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“ C i t i e s a r e p r o b l e m s i n o r g a n i z e d c o m p l e x i t y, like the lif e sciences. .�

Ja n e Ja c o b s c . 1 9 6 1


Chair: prof. ir. Kees Kaan Chair Editor: Mitesh Dixit


A MB ITION COMPLEX PROJECTS

Cities are increasingly renewed by large projects rather

than by long-term visions and subsequent Master plans. Public-private partnerships are organised

to engage strategic sites, resulting in complex developments. These developments are comprised of multiple and often times, conflicting interests which

have to be negotiated simultaneously. The traditional

tools of architecture and urban planning are simply not equipped to deal with the conditions that arise. This

critical condition will be the focus of Complex Projects. Western cities have typically used large-scale,

commercial projects, to rejuvenate or stimulate urban growth. However, the diminishing role of Public Works in Europe & the United States has necessitated the

A non-linear trajectory of integrated design studios

and develop large works, which have resulted in

define complex projects. Employing forensics analysis,

emergence of public-private partnerships to organise projects that have redefined traditional architectural

and urban issues such as scale, program, client, speed, etc. The result is a new genre of work on the city: Complex Projects.

Complex Projects have eliminated the traditional and perhaps linear roles that define Planning, Urban Design, and Architecture. Due to redefined complexities and

and seminars will expose the multiple layers that

and documentation, one will develop a methodology to separate and examine the scales, actors, and

systems that define the layers. The Chair’s ambition is to develop analytical and critical

thinking skills that will allow one to successfully

negotiate the multitudinous demands of a complex project.

parameters the designer must function simultaneously

With the establishment of CP (Complex Projects) as a

an architect.

in Delft recognises developments and

as a planner, spokesperson, and most importantly,

Transportation hubs, universities campuses and

healthcare centres are projects that motivate both private and public needs. Allowing private interests to exploit commercial opportunities associated with such

projects. The public interest can demand resources

to improve and develop the city, such as public

transportation, affordable housing, education facilities, etc. However, in order for such projects to achieve an equilibrium, they must have a system to manage and

negotiate the multiple actors. It is precisely this system that the Chair of Complex Projects will examine.

scientific field of study, the Department of Architecture

challenges within our discipline. In order for one to contribute to the changing needs of our discipline,

it will require a fundamental shift in how we define ourselves as ‘architects’


CONTENT INTRODUCTION THE CHAIR

Kees Kaan Complex Project Studios CHALLENGES OF EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE PASSENGER RAIL AIR TRAFFIC WATERBORNE CARGO

MASTER PROGRAM

IMPORTANCE OF INFRASTRUCTURE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF AUTO CHALLENGES OF EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE PASSENGER RAIL AIR TRAFFIC WATERBORNE CARGO

YEAR 1

DEPENDENCY ON FOSSIL FUELS EXISTING ENERGY GRID CO2 EMISSIONS HAZARDS WIND POWER SOLAR POWER ALGAE PRODUCTION POTENTIAL ENERGY

YEAR 2

LAND USES OF THE MIDWEST MONOCULTURES & PETROLEUM DEPENDENCY SOIL DEGRADATION WATER POLLUTION UNPROTECTED GREAT PLAINS PERENNIALS & POLYCULTURE HYDROPONICS ALGAE FOR FILTERING BISON

GRADUATION MANUAL

28 30 40 50 64 68

72 82 88 94 102 104 106 108 114 122 128 138 158 162 170 174 178

182 190 194 200 202 212 216 220 222 224 232


COMPLEX PROJECTS

KEES KAAN Kees Kaan with Felix Claus founded Claus en Kaan Architecten in 1987. Kees Kaan graduated in architecture at Delft University of Technology in 1987. Kaan is now the chair of Complex Projects at the department of Architecture of Delft University of Technology.

His research is focused on large complex projects that characterize rapid global urbanization. Kaan is an international lecturer and also sits on various juries and boards both in the Netherlands and abroad. Various books and exhibitions have been dedicated to their body of work.


AWARDS 2013

The Building Award (Bouwprijs) Insti tute for Ecological Research, NIOO

2012

Netherlands Institute for Ecology awarded the Gouden Piramide

2012

House Idenburg won the Häuser-Award in category ‘Kostengünstige Einfamilienhäuser’

2011

Concrete Award for IPMMC Utrecht

2011

Award Sustainable Architecture for NIOO and Central Post

2010

Nomination ECSN Award for Excellence in Concrete 2010

2009

Concrete Award 2009 for Crematorium Heimolen

EXHIBITIONS 2007 Lisbon Architecture Triennale 2004 La Biennale di Venezia, 9. Mostra Internazionale di Architettura Beauftragt, Aedes West, Berlin 2003 La Biennale di Venezia, 8. Mostra Internazionale di Architettura 2002 Minimalismos, Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid 2001 Dutchtown, Aedes East, Berlijn 2000 Bienal International de Arquitectura, São Paulo 2000 Claus en Kaan Architecten, ABC Haarlem 1998 Bienal de Arquitectura y Urbanismo, Zaragoza 1994 Premio internazionale Andrea Palladio, Vicenza

2009

Amsterdam Architecture Prize (Gouden A.A.P.) 2009, Stadsdeelwerf Zuideramstel

2008

International Funeral Award, Crematorium Heimolen

2008

FRITZ-HÖGER Backstein Preis for De Eekenhof

2007

Nomination Lensvelt De Architect Interior Prize for De Bazel

2005

Lensvelt De Architect Interior Prize Netherlands Forensic Institute

2004

Nomination Premio Dedalo Minosse

2003

Nomination Museum of the Year Award

2001

Award Best Designed Book for the monography ‘Claus en Kaan Building’

1998

Nomination Mies van der Rohe Pavilion Award

1997

Grand Prix Rhénan d´Architecture

1994

Incentive Award, Amsterdamse Raad voor de Kunst Nomination for the Océ/BNA Award for Industrial Architecture

1993

Nomination Premio Palladio

1991

Nomination for the Rietveld Award

1992


MSc 1

INFRASTRUCTURE, LAYERS, & RULE

DEPT. OF AR CHITEC TURE

Complex Projec ts have traditional and per hap define Planning, Ur ban Architecture. Due to rede and parameters the desig simultaneously as a plan and most impor tantly a Transportation hubs, uni healthcare centers are pro both pr ivate and publi pr ivate interests to exp opportunities associated the public interest can d to improve and develop public transpor tation, a education facilities, etc for such projec ts to ach they must have a syste negotiate the multiple a this system that the Ch Projec ts will examine.

ANATOMY OF A LANDMARK MS C 1 STUDIO

MS C 2 STUDIO

18.04.13 Cities are increasingly renewed by large projec ts rather than by long-ter m visions and subsequent M aster plans. Public pr ivate par tnerships are organized to engage strategic sites, resulting in complex developments. These developments are KEES via K AAN compr ised TheIR. studio, the dissection of an existing Landmark, willof multiple and of ten times conflic ting interests, which have to be expose the basic elements that will define a building. negotiated simultaneously. The traditional tools of architec ture and ur ban planning IR. HENRI VAN BENNEKOM are simply not equipped to deal with the conditions that arise. This critical condition The resulting data will be organised into a comprehensive will be the focus of Complex Projec ts.

MS C 1 MSof C 2 MS C 3&4 Anatomy a Landmark CHAIR PROFESSOR

CHAIR COORDINATOR

STUDIO research tool, LEADERS which will be used to develop a position to COMPLEX PROJECTS OBER TO C AVALLO the RLandmark. OLINDO C ASO TANNER MERKELE Y ALDO TRIM ENGBER T VAN DER ZAAG JAMES WESTCOT T

EDITOR MITESH DIXIT

Site: Antwerp, Berlin, Paris

Wester n cities have t ypically used large scale commercial projec ts to rejuvenate or stimulate ur ban growth. However, the diminishing role of Public Wor ks in Europe & the United States has necessitated the emergence of public-private par tnerships to organize and develop large works, which have resulted in projects that have redefined traditional architec tural and ur ban issues such as scale, program, client, speed, etc. The result is a new genre of wor k on the cit y : Complex Projec ts.

A nonlinear trajec tor y design studios and sem the multiple layers tha projec ts. Employing fo


MSc 2

Vertical Cities Asia Every year a one square kilometre territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention.

Site: Hanoi Vietnam


CTURE, LAYERS, & RULES

MS C 2 STUDIO

rge ions

o plex are es be onal ning the tion s.

rge ate the ope the hips hich ined sues

GRADUATION MSc 3 & STUDIO 4 MS C 3&4 STUDIO

Graduation Studio

and documentation, one will develop a Complex Projec ts have eliminated the methodology to separate and examine the traditional and per haps linear roles that ac tors, and systems that define the define Planning, Ur ban D esign, and Developscales, and integrate an architectural solution within a Architecture. Due to redefined complexities layers. The Chair ’s ambition is to develop and parameters the designer must function and cr itical think ing sk ills that complex analytical urban condition. will allow one to successfully negotiate the simultaneously as a planner, spokesperson, multitudinous demands of a complex project. and most impor tantly architec t. Transportation hubs, universities campuses, Research and analysis: Forensic inventory of both hard and With the establishment of CP (Complex healthcare centers are projects that motivate Projec ts) asconditions. a scientific field of study, both pr ivate and public needs. Allowing soft infrastructural pr ivate interests to exploit commercial the D epar tment of Architec ture in D elf t Master plan: Develop a plan for the area opportunities associated with such projects, recognizes developments and project challenges in the public interest can demand resources our discipline. In order for one to contribute Design and development: A critical element of the master to the changing needs of our discipline, it to improve and develop the cit y, such as plan will will be developed. require a fundamental shif t of how we public transpor tation, affordable housing, education facilities, etc. However, in order define ourselves as ‘architec ts’. I t seems for such projec ts to achieve equilibr ium, Buck y Fuller k new of this long ago: they must have a system to manage and negotiate the multiple actors. It is precisely “I like big ideas...I would descr ibe myself this system that the Chair of Complex as a comprehensive anticipator y design scientist … an emerging synthesis of ar tist, Projec ts will examine. inventor, mechanic, objective economist, & A nonlinear trajec tor y of integrated evolutionarSite: y scientist.” Chicago, Illinois design studios and seminars will expose Bucky Fuller c.1962 the multiple layers that define complex


MASTER PROGRAM


YEAR 1 MSc1

LANDMARK

AR1A060 AR1A065 AR1A075 AR1CP010 AR1CP020 AR1CP030

Delft Lectures on Architectural Design Delft Lectures on History Delft Lectures and Seminars on Building Technology Anatomy of a Landmark - Design Studio Seminar - Anatomy Seminar - Making

MSc2

CITIES

AR2CP010

Vertical Cities Asia Studio - Research Studio

3 ects 3 ects 6 ects 12 ects 3 ects 3 ects

12 ects

YEAR 2 MSc3

URBAN

AR3A160 AR3AT060 AR3CP010 AR3CP020 AR3CP030

Research Methods and Positions New Urban Questions Complex Projects Graduation Studio Seminar - Language Seminar - Visualizing Data

MSc4

BUILDING

ARC4CP010

Complex Projects Graduation Studio

3 ects 3 ects 6 ects 12 ects 3 ects 3 ects

30 ects


Rotterdam Berlin Antwerp Paris


Bejing Tokyo Chicago Taipei


“A bui l di ng do es not ha ve t o b e a n i m p o r t a n t w o r k o f a r c hi t ec t u r e t o b ec o m e a f i r st - r a t e l a n d m a r k . L andmarks ar e no t c r ea t ed b y a r chi t ect s. T hey a r e fa shi o n ed b y t ho se who en c o u n t er t hem a f t er t hey a r e b ui l t. The essenti al f ea t u r e o f a la n d m a r k i s n o t i t s d esi g n , b u t t he p l a c e i t ho l d s i n a c i t y ’s m em o r y. Co mpar ed to the p la ce i t o ccu p i es i n so ci a l hi st o r y, a lan d m a r k ’s a r t i st i c q u a l i t i es a r e i n c i d en t a l . ”

Herbert Muschamp


MSc 1

Anatomy of a landmark

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On a physical level, a city consists of an urban fabric and architectural features. The fabric contains various layers such as infrastructure, buildings, green zones, water bodies and public spaces. The features are singular buildings that stand out from the fabric and work as anchor points. In his book The Image of the City, Kevin Lynch explains that people perceive the city by means of five predictable elements: paths, edges, districts, nodes (these make up the fabric) and Landmarks (features). Landmarks are defined as ‘readily identifiable objects which serve as external reference points’. Kevin Lynch’s study shows that Landmarks are essential for creating an awareness of ‘place’ and that they play a vital role in man’s navigation in cities.

What determines a Landmark, is that it exists by virtue of the environment it’s located in and its unique representation, otherwise it would be merely a building. So to understand the true meaning of a specific Landmark, it is important to first identify the contexts to which that Landmark relates. Since Landmarks often are buildings of certain importance or impact, their ‘raison d’etre’ should always be comprehended before analyzing the building itself. Only then the meaning of the building’s intrinsic elements can be understood to the fullest; just as the engine of a car can be understood when taken into account that the car is a means of transportation. All the engine’s components, their movements, dimensions, materials and relations, have that one function.

