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MAGAZINE highlights of MATEXPO

December 2017

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT KORTRIJK XPO | WWW.MATEXPO.COM


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TABLE OF CONTENT P2

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Forword chairman

Building and Demolition Waste

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About MATEXPO

SIGMA looks back at a successful exhibition

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Digitisation in road and infrastructure works

Willemen Construction Group focuses on innovative technology

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MATEXPO innovation and green award

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Successful Febelcem/Eupave workshop on "Slipform Pavers" during MATEXPO P10

Go4circle demonstrates at MATEXPO that chain management stands or falls by inspections P19

Successful breakfast session for Bouwunie Infrastructuurwerken at MATEXPO

Study indicates areas of improvement for workplace learning

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The complementary cluster at MATEXPO

Facts & Figures

This was 2017


FORWORD

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ear Reader, it is the second time that I am honored to present you with the MATEXPO magazine. We received a lot of feedback on our first issue which was published in the aftermath of the 2015 edition. We integrated that feedback into this second edition. You will find more pictures, only the most relevant statistics and a comprehensive overview of the many seminars and other events that took place during MATEXPO 2017.

I believe we can look back at MATEXPO 2017 as a ‘grand cru’. I was privileged to talk to many exhibitors who all gave me basically the same message: they had never expected that business would go as well as it did during this last edition of the fair. Many unexpected orders added to the success of their participation. And this means something: it is quite obvious that the construction industry in Belgium and the neighbouring countries is facing the future with great confidence. And besides from a few major infrastructure projects released by public authorities, it is mainly the private sector that is responsible for this surge in business. In the context of this booming economic climate, it is great to see that construction companies are investing in new equipment of all kinds. And that is precisely what MATEXPO tries to facilitate : getting the offer side in touch with the demand side. And it looks like that is working really well!

FORWORD - 2

With over 40.000 visitors in 2017, MATEXPO was not only a big success in number of visitors, it was at the same time a challenge to insure that all went well from an operational point of view. And even though there is always room for improvement, our organization was on top of things: from parking to security, from registration to catering, all aspects had been thoroughly examined in order to determine where we could improve on an organizational level. Like I said, there are definitely things that can be improved, but the overall satisfaction score of 8,3/10,

the highest ever, shows we’re on track with improving all of our services. Indeed, MATEXPO wants to be a reference in trade fairs. We don’t need to be the biggest, we just want to be the best trade fair, where there’s room for business and pleasure at the same time. And so far we’re succeeding, thanks to the help from all of our exhibitors, visitors, partners, sponsors, media, trade federations and many other stakeholders that make MATEXPO the successful trade fair it is right now! So thank you to all these people! I hope you enjoy reading this magazine and I look forward to seeing you soon!

"WE DON’T NEED TO BE THE BIGGEST, WE JUST WANT TO BE THE BEST TRADE FAIR" Johan Verhelst | Chairman


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ABOUT MATEXPO

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ATEXPO would like to thank the entire staff, project managers, freelancers and students who contributed to the success of the 2017 edition. And this entire team would like to extend its gratitude towards the numerous partners, sponsors, suppliers, exhibitors and visitors: without you, MATEXPO just wouldn’t be the same. So thank you from all of us and we’re looking forward to working with you in 2019!

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Carl Vanginderhuysen | Project manager in charge of Operations

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Gregory Olszewski | Managing director

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Shauni Declercq | Services & Support

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Roel Proesmans | Project manager in charge of Operations

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Valerie Neyt | Marketing & Communication

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Stefanie Delatter | Services & Support

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Tine Claerbout | In charge of Services & Support

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Marc Steppe | Sales

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Bo Sturtewagen | Jacks of all trades

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Amber Sturtewagen | Jacks of all trades

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Daisy Demeyere | Side events

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Olivia De Poorter | Jacks of all trades (not on photo)

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Liselotte Casteur | Conversation Manager (not on photo)


DIGITISATION IN ROAD AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKS "WE NEED TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF DIGITISATION, IT CAN’T BE STOPPED"

T DIGITISATION - 4

he Confederation opened MATEXPO on Wednesday 6th September with lnfra 4.0 - Myth or reality?, a hard-hitting seminar about the digital transition in the construction sector. The seminar concentrated on road and infrastructure works.

Despite the early hour and the difficult-to-reach venue – Kortrijk is not exactly next door for the majority of Belgium – there was a good turnout in the room. And justifiably so. What BouwForum achieved for the sector in general in February, this seminar did for road and infrastructure works: highlighting the input that digitisation is having, researching where we stand at the

moment and taking a look at the future. As a result, the session fitted seamlessly with the Confederation’s strategy to help and guide members in the best possible way in the digital transition.

OCW

Alain Leuridan, Director of the Opzoekingscentrum voor de Wegenbouw (OCW – Road-building Research Centre), got the seminar off to a good start. As a sector-specific research institution, the OCW is an essential partner for construction companies. Alain emphasised what was also reiterated in the contributions made by others: namely that digitisation is a very extensive process that touches on all aspects of operational management. The examples he gave illustrated this: robots for managing and inspecting drains, and drones for preparing sites and monitoring works. But there were also administrative applications such as Osiris, the computer system that the Brussels Region is using to manage its public space for building works. The OCW also has the ROAD-IT project, which is researching how ICT infrastructure is able to optimise all of the processes involved in asphalting.

CONTRACTORS The building companies themselves had their say mainly through a collection of interesting films. In our sector, we have a group of pioneers who are exploring the digital world, who believe in it and who don’t want to go back. “We need to take advantage of it,” as Johan Van Wassenhove said.

