 C

5 p . m . - 7 p . m . 3 $12.95 4 2 1 4 E . 9 t h S t Restaurants i n the Theatre D i s t r i c t $30-$45 7 Atlunchtime Scandinavian f o o d

3 PRONUNCIATION

Speaker 3 A ,

Speaker 4 D ,

1 VOCABULARY a

2 c h a n g i n g r o o m s 3 checkout 4 receipt 5 suit 6 size 7 f i t 8 take, back 9 shop assistants

b D o w n : 2 item

5 auction

Across: 3 basket 8 delivery

7 website

4 payment

6 checkout

4 do

5 do

2 3 4 5 6

I haven't b r o u g h t my credit card Has A n n a gone / been shopping Has your sister ever w o r k e d as a model You haven't w o r n y o u r new s h i r t Have I ever t o l d you about my holiday i n Greece 7 T h e shopping centre's never been so crowded 8 I've never used eBay 2 A Have you ever sold, B have, A did you sell, B d i d n ' t w a n t 3 A Have you ever w o r n , B haven't 4 A Have you ever lost, B have, left 5 A Have y o u ever had, B have, d i d n ' t have, couldn't

3 clothes

2 Have you made any plans for the weekend yet 3 We haven't f i n i s h e d lunch yet 4 D a n i e l has already tidied his r o o m 5 I've already done the i r o n i n g 6 Have you been to the supermarket yet 7 I haven't cleaned the b a t h r o o m yet 8 E d w a r d has already taken out the rubbish

4 card

a 2 y o u n g 3 year 4 yellow 5 u n i f o r m 6 jacket 7 teenager 8 bridge 9 j u m p e r 10 enjoy

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

2 Speaker 4 6 Speaker 4

2 VOCABULARY 2 spend

3 on

4 waste

lO0round

1 GRAMMAR

2T

3T

4F

5T

6F

7F

6 in

3 PRONUNCIATION

5 children

b

5 save

a 2 centre 3 parents 4 ago 5 children 6 patient 7 j iroblem 8 c o m m u n i c a t i o n 9 t r a d i t i o n a l 10 around 11 seconds 12 better 3 parents

2F

3T

7 problem

9 tr^dit^ojnal

11 seconds

4 READING

b

4(a)go

6 patient

8 c(o)mmunica(fic^n

a 2 a n y t h i n g 3 anywhere 4 anywhere 5 anyone 6 something 7 nobody 8 somewhere 9 somebody

3 Speaker 2 8 Speaker 2

as stylish as her shoes as big as my boss's play as w e l l as Spain drive as carefully as me as expensive as laptops l o o k as relaxed as H a r r y as d i r t y as his s h i r t

b 2 cen(fr^)

b 2's just fallen 3 ' v e just w o n 4 ' v e just cleaned 5's just laid 6've just missed

3 PRONUNCIATION

1 Speaker 3 4 Speaker 3

1 GRAMMAR

b

2 £1.45 billion 3 T w o department stores, one supermarket, and 3 0 0 smaller shops 4 70 5 10,000 6 By car, bus, t r a i n , and by the underground 7 Some trousers 8 Because there were t o o many people i n the c h a n g i n g r o o m s t o t r y t h e m o n

1 went camping i n the Lake District. 2 stayed i n a hotel i n Paris. 3 went to a local museum. 4's brother and w i f e came to stay.

a 2 worse 3 more slowly 4 hotter 5 harder 6 f u r t h e r 7 better 8 healthier 9 more dangerous 10 busier

4 LISTENING

2 GRAMMAR

90

b

a A shopping centre b

T i d y your wardrobe Listen to some podcasts Play board games Bake a loaf o f bread L e a r n h o w to juggle Meet your neighbours Organize y o u r shelves Take some photos Startablog

a Speaker Speaker Speaker Speaker

6 take out 6 make

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

5 LISTENING

2 GRAMMAR

b

1 a n y t h i n g , dress, friendly, sweater, website 2 coat, don't, goes, home, photos 3 funny, gloves, lunch, something, n o t h i n g

4 READING

a 2 proceed 5 clean

a

a

3 PRONUNCIATION

1 VOCABULARY

a

2 r e l a x i n g 3 b o r i n g 4 depressed 5 interested 6 exciting 7 depressing 8 relaxed 9 bored 10 excited

