Page 1

MOVING INTO THE FUTURE

MOVING INTO THE FUTURE NIKE + KEA COLLABORATION


WITH EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS AT THE INTERSECTION OF DESIGN, TECHNOLOGY, IT AND BUSINESS KEA’S PRIMARY TASK IS TO IDENTIFY THE SYNERGIES BETWEEN THEORY AND PRACTICE. KEA HAS DEVELOPED A STRONG PRACTICE-BASED STRATEGY IN ALL OF ITS ACADEMIC PROGRAMS BY PROVIDING PROFESSIONAL INTERACTIONS AND RESEARCH-BASED COLLABORATIONS WITH COMPANIES, SO THAT THE STUDENTS’ KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS CAN BE TRANSLATED INTO ACTUAL PROJECTS WHICH PROVIDE THE STUDENTS WITH NEW KNOWLEDGE, AND ALSO THE EXPERIENCE OF WORKING WITH REAL ISSUES. THE COLLABORATION WITH NIKE IS AN EXCELLENT EXAMPLE OF HOW THIS STRATEGY


CAN BE PUT INTO PRACTICE. THE STUDENTS TACKLE SPECIFIC CHALLENGES AND DEVELOP MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS SOLUTIONS AND THEREBY ENSURING A HIGH ACADEMIC LEVEL AND THE STUDENT’S CAPABILITY TO WORK IN THE PROFESSIONAL REALM. MATERIAL DESIGN LAB IS A DEPARTMENT WITHIN KEA THAT WAS CREATED TO DEVELOP AND DISSEMINATE KNOWLEDGE ON SUSTAINABILITY AND INNOVATION IN MATERIALS AND PRODUCTION. IT IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SPACE WHERE SCIENCE, DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY MEET IN THE EXPLORATION AND UNDERSTANDING OF MATERIALS.


THIS COLLABORATION PROJECT UTILISES A MATERIAL DRIVEN DESIGN PROCESS IN WHICH THE DESIGNING AND/OR MANIPULATION OF THE MATERIAL IS THE PRIMARY FOCUS FROM THE OUTSET AND BECOMES A MAIN DRIVER FOR DESIGN DECISIONS. WORKING THIS WAY ENABLES TECHNOLOGICAL AND ARTISTIC INNOVATION AND MORE IMPORTANTLY, A SUSTAINABLE OUTCOME. IT OFTEN PROVOKES AND INSPIRES THE DESIGNER TO USE ALTERNATIVE RESOURCES AS RAW MATERIALS AND FACILITATES THE DESIGN OF PRODUCTS THAT ARE SUITABLE FOR A CIRCULAR ECONOMY. THE MATERIAL CAN BE SEEN, TO A LARGE DEGREE, AS THE DNA OF A PRODUCT. IT IS WHAT DEFINES BOTH THE TACTILE AND TECHNICAL PROPERTIES, AND THEREFORE LARGELY DETERMINES THE PRODUCTION METHOD AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. QUALITIES SUCH AS INNOVATION AND SUSTAINABILITY ARE NOT ADDITIVES THAT


CAN BE INJECTED BY A TECHNICIAN INTO A PRODUCT AT THE LAST MINUTE, SO IF IT IS NOT ORIGINALLY DESIGNED TO BE SUSTAINABLE, IT MOST LIKELY NEVER WILL BE. THE SUSTAINABLE FASHION STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO ‘PRODUCE’ THEIR CHOSEN MATERIAL, WHOLLY OR IN PART,

AND THEN USE THAT MATERIAL IN THE FINAL

PRODUCT. THIS IS TO ENSURE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF AN APPROACH THAT IS NEW TO A MAJORITY OF THE STUDENTS, WHILST AT THE SAME TIME FACILITATING A PROCESS THAT IS INDEED MATERIAL DRIVEN AND FURTHERMORE COULD SATISFY THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A CIRCULAR ECONOMY. THE 10 MOST SUCCESSFUL PROJECTS, RANGING FROM RECYCLING WASTE MATERIALS TO GROWING YOUR OWN MATERIAL FROM SCRATCH, ARE HIGHLIGHTED IN THIS BOOKLET.


TIME-WISE SNEAKER LEATHER LEFT-OVERS TURN SHOE

Marie Dørge explores how to use leftover trimmings from the leather production with the aim of making them just as accessible as the highly durable material of the larger skins. She is looking at the varying sizes, shapes, qualities and colours of the sourced pieces, otherwise regarded as waste, as an opportunity to combine a number of techniques to create a biodegradable sneaker. Rather than working on separate parts from a range of different materials, which more often than not include non-biodegradable choices, her solution is made entirely from one material with only a small amount of natural rubber and utilises conventional stitching methods.


PUZZLE MODULAR DESIGN FOR DIY APPAREL

Anne-Katrine Lund looks at how to achieve a customised experience which will establish a personal connection between the garment and the owner. Her studies of modular fabric systems are created through a process of zero-waste pattern construction and a hands-on assembly. This thoughtful solution provides multiple opportunities for the owner. Individual sections can be replaced if torn or stained, additional panels can be added or removed in accordance to changes in size and seasonal needs and if the mood suits, the whole garment can be reassembled into something completely different.