WORLD FIRST One of the high points of the seminar was also a world first. Johan Bolhuis (BAM Infra Solutions) presented the first printed


"I AM SEEING INCREASING USE OF ROBOTS ON CONSTRUCTION SITES FOR ALL KINDS OF BUILDING ACTIVITIES." Udo Linden | HP-Linden-Alpha Béton

prestressed concrete bicycle bridge. This bridge was constructed in conjunction with the Technical University Eindhoven. Thanks to the printer, no shuttering was required. This is a remarkable technique that perfectly demonstrates the potential of the new technologies. Marc Vanlook (EUKA) delved more deeply into the opportunities provided by drones. Drones are currently used mainly for the visual or thermal inspection of construction land and buildings. But it is also technically possible to use them as a working tool on a construction site to spray fluids and to move or tow items from one place to another. A small, intelligent drone is able to fly into a building autonomously to take photographs for a 3D model of the structure.

initiatives taken by our trade organisation. But to a certain extent he also kept the feet of those present firmly on the ground. It doesn’t matter how blindingly obvious the possibilities may be, in the end it all comes down to people. Robert de Mûelenaere: “It is crucial to keep in the back of your mind that people need to remain central to all these debates. It is our task to convince all of the players involved about the benefits provided by these developments. We also need to be able to get our employees on board. In any case, motivating everyone will be the key for making this project succeed.”

"TOMORROW WORKERS WILL ALSO BE ABLE TO LOG IN AT THE SITE SO THAT THEY CAN BE GIVEN TASKS TO CARRY OUT." Pierre-Etienne Eloy | Eloy Travaux

BIM FOR INFRA

Pierre Van den Eynde (Arcadis) discussed the use of BIM for infrastructure projects. Here again there are many opportunities, although he also made it clear that this tool poses specific challenges for road and infrastructure builders. BIM is ideally suited when a structure is made up of clearly identifiable objects. But in road-building, this sort of Lego brick approach is often not possible.

GOVERNMENT Road and infrastructure works are usually carried out on behalf of government. So, where do the authorities stand? This point of view was presented by Tom Roelants (general administrator of AWV), Etienne Willame (general manager of DGO1 - Roads & Buildings – Wallonia Public Service) and Luc Van Dijck (MOW). Governments are examining the importance of digitisation for construction and the maintenance of infrastructure. It’s a work in progress. But for the time being they are mainly busy with digitising their internal processes, as well as with what were previously administrative aspects, such as e-procurement and the e-office for government procurement contracts. BIM in government contracts is certainly no longer a myth, but it is also not a reality yet either. Attentive observers will have understood that our sector is further down the track than the government when it comes to digitisation in this context. Highlights in the contributions from both Roelants and Willame included pointing out the fact that infrastructure users in the future will be able to generate a treasure trove of data. For example, it would be very valuable for governments to know the location and time when the automatic traction control of cars is activated. Data such as this can say a lot about the condition of a particular road and indicate a need for maintenance or repairs.

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS Robert de Mûelenaere (Confederation managing director) rounded off a particularly successful event. He analysed the

INFO: In addition to the members who are mentioned in this article, we would also like to thank Jan De Nul, Nonet, Devagro and Godts for their enthusiastic cooperation.


MATEXPO INNOVATION AND GREEN AWARD

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or the 6th time, the MATEXPO Innovation Award was presented to the biggest technical innovation at MATEXPO, which is the biggest equipment and plant trade show in the Benelux. And the 4th Green Award was presented to the most environmentally friendly machine or innovation on display at the show.

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The judging panel, made up of members from Comatko, the association of Belgian equipment managers, began by assessing the entries for their validity, before selecting the two lots of five nominees. All of the entries had to abide by a common rule: the machine or process must be genuinely new – not a variation on a theme or a “copy” of an existing machine. For the Innovation Award, the machine submitted for consideration must be in production and cannot have been available on the market for more than one year. The candidates for the Green Award need to make a positive contribution to the quality of the environment; either by the machine or process actively enhancing our living environment, or by it being less polluting. The conditions of entry for the Green Award are a little more flexible: the machine or process can have been on the market for a maximum of two years and it can also be a working prototype. And, naturally, all of the entries have to be on display at the show.

MATEXPO GREEN AWARD 2017 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

WINNER | Recogeno | Verhelst Machines Kobelco SK210 HLC | De Bruycker Topcon Smooth Ride | Topcon Sokkia Sennebogen 850 M-E Green Hybrid | SMT Fimap 4 Twin Action | Clevermac

Jury chairman, Leo Van Hoorick, commented that it is becoming increasingly difficult to identify products that are genuinely new. “Various entries were in fact developments of existing ideas or processes that had already been presented by the entrants or their competitors in past years,” he said. “The environmental aspect is also an important driving force, not least because it usually involves a lower fuel/power consumption cost. Some of the entries were also eligible for both categories.”

GREEN AWARD From the five nominees per category, the three best-scoring ones were showcased at the opening ceremony of MATEXPO. TOPCON SMOOTH RIDE | EXHIBITOR: TOPCON SOKKIA With the Smooth Ride, Topcon Sokkia presented a system that enables a road surface to be surveyed at a speed of 60-80 km/h. The road-builder can then use the survey data and other information gathered to model a new road surface, simply and accurately. As a result, only the material that needs to be taken away actually has to be removed. Also, when laying a new road surface, the quantity of materials needed can be gauged very accurately, with no additional millimetres of “safety margin” needed.


