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On-site Insight May 2008 In This Issue Scaffolding: Are You Competent? Working With You To Enhance Your OH&S Compliance The New Planning System Substantial Alteration To A Building Construction OHS Failing Lodging Plans And Documentation Under The New Planning System Roof Replacement – Some Key Issues To Consider Some Of The Key Changes To BCA 2008 More Fuel Tax Credit Entitlements Notice Of General Meeting Guide To Standards And Tolerances OHS Regulation In Force – 26 May

Important Dates Monday 19 May Grid Connect

Wednesday 28 May Next Work Method Statements Induction

Wednesday 28 May Industry Dinner

Friday 30 May Master Builders Group Training Apprentice and Cadet Awards

Friday 27 June Master Builders and Boral Excellence in Building Awards

Scaffolding: Are You Competent? Under the ACT Government’s Occupational Health and Safety Act, employers, persons in control of a workplace and self-employed persons must take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure that persons at or near the workplace are not exposed to health and safety risks. Falls from height are the most common cause of accidents on building and construction sites with falls from scaffolding being the major contributor. An interesting fact to note from ACT WorkCover’s information sheet on Scaffolding is that employers, persons in control of a workplace and selfemployed persons are to ensure that the workplace is safe and this means that scaffolding erected on site is safe and has not been altered by nonticketed persons. The person in charge of the site must ensure that the scaffold has not been altered and should inspect the scaffold daily. If it is found to be defective or incomplete it should not be accessed by anyone and sign posted “Scaffold Incomplete – Do Not Use”. If the person in charge of the workplace knowingly allows someone to use incomplete and defective scaffolding, and that someone falls from the scaffold and is injured, it is not the ticketed scaffolder nor the un-ticketed person who altered the scaffold that is pursued. The person in charge of the site is the responsible person under the Occupational Health and Safety Act. For those that do not know, scaffolding higher than 4 metres must only be erected, altered and dismantled by a person with a certificate of competency of the appropriate class or by a trainee directly under the competent person’s supervision. The MBA recommends that any members with scaffold erected on site inspect the scaffold daily and if one of your trades require an alteration, have it altered by a ticketed scaffolder. When a job is priced ensure that you have a contingency in the price for scaffold alterations.


Working With You To Enhance Your OH&S Compliance In collaboration with it’s members the Master Builders Association of the ACT and Matrix Compliance Management have developed a series of comprehensive Work Method Statements (WMS) kits for key trades and contractors. These kits are intended to provide generic information to satisfy compliance with occupational health and safety obligations. Using these kits does not ensure absolute compliance, you may need to consider additional information relating to specific tasks and work environments to ensure total compliance.

Induction Training To gain a greater appreciation of how the WMS are applied when you purchase a kit you will be provided with a free, one hour, face-to-face induction program. The Master Builders Association of the ACT has already scheduled dates for these induction programs. Please contact the Master Builders Association of the ACT on 02 6247 2099 for more details

Key Elements Of The Work Method Statements Kits Included in each WMS kit are hard copy WMS for each category and a CD. The kit will also include a free 2008 ACT Building and Construction Industry Safety Handbook. The WMS kits will be available for purchase through the Master Builders Association of the ACT at a costing of $110 for members and $550 for non-members which includes the associated induction training. Table Of Referenced Work Method Statements Applicable To Each Trade/Contractor  Ceramic Plant Principal Bricklayer Carpenter Tiler Concretor Electrician Painter Operator Plumber Contractor 101 WMS Contents 102 Disclaimer/Duty Of Care 103 WMS Information Sheet 104 Scope 105 Induction Register 106 Risk Calculator 107 Plant And Equipment Register 108 Material Safety Data Sheet Summary 109 Job Safety Analysis 110 General Site Safety Checklist 111 Emergency Procedures 112 General Site Safety

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113 Electrical 114 Carpentry 115 Bricklaying

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116 Painting

117 Plumbing

118 Concreting

119 Ceramic Tiling

120 Excavation 121 Working At Heights

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122 Confined Spaces 123 Prefabricated Scaffold 124 Welding And Hot Works 125 Using Laser Levelling Equipment 126 WMS Summary

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                         

For more information on the WMS kits or to book your induction program please contact the Master Builders Association of the ACT on 02 6247 2099.


On-site Insight The New Planning System Transitional arrangements for pre-31 March 2008 planning system matters The ACT’s new planning system commenced on 31 March 2008. Transitional arrangements are in place for a number of matters, including development applications and appeals. Where reference is made on this page to the previous Act, this means the Land (Planning and Environment) Act 1991.

