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Matthew Flores | Portfolio | 2013


Orlando City Art Museum

Sun Diagram

Affected Area

Sight Lines From Key Locations

The Orlando City Art Museum is curated as a contemporary art museum that functions as a link between the art, the passerby, and the city of Orlando. Anchored to the light rail transit system on a prominent corner of the City, the museum’s shifting volumes and perforated skin become and artistic expression of density and connectivity within the context of the Orlando metropolis. As travelers approach the new Church Street Station train stop via the Orlando Sun Rail, they will be welcomed by the cantilevered gallery that reaches and welcomes them into the public space outside the main entrance to the Orlando Contemporary Art Museum. That public space will include informational nodes on the city and the museum, a concession area with ample outdoor seating, and ticketing for the train station. From there they may choose to walk to the Amway Center, through the Church Street Gardens on the other side of the tracks toward Church Street, or to the new Performing Arts Center via South Street. Or they may enter the museum itself, a series of shifting volumes that allows the itinerants to interact with the artwork and the city of Orlando simultaneously as they meander through the galleries. The museum is designed as a modification of the typical “white box”. By shifting, pushing and pulling the box, several spatial opportunities are created to enhance visitors’ experience of the city and museum. Terraces, overhangs, abstracted views of the city, and panoramas of the Orlando area are designed to link viewers’ experience of the iconic artwork directly with their experience of the city of Orlando.

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a nk ron ftic he pres he x� x, ce ctdo he he cle he wo re to nly

Church Street

exterior perspective

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4.


Exploded Axo

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Section Perspective

Section Perspective 6


Ground Floor Plan

1. Inverted Video Art / Seating 2. Performance Stage 3. Ticketing / Shop / Snack 4. Gallery 5. Mini-Gallery 6. Mechanical / Art Storage Overhead 7. Bus Stop

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Kissimmee Station - An Architectural Link

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A bridge extends, connects, and unites. It spans across space to shape a synapse between entities. On a macro-level the Sunrail System is a link between seventeen stations in the greater Orlando area. On a micro-level the Sunrail Station at Kissimmee is a promenade that connects terraced gardens on either side of the tracks. These gardens penetrate two typical multi-level parking garages. This urban acupuncture is conducive to pedestrian traffic, whether it is for pleasure or business. The structure uses curves and angles to create an architectural language that expresses movement and flow in all directions. The construct is also anchored to the Kissimmee Civic Center, a hub for activity in the local area. This building includes a fitness center, which is a launching point for people who wish to exercise on the station’s promenade. The upper level includes two volumes that program as a ticket booth area and smoothie shop. Finally, this junction is also a connection between residential and commercial districts of the city. It is a place for people to catch a train or a view, or simply enjoy a walk through downtown Kissimmee.


Kissimmee

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Performative Skin Charrette

Southwest facing windows of the architecture offices at the University of Florida are a significant source of heat gain in the warmer months. The goal of this performative skin project is to create an envelope for this faรงade that alleviates the heat gain, filters light in the building, and to create an overhead condition that shades the sidewalk leading into the core of the building from the southeast corner. The intervention will create a thermal chimney effect that ventilates the southwestern faรงade with natural convective forces created from the architectural design. The aesthetic form of the faรงade is derived from these natural winds that sweep up the side of the building.

Aluminum Skin

Plexiglass Layer

Steel Frame

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Banyan Tower Charrette

The intent for this tower charrette located on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida is to create a series of three vertical structures that extrude from a horizontal frame, which blends into the landscape. The three vertical elements can be read as one tower from a distance, as they will be connected at different levels of the buildings through their circulation and skin. The envelope itself will be a performative skin that will rely on orientation and the arrangement of the elements to create a sustainable design that utilizes energy from the sun and offshore winds. The design of this residential tower is derived from the wooded are that it rests in and form the banyan trees that populate the Miami area.

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Site Plan

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Charleston Environment Visitors Center

The new design for the Charleston Environment Visitors Center, located in the heart of the historic district, will utilize passive strategies that will greatly affect the efficiency of the building. It will specifically address issues of direct sunlight, wind, and rainwater collection. The south faรงade, which faces the markets of Market Street, is considered the front of the building as it includes the main entrance. This presents a challenge in a climate that has hot humid summers. However, it will be countered with sufficient overhang for sun shading and a double skin that will be vented in warm temperatures. There are also intermediate spaces that transition from outdoor to indoor conditions. The east side of the building is more open, and includes a large plaza and garden to welcome early morning sunlight. The western side of the building is more opaque to counter direct solar radiation from late afternoon sun. The north side is close to an existing building. This particular site is close enough to the coast and Ashley River that it catches significant east-west winds that have influenced architecture of this historic city for years. Charleston is known for its church spires that characterize the skyline of the city. The visitors center will have wind spires to relate to this architectural typology. These quiet wind turbines will harness energy to power portions of the building. Finally, the curved slope of the roof will enable rainwater collection for irrigation of the gardens. 22