The road surface renewal software is a powerful and very easyto-use tool for grinding or asphalting projects. Once the design is complete, the plan can be exported with a single mouse-click. Topcon can then use its webservices available worldwide to send the files immediately to the grinding and asphalting machines at the project location. The Smooth Ride scored 30 points (out of a maximum of 72) and was just pipped for second place by the Kobelco SK210 HLC hybrid excavator, which scored 3 points more. KOBELCO SK210 HLC | EXHIBITOR: DE BRUYCKER In contrast with existing systems that use capacitors, the Kobelco operates with high-capacity lithium-ion batteries that generate extra auxiliary power of 25 kW. This means that the machine can operate with a lighter combustion engine, which in turn results in lower fuel consumption. Energy is recovered via the rotary engine and the swing mechanism system. The swing is 100% electric and independent from the hydraulic system, which results in unprecedented operator comfort. RECOGENO | EXHIBITOR: VERHELST MACHINES The Green Award was won by the proverbial mile (with 64 points) by the Recogeno water/air heat exchanger for liquid-cooled generators, presented by Verhelst Machines. This system can be mounted on top of the cooling radiator and, if required, it can be extended to include a heat exchanger around the exhaust. This provides an extremely simple way of recovering the radiated

"BEST ALLďšşROUND SHOW IN THE BENELUX FOR BOTH LARGE AND SMALL EQUIPMENT." Len Vandekerckhove | Intermat

heat that would otherwise be lost. This can then be used for the production of hot water or air to heat the site circuit, etc. The system is totally independent of the generator and hence can be fitted very quickly. According to the manufacturer, Orefice, the system provides a yield on generators starting at 12 kW. The jury was charmed by the simplicity of the system and amazed that no one else had ever come up with the idea before.

INNOVATION AWARD CROSBY SL-150 SLIDE LOCK | EXHIBITOR: CROSBY EUROPE The Crosby SL-150 Slide-Loc is an eye-bolt with a locking >p8

MATEXPO INNOVATION AWARD 2017 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

WINNER | JCB Hydradig | JCB Belgium Tohaco | Lenaerts-Blommaert Verhuur Crosby SL-150 Slide Lock | Crosby Europe Fast-Grind | In2-Concrete Peri Duo | Peri


"MATEXPO: A BENCHMARK TRADE SHOW WITH WIDE DIVERSIFICATION. THE HIGH-QUALITY EXHIBITORS REALLY MAKE TIME FOR YOU AND THEY THINK IN LINE WITH WHAT THE CUSTOMER WANTS." Hans Robberechts | MiniTruck Schriek

mechanism that can be fitted quickly and without any special tools. The eye can rotate 360˚ so that the load remains aligned vertically. The Crosby SL-150 Slide-Loc is made from forged alloy steel, with the eye tempered for extra strength. it complies with the machine directive (2006/42/EC) and is accordingly CEmarked. You couldn’t call it genuinely spectacular, but sufficient to earn 29 points and third place.

AWARDS - 8

TOHACO | EXHIBITOR: LENAERTS-BLOMMAERT VERHUUR Lenaerts-Blommaert presented an air-suspension trailer from Tohaco. The air-suspension system, combined with the low centre of gravity and matching shock-absorbers, create a better ride and ensures that the trailer remains steady and doesn’t ‘jump’. The load platform can be lowered to the ground, so the loading angle is kept to the minimum (maximum of 5º). All Tohaco trailers feature level adjustment, varying from manual to a sophisticated system that adjusts automatically to the weight of the load. This electronic adjustment means that the trailer is always at the pre-programmed driving height. It also corrects and possible weight differential in the load between left and right. The

system has a 12V traction battery and its own compressor and was awarded 38 points by the judges. JCB HYDRADIG | EXHIBITOR: JCB BELGIUM The JCB Hydradig was an easy winner in the innovation category, scoring 57 points. This mobile excavator sets new standards for visibility, stability, mobility, agility and ease of maintenance. None of the features provided by JCB are genuinely new, but this is the first time they have all been combined into a single machine. The undercarriage is not only compact – wheelbase of 2.65 m – but in addition to the engine, it integrates all of the main components on the cab and excavation equipment. This makes its centre of gravity some 75 cm lower than with a conventional mobile machine. The fact that all JCB engines meet the Tier IV Final exhaust gas standard without a particulate filter helps with the compact structure. The machine’s four-wheel steering gives the Hydradig a turning circle of just 3.9 m. The machine can also carry a 1-ton load at full speed without stabilisers. The Hydradig is fast, too, reaching the maximum permitted speed of 40 km/h. The stepless hydrostatic transmission means that inclines have little effect on the driving speed. In addition, the machine has a ratified towing power of 3.5 tons – sufficient for carrying all of the extra equipment needed from one site to another in a trailer, which can also be supplied by JCB as an option.


SUCCESSFUL FEBELCEM/EUPAVE WORKSHOP ON “SLIPFORM PAVERS” DURING MATEXPO

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he Federation of the Belgian Cement Industry, FEBELCEM, and the European Concrete Paving Association, EUPAVE organised on 7th September 2017 a joint workshop on “Slipform pavers”.

“For more than 50 years, slipform pavers have been used for the construction of concrete roads, safety barriers, kerbs and gutters. They turn the fresh concrete into a finished high-quality product, and are fast and precise. Thanks to continuous development and new equipment, they have become an indispensable tool for a concrete pavement contractor.” EUPAVE members include the 4 main slipform pavers manufacturers: Gomaco, Guntert & Zimmerman, Wirtgen, Power Curbers. Three of them delegated speakers for this workshop, which was attended by around 60 participants. Luc Rens, Managing-Director of EUPAVE, opened the workshop and introduced EUPAVE and the speakers to the participants. Following this, Rolf C. Guntert, Vice President of Guntert & Zimmerman, explained how to achieve high-quality concrete pavements.