DAs Awaiting Approval The previous Act – including the Territory Plan 2002 applies to all development applications: • lodged prior to 31 March 2008; and • where a decision had not been made by ACTPLA prior to 31 March 2008. If the development application is approved, it will be done so under the previous Act.

Approved DAs The previous Act applies to all development applications approved prior to 31 March 2008. Where an approval has been granted: • it continues until the time it would have ended under the previous Act; and • may be extended under the previous Act if the application for extension is made before the approval expires and prior to six months after the commencement of the new Act. Where an extension had been granted but not started, it will end on the date to which it was extended.

Alterations To DAs If after 31 March 2008 a person wants to apply to alter their development application that was lodged under section 226 of the previous Act, the application shall be made under section 226(7) of the previous Act. The development application shall be determined under the previous Act.

Submission Of More Information For DAs If after 31 March 2008 a person wants to submit more information for their development application that was lodged under section 226 of the previous Act (providing additional information to a current application which is in response to a written request from the ACT Planning and Land Authority), the application shall be made under section 233 of the previous Act. The development application shall be determined under the previous Act.

Application To Satisfy Conditions Of An Approval If before 31 March 2008 a person submitted plans in response to conditions of approval imposed in accordance with section 245 of the previous Act, and the decision is to be made after 31 March 2008, the application shall be determined under the previous Act. If after 31 March 2008 a person submits plans in response to conditions of approval imposed in accordance with section 245 of the previous Act (DA determined before or after 31 March 2008), the application shall be determined under the previous Act.

Amendments To Approvals If before 31 March 2008 a person applied to amend their approval under section 247 of the previous Act and the decision is to be made post 31 March 2008, the application shall be determined under the previous Act. If after 31 March 2008 a person wants to apply to amend their development approval that was granted under the previous Act (pre or post 31 March 2008), the application shall be made under section 197 of the new Act - the Planning and Development Act 2007. The application will be taken to relate to a proposal in the merit track.

Reconsideration Of Decisions Reconsideration applications lodged pre and post 31 March 2008 for development applications determined under the previous Act (pre or post 31 March 2008) shall be lodged and determined under the previous Act.

Appeals The previous Act applies to all appeals to the Administrative Appeal Tribunal for review of decision made under the repealed Act and where the application for review had not been decided by the AAT. The previous Act will be applied when deciding the outcome of the appeal.

Lease And Development Conditions When assessing a development application to which lease and developments conditions apply, the application must be considered against the requirements of the lease and development conditions where the Territory Plan requires it, in addition to any relevant code. This applies for five years, until 20 March 2013.

AN INDUSTRY UPDATE FROM THE MASTER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF THE ACT


On-site Insight Substantial Alteration To A Building There have been major changes to the building regulations regarding the definition of a substantial alteration to a building which affects any work to existing buildings.

Substantial Alteration – Section 29(2) Building Act For a class 1 building, an alteration is considered a substantial alteration if, the total floor area of the proposed alteration (not including any internal alteration) is more than 50% of the floor area of the original building. Any alterations made during the 3 years before the application for the new alteration will have to take into account the added floor area of all the alterations made in that period. The same applies for a class 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 or 9 building, however the total floor area includes any other alteration (including any internal alterations). The floor area of a building, denotes the area of floor measured from the outer walls of the building, and includes the area on each storey of the building if there is more than one storey. Neither refitting a building nor replacing the internal elements of the building is an alteration of the building unless the layout and function of the internal spaces of the building are changed.

Construction OHS Failing The Federal Safety Commissioner (FSC) has criticised the “unacceptable” OHS performance in the construction industry, pointing to recent data that indicates fatalities continue to occur at an alarming rate. In his 2005–06 annual report, FSC Tom Fisher says “there is still scope for significant improvement, despite gains in some areas”. Fisher says that, on average, in the years 2002–03 and 2004–05 combined, between five to six fatalities occurred for every 100,000 employees in the industry. In 2003–04 alone, 52 workers died as a result of a construction site incident. Further, each year, over 14,000 employees in the industry are injured badly enough to lose a week or more off work. “The statistics demonstrate that the building and construction industry is not achieving the level of OHS improvements, particularly in relation to fatalities, that other industries are achieving,” the FSC says in the report. To meet the challenge, the FSC has introduced a reporting framework under the Building and Construction OHS Accreditation Scheme, which will provide more timely information on the OHS performance of accredited contractors and their projects. Source: National Safety Magazine