In the design studio we will dissect an existing Landmark via anatomy and expose the basic elements that define a building. Gross anatomy has the goal to obtain information about the structure and organization of elements and systems. A more physiological study is needed to determine the functionality of the elements. The resulting data will be organized into a comprehensive research tool, which will be used to develop a position to the Landmark.


MSc1 STUDIO Anatomy of a Landmark AR1CP010 - Complex Projects Design Studio 22

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


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SITE The Landmarks used for the anatomical study do not necessarily have to be too obvious, but rather form part of everyday city life. Through their specific location, function and distinct architecture these buildings have become meaningful and recognizable. The city around has changed or adapted but the Landmark has remained and even solidified its meaning. In time the Landmark has not only fulfilled its own function, but became the embodiment of an era, culture, style or dogma. Various Landmarks have been selected in Antwerp, Berlin and Paris. They answer the criteria written above and most are rather small. The size or complexity is manageable for a small group of up to four students within six weeks.

STUDIO STRUCTURE & METHODOLOGY Phase 1 Anatomy: weeks 1 - 9, group analysis of Landmark. Depending on the size and complexity of the Landmark, groups are formed ranging from 2 to 4 students. Students can give their preference for a certain Landmark. Each group disects the Landmark on the scales and aspects as described on page 3, with specific requested drawings and data in mind. All material will be collected in a booklet. Phase 2 Redesign: weeks 10 - 17, individual redesign of Landmark. Each student redesigns the Landmark with the anatomical study as basis. The design will focus on a critical stance towards the Landmark, its architectural presence and its relevance in relation to the present context. The seminars AR1CP020 (Anatomy) and AR1CP030 (Making) are fully integrated with the studio. (Students who follow this studio as MSc2 architectural design project, are required to also follow the seminars AR1CP020 (Anatomy) and AR1CP030 (Making).

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Studio meetings are every friday morning from 08:45am until 12:30pm. Students need to send an update of their material two days before the meeting so teachers can give necessary feedback.

STUDIO TRIP Although not obligatory, it’s highly recommended for all students to visit the city and landmarks they choose. A one day field study is much more effective than days spent on browsing the web.

STUDIO OBJECTIVE As introduction to Complex Projects, this design studio has the ambition to make students familiar with the multiple layers that define a building. Whereas the whole chair creates recognition of the increasingly more complicated development of projects, the Anatomy of a Landmark assignment aims for developing skills in the scientific method of analysis and synthesis. Via anatomical dissection, students learn to identify soft and hard aspects of a building while placing them in the bigger frame of the total composition of the building and its context. Soft aspects contain amongst many, politics, demographics, culture, symbolism. Hard aspects contain elemenst such as construction, proportion, material, ornament. When the building and all its aspects are clear, the students are faced with the challenge to redesign a Landmark on the same site. Like this, the student learns how to develop a design concept as symbiosis of knowledge of the predecessor, critical judgment of the current situation and future necessities. Whichever concept is developed, the final proposal should always be the result of a clear sequential thinking from objective study to subjective design.


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26


CONTENT REDESIGN Although the anatomical study is objective, it is not merely a collection of drawings but should result in a critical stance towards the Landmark, this is the diagnosis. After the analysis it should be clear what discrepancies have risen due to a changing context, adapted site or transformations of the building itself. It is very well possible that the original Landmark itself is not functioning anymore as supposed, or that the context requires a different Landmark. The student should be able to clearly indicate flaws in the predecessor and design a new Landmark based on proposed corrections, placed in the current situation. Reconsideration of the programme might be necessary. Appreciation in general can be a form of criticism, but nevertheless it should be translated into a new interpretation of the Landmark on the same site. Various scenario’s of redesign are immaginable; these consist of making a completely new design, adapting the existing Landmark or re-using certain elements but rearranging their order. The final result will be a mixture of corrections and appreciations, conjoined in a new proposal positioned in the contemporary context.

REQUESTED REDESIGN PRODUCTS 1)

Schematic explanation of flaws in Landmark

2)

Conceptual schemes and diagrams

3)

Site plan, 1: 500

4)

Floorplans, (perspective) section, and elevation, 1: 200 / 1:100

5)

Fragmental drawing of most representative element (detail, facade, entrance, space, stair)

6)

Site model, 1:500

7)

Model, 1:200 / 1:100

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CONTENT ANATOMY Three scales with both soft and hard aspects have to be integrally analysed:

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1)

Context - Political - power, motivation, decisions, system - Urban - fabric, location, development, impulse - Social - use, contribution, demographics - Cultural - representation, relation, religion, music, art - Historical - predecessors, tendencies, effects, timeline - Economical - conjuncture, finance, spin-off, feasibility - Commission - assignment, brief

2)

Site - Surroundings - characteristics, styles, place - Vistas - views, relations - Visibility - situation, recognisability, dominance - Axis - streets, paths, orientation - Approach - surprise, drama, sequence

3)

Building - Geometry - relations, symmetry, dimensions - Scale - proportions, man - Organisation - entrance, circulation, connections - Program - functions, relations - Space - effect, experience, senses, size - Construction - system, elements, principles - Material - weight, making, detailing - Decoration - applications, meaning - Evolution - adaptation, extension, demolishment

REQUESTED ANATOMY PRODUCTS 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11)

General contextual information including city: location, demographics, politics, economy (present situation) Building contextual data as listed above under ‘Context’: present situation and history Plans and explanatory diagrams showing site specifics General plans, sections and elevations of building, scales 1:500, 1:200 Analytical plans, sections and elevations: all aspects clearly separated in layers Detailed analysis in fragmental drawings: dissection of elements 3d exploded view of elements (component location) Overall model, scale 1:200, showing generall mass, proportions, layering, spaces One detailed model, scale 1:50, showing building specific element as decoration, space or material Photographic documentation, past and present Explanatory text, max. 400 words


MSC 1 KEY DATES

READING LIST

Week 1 Chair introduction

The Image of the City Kevin Lynch

Week 2 Discuss Landmark selection and form groups

Framing Places: Mediating Power in Built Form Kim Dovey

Week 3 Context analysis

The Poetics of Space Gaston Bachelard

Week 4 Site analysis and extra context

Architecture: Form, Space, and Order Francis D. K. Ching

Week 5 Rough building analysis

Delirious New York Rem Koolhaas

Week 6 Detailed building analysis

The Concise Townscape Gordon Cullen

Week 7 Start forming criticism

A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction Christopher Alexander

Week 8 Fine tuning of analysis material Week 9 Anatomical analysis and initial design proposal (critical stance) Week 10 No studio Week 11 ‘Fix’ concept Week 12 Design development Week 13 Design development Week 14 Design development Week 15 Week 16 Design development Week 17 Presentation development Week 18

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Todd McLellan


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33


MSc1 SEMINARS 34

Landmark Seminars

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


Summary: The studio, via dissection of an existing Landmark, will expose the basic elements that define a building. The resulting data will be organized into a comprehensive research tool, which will be used to develop a position to the Landmark. The seminars AR1CP020 (Anatomy) and AR1CP030 (Making) are fully integrated with the studio. (Students who follow this studio as MSc2 architectural design project, are required to also follow the seminars AR1CP020 (Anatomy) and AR1CP030 (Making).

Delft Lectures on Architectural Design AR1A060 Delft Lectures on History AR1A065 Delft Lectures and Seminars on Building Technology AR1A075 Seminar - Anatomy AR1CP020 - Complex Projects Seminar Seminar - Making AR1CP030 - Complex Projects Seminar

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36

ANATOMY Seminar - Anatomy AR1CP020 - Complex Projects Seminar Plan, section and elevation form the triadic system that is the universal method of dissecting a three-dimensional object into two-dimensional drawings. They can be considered a diagram since the drawing is an abstraction (in contrast to 3d perspective) of reality in order to give specific information. Architecture can never be perceived as in an elevation.

of the Roman temples. Its plan shows the all essential elements: entrance, space, hierarchy, structure and system. The spatial succession is 1) stairs, 2) colonnade, 3) entrance hall, 4) nave with three domes, 5) main altar 6) side galleries, higher level.

Interesting is that the triadic system hardly has changed in history. We see attempts to uplift drawings via rendering materials, shadows and depth, but the essence of the information included remains the same.

THE SECTION – spatial scale and structure

THE PLAN – arrangement of spaces and system Often the plan is the main design tool, as an architect is capable of instantly thinking in 3d while he draws simple lines on a sheet. In the plan, a design is abstracted as a scheme of spaces and the building’s system; it shows arrangement, structural spans, position of structural elements, relations between interior and exterior and functionality of the circulation and spaces i.e. logistics. La Madelaine was erected to the glory of Napoleon’s army. It’s Neo Classical design refers to the grandeur

During the design a section mostly comes second for adding specific spatial characteristics in floor heights, cantilevers and structural stacking. Vertical relations between spaces become clear as well as their connecting elements (stairs, elevators, ramps). More than in the plan, the section displays depth in order to make the section better understandable e.g. a section of a dome could be interpreted as a vault if the dome is not drawn with shadows.

THE ELEVATION – façade versus projected mass What is generally referred to as ‘facade’ is actually a projection of the buildings vertical mass on a 2d surface.


37

We call this the ‘elevation’ (‘opstand’ in Dutch). Within the triadic system, the elevation has a different status as plans and sections; it shows less of the structure and spaces, but rather focusses on the appearance of a building. In history the elevation played a more important role in architectural design, as it was the tool for developping ornaments and hierarchy in the facade. Now with the rise of 3d modelling, the facade takes a different position. Often it only shows the result of design steps made with other techniques. This goes mostly for architecture with non orthogonal shaping. The facade remains an important drawing to indicate relationships in heigt with the surroundings, materialisation and exterior scale.

THE PERSPECTIVE – from scientific study towards selling dreams The 3d perspective is maybe the architect’s biggest struggle in history of drawing, always it has been the main study tool for comprehending and representing space. Until the introduction of the computer, the 3d perspective (as in visualisation) usually had the goal to show reality, nowadays the goal has shifted to selling an idealistic, if not utopian, image of perfection instigated

by architecture. Isometric (30º) and axonometric (45º) > combination of plan, section and elevation into 3d scale drawing. Use perspective drawing of metro station Wittenbergplatz which was used to illustrate the ‘grand’ hall. It clearly shows the spatial hierarchy of the stairs, cross like shape plan and elevated central space.

THE DIAGRAM – the explanatory scheme becomes iconic Architectural drawing started as diagrammatic language due to lacking techniques and knowledge of how to reach reality (depth, material). The evolution of drawing was a struggle of the architect to free himself from the diagram. In the 19th century the diagram becomes important again to simplify the complicated drawings. Technical drawings have become too difficult to understand for the general public. We have passed the point where these drawings no longer form part of the discourse, it’s a Y-junction in the work of the architect: producing drawings for construction and discourse (communication, pr, presentation). In the diagram, the building’s practical


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matter is displayed, often in an exaggerated or schematic way. The diagram sometimes even becomes a logo, the hallmark of the design.

THE COMPUTER – from analogue to digital (better: from digital to virtual) CAD, Grasshopper, parametric design, visualisation. Introduction of the computer has drastically changed the work of an architect. The time consuming gradual process of developping a handdrawn sketch into pencil lines and then into a pen drawing, is replaced by a fast tool that has almost completely obliterated the pen. Before, the slower process of desing development gave more time for contemplation and there was a direct relation between architect and drawing. The computer is a medium between idea and drawing. The drawing as study tool has changed forever. No more it is the product, it now is an extraction (print) of a virtual product. On the other hand, the computer has speeded up the design process so choices are made easier. 3d modeling gives instanst insight in the consequences of an idea. We see that architects which tend to design complicated buildings now are capable of realizing those ideas due to advanced CAD and CAM technologies. (See difference between Hadid’s Vitra fire station...rather simple and her current work) The Institute du Monde Arabe was designed during the beginning of the eighties when the computer started becoming part of the design process. This is visible in the systematic planning and control of the construction, facade elements and building systems. Information became easily exchangable with all parties, so different expertises became more involved. Also the rise of the digital age has paved ways for the use of new technologies in architecture. This is illustrated by the highly advanced (high-tech?) facade which responds to the amount of sunlight.