7T

• i J J

4 READING

2 make 3 make 7 do 8 make

6F

•FHI

1 start w i t h 2 any suggestions, be great 3 we have 4 a mistake, my day 5 to go

b

5F

|

a

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH

2 make 3 tidy 4 lay 7 do 8 put away

4T

5 LISTENING b

2 Yes, please. 3 Can I get you s o m e t h i n g to start w i t h ? 4 N o , t h a n k y o u . Just a m a i n course. I'd like the steak, please. 5 A n d h o w w o u l d y o u like y o u r steak? Rare, m e d i u m or w e l l done? 6 Rare, please. 7 W o u l d you like that w i t h fries or w i t h a baked potato? 8 A baked potato, please. 9 OK. A n d to drink? 10 Water, please. 11 S t i l l or sparkling? 12 S t i l l . 13 Here's y o u r steak, madam. 14 I ' m sorry but I asked for my steak rare and this is w e l l done.

a

3T

a Speaker 3

2 AT THE RESTAURANT

a 2 5 6 7

2 VOCABULARY

READING

urant problems

4T

5F

6F

12bett@


5 LISTENING

3 PRONUNCIATION

a 1 Speaker 3 2 Speaker 5 3 Speaker 2 5 Speaker 4

a

b Happiest: Speakers 4 + 5 Least happy: Speaker 2

a

potatoes

b

2F

1 m u c h , none 2 few, f o o d , t o o 3 diet, like, quite 4 any, healthy, many

2 3 4 5 6

5 LISTENING

b

2P

a A l i c e is 35. H e r body age is 3 1 .

2 VOCABULARY

4 READING

b

1 GRAMMAR

3F

4T

5F

6F

3 west

b 2 polluted 6 crowded c 2 t o w n hall

4 population

3 safe

4 noisy

3 castle

1 VOCABULARY 2d

b 2F

3F

4T

3e

4a

5b

2 TAKING SOMETHING BACK TO A SHOP 2 bought 3 p r o b l e m 4 afraid 5 size 6 small 7 m e d i u m 8 see 9 sorry 10 r e f u n d 11 changing r o o m s 12 receipt

2 O h , you k n o w . W o r k i n g ! But it was O K . 3 W h y don't we go out for dinner? I c o u l d b o o k a restaurant. 4 O K . For w h a t time? 5 Eight o'clock? 6 C a n we make it a bit earlier? Say, seven thirty? 7 O K . I ' l l go and have a shower then. 8 Sure.

4 statue

1,2,4,6

a

2 Tiffany & Co

b

1 keyboard 2 pricey 3 accessories 4 engagement 5 huge 6 do-it-yourself

a 2 illness 3 skin 4 faces 6 prevent 7 b r a i n

3 Ricky's

2 GRAMMAR

5 give

6 send

2 Gemini

3 Aries

sunbathe,(|nvit^,^omplaTn)

b a6

b3

c5

e4

f2

g8

h7

5 LISTENING a They had problems w i t h c r i m e . b Speaker 2 A Speaker 5 E

Speaker 3 C

Speaker 4 B

1 GRAMMAR a

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

do . . . go, read w i l l win,'11 lose were ... d o i n g , was w a t c h i n g Have ... d r e a m t , ' v e ... had are ... d o i n g , ' m reading D i d . . . sleep, woke up are . . . leaving, going t o go

b 2 have done 3 works 4's s t u d y i n g 5 has . . . published 6 helped 7 chose 8 discovered 9 had 10 saw 11 were w a t c h i n g

4 P u l l 5 broken 8 t u r n o n 9 sent

4 Aquarius

3 for

4 at

5 to

6 in

7 of 8 from

3 PRONUNCIATION a

4 READING a

borrow,(forgep.(agree)

5

2 with

2 VOCABULARY 2 learn 3'11 pass 6 b o r r o w 7 lose 10 found

4

2 VOCABULARY

a 2 w o n ' t w i n 3 w o n ' t remember 4 '11 forget 5 w o n ' t sell 6 '11 miss

a 2 a few 3 many 4 much 5 a little 6 enough 7 many 8 A little 9 a lot o f 10 a few b 2 tall enough 3 too much 4 enough t i m e 5 too much 6 too many 7 enough exercise 8 sleep enough

4 take

a Paul learnt not to lend money to strangers,

4 Ricky's

1 GRAMMAR 5 bones

3 come

6P

4 READING

4 READING

5F

1 VOCABULARY

5D

3 practise, listen,(^pai?)

he wrong shoes

3 PRONUNCIATION

a

40

3 PRONUNCIATION

5 famous

4 LISTENING

30

a 2 (decide), email, promise

5 boring

a 2 crowded 3 dangerous 4 exciting 5 f r i g h t e n i n g 6 generous 7 interesting 8 polluted 9 romantic

Shall I lend you some money I ' l l have the chicken Shall I take your coat Shall I t u r n o f f the air conditioning? I w o n ' t be late