Contemporary design and sustainable design are quickly becoming one in the same. Both design approaches are often utilized today in architectural practice. When considering Charleston as a site for a contemporary intervention, the history of the city is vital to the form that it takes, even if it is a contemporary building. However, the thermal properties of the building can contribute significantly to the formal qualities of the design as well. The design for the new Visitor’s Center of Charleston will use the city’s history and typological characteristics as well as sustainable concepts as generative tools in the design process. Typologies that will be used and/ or re0invented include piazzas, columns gardens alleys, plazas, and spires. Thermal considerations for the project will include the use of wind power, water collections, orientation, of the building, and a double skinned façade. The programs included in the building will include kiosks for general visitor information, tours, horse and buggy rides, souvenirs, etc. It will also include a restaurant, art gallery, event space, and a garden space that winds throughout the east side of the building.

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Site Plan

Bird’s Eye View

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Longitudinal Section

Cross Section

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Luminare Design Competition

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31

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CIFLO Office Building

A Collaborative Effort | Claudia Cintas + Matt Flores

CIFO Office Building is a design and study of a midsized construction that utilizes and celebrates a number of sustainable strategies within the design. Strategies utilized in the project include angled solar PV panels, terraced gardens, vertical green wall, water collecting cistern, retracctable shading devices, and a trombe wall transisiton form terrace gardens to main building. Multiple sunlight and radiance studies were performed to understand heat load and natural illumination within the building.

1. Open Office Space 2. Meeting Room 3. Conference Room 4. Restrooms 5. Exterior Gardens 6. Interior Private Garden 7. Bridge

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Gainesville LibraryReading Room

A Collaborative Effort | Loi Flink + Matt Flores + Jenna Lychako + Camile Rusch

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK AUTODESK ED PRODUCED BY AN ED PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCED BYPRO AN

Reading room pavilion for addition to community library. Single public room addition to existing facility which will contain a small books collection regarding history of the North Central Florida region. Project separate from existing facility by courtyard/garden space and linked by a paved walkway.

A

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

AA

B

BB

A

B C

C AC

D

D D

B

C

D

D EE

C

E

E

E

1

11

1

1

2

22

2

2

A6.1

A6.1 A6.1

A6.1

A6.1

A6.1

A6.1 A6.1

A6.1

A6.1

E.L. ++ 25'-0" 25'-0" E.L. T.O. PARAPET PARAPET T.O.

E.L. + 25'-0"

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

SLOPEDOWN SLOPE DOWNTO TODRAIN DRAIN

SLOPE DOWN TOT.O. PARAPET DRAIN

SLOPE DOWN DRAIN TODRAIN TO DOWN DOWN DRAIN SLOPETO SLOPE

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

E.L. + 25'-0"

E.L. ++ 25'-0" 25'-0" E.L. E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET PARAPET T.O. T.O. PARAPET

E.L T.O

E.L. + 15'-0" T.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

E.L. ++ 15'-0" 15'-0" E.L. T.O. LIMESTONE LIMESTONE CLADDING CLADDING T.O.

E.L T.O

TO DRAIN T.O. PARAPET SLOPE DOWN

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

E.L. + 12'-8" FINISH FLOOR U.L.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

E.L. ++ 0'-0" 0'-0" E.L. FINISH FLOOR FLOOR L.L. L.L. FINISH

1 SECTION 3/16"=1'-0"

COMPUTER TERMINAL

COMPUTERTERMINAL TERMINAL COMPUTER

COMPUTER TERMINAL

G108

G108 G108

G108

E.L. + 10'-6" B.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

3/16"=1'-0" 3/16"=1'-0"

E.L. ++ 10'-6" 10'-6" E.L. B.O. LIMESTONE LIMESTONE CLADDING CLADDING B.O.