SEA-GRAIN PACKAGING WASTE-WRAPPING YOUR GOODS

Waste is the most quickly generated resource, and its “production� is free. With this sentiment in mind, Jasmin Druffner and Ji Yoon Lee were very determined to use local resources in their search for packaging solutions. Their search culminated in the beer waste from a local brewery, seaweed from the local shore and a corn-starch-based bio-plastic, which, when mixed together results in a lightweight packaging material of superior strength that offers an alternative to traditional cardboard boxes. Moulding the mix into this unique shape creates a lightweight and strong solution for a packaging that not only is responsible in the production process but will also raise awareness to general waste issues and the need for a circular economy.


GO FISH URINE-TREATED FISH LEATHER

5

4

Stina Jalving is researching common waste products from the food industry to use as a resource material. She is looking at possibilities of using fish skins as an alternative to regular leather, which have surprisingly similar characteristics in terms of strength. Stina explored the material anthropology of Scandinavian cultures to discover an ancient tradition of using urine as a tanning method. This could be used as an alternative to the chrome tanning that is commonly used today. She creates a 100% biodegradable product that leaves space for exploring diverse weaving and patching techniques, which enables a more effective use of the varying skin sizes, obtained from the local markets.


NIKE WOOD WALK ON WOOD

Kathrine Grøner Errboe works with the waste materials from a carpenter’s workshop: wood shavings, chips and dust. By salvaging waste from a natural renewable resource, she not only has a sustainable approach to her material choice but she can also take advantage of the wood’s superior characteristics. It is soft and light, strong yet flexible, warm yet breathable. Using the shavings, Kathrine is experimenting with traditional weaving techniques for the varied demands on the different parts of the shoe, allowing for both flexibility and strength. The soles of the shoe consist of chips and dust combined with natural rubber.


PERMAWEAVE LIMESTONE TO KEEP YOU WARM

Freja Nielsen explores the integration of limestone into apparel. Limestone is a natural resource that is found in abundance throughout Denmark and known for its superior insulating properties. Using a recipe of limestone and natural rubber, Freja creates a smooth material that is suitable for laser cutting. She cuts this new material into stripes of equal width and carefully weaves intricate structures that can be applied in strategic places on the garment to keep the wearer from losing heat. Freja is interested in seeing how this new material can contribute to winter wear in combination with traditional wool.


CLEAN WAVE OCEAN PLASTIC TO MAKE A SPLASH

Cæcilie Holmbom reclaims ocean waste as a sustainable resource for use in warm water surf wear. Through experimenting with different techniques of manipulating the material of the found objects, she finds ways of separating the discarded nylon into fibres that can be spun and woven into lightweight interlock jersey and at the same time, melting the nylon for trimmings to ensure that the whole garment can be easily recycled at its end of life. The possibilities seem endless and Cæcilie didn’t stop at just the garment. She also tried fusing the nylon to make tags and packaging. The problem with ocean plastic is so prevalent that this project is presented as an integrated strategy where waste material is collected in collaboration with interested parties within the marine community and production techniques are thought in terms of circular economy.


NIKE LAGOM BICYCLE TUBES UPCYCLED INTO SHOES

Dianna Venia Olsen is investigating the possibilities of giving a second life to discarded bicycle tubes. By experimenting with different weaving and interlocking techniques using varying thicknesses and lengths, she up-cycles the tubes into rubber shoes. Density and strength are adjusted according to the foot’s ergonomic needs thereby not only creating a functional product for use in water environments but at the same time giving the material a surprising context fit, one where the product, by ways of its material, challenges the user’s expectations on feel and looks.


MERAKI YOGA IN AN ORGANIC PALETTE

Julie Christensen is investigating organic solutions for yoga wear that can personalise the product and potentially prolong its lifecycle. She is starting her product’s journey with organic cotton that can be individualised with an organic colour powder. By studying the results of dyes made from organic vegetables, mainly from potential bi-products from the food industry, Julie creates a palette of colours that ranges from shades of green to blues and pinks. The dyes are then dried to accompany the yoga wear, giving a range of choices to the buyer whilst at the same time integrating the user in the individualisation process, offering the opportunity for consecutive changes over time.


NIKE BIOTECH – SECOND SKIN GROWING PERFORMATIVE SECOND SKIN

Fanni Fabian imagines a future where synthetic biology and genetic engineering are combined in the creation of a high performance athlete product that is grown to size and function, in the form of a second skin. Fanni started this process from a biomimetic view point by researching snakes and how they conquer the problems of friction. She proposes that by extracting the inert characteristics of snakeskin’s DNA and genetically modifying it to be more breathable, it will soon be possible, with the advances in synthetic biology, to grow this new leather in an E-coli bacteria bath. The synthetically grown leather is designed for running gear that is strong and aerodynamic, yet breathable and flexible.


PHOTOGRAPHER / MICHAEL FALGREN

MATERIAL DESIGN LAB KEA / COPENHAGEN SCHOOL OF DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY GULDBERGSGADE 29N DK - 2200 COPENHAGEN MATERIALDESIGNLAB.DK

Movingintothefuture  
Movingintothefuture  
Advertisement