2 pay

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH

2 VOCABULARY a 2 coast

7T

2 n o 3 any 4 a l o t o f 5 positive 6 a little 7 a few 8 enough

a 2 wettest 3 furthest 4 worst 5 ugliest 6 safest 7 most exciting 8 friendliest b 2 the most interesting 3 most expensive 4 best 5 busiest c 2 That's the fastest car I've ever d r i v e n 3 It's the most beautiful b u i l d i n g we've ever seen 4 That's the healthiest meal he's ever eaten 5 It's the best photograph you've ever taken 6 This is the most exciting sport I've ever done 7 That's the worst f l i g h t we've ever had 8 This is the most interesting city I've ever visited

1 GRAMMAR a

5 Taurus

5 LISTENING a M a t t ' s star sign is C a p r i c o r n and A m y ' s star sign is V i r g o . b 2 M 3A 4A 5 M 6 M 7 M

2 now

3 borrow

4 down

4 LISTENING a 2 You are f a l l i n g . 4 You are f l y i n g . b Dream 2 a Dream 5 b

3 You are lost. 5 You can't escape.

Dream 3 d

Dream 4 c


2 VOCABULARY 1 GRAMMAR a

2 to see 3 not to f i n i s h 4 t o f i n d 5 not to tell 6 not t o do 7 t o rent

b

2 d i f f i c u l t to talk 3 easy to buy 4 i m p o r t a n t not to say 5 great to hear 6 f u n to be

c 2 to study 3 to book 6 to take

a

b

4 to make 5 to get

d 2 w h e n to call 3 h o w many t o buy 4 where t o go 5 what to study 6 how much to take

1 2 3 4

don't have to, have to D o . . . have to, have to, don't have to D o . . . have to, don't have to, have to Does . . . have to, doesn't have to, has to

2 You must 5 You must

c 2 mustn't 5 mustn't

3 You mustn't 6 Y o u mustn't

4 READING

a The w r i t e r is generally positive about mothers-in-law.

a

Students' o w n answers.

b

2 Luis

5 Gloria

a

6 Paolo

O n a l l Mac computers, iPhones, the iPod touch and the iPad.

3D

4D

SJ

6D

7D

8[

b

2 around 3 , 0 0 0 5 2006

3 8,000

2 playing 3 s t u d y i n g 4 w r i t i n g 5 s n o w i n g 6 going 7 s w i m m i n g 8 getting 9 listening 10 using, not d r i v i n g

b

2a

3e

4f

5d

6b

c 3 i m a g i n i n g 4 d r i v i n g 5 listening 6 Staying 7 reading 8 getting up 9 t a k i n g 10 going 11 exercising 12 having 13 T u r n i n g 14 leaving d 2 to use 3 buying 4 to carry 5 travelling 6 t o read 7 to look for 8 to show 9 reading 10 l o o k i n g 11 not t o lose 12 t o b o r r o w 13 to lend 14 reading 15 to take 16 to charge

4 290,000

2 cold 3 bad stomach 5 headache 6 cough

b

2 see 3 use 4 w o n ' t get 6 doesn't w o r k 7 w i l l be

c 2 3 4 5 6 7

3b

4a

5d

2 promise

2 GOING TO A PHARMACY

b

2 3 4 5 6

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH 2 C a n , for

Speaker 2 D Speaker 5 B

5 don't take 8 isn't

I n M a y and June. Extra nights i n a hotel i f you can't fly home. T h i n g s w i l l only get worse. Your f a m i l y and friends at home. W h a t they w i l l do i f there is a natural disaster.

4 READING 2C

3A

41

5H

6G

7F

8B

9D

1 GRAMMAR

4 engine

Speaker 3 A

Speaker 4 E

1 GRAMMAR

a

2 should, F 5 should, C

b

2 shouldn't d r i n k 3 should go 4 should see 5 should tell 6 shouldn't give 7 should call

c B4

92

6d

3 should, sure

a

4 LISTENING b

5b

2 lost, missed 3 tell, says 4 w a i t i n g , hope 5 w a t c h i n g , look at 6 k n o w n , met 7 b o r r o w , lend 8 l o o k i n g for, f o u n d 9 wearing, c a r r y i n g 10 take, b r i n g

five

2 w e l l 3 symptoms 4 have 5 allergic 6 better 7 take 8 every 9 often 10 much

6f

3 surprise

4f

hang,'11 b r i n g , C w a l k , '11 have, F t h r o w , make, w i l l come, A 's, catch, w o n ' t be, G break,'11 have, B see, runs,'11 go, E

a

3 PRONUNCIATION a

3a

4 LISTENING

4 temperature

2 VOCABULARY 2e

Speaker 4 E

2 VOCABULARY

1 VOCABULARY

1 lovely, glad

Speaker 3 D

2e

Practical English \t the pharmacy

a

Speaker 2 B Speaker 5 A

a

a

1 GRAMMAR

4 book

1 GRAMMAR

5 LISTENING

a no 2)