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ROUGH TIMELINE EVOLUTION OF DRAWING

Drawing techniques show strong correlation with cultural tendencies, they usually express the common emotion and style of an era. Vice versa, the evolution of graphic representation enhanced expression of that particular style. Development of architecture and drawing therefore is mutual. Until 13th century: Until the Middle Ages, building was done out of experience and with rudimentary plans, sections and details (to make decorations). Working on site was the standard and the architect was more of a craftsman who worked with instant production, not a pre-planned design. Drawing was done when necessary for big projects (e.g. cathedrals, fortifications) > plans and sections purely as help for construction. See the rendering of the Strasbourg façade as one of the earliest architectural sketches to survive. 40

13th to 15th century: Scale drawing emerges parallel to the increasing role of ‘the architect’ in the Late Middle Ages, especially in Renaissance Italy. We see that drawings go hand in hand with planning, thus pre-design. Until the Middle Ages architecture remained mostly an on site activity, whereas in the Renaissance, architecture got fundamentally connected to ideology (Renaissance is not only culture, it was a conviction: liberation of Middle Age sobreity). Therefore architecture became subject to ‘style’ i.e. design. Studies are done to find new ways of imagining architecture. Especially Brunelleschi and Alberti develop the linear perspective so to depict the essence of space on a two-dimensional surface > this could be the first ‘anatomical’ study in architecture as scientific method. 16th to 17th century: Time of contemplation after the Renaissance, this meant a revalorization of classical architecture > Classicism. Increasing attention for order, geometry and proportion. Drawing more and more becomes a means to control, to construct architecture as a mathematical conjoining of simple elements into complicated compositions. Renaissance resulted in rather simple forms with an abundance in façade design and ornaments. Classicism can be considered as first style where massing is more important. Therefore the perspective is developed thoroughly. Palladio. The use of central perspective spreads to Northern Europe. Parallel projection (Cabinet) is developed to depict front and side, this is the predecessor of axono- and isometric 18th century During the age of the Enlightenment, there was an increase of reason and knowledge through scientific method. In architecture this is reflected in a simpler interpretation of classical architecture: Neo Classicism > Madelaine, Paris. Neo Classicism can be seen as a response to the previous abundance in Rococo. Due to the attention for science, drawings also got a more scientific component. The drawing itself became a product for study, not merely a medium for illustration and construction. During the 18th century the section became an increasingly popular method for analysing ancient and contemporary architecture. Also we see combinations of plan, section and elevation into one ‘anatomical’ study. 19th century Victorian age, Industrial Revolution. A time of increasingly varied architecture and new professional methods and standards. There was an increase of individual approaches. Upcoming of ‘individuality’ that finds its full blossoming in the 20th century in society, art, music. Under the influence of industrialism, drawings became more information based. This meant a separation between technical drawing and illustration. Inventions of many products, machinery and standardisation meant that drawings for production needed to be less elaborate and focussed on their intrinsic goal. At the same time, illustrations were made to sell. The separation started the development that nowadays is the normality: the general public only sees fancy, sometimes utopian, renderings, the builders only see black and white lines.


20th century This period witnessed the proliferation of alternative media and forms in drawing to represent architecture. Further evolvement of individuality and personal expression. Architecture got rid of decoration and became ‘honest’ in construction and materialisation. A new technique of drawing arises: the diagram / scheme and the 3d perspective as illustration becomes totally disconnected from building but rather becomes a selling image, sometimes on the level of art itself (Zaha Hadid, Archigram, Paul Rudolph, Hugh Ferris). With the breakthrough of the computer, the complexity of drawings increases because more information can be added through layering. 3d modelling enhances the design process and makes extremely complicated forms and constructions possible > drawing integrated with manufacturing > steel, cladding, glass. Technical drawings become fully disconnected from the public discourse as simplified drawings are made for publication. Through these public drawings, architects express their ideas afterwards for branding. The technical drawing is subject to international standards. Another big introduction is that of the diagram / scheme, which has equally gained importance as unique selling image. Where it started as a simple explanatory medium, the diagram now has iconic proportions as the simplification of complexity in one catchy scheme. See the diagrammatic map of the London subway, which is being printed on T shirts. ‘Super Dutch’ and the rise of the iconic scheme > having one little drawing that is understandable for all parties involved. 21st century The beginning of this century is marked by further globalisation and the emerging of separate visualisation companies that operate aside the architect, sometimes even filling in blank pages in the design (MIR, ….) International competitions all show the same presentation styles for different architecture, as the computer almost completely renders personal touch obsolete. The goal has now become to reach perfection in visualisation, comparable to the studies in perspective during the 15th century…it’s about reaching ‘reality’. Further development of 3d modelling will lead to projections of designs and the possibility of direct manipulation of via integrated techniques (projection, tweaking, scanning). 3d projection will be the big change in presentation tools… Summary In old history, the drawing was reference material giving basic dimensions, anchor points, positions and proportions for building on site. Drawing actually started as a diagrammatic representation. Architecture and drawing both became more complicated, in a mutual evolutionary process. Not only does the development of architecture change our way of representing it, also our understanding of techniques, perspective, abstraction, communication and drawing tools develop architecture itself. This is due to that drawing more and more becomes part of designing; sometimes the drawing itself is the product, as in architectural theory. The act of drawing gives the architect new insight into the own idea. With the pre planning of building and the increasing amount of different experts involved in the building process, the drawing has become a synthesis of different interests, instead of merely the representation of an architectural idea. The technical drawing is not only a guideline for how what and how to build, the technical drawing has become a contract piece. Nowadays nothing will be build if it’s not drawn because nobody is willing to take responsibility for what is not on the drawing. It is presumable that in history the drawing was the centre of a linear relationship between, creation, communication and realization. The drawing made during the creation was used for communication and realization. Now these three have been separated into ‘in office’ drawings (sketches, 3d models and schemes), PR visualisations (abstracted plans, presentation images) and technical drawings (which the public hardly sees and understands).

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MAKING Seminar - Making AR1CP030 - Complex Projects Seminar

The MAKING course will run on 7 concessive Tuesday mornings, starting in week 2.1 till week 2.7. The main focus of this course is to acquire a better understanding - and therefore skills - of how architecture and its architecturally crucial details are designed and constructed. Insight in the mutual dependency between designing and constructing is not only important for the architect, it also will be a source of inspiration. The relation between the wished architectural expression of a (part of a) building and the detailing that this particular expression needs, will be the heart of this course. We aim that the student will be capable of understanding that part of the design process in which the choice and knowledge of the material is combined with appropriate knowledge of the assemblage techniques, it’s practical possibilities and impossibilities, and ultimately it’s influence or consequences on the architecture of the building. The course contains three different methods of approach in achieving this goal: ‘’Hands-on’ workshops, weekly lectures on ‘The Critical Detail’, and the ‘Material’ seminars.

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STUDENT WORKS


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“People get tir ed of living in towns. They move to the countr y and all settle down. They build themselves houses and roads and then, They all have to move to the countr y again�

ANONYMOUS


MSc 2 Cities

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From VCA competition manual: “Every year a one square kilometer territory will be the subject of the competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program – their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention. This new environment will have a full slate of live-work-play provisions, with the residential component making up to 50% of the total floor space. In the third of this series of competitions, the theme of ‘Everyone Harvests’ will be explored. By year 2050, food production is projected to increase by about 70 percent globally and nearly 100 percent in developing countries in order to meet the needs of the world’s expected 9 billion-strong population (UN Food and Agriculture Organization). However this incremental demand for food worldwide is facing growing challenge with competition for land and water resources, with quarter of all land of the planet being highly degraded (United Nations). With projections of nearly 80% of the world population to reside in urban centres by the year 2050, the brief is seeking for potential solutions for an entirely new approach to urban agriculture. The proposals should provide visions for a sustainable production of a safe and varied food supply that can first fulfil the basic needs of the daily food consumption of the city and if possible, produce surplus that can support the needs of other cities as well. The understanding of ‘harvesting’ will be extended to include energy and water resources. The solutions should seek to introduce innovative ways to effectively utilize resources, such as minimizing water, saving energy and their associated costs related to urban agriculture.”


MSc2 STUDIO

Vertical Cities Asia AR2CP010 - Complex Projects City Research Studio

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Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


Summary:

The assignment for the MSc3 CP Graduation Studio will be to develop and integrate an architectural solution within in a complex urban condition.

COMPETITION SITE The site is located about 17km to the west of the city centre of Hanoi, Vietnam. It is part of the Hoai Duc District. It has the Thang Long Highway running from east to west. The highway from north to south has not been constructed.

STUDIO STRUCTURE Phase 1:

Research– a forensic inventory, of both the hard and soft infrastructural conditions

Phase 2:

Analysis / Critical Thinking– critically examine the research, use it to develop a position

Phase 3:

Infrastructural Masterplan – develop a masterplan for the project area

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The Vertical Cities Asia International Design Competition is organised by the National University of Singapore (NUS) School of Design and Environment (SDE), and is sponsored by the World Future Foundation (WFF) and Beijing Vantone Citylogic Investment Corporation. The competition was launched on 1 January 2011, premised on the belief that a new paradigm of high density compact urban development was necessary for rapidly urbanising Asia, which is besieged by massive rural-urban migrations. Either existing urban architectural models will continue to be recycled to accommodate increasing populations with devastating effects on land, infrastructure, and the environment or new models of urban architecture will be formed to take on the specifics of Asian urban development. Through this series of international student competitions, we hope to stimulate our students to think about this critical issue and propose solutions. A one square kilometre territory will be the subject of the Competition. This area, to house 100,000 people living and working, sets the stage for tremendous research and investigation into urban density, verticality, domesticity, work, food, infrastructure, nature, ecology, structure, and program – their holistic integration and the quest for visionary paradigm will be the challenges of this urban and architectural invention.

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METHODOLOGY The ambition of this studio is NOT to win a design competition. If we win, which I fully expect and demand, it will be a fortunate by-product of our true ambition: to develop intelligent, thoughtful and appropriate design solutions, which will transcend the narrow and limited scope of the competition brief. The studio promotes broad speculation, independent thinking, and the positioning of architecture within a broader social, cultural, political, and economic context. The theme of agriculture invites fundamental reconsideration of the role of the city and its architecture in the 21st century beyond the overburdened issue of sustainability. You will engage deeply with the rural in order to generate its opposite, the urban. Your research will take place on every scale, from local and practical issues in Hanoi to the global conceptual frame: how can we go beyond the cliche of rooftop farming? Can we directly connect the city to its food footprint?

What is humanity’s relationship with agriculture in the 21st century? Since the first human settlements (cities) arose because of farming, how can we re-articulate this original connection today? Or is it now necessary to exacerbate the difference between city and countryside, rather than trying to heal the division? Your design proposals must grow out of your substantiated and original thinking in these areas.

A nonlinear trajectory of integrated design studios and seminars will expose the multiple layers that define complex projects. Employing forensics analysis, and documentation, one will develop a methodology to separate and examine the scales, actors, and systems that define the layers. The Chair’s ambition is to develop analytical and critical thinking skills that will allow one to successfully negotiate the multitudinous demands of a complex project. With the establishment of CP (Complex Projects) as a


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scientific field of study, the Department of Architecture in Delft recognises developments and challenges within our discipline. In order for one to contribute to the changing needs of our discipline, it will require a fundamental shift in how we define ourselves as ‘architects’.

Ra sendiemque nos pra iam ad sent, tum publissolto enit pere adhuid duceresidiem none adhuitiquit, quamdiem, facis; C. Cipiendit; erum eribus comnos am oc terum dero, con nos a vidicen atanum audentr urorumur, faciem igit. It verente vivium atuam seninam hum tem mor halicit. Natidica; nocultiam escremque aventem pubisulium iuri cus nonsusum inatod molicer isquastemus, noverit; nosula movesil issigna, deroporte consultus bondent? Nihilin re, con vis. Oludere potiqui sid rei paritis, essa rem nost furbi tus. Ut L. Ra terum quam nos bondam hiliquoste nox seristem es horur, cles sperionsu morarbis ex sumus, contili catque aucto pris cesilicat, Catque nonstorum. Etrae es M. Bat L. Us am que di storum, et, que aperis ina quodistur, consus, moviti furoxim tela nihilla publium

eritiae, nos horum quam quod cotius; num et; eorum pereis ingulvidet vivat, cone tuscerit? Ilius, mo conte, consult orteberudam occivatquid nonitilin sedemulis confec tum, que notam maio nostrav erudam speritiurbi sentemusa rei ex norunti, utermil hae consulis, coerum aperfec ina, Ti. Mius obus, nosti, ingul hilicatiam culabutemus. Simunte, quer pertes cor qua Sp. Hicienimus


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STUDENT WORKS


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“There is a saying in Korea: If you sleep for 3 hours a day, you will pass the exam. Sleep for 4 hours, you will fail.”

Mobility radius through time

Mckinsey & Company, Korea 2020

“Korea is the only OECD country in which a college educated woman is less likely to work than a woman without a college degree”

Current situation

Organising program

Building Communities


Flexibility The primary and secondary roads are fixed and thus allow for some elements on the site to be permanent, maintaining the flows of traffic that will pass through YongSan to the surroundings

The rules for each community will guide the growth of the area and result in different possible variations within the block structure.

CBDs. However, the tertiary roads can be modified and reconfigured in the future, which will allow blocks to be enlarged or reduced according to the needs of the people living in the area.

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Fixed connections

Variation 1

Variation 2

Variation 3

Fixed Roads to preserve critical flows


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Proposal By 2050 the convergence between the percentage of elderly (38%) and the working class(52%) is quite alarming. However rather than seeing the elderly as a liability, we see an opportunity to address several issues that S.Korea is currently facing. 1. Strengthen and build communities 2. Mobilise women into the workforce 3. Integrate Elderly into society by letting them run day care

services that free the women to work.