Rory Keogh, Managing Director of GOMACO International Limited in the UK presented the concrete slipform paving, the way it works, its potential problems and a range of solutions. Patrick Zanen, Head of Sales Slipform Paving and Product Manager at Wirtgen, introduced the offset applications. Afterwards, at the outdoor exhibition, the audience visited the stands of De Bruycker and Wirtgen Belgium where slipform pavers from Gomaco and Wirtgen were presented. The workshop and visit ended with a stand-up lunch organised by MATEXPO. We would like to thank our speakers one more time for their great contribution and the MATEXPO team for the opportunity.


STUDY INDICATES AREAS OF IMPROVEMENT FOR WORKPLACE LEARNING

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uilding companies are willing to accept their share of the responsibility for making the concept of workplace learning in the sector a success story. The system whereby companies create space on the workfloor to train employees starting in the industry has already found its way into many construction companies. And although these companies may believe in this type of training, they are also asking for support and proper liaising with the training providers. These findings come from a study entitled ‘Workplace learning – How building companies view workplace learning’, produced by the Tempera research bureau, working on behalf of Constructiv and Talentenwerf.

WORKPLACE LEARNING - 10

Workplace learning means that a significant proportion of a newcomer’s training can be carried out on the job. With workplace learning, the training institution outsources, as it were, part of its training process to the construction company. This creates a triangular relationship in which each party involved has its own area of responsibility. This form of training is customised for the construction industry, which makes it an atypical sector as it involves a large number of small teams who carry out their work at temporary locations (building sites). The system has its pros and cons: while a great many different aspects of the training process can be catered for ‘on the job’, it also depends on which subjects can actually be organised on a site-to-site basis – an issue that requires a high level of flexibility from all parties. Tempera asked over 300 companies to think about the way in which they could participate in this form of training. The results show that building companies can see clear added value in training at the construction site. But despite the benefits, they also find themselves coming up against a number of difficulties when they commit to being a learning workplace. These stumbling blocks may be related with the trainees themselves, or the way in which the company is organised or general collaboration with the training or educational establishment in question. The regulations and legislation governing workplace learning also provide their fair share of headaches. The study came up with a number of recommendations for companies to deal with these stumbling blocks. The research bureau then took these recommendations and joined the debate with a number of training providers. Their thoughts are also included in the study.

OBSERVATIONS AND EXPECTATIONS OF THE BUILDING COMPANIES The main thing is that companies want and expect employees starting out in the industry to do so with the right intentions. The technical skills that newcomers may have are clearly subordinated to their attitude to the profession and their desire to make something of their trade. Taking the various workplace learning systems into account, companies say they are prepared to invest an average of 10 months of learning time. Looking at their own business, the main thing that companies ask for is support. And they want that support in various forms. First of all, 2 out of 3 companies hope to be able to rely on substantial financial support to offset their investment in training and so make up for their loss of production. 54% of companies want a trial period so that they can have the time to assess the candidate properly. Does the person fit into the team? Are they right for the company? 1 in 4 companies believe strongly in the role of the mentor, acting as a go-between between the newcomer and the company. And, of course, this type of system also involves the necessary formal obligations. In this regard, the companies ask for these requirements to be kept simple and limited. But companies also need to take a critical look at their own organisation. They realise that they have to make space internally so that workplace learning can be organised successfully.


This means that not only the senior management needs to be involved, but also the people on the workfloor, where the team has to be part of the preparation and organisation process. A mentor is the ideal person to take on this role – both as a coach to the trainee starting out, and as the direct line of contact with the training establishment. As far as the education and training institutions are concerned, the main problem is miscommunication. Both the jargon used by the training establishments with the companies and the lack of knowledge in the business world mean that a number of cases go wrong. The companies also feel that the mutual expectations are not sufficiently known on both sides. So, on the one hand, companies ask the training establishments to spend the time required on good consultation, as well as on the process of matching a possible candidate to fit in with the operating capabilities. On the other hand, they also want the training providers to demonstrate the necessary pragmatism and flexibility with their workplace visits and in dealing with the administrative merry-go-round.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SUPPORTING PARTNERS AND POLICYMAKERS In terms of organisations, such as the companies that commissioned the study (Constructiv and Talentenwerf), the construction companies mainly see themselves playing a strong role from the sidelines. A role in which the organisations disseminate and promote the system, as well as monitor its quality. There’s also a need to ensure that the administrative side remains within reason and the task of looking to customise the various possible variants of workplace learning is something for the supporting organisations to take on board. The policymakers see the study as an argument for greater uniformity, limited administration, plenty of room to accommodate flexibility and a balanced remuneration system. Employers say clearly that paying wages is not an obstacle, but that the cost of wages needs to be in proportion to the overall cost of workplace learning.

"A MENTOR PASSES ON THE KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCE THAT HE OR SHE HAS BUILT UP TO THE NEXT GENERATION." PRESENTATION The results of this study were the common theme running through the Colloquium organised by Constructiv, the sector fund last Saturday at the MATEXPO trade show in Kortrijk under the title of ‘Getting together – workplace learning begins with a good conversation’. More than 200 attendees from the building sector and training circles were presented with the results in the form of relationship therapy. And as befits good therapy, the people present immediately felt more involved in the debate about the results and proposals. In the meantime, the sector fund has also created a specific website dealing with the mentor story. It’s true to say that the sector believes in the power that a mentor can have in a building company. Mentors act mainly as a catalyst: they ensure that the learning process runs more smoothly and from their position of guidance they are responsible for making sure that newcomers are incorporated into the companies and the sector. At the same time, the mentor also acts as an intermediary between the workfloor and the boss’s office or the personnel department. And finally, a mentor passes on the knowledge and experience that he or she has built up to the next generation. The website at http://mentor.constructiv.be puts together a picture of the strengths and assets of the mentor. It also provides an overview of the training locations where companies can have their employees trained, plus it gives companies the chance to say why they believe in the mentor story. This is how the building industry aims to create a community of building mentors and support construction companies as much as possible in their workplace learning.