4 Josef

3 soup

/

4c

5 LISTENING b

3 Kiko

2 could

a two b

4 READING 3a

3 PRONUNCIATION a

4 LISTENING

3 mustn't 4 don't have t o 6 don't have t o

2 quite d i f f i c u l t t o understand American films 3 new teacher speaks very fast 4 o f those students are a b i t u n f r i e n d l y 5 English books is a really good idea 6 incredibly h a r d t o learn Chinese

2 offered 3 d i d n ' t w a n t 4 pretended 5 needed 6 p r o m i s e d 7 planned 8 forgot / d i d n ' t remember 9 forgot / d i d n ' t remember 10 t r i e d 11 learned

2b

4 You mustn't

2 VOCABULARY

2 VOCABULARY

b

2 gets home 3 got lost 4 get f i t 5 getting worse 6 got tickets 7 get on 8 got, text message 9 getting up 10 get, school

1 GRAMMAR

C I

3 shouldn't, E 4 shouldn't, A 6 shouldn't, D

D7

E6

F2

G5

b

2 3 4 5 6 7

yours Whose Whose Whose Whose Whose

laptop is that, his keys are those, hers car is that, ours coats are those, yours house is that, theirs

2 yours, ours 3 his, H i s 5 Your, M i n e , hers

4 ours, theirs


2 VOCABULARY

Getting around

2 quietly 3 seriously 5 dreamily 6 calmly

4 lazily

1 VOCABULARY

1 VOCABULARY

3 PRONUNCIATION

a

2 claustrophobia d 3 arachnophobia a 4 glossophobia e 5 acrophobia c

a 2 distance 3 dollar 4 advantage 5 enjoy 6 completely 7 remember 8 promise 9 suspicious

b

2 scared 6 phobia

4 READING 3D

4H

5J

5 LISTENING a The experiment hoped t o found out if men and w o m e n cook differently. It wasn't successful. b 2F

3T

4F

1 GRAMMAR

a2e

3a

4c

5F

5b

6T

6d

b 2 3 4 5

would you do i f you found a m i l l i o n euros a phone i f he could a f f o r d one gave me caviar I w o u l d n ' t eat it would you say i f you could talk to the president 6 look for a new job i f I were you

c 2 3 4 5 6

saw, w o u l d scream wouldn't have, didn't have wasn't, w o u l d get lived, w o u l d learn would ... do, attacked

2 VOCABULARY a Across: 2 cow 6 jellyfish 7 whale 9 bear 10 snake D o w n : 3 spider 4 bee 5 sheep 8 horse

a

2 since 6 since

b

2 since 3 since 4 for 7 f o r 8 since 9 since

4 READING a Students' o w n answers, b 2

5 LISTENING

d 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

5 since

3a

C o u l d you say that again? H o w many stops is that? O K . A n d then? W h e r e is it? O K . T h a n k s . See you later.

3 SOCIAL ENGLISH 2 said 3 don't 7 think

4 stay

5 feel

6 long

4 READING

X H o w long / X since February X have y o u had X for eight years / /

2c

2 3 4 5 6

6 Since

2 3 0 - 4 0 minutes 3 $14 4 $ 4 5 5 n o t h i n g 6 6.30 a.m. 7 $13

1 VOCABULARY

a a fear o f dogs b

5 lights

2 ASKING HOW TO GET THERE

5 for

3 since 4 for 7 f o r 8 since

4 LISTENING

a 2 given 3 discovered 4 used 6 s h o w n 7 called 8 invented 10 based

4c

5 played 9 opened

2 GRAMMAR 1 VOCABULARY

a

2d

3b

4f

5e

6h

7g

a

2 T h e film The Iron Lady is based on the life o f M a r g a r e t Thatcher 3 M o b i l e phones weren't invented by Apple 4 Lead isn't used i n p e t r o l nowadays 5 Low-cost f l i g h t s are sold o n l i n e 6 T h e Petronus Towers were designed by an A r g e n t i n i a n architect 7 Avatar wasn't directed by Steven Spielberg 8 M i n i s aren't made by a B r i t i s h company any more

b

2 Contact lenses were invented by a Czech chemist 3 W h e r e are olives g r o w n 4 The V W Beetle was designed i n the 1930s 5 D i a m o n d s are found i n many different colours 6 W h e n were v i t a m i n s discovered 7 Spanish is spoken i n Spain and many parts o f South A m e r i c a 8 W h e r e were the Lord of the Rings films made

c

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

8a

2 GRAMMAR a

2 sent 3 she met 4 They fell 5 they got 6 They had 7 They moved 8 they've lived 9 has just put 10 he's been 11 have made

b

2 3 4 5 6

d i d ... get,'ve been has . . . w o r k e d , finished have ... had, bought d i d ... m e e t , ' s k n o w n have . . . lived, a r r i v e d