Non-Substantial Alteration The Building Regulations are quite specific regarding what needs to be done to achieve compliance where the building work is part of a substantial alteration. However the regulations as they now apply try to deal with alternative glazing requirements for the new addition and what you need to do to achieve compliance. The main issue we are trying to address is enhancing the thermal performance of the new windows in the house extension. The extension must comply with the BCA including the energy efficient requirements. Ensuring the extension will not suffer from excessive solar heat gain in summer can be impractical if the adjacent pre-existing part of the house has windows that suffer from excessive solar heat gain. Similarly, ensuring the extension will not lose excessive heat can be impractical if the adjacent pre-existing part of the house has windows with poor thermal resistance to outflows of heat. However the cost of upgrading window units, by providing shading structures, thermal break frames, double glazing or low emittence glass can be cost prohibitive in some circumstances. The MBA have been working with ACTPLA to develop explanatory guidelines that can be used by industry in interpreting these new requirements. At this stage we expect to have a guideline developed and published in our next edition of On-site Insight.

Lodging Plans And Documentation Under The New Planning System There has been some confusion with the requirement of ACTPLA to submit all plans electronically or on CD in landscape format. Some of our members have standard house designs that are created and drawn in portrait and are concerned about the cost to their businesses to change formats. All is not lost!!! The MBA has lobbied ACTPLA to accept plans in portrait as long as the plans are right reading, meaning that when ACTPLA inserts the documents on their system, the plans and accompanying documents are able to be read without the need for rotating. They also require that the sequence of submitted documentation is as per their requirements. There has been issues with the requirement for the Crown Lease commencement date to be included in the DA application. We have also successfully lobbied ACTPLA to delete this requirement.


On-site Insight Roof Replacement – Some Key Issues To Consider With the rising demand for residential remodelling, there is an increasing requirement for roof replacement or, more specifically, replacing roof tiles with a metal deck roof.

with 3 x 2.8 ø nails each end over each alternate truss (See diagram). In this case the calculated uplift force is 4.4 kN and the tie-down capacity is 4.7 kN.

The MBA receives a number of enquiries regarding the requirements and implications for roof replacement.

The important thing to remember is that you ensure the roof structure is tied to the studs and not only the top plate. This is crucial!

Probably, the first consideration is to check whether you need development approval, and whether the colour chosen by your clients comply with the rules in the new Development Codes of the Territory Plan. That’s something easily looked up, but have you considered the changes to the forces applied to the new roof? Replacing a tiled roof with a metal roof will dramatically increase the uplift forces. Remember that the dead load of the roof changes from 60 kg/m2 to 10 kg/m2. As a result of this increase in uplift forces, provision must be made to ensure that the new roofing material does not help to rip the whole roof structure from the house. These provisions come in the form of tie-downs which are similar to the tie down requirements for metal roofs in AS 1684 National Timber Framing Code. On a conventional cut roof, with rafters spaced at 600 mm centres, and a wind Uplift Load Width (ULW) of, say, 2.5 m and each alternate rafter being tied down, the calculated uplift force would be 2.9 kN. The selected tie-down to satisfy this uplift requirement would be a 30 x 0.8 GI strap, fixed with 3 x 2.8 ø nails each end over every third rafter. (See diagram), This tie-down has a capacity of 3.5 kN. The same tie-down method can be used for securing under purlins/ridge to strutting beams/wall as noted in the diagram.

“But it can’t be done on an existing roof structure” we hear you say. On a typical roof construction the eaves overhang (when the tiles are removed) exposes about 300 mm of the external timber frame above the last course of bricks. This allows plenty of room to tie straps to the studs. We have described this method of tie-down as it is the simplest and most easily applied on site, given the difficulties of installing continuous tie-downs in existing houses. Finally the roofing battens must be screwed to the rafters or top chord of the truss using the following: 1 x 75 No 14 Type 17 screw with a minimum penetration of 50 mm, at every truss (900 c/c) and every second rafter (1200 c/c). Batten straps can also be used as an alternate method of fixing. The methods noted do not preclude other methods from being used as long as they are satisfactory and comply with AS 1684.