4. Organise communities to allow for convenient distribution of shops and ammenities, prioritising walkability.

Walkable Communities As people grow older, their ability to travel long distances diminishes, their world grows smaller and smaller. It is therefore a priority that functions and ammenities be placed within a walkable radius of 5minutes, so that people are able to continue living in one neighbourhood their whole life without having to move to an elderly home once they get older.


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MSc 3 Graduation Research Studio

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The continued decline of the United State’s Midwest regions, specifically the last decade, has not escaped Chicago. In this day of “Rapid Urbanization” and Mega Cities, Chicago seems to have missed the memo. Of the 15 largest cities in the United States in 2010, Chicago was the only city to see its population decrease. While New York and L.A.’s populations reached record highs in 2010, Chicago’s population drops to a low not seen since 1910. In fact, in countries such as India and China, Chicago would not be not legally defined as a city…

The question is not whether Chicago belongs to the highly appreciated jet set of global cities: Chicago is a global city. It has the appropriate combination of human resources, manufacturing businesses and world institutions. It is control point for eleven of the most successful corporations in the world. Nearly 30% of the 104 Fortune 500 companies, which headquartered in the Midwest, are located in the Chicago metropolitan area. These companies generated over $443 billion revenues in 2005

However, Chicago’s lacks critical attributes associated with a true global city: a critical center of a significant industry. Finance in New York, entertainment in Los Angeles, government in Washington, and so on. Perhaps this lack of definition, could very well serve to be its most strategic element…

For a city of this size its main vision is to become an “alpha” city, a true global player, one could wringly assume hat the overall image of the region and the involved cities, hold Chicago back from its true potential. However, the strategic organization of the region, via transportation and mobility, as well as its strong cultural definition, could provide Chicago the resources and ability to develop a Global Appeal. Therefore, the development of Chicago and its ability to unify the Midwest into a cohesive and functional region, will further define it as the ‘heart of the heat, and allow it to compete with New York and LA.

The Lakeside cite, will be explored, as the site with an ambition to help Chicago achieve its Global ambitions...


MSc3 STUDIO 82

Chicago Graduation Studio AR3CP010 - Complex Projects Reserach Studio

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


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SITE The Chicago Lakeside studio is situated on a former industrial site in south Chicago.

STUDIO STRUCTURE AND METHODOLOGY Phase 1 Research: weeks 1 – 4, group research divided into 4 section, 3 teams per section. The research will be graphically coordinated and organized into a single research book. The book format will be A3 Portrait. See detailed outline below. Phase 2 Analysis: weeks 5 – 6, Teams will use the collective research from phase 1 as a tool to develop strategies / frameworks for their project, e.g. Define a program mix, land use strategy, e.g. consolidate, fragmented, sprawl, etc. Define environmental strategies. Begin to introduce building typologies that will be explored, e.g. high-rise, mix-use, housing types, etc. Phase 3 Masterplan: weeks 7 – 14, Teams will develop a strategies for the entire site & neighborhood. Phase 4 Building: weeks 15 – 20, students will work individually to develop concepts and proposals for Thesis studio

WEEKLY SCHEDULE Every Friday from 09.30 – 12.00 Every Tuesday by 20.00, each group will e-mail PDF updates, 10 pages maximum, A4 Portrait (mandatory). Every three weeks the studio will be required to update the Research Book

STUDIO TRIP The Studio will visit Chicago, October 05 – 12. . Visits to local Universities, architects, and cultural institutions significant have been arranged for the visit - see agenda on page

STUDIO OBJECTIVE The studio promotes broad speculation, independent thinking, and the positioning of architecture within a broader social, cultural, political, and economic context. Using The Midwest Research Studio’s findings, the studio will focus on the Chicago Lakeside Site. as the potential Phase 1 catalyst hub, which could help transform Chicago into true Global City, and therefore unify the Midwest into a wholly connected economic, transportation, and cultural region. This transformation would allow for The Chicago and the Midwest to reassert itself as a Global force for the 21st Century, as it did at the beginning of last century.

STUDIO EVALUATION Evaluations will be based on the overall performance of the team. The team’s performance will be determined by the quality of its work, its commitment, effort and improvement over the entire course of the semester.


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KEY DATES Week 01 Introduction and group selection Week 02 PIN-UP #1 Week 03 FIRST DRAFT OF STUDIO RESEARCH BOOK Week 04 Week 05 Week 06 Week 07 SECOND DRAFT OF STUDIO RESEARCH BOOK Week 08 Week 09 Week 10 Week 11 Week 13 Week 14 Week 15 FINAL REVIEW Week 16 Week 17 Week 20 Week 22


GLOSSARY

ACCESS, CAR: Requirement as to where vehicles access plots such as car parking entrances. Vehicular entrances should be shared between plots wherever possible. ACCESS, SERVICING: Refers to access for loading/unloading activities within a plot. ACCESS, VISITOR: The place or way by which pedestrians and vehicles have a safe and usable ingress and egress to a property or use. An unobstructed way or means of approach to provide entry to or exit from a property. BUILDING: A permanent structure that has one or more floors and a roof, is permanently affixed to the land and is bounded by either open areas or the plot lines of a plot (no form of fabric tent or vehicle shall be considered a building). BUILDING HEIGHT: The vertical distance measured from the average elevation of the finished grade at the front of the building to the highest point of the structure and the highest point of the roof surface. BUILDING TYPOLOGY: The classification of a building by its formal, functional, or morphological attributes. BUFFER: A naturally vegetated and undisturbed, enhanced or re-vegetated zone surrounding a sensitive area which protects it from adverse impacts to its integrity and value, or is an integral part of the resource’s ecosystem. COURTYARD: An open space surrounded by walls or buildings, adjoining or within a building such as a large house or housing complex. FLOOR AREA RATIO (FAR): The ratio of the gross floor area of a building to the area of the plot on which it is situated. Refers to the gross floor area (GFA) definition for a description of the elements included in the building floor area. GROSS FLOOR AREA (GFA): The total horizontal area of all the floors of the building measured from the exterior surface of the outside walls. DENSITY:


The intensity of a development within a plot. In residential plots density is generally measured by the maximum number of dwelling units permitted on a plot. DEVELOPMENT: The construction, reconstruction, conversion, erection, alteration, relocation or enlargement of any building or structure; any mining, excavation or landfill; and any land disturbance in preparation for any of the above. HOTEL: A building offering temporary accommodations for ten or more guests which may provide as accessory uses restaurants, meeting rooms, and recreation facilities. IRRIGATION: An artificial application of water to the soil. It is used to assist in the growing of agricultural crops, maintenance of landscapes, and re-vegetation of disturbed soils in dry areas and during periods of inadequate rainfall. LANDUSE: The designation of permitted uses of land based on mapped zones which separate one set of land uses from another. Zoning is use-based, regulating the uses to which land may be put. MASTER PLAN / MASTERPLAN: Document that describes, in narrative and with plans and imagery, an overall development concept including both present land uses as well as future land development plans. MASSING: The volume (shape and quantity) of a building or group of buildings. MIXED USE: A land use that combines two or more uses into one development or building. OPEN SPACE, PUBLIC: Any area of land or water, which is not located within an enclosed building, and which is set aside for the use and enjoyment of the public. PARK: An area of land, usually in a largely natural state, for the enjoyment of the public, having facilities for rest and recreation. Parks are often owned, set apart and managed by a city, state or nation. PARKING AREA: An area of open land other than a road, used or intended to be used to provide space for the parking or storage of motor vehicles. It includes parking spaces, loading/unloading spaces, manoeuvring aisles and other areas providing access to parking or loading/unloading spaces. PARKING PROVISION: Maximum parking spaces permissible in the boundaries of a plot. This number is calculated based on the land use of the plot and gross floor area (GFA) of the development. It is generally a requirement that parking should not be visible. PLOT: A piece, parcel, tract or area of land occupied by (or to be occupied by) the specified land uses located within principal and accessory buildings. PLOT AREA: The total extent of surface, measured in a horizontal plane, within the plot lines of a plot. PLOT COVERAGE: The percentage of the area of a plot or parcel of land, which is occupied by buildings or structure (building footprint). PUBLIC: Space, building or use that is equally open and available to all who choose to use it, and does not denote ownership.


RESIDENTIAL UNIT: A sleeping unit or dwelling unit. RIGHT-OF-WAY (ROW): A strip of land acquired by reservation, dedication, or condemnation and intended to be occupied by a road, crosswalk, sidewalk, railroad, electric transmission lines, oil or gas pipeline, water line, sanitary or storm sewer and other similar uses. ROAD: A right-of-way that has been improved and is intended for motor vehicle traffic and provides access to property. SERVICED APARTMENT: A type of furnished apartment available for short-term or long-term stays, which provides amenities for daily use. STREET: Any road (other than a private road), highway, parkway, avenue, alley or a way at least 15 meters wide and intended for public use which connects a way to another such way or to a building or structure. A street refers to the entire public right-of-way (including public sidewalks). STRUCTURE: Anything constructed or erected with a fixed location on the ground, or attached to something having a fixed location on the ground. A permanent or temporary physical addition to the land, including but not limited to: buildings, sheds, walls, fences, swimming pools, poles, pipelines. USE: Any activity, occupation, business or operation which is conducted in a building or on a tract of land. Use, temporary: A use permitted for a fixed period of time with the intent to discontinue such use upon the expiration of a period of time, or a use which occurs on a periodic basis and is not continuous. UTILITY INSTALLATIONS: Means public utility or public service uses such as electric, gas, water, sanitary, irrigation, storm water, fibre optics and substations and distribution systems, poles, wires, cables, conduits, vaults, laterals, pipes, mains, valves or similar pumping stations, radio, television and micro-wave transmitting or relay stations and towers, transformer stations, water towers and standpipes. ZONE: An area of land shown on the official zoning map or described herein within which uniform regulations for the use and development of land as set forth in these regulations shall apply.


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METHODOLOGY PHASE ONE: RESEARCH BOOK

CHICAGO SOFT

The studio will develop a comprehensive research book; the Book will be a collective tool for each group to frame their initial ‘argument’. The Book is a living document and will be adjusted and adapted as the studio evolves. Groups will be assigned one of the following topics:

Global Perception Local Perception Culture – State, & City scale Ageing, culture & society The Midwest Architectural Styles – Historical Inventory Building Typologies, eg. office, housing, commercial, elevations Public Spaces – specific to Chicago Inventory of street sections Inventory of block conditions Tourism Historical Analysis of Political Structure – State & City scale Regional Competitiveness

CHICAGO HARD Demographic data for Illinois Demographic data for Chicago Ageing, infrastructure and landscape Mobility – movement of people Transport – movement of goods Infrastructure Existing – National, State, & City scale Infrastructure Proposed – National, State, & City scale Existing Energy Grids


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SITE HARD

SITE SOFT

Topography: detailed site drawings, 2d & 3d 1:3000 Site of Site + Immediate Area – FOAM Infrastructure Current Infrastructure Proposed Mobility – movement of people Transportation – movement of goods Site & Neighborhood analysis Document & Diagram Urban Restrictions Significant landscape features Context of site in relation to Hanoi Ageing of the site – evolution of the site Proposed scenarios / visions for the site and immediate area, i.e. Hanoi 2030 Vision Plan

Local Perception Culture Architectural Styles – Historical Inventory Building Typologies, eg. office, housing, commercial, elevations Public Spaces – specific to neighborhood Inventory of street Inventory of block


MSc3 SEMINARS 96

Chicago Graduation Studio Seminars

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


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Research Methods and Positions AR3A160 New Urban Questions AR3AT060 Delft Lectures and Seminars on Building Technology AR3CP010 Seminar - Visual Culture Studies I AR3CP020 - Complex Projects Seminar Seminar - Visual Culture Studies II AR3CP030 - Complex Projects Seminar


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VISUAL CULTRAL STUDIES Seminar - Visual Culture Studies AR3CP020 - Complex Projects Seminar TU DELFT FALL 2013 MSc3 Seminar - Visual Culture Studies SEMINAR LEADERS Mitesh Dixit


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This course will explore various concepts of images. It will consider natural images (as in optics), images as artifacts, The Seminar will examine visual culture through the ways in which ideological and historical forces such as politics, economics and technology exert influence on the ‘objects’ of visual culture that take the form of photography, film, music, painting, sculpture and literature. We will then look at how these objects are divided into industries and disseminated into the cultural realm via mediums such as television, publishing, cinema and the Internet. And finally we will consider the ‘apparatuses for viewing’ that determine the way in which these objects are interpreted; looking to diverse theories of perception- from psychoanalysis to semiotics, in order to understand the interplay between our identities and emotions and the cultural ‘objects’ that give meaning to our visual world. Around this process we will touch on a vast range of topics from Plato’s theories of beauty to McLuhan’s

theory of virtuality. We will go back into the seminal theories of the past to see how the prophets of visual culture where able to know how today’s visual culture would be determined, in order to make judgments about what its future might be.