3 PRONUNCIATION a

1 m a r r i e d , p r i m a r y , secondary, separate 2 divorced, musician, retire, successful

4 READING

a A7 b

a By pressing his fingers i n t o the shark's eye. Australia Fishing His head, shoulders, and one o f his arms. Metal His son By helicopter He had deep cuts all over his body and a broken nose. 8 Over three metres long

5 afraid

c 2 H o w l o n g has . . . played 3 H o w l o n g has ... lived 4 H o w l o n g has . . . had 5 W h e n d i d ... hear

3 PRONUNCIATION a 2camel 3chicken 4crocodile 5 d o l p h i n 6 elephant 7 giraffe 8 jellyfish 9 Hon 10 monkey 11 mosquito 12 rabbit 13 spider 14 tiger

b 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

4 terrified

2 GRAMMAR

a Students'own answers, b 2G

3 fear

2 straight 3 r o u n d 4 exit 6 take 7 left 8 r i g h t

2 3 4 5 6

B2

C6

D3

E5

G4

d i d his m o t h e r buy were d i d John L e n n o n die has Julian L e n n o n made has Sean L e n n o n played

5 LISTENING a They were b o t h t w o years o l d . b

2F

3T

4T

5T

6T

7T

8F

are w o r n by people o f all ages weren't invented by M i c r o s o f t the heating c o n t r o l l e d by a computer was w r i t t e n by Stieg Larsson aren't used by people very m u c h today wasn't painted by Picasso all the H a r r y Potter f i l m s directed by the same person


4 LISTENING

3 PRONUNCIATION

a 2 checked

3 wanted

4 rained

5 decided

4 LISTENING a 2c b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 GRAMMAR a

4 m i g h t take

6 might invite

2h

3e

4b

5a

6f

7i

8d

9g

b 2g

3c

4a

5b

6i

7f

8d

9e

2 GRAMMAR 1 d i d n ' t use to behave We used to wear D i d A l e x use to have d i d n ' t use t o studv used to be d i d n ' t use to play D i d your teachers use to give

b

He used to go We didn't use t o understand D i d you use to School used to D i d your friends used to help

2 VOCABULARY a 3 decision 4 die 5 education 6 elect 7 imagination 8 inform 9 invitation 10 live 11 o p t i o n 12 organize 13 succeed 2 decision 6 decided

a 2/

3 i n v i t e 4 Success 7 imagine 8 life

3/

4X

5X

6/

3F

4F

5T

6T

7T

7/

8/

2 at d i f f e r e n t times 3 some t i m e later 4 Some 5 four 6 different 7 lost 8 R E M sleep

2 t h r o w away 3 t u r n up 4 look up 5 look f o r w a r d to 6 get on w i t h 7 go out 8 t r y o n 9 take back 10 give up

a

b

Speaker 2 D Speaker 5 B

a A m y was good at languages at school, but Tony wasn't. studied it at university some numbers too u n c o m f o r t a b l e German make younger pupils learn languages

Speaker 4 E

5 in

6 on

2 pay it back

3 look for them

2 3 4 5 6

4 /

6 /

She'll give them back on Friday A r e you l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to it I called her back w h e n 1 got home We don't get o n w i t h them Shall we t u r n i t on

2 get up 3 go out 4 take o f f 5 put on 6 give up 7 t u r n on 8 w r i t e d o w n 1 /

2X

9/

10/

3X

4X

5X

5T

6T

6/

7/

8/

5 LISTENING a

positive

b

2T

3F

4F

1 VOCABULARY a 2 track 3 match p o i n t , serve 5 lap 6 penalty 7 corner b

4 bunker

1 into 2 round 3 into 4 out o f 5 towards 6 past 7 to, i n t o

c Across: 4 d o w n

5 up

7 towards

D o w n : l o u t o f 2 round 7 t h r o u g h 8 along

3 into

1 GRAMMAR 8 across

a 2 Neither was I 3 So do I 4 So w o u l d 1 5 So a m I 6 Neither have I

6 past

b

2 GRAMMAR a

2 kicked, under 3 went t h r o u g h 4 threw, i n t o 5 ran across 6 h i t , over

b

2 o u t o f 3 t o 4 i n t o 5 along 6 under 7 past 8 t h r o u g h 9 along 10 towards 11 across

3 PRONUNCIATION a 2 volleyball 3 m o t o r racing 4 s k i i n g 5 w i n d s u r f i n g 6 cycling 7 basketball 8 rugby 9 athletics