Rafter or truss GI strap fixed to studs using 3x2.80 nails both ends

Top plate

Studs

On a typical truss roof with an ULW of 5 m, the tie-down requirement is a minimum of a 30 x 0.8 GI strap fixed

Tie Down Points

2.5( 2.5

)

T YP

5.0(

T YP

)

If possible tie down underpulins and struts to frame

GI strap fixed to studs using 3x2.80 nails

GI strap fixed to studs using 3x2.80 nails CUT ROOF

TRUSS ROOF

00045

AN INDUSTRY UPDATE FROM THE MASTER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF THE ACT


On-site Insight Some Of The Key Changes To BCA 2008 1 May 2008 is the national adoption date for BCA 2008 and with all the latest amendments incorporated into it. All building work approved after this date will have to comply with BCA 2008 as amended. Listed below are some of the key changes that have been incorporated into BCA 2008.

Volume Two Housing Provisions Climate Zones Figure 1.1.4 – The climate zone map has been updated and the location of the climate zone map on the ABCB web site has also been updated in Note 1. Subsoil Drains 3.1.2.4 – In response to the different methods of the design and installation of subsoil drains throughout Australia, the entire section including the explanatory information has been revised. Figure 3.1.2.5 has been deleted and a new diagram replacing the previous diagram on 'Typical subsoil drains' as referenced in AS/NZS 3500.3 has been inserted. Articulation Joints In Masonry 3.3.1.8(b) – The words "between masonry elements" added to clarify the location of articulation joints and reference to Figure 3.3.1.8 added. 3.3.1.8(d) – For consistency with TN 61, subclause (d) has been deleted. Consequently, the remaining subclauses have been renumbered. 3.3.1.8(e) – Amended to clarify when sealing of joints is required.

Fire Protection 3.7.1.5(a) and Explanatory information: • Reference to Figures 3.7.1.3(a) and (b) amended to refer to Figure 3.7.1.3 because of the revision and relocation of the figures. • Clarification added that the intent of Figure 3.7.1.3 is that combustible materials are not directly exposed to fire at the junction of the wall and non-combustible roof, etc. Figure 3.7.1.3 – Details revised to reflect current construction practice. Figure 3.7.1.3(b) – Deleted; figure has been revised and incorporated into Figure 3.7.1.3 as described above. 3.7.1.6(d)(ii) – The concession for carports has been extended to include carports with polycarbonate roofing, in addition to those with non-combustible roofing. Figure 3.7.1.7 – To be consistent with the intent of 3.7.1.6(d)(ii), text to (a) reworded "Roof covering must be polycarbonate or non-combustible…" and notation to (a) now reads "Timber posts and beams are permitted adjacent to a boundary. However…”. Wet Area Waterproofing 3.8.1 – The explanatory information following the definition of "shower area, enclosed" has been included in the definition. Consequently, the explanatory information has been deleted.

3.3.1.8(f ) – Amended in line with the recommendation in TN 61 not to allow the use of articulation joints adjacent to arched openings.

3.8.1.1(a) – The reference to 3.8.1.3 has been corrected to 3.8.1.2 so that the intent of including 3.8.1.1 and Table 3.8.1.1 in the acceptable construction practice is clearly set out.

Flashings Figure 3.3.4.5 – Alternative position of flashings to head of windows shown.

Figure 3.8.1.1 – In both (a) and (b) 'WP' on shower walls has been corrected to 'WR', graphics have been added and text amended for clarity.

Sarking Tiled Roofs 3.5.1.2(f ), (g) and (h) – New provisions added on requirements for installation of sarking under tiled roofs.

Figure 3.8.1.2:

Table 3.5.1.1b – New table added for sarking requirements based on the pitch of the roof and the length of the rafters. Existing Table 3.5.1.1 and its associated reference renumbered as Table 3.5.1.1a. Glass And Glazing 3.6.0(b)(x) – Glazing used in balustrades and sloping overhead glazing included in the list of glazed assemblies for which compliance with Performance Requirement P2.1 is achieved by complying with AS 1288. 3.6.4.5(c) – New provision inserted to align with changes to AS 1288 to allow a concession where the glass is protected by a vanity.

• "Unenclosed" has been added to the title of the figure to clarify when the requirements apply. • In diagram (a), 'WP' has been added. • In diagram (b), the title has been added, the 3 junctions below the bath are now illustrated the same, text referring to the 'lip/tile joint' added and a reference to a 1300 mm distance has been corrected to 1500 mm. Figure 3.8.1.3: • "Unenclosed" has been added to the title of the figure to clarify when the requirements apply. • In diagram (a), 'WP' has been added. • In diagram (b), the 3 junctions below the bath are now illustrated the same.