167 White Conversations, Joseph Grigely


SEMINAR STRUCTURE AND METHODOLOGY THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE OBJECT VISUAL CULTURAL FORMS VISUAL CULTURE INDUSTRIES POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON VISUAL CULTURE WEEKLY SCHEDULE Every Friday from 13.00 – 15.00 SEMINAR OBJECTIVE

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Each week a theme related to Visual Culture, will be explored. To demonstrate the method of evaluating ‘objects’ Charlie Koolhaas, will use her own personal work as an artist, writer and sociologist to demonstrate the ways of looking and discussing objects. Mitesh Dixit lectures will use the canons of Western Intellectual thought to examine the objects, which define Chicago. Readings and assignments will be coordinated to relate to the week’s theme. SEMINAR EVALUATION SEMINAR ASSIGNMENTS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Weekly 150 word essay and ‘object’ examples Chicago ‘Object’ Book - due week 8 Essay – 1500 word essay – theme TBD – due week 5 (before Chicago trip) Develop Essay - 1000 word essay & Book format – due week 12 Group Installation – Teams of 2 to 3 will produce an ‘object’ – due week 16 Studio Magazine – The Seminar will make a ‘future’ Magazine – 31 January 2013

SEMINAR SCHEDULE Week 01 - THE GAZE Week 02 – SEMIOLOGY; SIGNS AND SYSTEMS Week 03 – WHAT IS VISION? Week 04 – PERCEPTION AND SPACE Week 05 - FETISHISM, FANTASY AND DESIRE Week 06 - THE BODY AND ITS REPRESENTATIONS; IMAGE AND IDENTITY. Week 07 – NON-LINEAR MAN; MCUHAN, AND ELECTRONIC MEDIA Week 08 – ART AND AURA; THE MOVE FROM PAINTING TO PRINT


Week 09 - MEANING AND EXPERIENCE IN THE AGE PHOTOGRAPHY Week 10 – -SIMULATIONS AND SIMULACRA; FROM REALITY TV TO COMPUTER GAMES Week 11 – A PERVERTS GUIDE TO CINEMA, FILM AND TELEVISION Week 12 – NETWORK THEORY, SOCIETY AND MEDIA Week 13 – -THE REAL VERSUS THE VIRTUAL Week 14 – WHAT IS SOCIAL MEDIA? Week 15 – GLOBALIZATION AND THE ART WORLD Week 16 – THE OBJECT AND THE FUNCTION OF IDEOLOGY Week 17 – IMAGES SELL; CAPITALISM AND THE OBJECT Week 18 – THE ART OF WAR; NEWS, PROPAGANDA AND THE ICONOGRAPHY OF THREAT Week 19 – THE INTERNET AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM?

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J. Lacan


STUDENT WORKS


Devils Lake Grand Forks

Detroit Lakes

Fargo Staples

St. Cloud

St. Paul-Minneapolis Red Wing

Winona

Tomah La Crosse

Wisconsin Dells Portage

Lapeer

Milwaukee

Columbus

Port Huron

Flint Durand

Grand Rapids

Pontiac

Milwaukee Airport

Madison

Birmingham

Holland

East Lansing

Royal Oak

Detroit

Dearborn Bangor

Battle Creek

Albion

Ann Arbor

Jackson

Kalamazoo

Chicago

St. Joseph/ Benton Harbor

La Grange Road

MDW

Toledo

Davenport

Summit

HammondWhiting

Michigan City

Elyria

Sundunsky

Toledo

Bryan

Waterloo

Elkhart

Dyer

Joliet

Elkhart

South Bend

Homewood

Mendota

Cleveland

Dowagiac Niles

New Buffalo

Naperville

Plano

CLE

Alliance

Fort Wayne

Princeton Kankakee

Pittsburgh

Omaha

Galesburg

11 0

Bloomington/ Normal Peoria

Burlington Lincoln

Columbus

Lafayette

Neccessary detours to accomodate la share markets or include cities with n connection.

Fort Madison Hastings Holdrege

Danville

Springfield

Decatur

Indianapolis

Dayton

ChampaignUrbana

Cincinnati Kansas City Independence

Alton

Topeka Lawrence

Lees Summit

Louisville

Kirkwood

Centralia

St. Louis Du Quoin

Hutchinson Newton

Carbondale

9.

Poplar Bluff

Devils Lake Grand Forks

Detroit Lakes

Fargo Staples

St. Cloud

St. Paul-Minneapolis Red Wing

Winona

Tomah La Crosse

Wisconsin Dells Portage

Lapeer

Milwaukee

Columbus

Port Huron

Flint Durand

Grand Rapids

Pontiac

Milwaukee Airport

Madison

Birmingham

Holland

East Lansing

Royal Oak

Dearborn Bangor

Battle Creek

Albion

Jackson

Detroit

Ann Arbor

Kalamazoo

Chicago

St. Joseph/ Benton Harbor

La Grange Road

Toledo

Naperville

Plano

ORD

Summit

HammondWhiting

Michigan City

South Bend

Homewood

Mendota

Davenport

Cleveland

Dowagiac Niles

New Buffalo

Joliet

Elkhart Bryan

Waterloo

Elkhart

Dyer

Toledo

Sundunsky

Elyria

CLE

Fort Wayne

Princeton Kankakee

Galesburg

Bloomington/ Normal Peoria

Burlington Lincoln

Columbus

Lafayette

Fort Madison Hastings Holdrege

Danville

Springfield

Decatur

Indianapolis

ChampaignUrbana

Dayton Cincinnati

Kansas City

Independence

Topeka Lawrence

Alton Lees Summit

Kirkwood

Centralia

St. Louis Du Quoin

Hutchinson Newton

Carbondale

Poplar Bluff

10. 48 MIDWEST

Louisville

Alliance

Pittsburgh

Omaha

Minneapolis role as a gateway is und question Since Minneapolis is second to last stop b Portland/Seattle in Empire Builder rout hard to justify any HSR connection with forseeable expansion toward Portland.


Staples

111

St. Cloud

St. Paul-Minneapolis Red Wing

Winona

Tomah La Crosse

Wisconsin Dells Portage

Lapeer

Milwaukee

Columbus

Port Huron

Flint Durand

Grand Rapids

Pontiac

Milwaukee Airport

Madison

Birmingham

Holland

East Lansing

Royal Oak

Dearborn Bangor

Battle Creek

Albion

Jackson

Detroit

Ann Arbor

Kalamazoo

Chicago

St. Joseph/ Benton Harbor

La Grange Road

Niles

New Buffalo

Toledo

Naperville

Plano

ORD

Mendota

Davenport

Cleveland

Dowagiac

Michigan City

Summit Gary

Joliet

South Bend

Elkhart Bryan

Waterloo

Elkhart

Toledo

Sundunsky

Elyria

CLE

Fort Wayne

Princeton Kankakee

Alliance

Pittsburgh

Omaha

Galesburg

Bloomington/ Normal

Burlington

Columbus

Lafayette

Peoria Fort Madison

Danville

Springfield

Decatur

Indianapolis

ChampaignUrbana

Dayton Cincinnati

Kansas City

Independence

Alton Lees Summit

Kirkwood

St. Louis

Centralia

Louisville

Du Quoin

Carbondale

Poplar Bluff

49


THAI NGUYEN HONG KONG (CHINA)

KUNG MING (CHINA)

VINH YEN PROVINCE

VINH YEN

SOC SON

HANOI AIRPORT HS

SON TAY

PHUC THO

HANOI

HANOI EAST AIRPORT IS

11 4

QUOC OAI

HANOI WEST HS

HOA LAC PHO NOI

CHUC SON

THANH OAI

PHU XUYEN

PHU LY

HO CHI MINH CITY

HANOI HANOI HANOIREGION REGION REGION2020 2020 2020 6.5 6.5 6.5million million millioninhabitants inhabitants inhabitants

HANOI HANOI HANOIREGION REGION REGION2030 2030 2030 999million million millioninhabitants inhabitants inhabitants

HANOI HANOI HANOIREGION REGION REGION2050 2050 2050 11 11 11million million millioninhabitants inhabitants inhabitants

HUNG YEN PROVINCE


LANG SON

HA LONG

HAI DUONG PROVINCE

11 5

FAR GRADIENT FROM 2.5 to 10

HAI DUONG HAI PHONG FAR 10 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 7.5 Office, business, educational

FAR 6 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 6 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 5 Office, educational, public

FAR 10 Office, residential, retail, mixed

FAR 7.5 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 6 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 5 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 5 Office, educational, public

FAR 10 Office, residential, retail mixed

FAR 10 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 5 Office, residential, mixed

FAR 6 Residential

FAR 2.5 Residential, retail

HAI DUONG PROVINCE

E.P.: 120 MW

E.P.: 250 MW

E.P.: 750 MW

E.P.: 300 MW KUNING

E.P.: 200 MW E.P.: 750 MW

SOUTH CHINA SEA

E.P.: 150 MW E.P.: 200 MW

1 km 5 km

15 km

E.P.: 150 MW

1920 MW E.P.: 120E.P.: MW

30 km

E.P.: 200 MW

E.P.: 500 MW

E.P.: 1000 MW

HONK KONG

KUNING

KUNING HONG KONG KUNING

VINH YEN

SON TAY

HOA LAC HAI DUONG

HAI PHONG

PHU XUYEN

PHU LY

HO CHI MINH

HO CHI MINH


11 6


11 7


120

“ Pe o p l e g e t t i r e d o f l i v i n g i n t o w n s. T hey move to the countr y and all settle down. T hey build themselves houses and roads and then, T hey all have to move to the countr y ag ain�

ANONYMOUS


MSc 4 Graduation Studio

Equibus, sum volume commoluptam la ditaquatum veniscia eaquist, assi te etur? Qui undipsapici atumquis moluptas dolorepelici alis eum latur sit laborrum qui omnimus volor aut la atemporro inimi, que si ipsum que in nonet mossunt. Alit pedita corum aute nienimus et oditati conseque cusam qui int endit ius doluptat ad que dolo ditatectur, quunt magnis ex et ipsum suntio que evelicim rem il ium, consequae. Nequatiis dolecupta saperchicab ius, officiate cusanimi, invenis sinvele niment. Fictatur eruptat. Ibus voloritatur, cus, que oditior erumqua tisintus, comnis quiamus explige niminve lluptae nim quunt lab invenimus. Sedit est, que eiciati oritemperum dit ducia sunde solorerspita plit ut dit mod magniatures nis mod quos veria sanducia volupietur, et aut dolorum vellent ioreprae voluptatem laborem pererro iumque acea eribusandant vel maiorecta pre et volor simo tectibea quam, quae quiaspe porenimi, sam qui nati corecti orerovitatis aut apit odisinime quatur? Bo. Nequiatia quat. Lorecti orporum dendem quodipsam nonem. Nonserovit enihil eariatiundi cuptas conseque saeste aut odicilici blam, occus et quataque inctore pelluptat aut doluptatur modit eatur a inveniaeres ium que qui corem sitibus tioribus denim quiande rnatur aut facestrum es doles et ullorum faccus aspid maio in nonsequibus, odisquae ped etur aspiet que delist fugiae core et pa dolut qui volorumquas quo cupta sitati blaut quodi as et qui corum eos exeratia qui rerum essit latem sum dolupta tionsed que am excepuda sunt fuga. Bus plaborernam fugit, inistium que dolentes experepudae con ex eseribus is sam adicili tiatquis solorio consequi sendiatet enist, omniscimus in pedi cullaut empore solore eos non rerion con rem conet quia nissimi nvelique quo officae veles quaerfero molorro estota voluptas rerferum esed estiatest etur? Quis asperesci sinvellum aut ducimilit aut excesed mosto qui beriat escitaque sim voluptatia nullorem atur simenti onsequi doluptio volorio quuntur sam cum laborum nosaepro tem fugiatquibus dolupta turibus, te natis quissim usciatis delibusam a derum que ideni nonsedicab isitam que nustiande volupie nimolor as corepta consequate voluptat alitaquamus dit pro voluptatem fuga. As doluptionese porate porpore simaion pro consequat possusdam rem et quas audia sit idit que est ea ipissim conemol oritium quibus dolectur, sit vid magnis prempor itatios alis nonsectibus as ma nus. Ab ipicim eature nullumquis nat odis iduscid undaerem ipsapicatus eatur? Equibus, sum volume commoluptam la ditaquatum veniscia eaquist, assi te etur? Qui undipsapici atumquis moluptas dolorepelici alis eum latur sit laborrum qui omnimus volor aut la atemporro inimi, que si ipsum que in nonet mossunt.