2 So d i d I 3 Neither have I 4 So was I 5 Neither a m I 6 Neither can 1 7 So w o u l d I 8 Neither do 1

2 VOCABULARY 2 as 3 like 7 identical

4 both

5 so

6 neither

3 PRONUNCIATION c 2 similar 3 coincidence 4 amazing 5 discover 6 everywhere 7 personality 8 definitely

4 READING a 1 b 2F

94

4 off

4 READING b

Speaker 3 A

3 after

5 looks after my kids

a

a two

5 LISTENING b 2 3 4 5 6

2 over

b

b

5 LISTENING

8F

4 Speaker 4

2 GRAMMAR

4 READING

2T

1 VOCABULARY

y o u have to make an i m p o r t a n t decision.

6 D i d you have a favourite teacher?

3 Speaker 1

a

5 inform

4 READING b

a 2 What's the most i m p o r t a n t lesson you learned at school? 3 D i d you ever behave badly? 4 W h a t subjects were you good at? 5 W h a t d i d you w a n t to do when you left school?

2 Speaker 5 5 Speaker 3

2 m i g h t not get 3 m i g h t have 4 m i g h t not come 5 m i g h t not be 6 m i g h t miss 7 m i g h t go 8 m i g h t f a i l

a To discover i f a good night's sleep helps when

a 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

b

b

7 might make

3 PRONUNCIATION

1 VOCABULARY

2 3 4 5 6

basketball

3 might have

8 might eat b

b

a

2 might go 5 might rain

3 a i n Percy Spencer's pocket, not on the table. G e r m a n , not A m e r i c a n glass and paper, not water and air. the man's wife's hand, not his hand potato chips, not crisps a chef, not a waiter 'Saratoga chips', not 'Saratoga potatoes'

a cards, tennis, f o o t b a l l , board games,

3F

4T

5T

6F


5 LISTENING

a 2a

4 LISTENING

3b

b 2KB

30T

a A2

4KB

5RR

6 0T

b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 ON THE PHONE a 2 sorry, w r o n g 3 line, busy, leave, message, call, back 4 put

2 SOCIAL ENGLISH a 2 great news 3 go first 5 Never better

a

3 READING 8g

9j

b

1 GRAMMAR

a 2 hadn't closed 4 hadn't f l o w n b 2 3 4 5 6

2 VOCABULARY

D3

3 had started 5 had read 6 hadn't heard

Had they eaten sushi before Had he w o n a medal before H a d they made a cake before H a d she r u n a marathon before H a d you been there before

a

2 o v e r w e i g h t - I t isn't used t o describe personality. 3 tracksuit - It isn't an i t e m o f jewellery. 4 a phone call - It doesn't use the verb 'do'. 5 e x c i t i n g - I t isn't a negative w o r d . 6 t o w n hall - I t isn't somewhere you can do shopping. 7 f i n i s h - I t isn't a verb that can be followed by 'to'. 8 get up - It isn't a use o f ' g e t ' w h i c h means 'become'. 9 b a t - I t isn't an insect.

b

2 o n 3 back 7 into/across

30 hours (not 13) Z a m b i a (not Kenya) s w u m to safety (not walked) c o o k i n g (not w a s h i n g up) t o o small (not big) l i v i n g r o o m (not kitchen). M r s Dodd's husband (not M r s D o d d )

1 GRAMMAR

4 later

7m

C4

12B

a 2 b 2 f 3 i 4e 5 d 6 b 10k 11a 121 13 h

B1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

d i d n ' t like her parents was g e t t i n g divorced 'd been t o the police station hadn't met his g i r l f r i e n d 'd seen James w i t h another w o m a n couldn't cook w o u l d n ' t tell anyone 'd speak t o her t o m o r r o w / the next day 'd got a lot o f w o r k t o do

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

I w a n t a cup o f coffee We haven't seen the new neighbours yet I don't w a n t to go to the cinema W e ' l l go t o the p a r t y M y computer has just broken T h e city is very o l d W e ' l l visit you

a

2 told 8 told

3 told 9 said

4 said 5 t o l d 10 said

b

2 told 7 said

3 t o l d 4 said 8 said 9 told

6 said

5 to 9 on

6 forward 10 u p

c 2 stay 3 f a l l 4 make 5 do 6 lend 7 spend 8 get 9 earn 10 f i n d

3 PRONUNCIATION a

2 school 3 hope 4 t u r n 5 bald 6 towel 7 t h i n 8 horse 9 w o r d 10 wear 11 fear 12 city 13 chemist's 14 forget