THE COMPLEMENTARY CLUSTER AT MATEXPO FOUR SUCCESSFUL SEMINARS

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ot only was the national Confederation prominent at MATEXPO, but so was Fedecom. The cluster of complementary companies in our trade organisation organised four seminars, covering a range of topical themes and explaining what the future may bring.

EARTHWORKS IN THREE REGIONS

Andy Heurckmans (Grondbank), Hugues Kempeneers (CBB-H) and Aymé Argelès (CCW) discussed the various regional regulations dealing with excavations in front of audience of around a hundred. In Flanders, the ‘Grondbank’ (Earthbank) guarantees the traceability of excavations and earthworks, providing proof that they are not causing any new contamination. The system applied by the Grondbank, which was set up by the VCB (Flemish Building Confederation), protects contractors against objective liability. What will the future bring in Flanders? There are discussions underway currently about where the scope of the regulations stands at the moment. There are movements with regard to the tipping of dredging and clearance spoil. Other considerations deal with expanding the rules to cover soil slurry and bentonite soil mixtures. The aim is to remove unfair competition and try to achieve more uniform handling and monitoring. Finally, there needs to be better enforcement, which will require closing a few loopholes. For example, consideration is being given to a reporting requirement for earthmoving works at small building sites and for alternative streams of spoil. This latter measure would affect transporting spoil to other regions and countries, for example.

FOUR SUCCESSFUL SEMINARS - 12

TRACIMAT Tracimat was also covered. Tracimat is best summarised as a sort of ‘Grondbank’, but for which certain fractions of the spoil go to a grinding mill so that it can be recycled as aggregate. Tracimat is an initiative from the VCB, which was recently granted accreditation as a demolition management organisation – in fact the only one in Flanders for the time being. An organisation of this kind is able to guarantee the traceability of rubble between the demolition site and the grinding mill. If it has a certificate from Tracimat, a mill can accept the rubble as LMRP spoil with a low risk (‘L’ for ‘low’) to the environment. Processing LMRP spoil is a good deal cheaper than HMRP (‘H’ for ‘high’) rubble with a high risk to the environment.

The Tracimat system comes into practice in the autumn of 2018. To join the system, the builder must have a spoil-monitoring plan in place. Contractors are advised to become familiar with these plans before the system comes into effect.

BRUSSELS The Brussels soil regulations were changed this year, making the administrative side simpler and the procedures faster. One of the consequences of the change is that building sites no longer have to be closed down immediately as soon as any contamination is found. There are now also more financial instruments available, such as a fund for dealing with fly-tipping. There is a code of good practice in place in Brussels, but no specific decisions have been taken yet about a number of other aspects, such as the traceability of excavated soil.

WALLONIA

There is a growing conviction in Wallonia that a form of quality control, with appropriate standards to go with it, is required. Whether this will take the form of a Walloon ‘Grondbank’ is not yet known. Aymé Argelès expects the necessary administrative texts to be publish in 2018, although it is not yet clear whether the monitoring will be carried out by a public body or a private organisation. However, it is expected that the functions of Tracimat and the Grondbank will be integrated into a single set of regulations. One of the obstacles in the way of reaching a quick decision on this topic is the cost of running the system.

BEING GREEN IN THE CONSTRUCTION WORLD This may be a seminar for a specific target audience, but it is one that is growing in importance. General interest for ‘being green in the construction world’ is on the increase. Emmanuel Ampe from the


Vereniging voor Openbaar Groen (Public Green Space Association) gave a talk about the protection of trees on building sites. He also expanded on the Flemish standard specification 250, which devotes far more attention to the protection of trees. In addition, two NTMB certificates have been issued, in which the letters NTMB (in Dutch) stand for ‘nature and technical environmental building’. The two newly certificated organisations are Texion Geokunststoffen and Van Raak, making them the first companies to be awarded this certification in Flanders. To gain its NTMB certificate, a company has to demonstrate that it has an NTMB system in place. Note that this is not a certification for products.

SCAFFOLDING A third seminar organised by the cluster focused on scaffolding, introducing the Code of Good Practice – Scaffolding, a new form of certification for professional scaffolders. There were around fifty attendees in the room for this interesting presentation, which began by dealing with the legal context. The Royal Decree that regulates the use of scaffolding dates back to August 2005, the audience was told by Kristof Bossuyt, president of the association of scaffolders in Fedecom. Kristof Bossuyt: “The first code of good practice then followed the decree in 2007. But it was very theoretical, so in April of that year, we brought out a second version of the code. This was produced in conjunction with Fedelec, Constructiv, the social partners and the FPS Employment, Labour and Social Dialogue.” This 70-page document also provided examples document and dealt with the erection of scaffolding for a builder’s own use as well as for other users. The code has no force in legislation, but

"IN THE NETHERLANDS, CERTIFICATION HAS BEEN OBLIGATORY SINCE THE BEGINNING OF 2017." Christian Depue | Constructiv

is a source of law that a court can draw on in making rulings. However, thus far this has not happened and the FPS has not yet ratified the code.