121


122


123


MSc4 STUDIO 124

Chicago Graduation Studio AR4CP010 - Complex Projects Reserach Studio

Contact Hours / Week x/x/x/x Education Period

Start education Exam period Course language Required for Expected prior knowledge

4 hours per week 80 hours per semester 1 2 3 4 1 3 None English MSc 3 Architecture Bachelors degree


Summary: Thesis is an independent design project on a theme selected by the student. The student begins with a thesis statement outlining an area of study or a problem that has consequences for contemporary architectural production. Marking the transition between the academic and professional worlds, the thesis project is an opportunity for each student to define an individual position with regard to a specific aspect of architectural practice. As an integral part of the design process, it is intended that the thesis project will incorporate research, writing, programming and analysis. This semester will be your last academic endeavour. It’s imperative that you use the studio NOT TO develop professional skills but to find where you might belong in this profession. The vocational aspect of architecture will slam you in the face as soon as you start working: this is inevitable. University CAN NEVER prepare you for ‘a job’. However university can teach you how to think, be critical, and instill rigor. The ambition of thesis is not to solely ‘make a building’, but to define a position and use the project. 125

Evaluations will be based on the overall performance from both semesters. Each student’s performance will be determined on his or hers participation, commitment, effort, improvement to the studio over the entire course of the both semester.


STUDENT WORKS


128

JAN MAARTEN MULDER


129


130


131


EMELIEN SCHUT

132

FF

PLAN

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

1

Drawing Atelier

2

Painting Atelier

Calligraphy Atelier

Meeting room

3

Administration

Shop

Courtyard

Foyer

28

4

Sculpture Atelier

General Atelier

5

6 Toilet

30

Toilet

7

Courtyard: Sculpture exhibition

Relax

8

Changing Room

9

Changing Room

Kitchen

Yoga Courtyard

30

10

Library

Dance

Toilet

Dance Cafe

11

Toilet

Exhibition Space

12

31

13

Exhibition Space

Children's Playground

Exhibition Space

Exhibition Space

30

14

15

Storage 16

17

18

Reception room

Reception room

Toilet

Backstage

Vertical Circulation

Poppodium

Courtyard: Outdoor Music

Karaoke

Storage

Toilet

19

GG

GG 20

Auditorium

Theatre Elderly recreational area

21

22

23

Technical Space

32

24

Courtyard

Backstage Storage

Vertical Circulation

FF

25

Seminar/Teaching Room


133


134


135


136

SAM LIEW


137


138


139


GRADUATION MANUAL


INTRODUCTION Graduation Manual

This manual is based on the official regulations concerning graduating and is meant for students, mentors, external examiners and others who are involved in the evaluations. This manual contains important information about the setup of the graduation process. In chapter one you will find a scheme of the setup of the evaluations and a scheme explaining the responsibilities of all people involved per evaluation. Chapter two contains information about the quorum, the appraisal, honourable mention and the “with distinction� regulation.

In the appendices you will find among other things details on the subjects to be assessed, graduation plan, reflection requirements, an example of a graduation contract and the references to official regulations which this manual is part of.


1.0

Graduation Process

1.1

Admission

Because of the graduation process the Master 3 and 4 are interconnected. These two Master semesters must be completed without any interruption. To guarantee an undisturbed graduation process, students are only admitted to the supervised teaching of Master 3 after having completed the Bachelor or bridging programme. Enrollment for and admission to the P2 presentation is only possible: · for students in the tracks Architecture, Building Technology, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture, after having obtained all study credits (EC) from Master 1 and 2, with a maximum of 5 EC unfinished. · for students in the track RealEstate and Housing, after having obtained 55 study credits (EC) from Master 1, 2 and 3.

1.2

Mentors

After a student is admitted to a graduation studio, he / she is allocated a main mentor in consultation with the studio coordinator. A second mentor is appointed at the admission to the P2 evaluation at the latest. For students in the track Architecture the second mentor is associated with the chair “Bouwconstructies Integratie en Coordinatie” of the Department of Building Technology.

The allocation of the second mentor is taken care of by the Master Coordinator of BuildingTechnology. For all graduation students in the tracks of Urbanism, RealEstate and Housing, Landscape and Building Technology the first and second mentor may be associated with the same department but must be from different chairs.

1.3

Evaluations

In the course of the graduation process two obligatory progress reviews (P1 and P3) and three formal assessments (P2, P4 and P5) take place. The P1 and the P2 are part of the Master 3 programme and P3, P4 and P5 take place within the Master 4. All evaluations are to take place within the assigned periods, indicated in the academic graduation calendar. The location of all evaluations must be situated at the TU Delft Campus.


Evaluation 1

Goal

Compulsory progress review

Where

Assess whether the student’s working method and progress guarantee he / she will be able to meet the requirements for the P2 in time. Studio

When

Midway Master 3, before subscription deadline P2.

Structure

30 minutes presentation 15 minutes questions

Assessors

Main mentor Possible Lab supervisor Possible research mentor Draft curriculum Planning and progress of graduation process Assessment is based on the P1 assessment criteria of the chosen track. The mentor gives the student a positive or negative indication regarding planning and progress of the final project The assessment is registered on the P1 assessment form. The conclusion is documented in the “graduation contract”. For the Track Architecture both documents are part of students’ Graduation Files The student proceeds; If necessary the mentor advises the student concerning his working method and pace

Subjects of assessment Method of assessment Method of assessmentRegistration Consequence of assessment

P1 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action

Responsible

Schedule day, time and location and inform student and mentor team. Note. Do not schedule in P2, P4 or P5 period.

Lab coordinator

Make a graduation file and add the P1 assessment form to the graduation file

Epoint

Collect the graduation file at Epoint

Main mentor

15 minutes before start, hang drawings of Student project or design and if necessary install (See appendix 1 for exact definition for prepadigital presentation rations)


P1 Responsibilities Part

Action

At the evaluation

Present draft curriculum, plan and graduation project. Fill in the complete front page of the graduation contract Fill in “P1 assessment form”. Document the conclusion on the “graduation contract”.

Completion

Responsible Student (See appendix 1 for exact description of required products) Main mentor Student Lab coordinator Main mentor

Sign “graduation contract”

Main mentor

Register assessment and inform the student of assessment; advise and make agreements

Lab coordinator

Submit the “graduation file” within five working days to Epoint

Epoint

Register handing in graduation file. Register P1 in Osiris.

Epoint


Evaluation 2

Formal assessment

Goal

Completion of Master 3 Assessment students admission to Master 4 The starting point for achieving the P2 should be that the belief is that the student can graduate in six months with a satisfactory result.

Where When

Own studio or reserved room by O&S scheduling department End of Master 3, in fixed weeks according to the academic graduation calendar Enrolment for and admission to the P2 presentation is only possible: · for students in the tracks Architecture, Building Technology, Urbanism and Landscape Architecture, after having obtained all study credits (EC) from Master 1 and 2, with a maximum of 5 EC unfinished. · for students in the track Real Estate and Housing, after having obtained 55 study credits ( EC) from Master 1, 2 and 3. Deadline according to academic calendar.

Admission conditions

Structure

30 minutes presentation 15 minutes questions and appraisal Studio’s with group work can request the Board of Examiners permission for a structure with partly group and individual presentations. Each individual presentation must be 10 to 15 minutes at least.

Assessors

Method of assessment

Main mentor Second mentor Third mentor (if appointed) External examiner Main mentor One other mentor External examiner Graduation plan (see Appendix 2) Provisional research (result) Provisional design (see Appendix 1 for exact definitions) Assessment is based on the P2 assessment criteria of the chosen track. The mentors give the student a positive, doubt or negative indication or a mark.

Method of assessment Registration

The assessment is registered on the P2 assessment form. The conclusion is documented on the “graduation contract”

Consequence of assessment Restriction

If student pass the chance to graduate within 6 months is realistic. At assessment result “doubt” or negative, the student does a retake

Retake

If a retake based on a restriction as described above isn’t achievable, or the student didn’t lift the restriction, than the student has to retake a complete semester. The student has to re-enroll by Intekenen-BK@tudelft.nl for the Master 3 in the same or another graduation laboratory and start again with the graduation project.

Required quorum Subjects of assessment

At result doubt or mark 5 and a realistic chance exists the student will be able to pass a retake by making a restoration assignment within 2 weeks in that case he gets a restriction. The main mentor agrees a date and time for the retake with the student, the second mentor and the external examiner in order to solve the restriction. If the restriction isn’t solved with this retake, than applies the rule stated under “retake”


P2 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action

Responsible

Pass on the scheduled days, times and student names to O&S secretary at the latest in week ten of the semester

Lab coordinator

Check whether student meets the admission conditions Allocate external examiner and inform Lab coordinator, external examiner and Epoint

OSA Secretary O&S (authorized by the board of examiners)

Add the names of the external Epoint examiner and reserve external examiner to “graduation contract� Inform main mentor, mentors and exter- Lab coordinator nal examiner on location and schedule. Add the P2 assessment form to the graduation file

Epoint

Retrieve graduation file from Epoint Main mentor Have the Master coordinator sign the filledMain mentor in front page of the graduation contract Hand in the research and graduation plan at the main mentor, mentors en external examiner at least one week before P2 15 minutes before start, hang drawings of project or design and if necessary install digital presentation

Student

Student (See appendix 1 for exact definition for preparations for this evaluation)


P2 Responsibilities Part At the evaluation

Action

Responsible

Act as chairman

External examiner

Present graduation plan, draft research results and draft of graduation project using digital presentation and/or drawings

Student (See appendix 1 and 2 for exact products for this evaluation)

Questioning the own academic field

All mentors

Evaluate academic level of students pres- External examiner entation and mentors questions

At the appraisal

Act as chairman

External examiner

Fill in P2 assessment form

Main mentor

Determine final judgment

Main mentor, mentors, external examiner Main mentor

Document the conclusion on the graduation contract /graduation files (A). Document the language used on contract External examiner

Completion

Check whether all forms are filled in and External examiner signed If applicable hand in the P2 mark by Main mentor Osiris Inform the student of assessment Main mentor and make arrangements for retake (restriction) if necessary Sign the graduation contract Student underneath P2 confirming the filled in front page and P2 result. Submit graduation file within five work- Main mentor ings days to Epoint Check whether forms are all present and Epoint filled in correctly. Undertake action if items are missing; register completion P2 Administrate completion P2

Epoint and ESA


Evaluation 3

Compulsory progress review

Goal Where

Survey whether the students working method and progress guarantee he or she will be able to meet the requirements for the P4 in time Studio

When

Midway Master 4 (Educational week 8 or 9)

Structure

30 minutes presentation 15 minutes questions

Assessors

Main mentor Second mentor Third mentor (if appointed) Content and progress plan of graduation project

Subjects of assessment Method of assessment Method of assessment registration Consequence of assessment

Assessment is based on the P3 assessment criteria of the chosen track. The mentors give the student a positive or negative indication concerning plan and progress graduation project. The assessment is registered on the P3 assessment form. The conclusion is documented on the “graduation contract� The student proceeds; If necessary the mentor advises the student concerning his working method and rate.

P3 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action Schedule day, time and location and inform student and mentor team. NOTE: Do not schedule in P2, P4 or P5 period. Add the P3 assessment form to the graduation file Collect the graduation file at Epoint 15 minutes before start evaluation, hang design or project drawing and if necessary install digital presentation

Responsible Lab coordinator

Epoint Main mentor Student (See appendix 1 for exact definition for required products for this evaluation)


P3 Responsibilities Part At the evaluation

At the appraisal

Action

Responsible

Present graduation plan, plan, and gradu- Student ation project (See appendix 1 for exact description of required products for this evaluation) Fill in “P3 assessment form”. Main mentor Document the conclusion on the “graduation contract”. Sign “graduation contract” for Main mentor, other mentors P3 Inform the student of assessment; Main mentor advice on progress Submit graduation file within five work- Main mentor ings days to Epoint Register completion P3 in Osiris

Epoint


Evaluation 4

Formal assessment

Goal Where

Assessment whether content of academic fields and presentation meets the requirements to admit the student to the final public presentation (P5) Class room, instruction room or lecture hall

When

At fixed weeks according to academic graduation calendar

Admission requirements

At fixed weeks according to academic graduation calendar

Structure

30 minutes presentation 15 minutes questions and appraisal

Assessors

Main mentor Second mentor Third mentor (if appointed) External examiner Main mentor One other mentor External examiner Reflection and Research or design

Required quorum Subjects of assessment Method of assessment How is the assessment registered

Assessment is based on the P4 assessment criteria of the chosen track. The mentors give the student a positive (GO) or negative (NO GO) judgment on the graduation Sproject. The assessment is registered on the P4 assessment form. The conclusion is documented on the “graduation contract�

Consequence of assessment

A positive judgment at P4 (GO) guarantees the student will obtain at least a grade 6 for all academic fields (including all forms of presentation) and also as end mark at the final presentation (P5). If a student fails to meet the requirements he obtains a NO GO; Also if a student doesn’t appear at or applies for a P4 he gets a NO GO result. This applies for every P4 period according to the academic graduation calendar; the mentor assesses whether the student should be referred to a student counsellor; After a second NO GO the student is given a binding advice to consult a student counsellor. The main mentor uses a address form to inform the student counsellor. After a third NO GO the student is basically no longer offered any guidance or supervision.