4 READING a

2 G 3J 4 C 91 10 B

5H

6D

7F

8A

5 LISTENING a

1 mind

2 Sport

3 Call

4 Millionaire

5 Pop b Speaker 2 C Speaker 5 A

2 VOCABULARY

4 out 8 in

Speaker 3 D

Speaker 4 B

7 said

5 t o l d 6 said 10 t o l d

c 2 had done the i r o n i n g , he put the clothes away 3 they had watched the news, they t u r n e d o f f the T V 4 I had read the book, I gave it back 5 had t r i e d on the top, she went t o the checkout 6 we had had dinner, we did the washing up

a

d 2 opened 3 had broken 4 had already left 5 hadn't stolen 6 hadn't lost 7 had seen 8 had left 9 had put

a Jess gossips, but A l a n doesn't.

3 PRONUNCIATION 2 m a r r i e d 3 letter 4 m i d d l e 5 h u r r y 6 different 7 sorry 8 summer 9 message 10 happy

4 LISTENING b

2F

3F

4F

5T

6T

7T

8F

2 PRONUNCIATION a 2 We'd lost it. 3 You'd seen her. 4 It'd been a terrible day. 5 1 hadn't sent i t . 6 She hadn't done it. 7 They hadn't told me.

3 VOCABULARY a 2 put 3 belonged 4 left 5 gone on 6 got o u t o f 7 had 8 realized 9 was 10 got o n

12C

1 GRAMMAR a

2a

b b 4

3a

4b

5b

6a

7a

8b

c5

d l

e6

f8

g2

h7

c 2 d i d Spain w i n 3 4 5 6 7 8

d i d R E M stay plays d i d A m y Winehouse die do polar bears live roads j o i n produces the most bananas

95


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The authors would like to thank all the teachers and students round the world whose

56 (Wolfgang Kumm/dpa/bee), 61 (Kevin Knight/Julian Lennon), 63 (Andy Rain/EPA/aeroplanes, Martyn Goddard/mini), 64 (Scott camazine/x-ray); Getty Images pp.5 (Yellow Dog Productions), 6 (Bartomeu Amengual), 10 (Lester Lefkowitz), 12 (Kniel Synnatzschke/girl wavy hair, Brad Wilson/girl with dark curly hair, Gabe Palmer/man curly hair), 15 (Jacob Halaska), 18 (Bloomberg), 20 (Joe Cornish/Prague, Keith MacGregor/Budapest), 23 (Dorling Kindersly/ paella), 29 (PM Images/tidy up), 33 (Walter Bibikow/Zagreb, John and Tina Reid/Dubrovnik), 35 (Davies and Starr), 38 (Leon), 53 (AFP/earthquake/fire/ hurricane, E s c h Collection/blizzard) 55 (Wireimage/Heston Blumenthal, Delia Smith, Nigella Lawson) 56 (Peter Cade/cow, Paul Souders/jellyfish/ whale, Paul Oomen/bear, Visuals Unlimited, Inc. John Abbott/snake, Suchitra prints/monkey, Danita Delimont/sheep, Kelly Funk/horse), 58 (TBR), 59 (Nick Ridley), 60 (Andrew Bret Wallis), 61 (John Lennon, Sean Lennon, Judy Garland, Liza Minnelli) 62 (Walter Bibikow), 63 (ULTRA.F/Petronus Towers), 64 (Brian Hagiwara/crisps), 74 (LatitudeStock/Justin Williams/Romulus and Remus, Kray Brothers), 78 (Ulrik Tofte/girls whispering. Yellow Dog Productions/men chatting); The Kobal Collection pp.63 (Film 4/The Iron lady. Twentieth Century Fox/Avatar); Oxford University Press pp.8 (Oleksiy Maksymenko Photography/ coat), 11 (Michael Blann/tourists, sunbathing, Alamy/Juice Images/couple with suitcase), 12 (Getty Images/Kindler Andreas/man w i t h scarf, Getty Images/ Alan Graf/middle-aged woman), 19 (Corbis/Ocean), 20 (Getty Images/Chase Jarvis/backpacker), 29 (Getty Images/Art Vandalay/juggling, Corbis/Plattform/ Johner Images/baking), 41 (Getty Images/Jose Luis Pelaez Inc), 44 (Alamy/ MBI), 48 (Corbis/Ken Seet/class), 51 (Tom Grill/Tetra Images), 56 (spider), 63 (Saturn, phone, petrol pump), 64 (microwave), 68, 72 (Getty Images/Diane Diederich), 73 (Getty Images/Scott Markewitz), 75 (Union Jack flag, US flag), 78 (Corbis Premium/backview of women); Reuters p.7 (Aly Song); Rex Features pp.11 (camping, Sipa Press/ski hire, D a n Callister/hotel reception), 23 (Ben Pipe/The Travel Library/New York), 26 (FI Online), 36 (Alex Segre), 46 (Geoff Moore), 48 Alex Segre/kindle 55 (Erik Pendzich/Jamie Oliver), 66 (iTV/David Suchet), 74 (Billy Farrell Agency/Olsen twins); SWNS p.16 (SWNS.com) The painting reproduced on pages 8 and 9 is Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grandefatte, 1884-86 (oil on canvas), Seurat, Georges Pierre (1859-91)/The Art Institute of Chicago, IL, USA/The Bridgeman Art Library Commissioned photography by: Gareth Boden p.8 (ring, trousers, skirt, track suit, hat, trainers, belt, tie)