CERTIFICATION In addition to this code, certification is a way of boosting quality and safety. Christian Depue (Constructiv) discussed the scheme for the personal certification of professional scaffolders. Christian Depue: “Certification is still in the start-up phase and is not obliged by law. But indirectly it has become a must, because people are obliged to employ safe work practices.” A certificate is awarded when an individual passes a theoretical examination and a series of practical tests. Constructiv guarantees the independence of the procedure and has established the required skills profiles. It also organises the certification process. The initiative was prompted by a number of accidents involving scaffolding. Christian Depue: “In the Netherlands, certification has been obligatory since the beginning of 2017. This means that Belgian contractors wanting to work in Holland must be certified and > p14


they can now also obtain this certification in Belgium.” Jean-Pierre Van Lier concluded the session by explaining the role of the safety coordinator when it comes to erecting scaffolding.

DEEP FOUNDATIONS The range of topics that Fedecom provided to contractors was particularly broad this year, because the subject of deep foundations also had its day at MATEXPO. Michel Roovers introduced ABEF, the association of foundation contractors, of which he is the president. ABEF was established in 2000 and defends the interests of the sector. ABEF has been part of the complementary cluster of companies since 2012. Safety is the most prominent concern for the thirteen members of ABEF. The code of good practice for excavation works plays an important role in this and was a subject discussed at MATEXPO. Unfortunately, not everyone in Belgium can call themselves a foundation specialist, says Tom Smet (CVR), who commented on a number of accidents that could have been prevented. Tom Smet: “There have been cases where no research was carried out beforehand to take account of things such as groundwater, or the people involved didn’t dare take the proper responsibility, or there were technical errors and so on.” A painful list – and one more reason to make sure the code is distributed to colleges, universities, evening classes, architects, design bureaux, etc.

TRAINING

FOUR SUCCESSFUL SEMINARS - 14

Luc Van Hecke (Franki Foundations) analysed a number of aspects

that have consequences for the safety of foundation works: the stability of the ground, any underground pipework, the actual feasibility and, finally, the simultaneous presence of various contractors at the building site. Erwin Dupont (Soiltech) provided an explanation about training on installing deep foundations (ODF). Erwin Dupont: “There has been consultation between ABEE Constructiv, the VDAB and Forem, with three objectives in mind: certification for workers who have attended appropriate training courses, anticipating new European regulations and increasing safety on building sites.” Johan Dedeene (Clusta), Maurice Bottiau (Franki Foundations) and Koen Duyck presented the results from the working group for Corrosion – concrete requirements for diaphragm walls – Soilmix.

SUCCESS “We have good reason to be very satisfied, because a lot of people attended our seminars at MATEXPO,” concluded Patrick Noé (director of the cluster of complementary companies) afterwards. In fact, the various meetings were very illuminating and demonstrate just how the Confederation defends the interests of its members.

"WE HAVE GOOD REASON TO BE VERY SATISFIED, BECAUSE A LOT OF PEOPLE ATTENDED OUR SEMINARS AT MATEXPO." Patrick Noé


BUILDING AND DEMOLITION WASTE

M

ore than 100 invited guests attended the seminar about the latest developments in the area of the recycling of building and demolition waste. Minister for the Environment, Nature & Agriculture, Joke Schauvliege, honoured us by making the closing speech.

She also announced that she had signed the accreditation of Tracimat as a demolition management organisation – a fact that can be considered as a minor revolution within the sector. This means that from September of next year, demolition companies will be required to make a distinction between waste that has a high level of risk for the environment (HMRP) and waste with a low level of risk for the environment (LMRP). The other speakers at the seminar were Philippe Van de Velde (OVAM) and Margo Briessinck (AWV – Roadbuilding Department).

SIGMA LOOKS BACK AT A SUCCESSFUL EXHIBITION

T

he auspices for MATEXPO 2017 were good from the outset, as trends have been positive in the industry for quite some time. The sales figures issued by the trade organisation Sigma for machinery to be used in Civil Engineering and Construction projects had been favourable for months already.

So it came as no surprise that the whole sector was out in force for this sell-out edition of MATEXPO. Exhibitors are always a little nervous when it comes to waiting to see whether the show will result in a more than healthy interest in their wares and – more important still – in machine sales. The weather gods were not so favourably disposed to us this time around, but there is still some doubt as to whether this has any adverse effects on actual results. Genuinely interested visitors are not going to be put off by a little rain and it’s very possible that some of them will have enjoyed going round the show, even in bad weather, than trudging through the mud on a building site. In any case, MATEXPO always has plenty on offer, both under cover and outside.

The general reaction of most exhibitors about visitor numbers was that there wasn’t an enormous quantity, but those who did come made visitor quality particularly high for this edition of the show. People came along with practical questions about actual projects – and plenty of business deals were finalised both during the days of the show itself, as well as in the days that followed. This, of course, is one of the main reasons for taking part in a trade show. The other – and perhaps even more important – reason for being there is the opportunity to put products on display for a broadbased audience, without necessarily expecting an immediate sale. And that is certainly a reason why MATEXPO was able to offer the ideal platform. For visitors and exhibitors alike, the exhibition created the kind of conditions that generate the optimum trade show experience. In terms of logistics, organisation, information and winding up the show, everything ran very smoothly, without any imperfections worth mentioning. It was certainly clear that the organising team had everything firmly under control. It was also reassuring to note that the organisers had listened to comments made from previous editions of the show and that there was always someone to listen and take comments seriously, as well as – where necessary – to come up with solutions. As a trade association, we are also proud that we were able to collaborate with such a professional organisation. MATEXPO 2017 was without doubt a great edition of the show – just the way we like it to be run and just as we hope and trust it will continue. Dries Van Haut - President Sigma vzw


WILLEMEN CONSTRUCTION GROUP FOCUSES ON INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY

I

NG organised a seminar on “The Connected Building Site” at the MATEXPO trade show. The focus of the seminar was on IoT (Internal of Things) applications for construction sites. We spoke to Alexander Laquière, one of the panel members. Laquière is responsible for innovation and digitisation at the Willemen construction group, making him the ideal person to ask a few questions.