Retake

The retake will be held in the next P4 period


P4 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action Arrange a preferred date and half-day Student within the defined P4 period with all involved. Fill in the P4 application form and collect Student signatures from all mentors and the external examiner. Submit the completed form before deadline according to graduation calendar to Servicepunt Collect P4 forms at Servicepoint and make P4 registration list Check whether student meets the admission requirements and inform student on admission decisions Schedule P4 Inform main mentor, other mentors, external examiner and student concerning date, location and time. Add the P4 assessment form to the graduation file P4 products available for mentors and external examiner: at least 1 week for P4 date Collect the graduation file at Epoint 15 minutes before start evaluation, hang design or project drawings and if necessary install digital presentation

At the evaluation

Responsible

Epoint OSA

O&S scheduling Epoint Epoint Student Main mentor

Student (See appendix 1 for exact definition for required products for this evaluation) Act as chairperson External examiner Present research result /graduation project Student and reflection using digital presentation (See appendix 1 for exact descriptionand drawings of the products for this evaluation) Verify title graduation project. Main mentor The title on the contract will be on the diploma supplement and in the repository. Questioning the own academic field All mentors Assess academic level of students’ External examiner presentation and questions of the mentors


P4 Responsibilities Part At the private appraisal

Completion

Action Act as chairperson Determine final judgment Document the conclusion on the graduation contract / graduation file. Sign “graduation contract” for attending P4. Fill in “P4 assessment form” for all involved academic fields Inform the student of assessment Sign “graduation contract” for P4 result If result “Go”: determine P5 date and sign “P5 application form” Submit graduation file within five workings days to Epoint Check whether forms are all present and filled in correctly. Undertake action if items are missing; register completion P4 Register P4 date and result (if GO) in Osiris Hand in P5 application form at Servicepunt before deadline according to graduation calendar (If desired) Request a copy of the “P4 assessment form” at Epoint

Responsible External examiner Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner External examiner Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner Mentors Main mentor Student Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner Main mentor Epoint

Epoint Student Student


Evaluation 5 Goal Where When Admission conditions Structure

Assessors

Required quorum Subjects of assessment Method of assessment How the assessment is registered Consequence of assessment

Public final presentation Public final presentation and assessment graduation project Class room, instruction room or lecture hall at Faculty of Architecture Next P5 period after the P4 period were GO at P4 was gained Student has finished all educational components with exception from P5 assessment. Main mentor took care off complete registration in the graduation file, including registering all assessments. 30 minutes presentation 15 minutes questions 15 minutes appraisal 15 minutes result and graduation ceremony Main mentor Second mentor Third mentor (if appointed) External examiner Main mentor One other mentor External examiner Research / graduation project (depending on track) and reflection. Assessment is based on the P5 assessment criteria of the chosen track. The mentors give the student a mark for all involved academic fields, presentation and an end mark. The assessment is registered on the P5 assessment form. The conclusion is documented on the “graduation contract” All parts should be rewarded with at least the mark 6.0 and the end mark should also be 6.0 or higher. Student is graduated and receives subsequently his or her MSc diploma

P5 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action

Responsible

Arrange a preferred date and half-day Student within the defined P5 period with all involved. Determine preferred date P5, collect Student signatures of all mentors and external examiner at the ‘P5 application form’ and submit this before deadline at Servicepunt Collect P5 forms at Servicepoint and make P5 registration list.

Epoint

Check whether student meets the admis- OSA en CSA sion requirements. If yes deliver diploma to O&S BK Reserve location and inform O&S scheduling Epoint


P5 Responsibilities Part Preparation

Action

Responsible

Inform student concerning scheduled Epoint date, location and time. Inform main mentor, other mentors and Student external examiner concerning date, location and time. Add the P5 assessment form Epoint to the graduation file Collect the graduation file, diploma External examiner and graduation package at Epoint Digitally store the graduation Student project at TU Delft repository at the latest 2 working days before the final presentation. Compulsory documents: · Graduation plan (P2) · Reflection report (P4) · Presentation P5 · Set of final drawings and/or graduation report 15 minutes before start evaluation, hang design or project drawings and if necessary install digital presentation

At the evaluation

Student (See appendix 1 for exact definition for required products for this evaluation) Act as chairperson External examiner Present research result / graduation pro- Student ject and reflection using digital presenta- (See appendix 1 for exact defition and drawings. nition for required products for this evaluation) 15 minutes before start evaluation, Student hang design or project drawings and (See appendix 1 for exact defiif necessary install digital presentation nition for required products for this evaluation) Questioning the own academic field All mentors Assess academic level of students’ External examiner presentation and questions of the mentors

At the appraisal

Act as chairperson Fill in the mark list for all academic fields Determine final judgment and register on grade list Document the conclusion on the graduation contract

External examiner External examiner

Open diploma envelop and determine if student graduated “with distinction”

External examiner

Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner Main mentor


P5 Responsibilities Part At the appraisal

Completion

Action Determine whether the student will be rewarded with an honourable mention. Conditions see chapter 2. Determine whether the student will be nominated for the Archiprix Sign “graduation contract� at P5. Welcome student and public to diploma ceremony Inform the student of assessment and address on the process, content of graduation project and the method of working. Hand out diploma Sign diploma two sided Eventually return extra diploma directly after the P5 to O&S secretary. At honourable mention: Draft a written motivation and send it to O&S secretary within five working days. Also add a copy to the graduation file. Submit graduation file within five workings days to Epoint Check whether forms are all present and filled in correctly. Undertake action if items are missing. Unsubscribe as TU Delft student Register P5 result in Osiris After student uploaded graduation documents at TU Delft repository: send diploma supplement to student address

Responsible Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner Mentors Main mentor, other mentors, external examiner External examiner Main mentor

Hand out diploma Student External examiner

Main mentor

Main mentor Epoint

Student Epoint and OSA OSA


2.0

Particular circumstances

Quorum at evaluations A quorum is required for the graduation evaluation to be valid. Quorum for P2, P4 and P5: main mentor, 1 mentor and external examiner · Absence of external examiner The board of examiners appoints external examiners and deputy external examiners for all evaluations. If the external examiner will be unable to attend an evaluation he asks the deputy examiner to replace him. The deputy external examiner is registered on the graduation contract and known at the O&S Secretary. · Absence of main mentor or mentor If it is known in advance that the main mentor or mentor will be unable to attend, a presentation must be held for that mentor prior to the evaluation. The assessment and signature of the mentor concerned must be written down in a letter. This letter must be given to the external examiner in a closed envelope. At the appraisal this assessment will be taken into account by the other mentors for determining the final assessment. At unexpected absence there will be looked for an exam authorized deputy within the same academic field. The determination for a GO / NO GO or the registration of the marks on the final mark lists only takes place after consulting the absent mentor by phone. If this isn’t possible final judgment at the P4 is postponed at the P5 a “pass” is registered for the involved academic field. In both cases a meeting with the absent mentor takes place on the shortest possible term, to determine a final conclusion. At doubt or on request of the student, it may be decided that an extra presentation must be held. Problems in the appraisal It may occur that the appraisal doesn’t lead to an assessment. The external examiner informs the student on this situation and explains the applied procedure and the corresponding terms. Subsequently he collects the presented products and presents the problem to the chairman of the board of examiners. The chairman of the board of examiners will reconvene the mentor team and the external examiner for a reappraisal, which he will chair, in which he will attempt to achieve consensus. In cause of failing he will make a final decision. Honourable mention On intercession of the mentor and approval of the external examiner the predicate honourable mention may be attached to the examination result. The condition for this is that the examinee achieved a mark 8.5 or higher for the graduation project.


The student is informed on the honourable mention at the diploma ceremony. The written honourable mention will be handed over to the student within two weeks after the final presentation. In case of particular circumstances or exceptional characteristic an honourable mention is only possible after agreement from the Board of Examiners. The complete system is described in Article 34 of the Rules and Regulations of the Exam Committee. With distinction The student graduates his Master exam ‘with distinction’ if he meets the following conditions: - he passed all Master courses with the mark 8.0 or higher - the final mark for the public final presentation is at least 8.0 or higher - and the Master program is completed within 3 years. In that case a note ‘with distinction’ is made on the student’s diploma. The complete system is described in Article 33 of the Rules and Regulations of the Exam Committee.


To assess subjects per evaluation Architecture P1

P2

Design studio

Design studio

Research studio

Research studio

· thematic research · situational research

· thematic research · Essay 3000 words · situational research

· Urban draft 1:1000 / 1:500 · Programme of requirement · Draft design (plans, cross-cuts, façades) 1:200 · Graduation plan

· Urban draft 1:1000 / 1:500 · programme of requirement · Draft design (plans, cross-cuts, facades) 1:500 Graduation plan

P3 · plans, facades, cross-cuts, 1:200 / 1:100 · part of the building, plan and cross-cut 1:50 · façade fragment with hor. and vert. cross-cut 1: 20 - details 1:5

P4

P5

· theoretic and · theoretic and thematic thematic support of support of research and designresearch and design + reflection on + reflection on architectonic and architectonic and social relevance social relevance (see app. 2) (see app. 2) · situational drawing· situational drawing 1:5000 / 1:1000 1:5000 / 1:1000 · plan b.g. in situ · plan b.g. in situ 1:500 1:500 · plans, façades, · plans, facades, cross-cuts 1:200 / cross-cuts 1:200 / 1:100 1:100 · part of the building, · part of the building, plan and drawings plan and drawings 1:50 1:50 · façade fragment · façade fragment with hor. and vert. with hor. and vert. cross-cut 1: 20 cross-cut 1: 20 · details 1:5 · details 1:5 (Reflection details, (Reflection details, see appendix 2) see appendix 2)


Real Estate & Housing P1

P2

Presentation of P1 ¡ Graduation plan. report with concept ¡ Presentation P2 research proporeport with plan: sition concept curriculum and report of literature examination. ¡ Main finding and conclusions for problem analysis, research questions, research plan and aimed final product

P3

P4

P5

Presentation P3 progress report: Describe working method for answering problem statement and research questions. Which (propositional) conclusions are to be drawn and what should be done to successfully complete this process in time.

- Presentation P4, final report (=P5 final report 99% completed) - Reflection - Report with appendices for detailed information. Eventually action plan, computer model, checklist of other tools, published separately and refer to this recognizable and accessible in the final report.

Presentation P5 final report and poster. Hand in CD with report and poster (headlines only) Report with appendices for detailed information. Eventually action plan, computer model, checklist of other tools, published separately and refer to this recognizable and accessible in the final report.

(For details see Appendix 2)

(For details see Appendix 2)

(For details see Appendix 2)


To assess subjects per evaluation Urbanism P1 · Provisional curriculum (in writing) · Progress research / analysis / design. · Review of position paper outline (250-500 words)

P2 · Graduation plan. Review of position paper · Progress on research / analysis and design in the form of an integral report

P3 · Progress research / analysis / design.

P4

P5

Provisional final results (design and research) in the form of a concept final report, including reflection

Final results (design and research) in the form of a final report, including reflection

(Reflection details, see appendix 2)

(Reflection details, see appendix 2)


Building Technology P1 P2 · Final problem · Formulation statement including problem stategoal. ment · Concept curric- · Graduation plan · Report containing: ulum · First step selec- 1. Technical scientifically research: tion of relevant - chosen method literature for collecting and editing data - research embedded in theoretical frame - relevant data and literature selected and collected 2. Designing research: - program requirements formulated based on functionality, design and construction - the in the program included preconditions analysed and ordered - reference projects collected and analysed

P3

P4

1. Technical scientifically research: - chosen method for collecting and editing data - research embedded in theoretical frame - relevant data and literature selected and collected 2. Designing research: - program requirements formulated based on functionality, design and construction - the in the program included preconditions analysed and ordered - reference projects collected and analysed

· Final report, including reflection (app. 1). Report meets requirements P5: - Logical and consistent structure and decision. - use of references and bibliography. - language, spelling, style and lay-out · Technical scientifically research: - research results processed and analysed - conclusions drawn · Designing research: - argued design result based on repeating process of generating, selecting and validating of design variants. - argued testing of concept and design to the program of requirements and preconditions (Reflection details, see appendix 2)

P5 · Final report, see P4 · Verbal and digital final presentation. (Reflection details, see appendix 2)


Description graduation plan P2

Graduation Plan: Architecture

The graduation plan consists of at least the following data/segments:

Personal information Name Student number Address Postal code Place of residence Telephone number E-mail address Studio Theme Teachers Argumentation of choice of the studio Theme Teaches Title Title of graduation project

Product Problem Statement The posed problem, research questions and design assignment in which these result. This should be formulated in such a way that the graduation project can answer these questions. The definition of the problem has to be significant to a clearly defined area of research and design. Goal This section has to include what the intentions are of the graduation project.


Process Method description A description of the methods and techniques of research and design, which are going to be utilized. Literature and general practical preference The literature (theories or research data) and general practical experience/precedent you intend to consult.

Reflection Relevance The value of the graduation project in the larger social and scientific framework.