LARGE REFERENCE DESKS

G101

G101

3/16"=1'-0"

3

22

33

2

4

2 44

3

2

22

2

2

A6.2

A6.2 A6.2

A6.2

A6.2

E.L. + 10'-6" B.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

E.L. + 25'-0"

SLOPE T.O.DOWN PARAPET TO DRAIN

SLOPEDOWN SLOPE DOWNTO TODRAIN DRAIN

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

35

556

4

E.L. ++ 0'-0" 0'-0" E.L. FINISH FLOOR FLOOR L.L. L.L. FINISH

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

47

5

SLOPE DOWN DRAIN SLOPE TO TO DRAIN SLOPE TO DOWN DRAIN SLOPE DOWN DOWN TODRAIN DOWN DRAIN SLOPEDOWN TO TO DRAIN SLOPE TODRAIN DOWN DRAIN SLOPE DOWN TO SLOPE

66

77

8

6

DRAIN DRAIN TO SLOPE SLOPE TOTO DRAIN TO DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN SLOPE TO SLOPE DRAIN DRAIN SLOPE

BOOK STACKS

BOOKSTACKS STACKS BOOK

O202

O202 O202

5889

7

SLOPE SLOPE SLOPE DO D SLOPE DOWN TO

BO

E.L. + 10'-6" B.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

LARGE REFERENCE DESKS

LARGEREFERENCE REFERENCEDESKS DESKS LARGE

LARGE REFERENCE DESKS

G101

G101 G101

G101

LARGE REFERENCE DESKS MEN'S RR G103

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

E.L FIN

1 SECTION

3/16"=1'-0"

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

E.L. ++ 0'-0" 0'-0" E.L. E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR FLOOR L.L. FINISH L.L. FINISH FLOOR L.L.

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

1 SECTION 1 SECTION

E.L. ++ 25'-0" 25'-0" E.L. T.O. PARAPET PARAPET T.O.

LARGE REFERENCE DESKS

G101 G101

G108

G101

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

2

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

LARGEREFERENCE REFERENCEDESKS DESKS COMPUTER TERMINAL LARGE LARGE REFERENCE DESKS

G101

MEN'SRR RR MEN'S G103 G103

MEN'S RR WOMEN'S RR G103

W W M

G104

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

IONAL ED BY PRODUCT AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT DESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT ESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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D

C

B

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

1 A6.2

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

MECHANICAL

E.L. + 15'-0" T.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

E.L. + 15'-6" B.O. LIMESTONE CLADDING

O201

E.L. + 12'-8" FINISH FLOOR U.L. E.L. + 10'-6" B.O. ALUMINUM CLADDING

CLMJ Architects

E

Camille Rusch, Loi Flink, Matt Flores, Jenna Lychako

F 3 A6.1

Methods & Materials I I : Section 6160 : Prof. McGlothlin

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

STORAGE G105

INFORMAL READING G107

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

3/16"=1'-0"

6

7

8

9

10

11 3 A6.2

OWN TO DRAIN

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

E.L. + 25'-0" T.O. PARAPET

SLOPE DOWN TO DRAIN

E.L. + 24'-0" T.O. ROOF

BOOK STACKS

MECHANICAL

ELEVATOR

STAIRS

O202

O201

G109

SG1A

E.L. + 12'-8" FINISH FLOOR U.L.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2 SECTION

GAINESVILLE, FL

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

READING ROOM

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

REVISIONS: xx-xx-09

E.L. + 6'-11" T.O. LANDING

MEN'S RR

WOMEN'S RR

STORAGE

ELEVATOR

G103

G104

G105

G109

STAIRS SG1A

E.L. + 0'-0" FINISH FLOOR L.L.

Drawn By: CLMJ Architects Checked By: McGlothlin

BUILDING SECTIONS

A5.1

DATE : 2 / 15 / 11

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTOD

ANCHOR PLATE WITH COMPRESSION BARS

FOLDED ALUMINUM COPING 2" X 12 ' P.T. ANCHORED BLOCKING

DRIP EDGE CANT 2" GRAVEL ROOF

SLOPE DN. 3 1 2" CLADDING BRACKET

1

4"

ROOF FLASHING

3" RIGID INSULATION STEEL TOP PLATE

CONCRETE ROOF SLAB 2 LAYERS OF 1 2" GYP.

3

4"

SHEATHING

3 1 2" AIR SPACE

2 3 4" LIMESTONE CLADDING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

10 1 4" BATT INSULATION

1 TYPICAL PARAPET DETAIL - LIMESTONE CLADDING 1 1/2"=1'-0"

10 1/4" BATT INSULATION 3/4" SHEATHING MECHANICAL FASTENER AIR/VAPOR BARRIER 4" CLADDING BRACKET STEEL BASE PLATE 2" ALUMINUM CLADDING ALUMINUM BASE PLATE

4" BASEBOARD

NON-STRUCTURAL SLAB ON GRADE COMPACTED SOIL FOOTER #6 REBAR

3 TYPICAL FOUNDATION DETAIL - ALUMINUM CLADDING 1 1/2"=1'-0"

DUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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" 4 4"

2" 2" GRAVEL GRAVEL ROOF ROOF

2" 2" TOP TOP ALUMINUM ALUMINUM MULLION MULLION

ROOF ROOF FLASHING FLASHING

1 1 4" 4"

SLOPE DN.