Willemen Group has a reputation as an ‘early adopter’ of innovative technology. Why are you so involved in it? Making use of innovative technology enables us to make a real difference. Not only can we speed up the building process, but we can also significantly reduce the cost when things go wrong, as well as improve the safety of our workers at the site. We are convinced that there are still other developments to come. Within a foreseeable space of time, innovative technology will no longer be just an option – it’ll be a must. Can you give us a few examples of innovations that you have implemented in the past five years? In our ‘W-Care’ department, we use the Internet of Things (IoT) for buildings that we are constructing ourselves, as well as for buildings where we are responsible for the maintenance. Built-in sensors gather data and forecast when maintenance is required. Or else they control HVAC, lighting and cleaning in specific areas, based on the actual presence of people.

INTERVIEW - 16

"BECAUSE YOU CAN ONLY DRAW RELEVANT CONCLUSIONS BASED ON THIS TYPE OF RELIABLE DATA." At the sites themselves, for example, we insert sensors in the asphalt that goes into the roadworks or into concrete walls when they’re poured. These sensors then tell us when optimum hardness has been reached – something that previously we had to decide about based on experience and gut feel. This means that we can work with a good deal more precision, which in turn is beneficial for quality and also enables us to move on to the next phase of the build more quickly.

At the moment we’re working on a data analysis project designed to give us more structured data. Because you can only draw relevant conclusions based on this type of reliable data. How does IoT help you in terms of on-site organisation? We use trackers for large and small plant. These help us to keep an inventory of the plant we are using, which is particularly useful for small equipment and also for keeping track of the inspection status of that equipment. It also means that inspections can be carried out on-site and so we are able to avoid incidents caused by equipment not being inspected on time. For us, safety is a top priority, which is another area where technology comes in handy. For instance, we are currently working on a research project involving ‘wearables’, in conjunction with manufacturers and the academic world. Sensors are incorporated into the clothing worn by workers on-site. An example of this is a receiver built into an excavator that ensures that the machine stops operating as soon as the person wearing the sensor comes too close to the digger bucket or boom. The next step is self-driving machines, although these are too


"FOR US, SAFETY IS A TOP PRIORITY, WHICH IS ANOTHER AREA WHERE TECHNOLOGY COMES IN HANDY." expensive for the time being. But we hope they’ll be possible within a year or two. How did you approach your CEO about the introduction of this innovative technology? He has been good at anticipating the feelings that these changes might bring. For many employees there was quite a lot of suspicion initially, even some wounded pride. So for that reason, we published a regular blog talking about the changes. In addition, we also staged a major event for staff where we demonstrated the sorts of benefits that the Willemen Group can gain from the new technologies. This generated a boost in both confidence and commitment on the part of our staff.

The innovations have also had an effect in the back-office, because to be able to process all of the current and future data, we will need to invest in a new ERP system that delivers better performance. Technologically speaking, what is the biggest challenge in construction? Without doubt, this is finding the right standards and establishing a uniform platform on which the various applications can all be linked together. But more than just the technical aspect, it is important for the various parties involved to overcome their mutual mistrust and come to the realisation that sharing information is necessary for an effective and sustainable building business.

Discover other interesting articles > Did you miss MATEXPO and the panel discussion? Don’t worry! We have put together all sorts of testimonials and handy tips for other businesses! You can find them all by visiting ing.be/mijn-zaak


GO4CIRCLE DEMONSTRATES AT MATEXPO THAT CHAIN MANAGEMENT STANDS OR FALLS BY INSPECTIONS

T

he chain management side of dealing with stony waste from building, renovation and demolition work will shortly have to take account of Tracimat, the spoil management organisation, and its procedures. But just how controllable is chain management? At MATEXPO we presented some of the difficulties to an audience of about 50 people.

Friday 8th September saw fifty or so participants attending a very informative morning session at MATEXPO: To warm up the audience, Sven De Mulder (OVAM) explained about the choices facing us if we intend to achieve an asbestos-

safe Flanders by 2040. It was clear that ‘business as usual’ is not an option and that we need directive regulations to help us on our way. OVAM will present its asbestos disposal plan for the end of this year. Kris Broos (VITO) presented a number of cautious early results from the study into the correlation between the vibration test and column test on sieved sand. For the most critical parameters – chrome and copper – it appears to work, although more data sets are needed first. This study, half of which was funded by Go4Circle, is designed to make it faster and cheaper to assess the leaching of heavy metals in sieved sand. This is important in the feasibility of processing rubble with a high risk for the environment. Our third speaker was a certification specialist on recycled aggregate in the Netherlands, Erik Hoven (SGS Intron). He was invited to speak in case any members were considering the export of recycled aggregate. Despite the fact that the European Construction Products Directive imposes the same rules, interpretation of the requirements differs for each country and region. Certainly the method used to check on the environmental and hygiene parameters – certification according to the Construction Materials Decree (BSB) – is different in Holland to what it is in the Flemish region. To round off proceedings, Werner Annaert conducted a debate with Margot Van den Berghe (chair of the building and demolition waste working group), Johny De Nutte (Copro) and Glenn Heernaert (chair of the soil decontamination centres working group). What is the situation at the moment regarding the quality of recycled aggregate? Copro was able to provide a number of figures, which showed that progress has been made in comparison with the study conducted in 2012. Yet it seems amazing that there is still no clear picture of just how extensive the real problem is. In the meantime, a whole chain management system is in the pipeline... But how can you tackle a “problem” if it’s not clear exactly how large that problem? We feel that this is very strange and actually unacceptable.