Time planning A scheme of the division of the workload of the graduation project in the 42-week time frame. Compulsory in this scheme are the examinations at the middle and end of the semester, if required, the minors you intend taking and possible exams that have to be retaken. The submitted graduation contract might be rejected if the planning is unrealistic Attention Part of the graduation (especially in the MSc 4) is the technical building design. Therefore a Building Technology teacher will be part of the tutoring team from the P2 presentation on. This should be taken into account when writing the Learning plan / personal graduation contract, in the time planning as well as in the relation to the content (e.g. statement, method and /or relevance).


Description graduation plan P2

Graduation plan: Building Technology The graduation plan consists of at least the following data/segments:

Personal information Name Student number Address Postal code Place of residence Telephone number E-mail address Studio Theme Teachers Argumentation of choice of the studio Theme Teaches Title Title of graduation project

Product Problem Statement The posed problem, research questions and design assignment in which these result. This should be formulated in such a way that the graduation project can answer these questions. The definition of the problem has to be significant to a clearly defined area of research and design. Goal This section has to include what the intentions are of the graduation project.


Process Method description A description of the methods and techniques of research and design, which are going to be utilized. Literature and general practical preference The literature (theories or research data) and general practical experience/precedent you intend to consult.

Reflection Relevance The value of the graduation project in the larger social and scientific framework.

Time planning A scheme of the division of the workload of the graduation project in the 42-week time frame. Compulsory in this scheme are the examinations at the middle and end of the semester, if required, the minors you intend taking and possible exams that have to be retaken. The submitted graduation contract might be rejected if the planning is unrealistic Attention Part of the graduation (especially in the MSc 4) is the technical building design. Therefore a Building Technology teacher will be part of the tutoring team from the P2 presentation on. This should be taken into account when writing the Learning plan / personal graduation contract, in the time planning as well as in the relation to the content (e.g. statement, method and /or relevance).


Description graduation plan P2

Graduation Plan: Landscape Architecture The graduation plan consists of at least the following data/segments:

Personal information Name Student number Address Postal code Place of residence Telephone number E-mail address Studio Theme Teachers Argumentation of choice of the studio Theme Teaches Title Title of graduation project

Product Problem Statement The posed problem, research questions and design assignment in which these result. This should be formulated in such a way that the graduation project can answer these questions. The definition of the problem has to be significant to a clearly defined area of research and design. Goal This section has to include what the intentions are of the graduation project.


Process Method description A description of the methods and techniques of research and design, which are going to be utilized. Literature and general practical preference The literature (theories or research data) and general practical experience/precedent you intend to consult.

Reflection Relevance The value of the graduation project in the larger social and scientific framework.

Time planning A scheme of the division of the workload of the graduation project in the 42-week time frame. Compulsory in this scheme are the examinations at the middle and end of the semester, if required, the minors you intend taking and possible exams that have to be retaken. The submitted graduation contract might be rejected if the planning is unrealistic Attention Part of the graduation (especially in the MSc 4) is the technical building design. Therefore a Building Technology teacher will be part of the tutoring team from the P2 presentation on. This should be taken into account when writing the Learning plan / personal graduation contract, in the time planning as well as in the relation to the content (e.g. statement, method and /or relevance).


Description graduation plan P2

Graduation Plan: Urbanism

The graduation plan consists of at least the following data/segments:

Personal information Name Student number Address Postal code Place of residence Telephone number E-mail address Studio Theme Teachers Argumentation of choice of the studio Theme Teaches Title Title of graduation project

Product Problem Statement The posed problem, research questions and design assignment in which these result. This should be formulated in such a way that the graduation project can answer these questions. The definition of the problem has to be significant to a clearly defined area of research and design. Goal This section has to include what the intentions are of the graduation project.


Process Method description A description of the methods and techniques of research and design, which are going to be utilized. Literature and general practical preference The literature (theories or research data) and general practical experience/precedent you intend to consult.

Reflection Relevance The value of the graduation project in the larger social and scientific framework.

Time planning A scheme of the division of the workload of the graduation project in the 42-week time frame. Compulsory in this scheme are the examinations at the middle and end of the semester, if required, the minors you intend taking and possible exams that have to be retaken. The submitted graduation contract might be rejected if the planning is unrealistic Attention Part of the graduation (especially in the MSc 4) is the technical building design. Therefore a Building Technology teacher will be part of the tutoring team from the P2 presentation on. This should be taken into account when writing the Learning plan / personal graduation contract, in the time planning as well as in the relation to the content (e.g. statement, method and /or relevance).


Description graduation plan P2

Graduation Plan: Real Estate & Housing Format of P2 – Graduation research Proposal

An efficient set-up of the definitive research proposal must be as follows: 1. Title page stating the title of the graduation project and, if required, an explanatory subtitle, the name of the person graduating (including student number, address, postal code, place of residence, telephone num ber, e-mail address), the RE&H MSc laboratory in which you are studying, the date of the evaluation and the supervisors’ names and fields of expertise (including those of the company supervisor). 2. Optionally, a concise foreword. 3. An abstract. 4. Table of contents of the curriculum report (do not yet include that of the final report here!) 5. An introductory chapter 1 that includes: - A concise reflection on: The scientific relevance and originality: the relationship with related and/or overlapping research (including that of RE&H), substantiated with sources (literature, own experiences, conversations) explicitly addresing what’s the added value of your research. The societal relevance: which societal problems are related to your research, what are the potential/intended effects that the outcomes of your research proposal might have for (specific groups within) society. The utilization potential: who, or what instance –directly- can make use of the outcome of your research, and to what extend does it contribute to their work, live or processes, are the outcomes directly applicable or are additional steps needed, what’s the economical valorization. Personal motivation: what’s your personal interest, in terms of learning aims and ambitions to study the subject chosen. - The study question and research questions (sub-questions), introduced by a concise problem analysis. - The objective and intended end product (result) plus application possibilities (what will you deliver, for whom, in what form, e.g. a checklist of attention points, policy recommendations, a process model, a com puter model, a calculation model). - The research design: a concise reflection on the research methods to be used (method of data collection and data analysis) as well as the phasing, linked to the research questions. Preferably juxtaposed and visualized in a block diagram. The diagram clarifies the research structure at a glance and shows what steps are parallel and what steps are sequential, as well as the extent to which the output of one phase or activity constitutes the input for another part of the research. - A reader’s guide. - Optionally, an explanation of the limited accessibility of data, if so required by the company or your respondents. Every graduation project is open to the public, although details of costs or data linked to a person or company, for example, may constitute sensitive information. It is customary to include such data in an appendix that is open to your supervisors only and to include in the report only the conclusions based on such data. 6. Chapter 2, further identifying the research field, including the results of the source study. Although you may integrate this into chapter 1, it is advisable to keep chapter 1 short in order to keep the report going \ (allowing the reader to know the ins and outs of the research after several pages) and to not go into more detail until chapter 2. In fact, chapter 2 constitutes the theoretical framework of your study. 7. Provisional table of contents of the final report Preparing an annotated table of contents (a concise description of the intended contents per chapter) at an early stage will structure your way of thinking and force you to think about the way in which to present \ the research activities and results consistently, logically and coherently. In addition, as the research process progresses, it allows you to regularly check whether you are still on the right track and do not deviate too much. Obviously, you do not commit yourself to this and you will adjust the table of contents more than once due to advancing insights.


8. Planning This chapter (or appendix) includes the start date of graduation, the expected length of time for the entire project and its separate components, and the compulsory evaluation dates at the middle and end of the semester. As far as applicable your free electives, and possible exams that have to be re-taken must be included. Your P2 as your graduation contract might be rejected if the planning is unrealistic. 9. Literature and other sources (e.g. interviews, conferences, websites) 10. Any appendices

Explanation In chapter 1, you work out your draft curriculum. Chapter 2 is mostly a reflection of an exploratory study of the literature: major findings and conclusions for your problem analysis, research questions, research approach and intended end product. You may consider a literature search that is prepared within the framework of free choice as an appendix to the curriculum. It is frequently unclear what the scope of the definitive curriculum should be, particularly with regard to methodology. You will understand that it will not suffice to state that you will conduct interviews and case studies in addition to a literature search. It is also important to provide an idea of the interview protocol or questionnaire and – if there are case studies – to indicate how many cases you intend to study, how you will select the cases (selection criteria, both collectively and per case) and how you intend to approach one and other. It would be even better if you can already identify the cases. Reflecting on data collection as well as the method of data analysis deserve attention! As stated earlier, the definitive curriculum more or less constitutes a contract between the student and the supervisor, but it has a certain level of flexibility as to adjustments due to advancing insights. This may even mean the study question and research questions are further refined in the course of the research. However, it obviously does not mean that previously made hypotheses are adjusted! For it is interesting to discover that presuppositions do not turn out to match empirical research material. In this case, it is best to critically discuss the original hypotheses at the end of your study and to put them into perspective or formulate new ones. P1-P2 presentations must be done in English in case one of the students within the laboratory or one of the mentors isn’t Dutch speaking. At the P2 the mentors together with the student decide whether the project (reports and presentations) continues in Dutch or English.


Description graduation plan P2

Reflection P4 and P5 (all tracks) At P4 and P5 a reflection must be included as a distinct part of the thesis (a separate chapter) or as a separate document. In this reflection the student uses a short substantiated explanation to account for the results of the research and design in the graduation phase (product, process, planning). The aim of the reflection is to look back and see if your approach worked, to understand the “how and why”, and subsequently to learn from this. The choice of method (how) and argumentation (why) which preceded the research was a part of your study plan – the reflection must contain an answer to the question of how and why the approach did or did not work, and to what extent. Depending on the research and design, reflection on a number of the following aspects should be included (you may choose in which order). The reflection should be in the form of a text, with diagrams and sketches for purposes of illustration and clarification. Aspect 1 Aspect 2 Aspect 3 Aspect 4

· the relationship between research and design · the relationship between the theme of the studio and the subject/case study chosen by the student within this framework (location/object) · the relationship between the methodical line of approach of the studio and the method chosen by the student in this framework · the relationship between the project and the wider social context


Manual external examiner The Board of Examiners has prepared an instruction for the external examiners. This document is available for teaching staff on Blackboard: “Educational Staff ” – “Documents”


Example of Graduation Contract


Assessment form Examples are available on Blackboard: “Educational Staff ” – “Documents”


P5 Responsibilities Part

Action

Responsible

Sequence of examinations and admission

Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master

Chapter 3.6

Graduation project

Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master

Chapter 3.7

Evaluation plan

Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master

Chapter 3.8

Graduation process (end responsibility graduation laboratories, supervision time, guest mentor en guest supervisor, evaluations, structure evaluations)

Individual degree programme section of the Student Charter

Master tracks

Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master

Combination of two Master’s tracks

Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master Implementation regulation of the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) of the Master

Graduation endorsements (TiDO, Belvedère, IE-design and Honours Track) Archiving graduation project Master final project Composition of the assessment committee for Master Thesis object Working method of the assessment committee Official date of Master final project result The predicate designation “With distinction” for Master degree audit “Honourable mention” Degree certificate and supplement

Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee

Article 23

Chapters: 3.13 (general) 3.14 (A) 3.15 (Metu) 3.16 (BT) 3.17 (REH) 3.18 (U) 3.19 (LA) 3.20 (Expl.) Chapter 3.12 Chapters 3.9, 3.10 3.11 and 3.12 Article 21 sec. 3 Article 26 Article 27

Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee

Article 28

Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee Rules and Guidelines of the Exam Committee

Article 34

Article 29 Article 33

Article 35


CHAIR EDITOR

MITESH DIXIT Mitesh Dixit co-founded DOMAIN in 2012; After completing undergraduate and graduate work in Politics & Philosophy, Mitesh completed a Master of Architecture from the Washington University in St. Louis in 2004. In 2011 Mitesh joined the faculty of TU Delft in The Netherlands as a visiting Professor of Architecture and Urbanism. 2013, Dixit was appointed as Editor of the Chair - Complex Projects - at TU Delft; Dixit wrote and developed the curriculum, content and graphic language for the Chair. Prior to DOMAIN, Dixit worked with Rem Koolhaas’ Office for Metropolitan Architecture as a Project Leader. While at OMA, Dixit has led multiple projects throughout the world, such as a MahaNaKhon Tower in Bangkok, Commonwealth Institute in London, UK, Kuala Lampur Financial District in Malaysia and a large-scale mixed used project in Helsinki, Finland. Dixit was the conceptual driving force behind other landmark projects such as Taipei Performing Arts Centre in Taiwan, the India Tower in Mumbai, & Bawadi Desert Gate. Dixit began his career at the San Francisco office of Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill.


Credits

Editorial Team Dante Borgo, Aimee Mackenzei, Aldo Trim, Tanner Merkley, Stef Boogaerds, Charlie Koolhaas, Kees Kaan, Darrel Ronald, Ying Lin, Marten Dashort, Roberto Cavallo, James Westcott Editor in Chief Mitesh Dixit Art Direction & Design Dante Borgo Text Editor Mitesh Dixit, James Westcott Editorial Researchers Aimee Mackenzei, Stef Boogaerds, Yiannis Tsoskounoglou.

CP


CP

Profile for Material Contours

Complex Projects - 2013  

Complex Projects - 2013  

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