ROOF ROOF FLASHING FLASHING DRIP EDGE EDGE DRIP

"" RIGID RIGID INSULATION INSULATION 3" 3" RIGID RIGID INSULATION INSULATION

CONCRETE CONCRETE ROOF ROOF SLAB SLAB

2" 2" ALUMINUM ALUMINUM MULLION MULLION

CONCRETE ROOF ROOF SLAB SLAB CONCRETE

DOUBLE GLAZED GLAZED WINDOW WINDOW DOUBLE

1 1 1/2"=1'-0" 1/2"=1'-0"

1 10 10 1 44"" BATT BATT INSULATION INSULATION 3 3 4" 4"

SHEATHING SHEATHING

BUILDING WRAP WRAP BUILDING 3 2 2 3 44"" LIMESTONE LIMESTONE CLADDING CLADDING

1 3 3 122"" CLADDING CLADDING BRACKET BRACKET

STEEL STEEL BASE BASE PLATE PLATE

BOARD BOARD

4" BASEBOARD BASEBOARD 4"

PRODUCED BY BY AN AN AUTODESK AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED

2 TYPICAL PARAPET DETAIL - GLAZING

GAINESVILLE, FL

CANT CANT

"" GRAVEL GRAVEL ROOF ROOF

CLMJ Architects

CANT CANT

Camille Rusch, Loi Flink, Matt Flores, Jenna Lychako

ANCHOR ANCHOR PLATE PLATE WITH WITH COMPRESSION COMPRESSION BARS BARS 2" 2" X X 12" 12" P.T. P.T. ANCHORED ANCHORED BLOCKING BLOCKING

READING ROOM

FOLDED FOLDED ALUMINUM ALUMINUM COPING COPING

Methods & Materials I I : Section 6160 : Prof. McGlothlin

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

CHANNEL CHANNEL SYSTEM SYSTEM BASEPLATE BASEPLATE

RUCTURAL RUCTURAL N GRADE N GRADE

NON-STRUCTURAL NON-STRUCTURAL SLAB ON ON GRADE GRADE SLAB

CTED CTED SOIL SOIL

COMPACTED SOIL SOIL COMPACTED

CONCRETE CONCRETE FOOTER FOOTER

REVISIONS: xx-xx-09

#6 #6 REBAR REBAR

Drawn By: CLMJ Architects Checked By: McGlothlin

DETAILS

4 TYPICAL FOUNDATION DETAIL - LIMESTONE CLADDING 1 1 1/2"=1'-0" 1/2"=1'-0"

A6.3 DATE : 2 / 15 / 11

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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African Hut Reinterpretation

A Collaborative Effort | Matthew Flores + David Goldsmith

Excerpt taken from African Seminar Presentation:

The original concept for the design was to create an architectural intervention that adds to the experience itecture. As previously mentioned, the first connotation with African architecture is often times the of the African ethnobotanical garden. The early idea for This project will seek to represent the qualitative nature of domicile nomadic huts and express the and program of also theserve intervention hitectural design to modern dayfunction standards. This approach to design will as an alternative towas to create that has been used by European countries in thethat colonization African countries. design will a structure wasofconducive toThe vine growth so the nd tectonic nature of African tents described in Labelle Prussin’s book African Nomadic Architecture: garden could grow vertically and create a shaded space However, it will do so with a modern formal influence. for visitors. Since the site for the construct has been moved, the program of the space has changed. It is now seen as more of a sculptural element on display at the zoo that will be used as an ongoing educational device ted of a language of 1100 dense, thin vertical bamboo elements of varying lengths that hang from a 15’ visitors. Different African-inspired projects created structural elements. Due to itsfor purely conceptual nature at this point, this iteration may have been the urely conceptual design perspective. However, it was not feasible, as the parameters of site, structure, by students from Professor Cervone’s courses will also counted for in the design. Therefore, a series of iterations were created to make the design a reality. be on display within the construct, which is offset four feet from the main path for safety reasons. Although the others that are not shown hereprogrammatic consisted of a heavier structure, which as an armature the aspect ofwould theactdesign hasforchanged since its from. After much consideration it was determined that the structure was resembling a typical pergola, move to a wooded area in the teaching zoo, it still meets hese iterations would have been in the $700 range, which was still too expensive the objectives set out by Professor Cervone, especially by internationalizing the curriculum and creating colstructure where the dense tectonic elements themselves were the makeup of the structure as well. laboration among different disciplines. quirements, and the cost was now at a more acceptable $300-$400 range. However, the cantilever was The African section of the Santa Fe Teaching Zoo will his design also required a larger site for the tension cables to extend from the actual construct. now include a contemporary architectural element that is inspired by indigenous African architecture. As model iteration from which the final design came. The construct consists of a 9’ x 9’ grid of bamboo previously mentioned, the first connotation with African foot off center from each other in the X and Y direction and 22 ½” off center in the Z direction. The architecture oftendesign times mud house or grass hut. e design is a 10’ x 10’ x 10’ cube. This was the mostissuccessful that the accounted for conceptual ost, and minimal use of the site. The project 1” tonkin cane diameter bamboo poles, which densify cube This will seek to represent thethequalitative nature ements, which are tied off to each other with natural fiber rope. Bamboo was chosen as a lightweight, of domicile nomadic huts and express the evolution of undant material, which resembles the Acacia root used by the Grabra people. African architectural design to modern day standards. ODS | The site of the project is located in the back ofto the design zoo, which will is surrounded by animalsas thatan alternative This approach also serve wer tools or loud noises. Therefore, it was imperative that we prefabricate as much as possible before to the tabula rasa approach that has been used by Euro. The bamboo elements were categorized according to their x,y,or z direction and measured in the 3D pean in the colonization countries. a spreadsheet was made to organize the countries precut bamboo poles off site. We created a 9’ gridof andAfrican utilized that it was squared off correctly. We hammered 4’ x ½”take rebar two into materiality the ground as foundation The designinwill onfeetthe and tectonic nan bamboo poles that touch the ground. We researched several types of knots, and decided on a simple ture of African tents described in Labelle Prussin’s book e easily taught and repeated quickly for efficient construction. Upon cutting and bundling the poles we African Nomadic Architecture: Space Place and Gender. rials and assembled the outer walls just outside the zoo to create a tilt-up style construction that tied it will do soutubu with formal influence. an with the back wall, the mainHowever, support that is reminiscent of the boruaofmodern the Gabra hut. Once in place, we systematically filled in the rest of the structure with bamboo and rope. Lateral bracing

ctural support. This is the only place where minimal screws were used. The rest of the structure was

ts tied with natural fiber rope. The void of the domicile shape was delineated by curvilinear rope tied to

poles.

ld consider the project to be a success overall. We hope that this is the first of several collaborative

r Cohen and Professor Cervone’s African classes. The concept of internationalizing the curriculum is dents such as myself who would like to be exposed to multiple customs and design alternatives while

ng.

Architecture: Evolution and Transformation. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1997. Print.

Architecture in Africa. New York: Universe, 1963. Print.

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Nomadic Architecture: Space, Place, and Gender. Washington: Smithsonian Institution, 1995. Print.

04


Iteration #1

Iteration #2

Iteration #2

Iteration #1

Iteration #3

Iteration 04 #3

Iteration #4

Iteration #4

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Iteration #3

Iteration #4

04

Iteration #5 Iteration #5

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Iteration #5

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Projected Motility

A Collaborative Effort | Matthew Flores + Darren Hargrove + Stephanie Salvo

The goal of this project is to create a densified, urbanized environment, which is inspired by the fluidity of movement. The concept for the project was inspired by the transient nature of the college residents and hotel occupants, which activate the building on an ongoing basis. The context was mapped by overlapping modes of private and public pedestrian movement and by tracking the sun’s movement throughout the day and year. The green belt which moves section cuts through the building and creates a mobile living experience for residents that is conducive to sustainable living.

Facade System

Program Volumes

Circulation Systems

Structure

Green Belt

Ground Plane Entries

Underground Parking

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Ground Floor Plan 46


Section A1

Section A2

NW 13th St Hotel Entry Southeast Corner

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3rd Level Reflected Ceiling Plan

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3rd Level Floor Plan


Residential Corridor Overlooking Plaza

Main Public Plaza

Green Beltway Main Tier

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10th Level Floor Plan

Unit Plans

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5th Level Floor Plan

13th Street North Entry | July 11:30am

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Apts South Elevation

Hotel North Elevation

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Apts West Elevation

Hotel East Elevation


Apts North Elevation

Hotel South Elevation

Apts West Elevation

Hotel West Elevation

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Green Belt Night View From 2nd Level Hote Retail

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Thank You

Matthew Flores mattfloresarc@gmail.com 407.227.4147


Portfolio  

Matthew Flores | Portfolio | 2013

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