"HOW CAN YOU TACKLE A “PROBLEM” IF IT’S NOT CLEAR EXACTLY HOW LARGE THAT PROBLEM?"

GO4CIRCLE - 18

Unfortunately, there wasn’t very much positive to be said about the mandatory GPS system on every grinding mill: the likelihood of an arrest involving illegal mill operators has not risen. The good news is that the enforcement department wants to use checks on chain management in the enforcement plan 2018. In fact, the entire system will stand or fall by riskbased enforcement on the part of the environment inspectorate. If not, legitimate companies will again be required to under paper-based checks, which will please the real problem companies even more.


SUCCESSFUL BREAKFAST SESSION FOR BOUWUNIE INFRASTRUCTUUR WERKEN AT MATEXPO

4 X 1000 SECONDS FOR THE INFRASTRUCTURE CONTRACTOR

O

n the Friday of MATEXPO, Bouwunie Infrastructuurwerken organised its inaugural breakfast session under the heading of ‘4 x 1000 seconds for the infrastructure contractor’ in which a number of interesting infrastructure topics were dealt with in four short sessions, each lasting 1000 seconds.

Timothy Geerts from Grondwijzer opened the session with a presentation about soil management, which included taking a close look at the traceability system and the current and future legislation in the matter, as well as outlining the main points in relation to earthmoving and a number of useful tips. Brecht Lonneville from Sitech Belgium then gave a talk about automation at construction sites. This included presenting the new, entry-level software platform SitePuls and the next generation of 3D machine controls with Trimble Earthworks. In the third session, Joris Breugelmans from BTV captured

everyone’s attention with his interesting talk about safety and inspections, which reiterated the safety instructions for building sites and also provided an update about the checks and inspections that are required by law at sites. To round off the four sessions, Sven Tilkin from Stradus Infra presented a number of innovative prefab concentre products for the public environment and infrastructure. Moderator Vincent Decruyenaere from Bouwunie Infrastructuurwerken then concluded by presenting the latest ‘Ask KLIP before you start digging’ construction memo relating to underground cables and pipes.

"IMMACULATE AND VERY ENJOYABLE" Pro Construct


FACTS & FIGURES 1.7% UK

2.6% LUXEMBURG

6.0% OTHER

2.7% ITALY

FOREIGN VISITORS

4.1% GERMANY

54.9% NETHERLANDS 28.0% FRANCE

INFOGRAPHIC - 20

MORE THAN 3.000 FOREIGN VISITORS

65%

HAS DECISION POWER

99%

INTEND TO VISIT NEXT EDITION IN 2019

97%

INTEND TO EXHIBIT AT MATEXPO 2019


2017 > 41.414

2015 > 39.335

2013 > 36.231

2011 > 27.980

UNIQUE VISITORS NUMBERS

VISITOR SCORES

EXHIBITOR SCORES

8.3/10

GENERAL IMPRESSION

2017

GENERAL IMPRESSION

7.7/10 2017

7.2/10 2015

7.9/10 2015

7.5/10 2017

VISITOR QUALITY

7.1/10 2015

NUMBER OF EXHIBITORS

8.6/10 2017

7.0/10 2017

8.1/10 2015

VISITOR QUANTITY

6.4/10 2015


THIS WAS 2017 - 22

THIS WAS 2017


"PROPER TRAINING PRODUCES GOOD EMPLOYEES WHO ARE ABLE TO DO GREAT WORK WITH GOOD EQUIPMENT FOR AN ACCEPTABLE BUDGET."

THIS WAS 2017 - 24

Etienne Van Hecke | VDAB


"TOGETHER WE WILL GO FURTHER." Isabelle Kahn | Wolftech


"THE MOST INTERESTING TRADE SHOW FOR ALL CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT, TRUCKS AND TOWED EQUIPMENT." THIS WAS 2017 - 26

Hendrik De Spiegelaere | Transportjournalistiek H. De Spiegelaere


"WHEN WE COME TO THIS SHOW, MY PEOPLE AND ME ARE LIKE KIDS IN A TOY SHOP!" Vincent Hoël | Hoël et fils


THIS WAS 2017 - 28


"ANYONE WANTING AN INSPIRING AND REFRESHING LOOK AT THE RANGE OF HEAVY-DUTY MACHINERY SIMPLY MUSTN'T MISS THIS UNIQUE EVENT!"


"THE LEADING FORUM FOR CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY IN THE BENELUX."

THIS WAS 2017 - 30

Davy De Ceuster | De Ceuster & Co


"MATEXPO IS AND CONTINUES TO BE THE "PLACE TO BE" FOR THE SECTOR. IT ATTRACTS THE RIGHT TYPE OF CUSTOMER, IS WELL ORGANISED AND IS SUPPORTED BY A GOOD MEDIA CAMPAIGN."

THIS WAS 2017 - 32

Kris Mertens | MAN Truck & Bus


CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT KORTRIJK XPO | WWW.MATEXPO.COM

MATEXPO nv | President Kennedypark 31B | 8500 Kortrijk | T +32 (0)56 98 07 60 | info@MATEXPO.com | www.MATEXPO.com | facebook.com/MATEXPO | twitter.com/MATEXPO


WWW.MODULO.BE - 501266

organizer: MATEXPO nv | President Kennedypark 31B | 8500 Kortrijk (Belgium) T +32 (0)56 98 07 60 | info@MATEXPO.com | www.MATEXPO.com | facebook.com/matexpo | twitter.com/matexpo

Matexpo Magazine 2017  
Matexpo Magazine 2017  

Highlights Matexpo 2017: photos, facts & figures, review seminars

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