feedback has helped us shape English File. The authors would also like to thank: all those at Oxford University Press (both in Oxford and around the world) and the design team w h o have contributed their skills and ideas to producing this course. Finally very special thanks from Clive to Maria Angeles, Lucia, and Eric, and from Christina to Cristina, for all their support and encouragement. Christina would also like to thank her children Joaquin, Marco, and Krysiafor their constant inspiration. The authors and publishers are grateful to the following who have given permission to reproduce the/ollowing extracts and adaptations of copyright material: p.9 Extract from 'Fleurs Fraiches' by Heidi Ellison, 19 October 2010. © Heidi Ellison, ParisUpdate.com. Reproduced by permission: p.16 Extract from 'My loaf saver: Woman's life is saved by bag of sliced white bread as it stops her head smashing against crashed car' by Luke Salkeld, The Daily Mail, 26 November 2011. Reproduced by permission of Solo Syndication; p.16 Extract from 'Man's life saved by heroic DVD', www.metro.co.uk. Reproduced by permission of Solo Syndication; p.25 Extract from 'Research: w o m e n w i l l be doing the housework until 2050' by T i m Ross, The Telegraph, 20 May 2011. © Telegraph Media Group Limited 2011; p.40 Extract from T o u r i s t Scam Alert'. © 2012 www.ricksteves.com, used w i t h permission; p.44 Extract from 'Mothers-inlaw are lovely i n their place. Their own place, that is' by Luisa Dillner, The Independent, 28 February 2010. Reproduced by permission; p.46 Extract from 'Apple Teams Up To Use iPhone To Save Cherokee Language' by Murray Evans. Reproduced by permission of Associated Press; p.66 Extract from 'David Suchet remembers his school sporting achievements and the teacher w h o inspired h i m to pursue acting' by T i m Oglethorpe, The Daily Mail Weekend Magazine, 24 October 2009. Reproduced by permission of Solo Syndication; p.66 Extract from 'Bonjour is about all we learn from 5 years of French' by Laura Clark, The Daily Mail, 02 August 2007. Reproduced by permission of Solo Syndication; p.68 Extract from 'No need to sleep on this one: A good night's rest really does help you make important decisions', The Daily Mail, 20 June 2011. Reproduced by permission of Solo Syndication. Although every effort has been made to trace and contact copyright holders before publication, this has not been possible in some cases. We apologize for any apparent infringement of copyright and if notified, the publisher will be pleased to rectify any errors or omissions at the earliest opportunity. The publishers would like to thank the following for their kind permission to reproduce photographs: Alamy Images pp.8 (Mediablizimages/dress), 11 (Robert Stainforth/ bluebell wood), 33 (Prisma Bildagentur AG/beach), 33 (Funkyfood LondonPaul Williams/ferry), 48 (Scott Hortop/laptop); Barcroft Media p.74 (Niklas Hallen/India twins); The Bridgeman Art Library pp.8 and 9 (The Art Institute of Chicago); Corbis pp.11 (RCWW.Inc/typing, Simon Marcus/passport, A.Inden/young people), 20 (Tibor Bognar/Vienna Opera house), 23 (Atlantide Phototravel/soup), 29 (Franz-Peter Tschauner/dpa/monopoly), 32 (John Warburton Lee/JAl), 48 (Dirk Lindner/i-pod), 55 (TW Photo/Gordon Ramsay),

Illustrations by: Peter Bull pp.47 bottom 49; Atsushi Hara/Dutch Uncle Agency pp. 13, 24, 25, 39, 50, 54; Satoshi Hashimoto/Dutch Uncle Agency p.69; T i m Marrs pp.22, 24,42; Jerome Mireault/Colagene Illustrations pp. 28, 31,40, 70; Ellis Nadler pp.28, 34, 51, 81; Roger Penwill pp.37,47 top, 71; Kath Walker Illustration pp.16,17, 45, 52, 69 top, 76, 77 Picture research and illustrations commissioned by: Catherine Blackie Design by: Stephen Strong

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