On-site Insight Figure 3.8.1.10 – In diagram (d), the membrane has been relocated to be above the tile bed as the wording states.

Balustrades 3.9.2.2:

3.8.3.2 explanatory information – For consistency with changes to Volume One, new explanatory information has been inserted setting out that a kitchen sink or washbasin must not be counted as a laundry washtub.

• The requirement of a balustrade is for the protection of window openings added. As a consequence of this change, the clause has been restructured. • To assist in understanding the intent, the word "deck" has been included in the list of areas requiring a balustrade.

A full listing of amendments for both Volume One and Volume Two of the Housing Provisions is listed when you purchase your copy of the BCA.

More Fuel Tax Credit Entitlements From 1 July 2008 many building and construction businesses will be able to claim fuel tax credits for the first time, and many others will be able to claim additional fuel tax credits. The Tax Office is encouraging businesses in the building and construction industry to find out if they can save money on their business fuel costs. In the past, businesses have only been able to claim a fuel tax credit for fuel used in heavy vehicles, such as trucks and specific activities, such as primary production. Under the expansion, fuel tax credits can be claimed for the majority of fuel used in business – whether it’s used in bobcats, cement mixers, cranes and wacker-packers. The exceptions are: • alternative fuels such: º liquefied petroleum gas º compressed natural gas º liquefied natural gas º ethanol and biodiesel • fuel used in light weight vehicles travelling on public roads, such as cars or small vans. How much a business claims depends on how the fuel is used. The table opposite explains what a business may be entitled to claim based on rates from 1 July 2008.

Get on board

Claiming Is Easy Simply keep any records that prove you bought fuel and how it was used for your business. You can calculate your claim by visiting www.ato.gov.au/businesses and selecting ‘Rates, calculators and tools’ on the left hand side. To find out if your business is eligible or for further information go to www.ato.gov.au/fuelschemes or phone 13 28 66 between 8.00 am and 6.00 pm Monday to Friday. Activities

Rates (per litre)

Fuel used in vehicles with a gross vehicle mass (GVM) greater than 4.5 tonne travelling on a public road.

18.51¢*

Fuel used in specified activities in agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining, and marine transport, rail transport and nursing and medical that have been eligible since 1 July 2006.

38.14¢

Electricity generation. Non-fuel use, such as burner applications and solvents. Fuel used in all other business activities, machinery, plant and equipment, such as a wide range of construction, wholesale, retail, property management and landscaping activities.

19.07¢**

If you’re registered for goods and services tax but not fuel tax credits, it’s easy to get on board – just phone 13 72 26 anytime (24 hours a day, seven days a week). Make sure you have your ABN and your tax file number handy when you call.

*This rate will change on 1 January 2009. For more information on rates visit www.ato.gov.au/fuelschemes or phone 13 28 66.

Once registered, an additional label will be added to your business activity statement (BAS) and the Tax Office will send you information on how to claim.

**The rate of 19.0715 cents per litre is 50% of the full rate of 38.143 cents per litre. The full rate will apply to all these activities from 1 July 2012.

AN INDUSTRY UPDATE FROM THE MASTER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF THE ACT


On-site Insight Notice Of General Meeting

Business

Members will be asked to consider and if thought fit, to approve the following resolutions as an ordinary resolutions: 1. That Sean James Michelle of 44 Sydney Avenue, Barton in the Australian Capital Territory be appointed as liquidator of MBA Group Training (ACT) Inc for the purpose of the winding up and transfer of assets.

Members will be asked to consider and if thought fit, to approve the following resolutions as special resolutions:

Dated: 1 May 2008

1. That MBA Group Training Inc be voluntarily wound up on 30 June 2008. 2. That all of the operations, assets, property and undertakings of MBA Group Training Inc be transferred to MBA Group Training Ltd ACN 130 865 253 on 30 June 2008

Rod Mitton Chairman

Guide To Standards And Tolerances The Guide to Standards and Tolerances has now been adopted in the ACT Building Regulations as a guide for determining fundamentally non-compliant work under the ACT Building Act. The purpose of adopting this publication was to set a standard whereby the guide can be used by builders and owners as a convenient reference to the minimum quality of work expected. The Guide to Standards and Tolerances is a valuable tool that will provide guidance for areas of building standards that are not prescribed in legislation or the Building Code of Australia. Research suggests that parties to a building contract can reduce the risk of serious disputes by referring to this guide at the time a contract is entered into or later, where there are concerns about the quality of building work. The Guide to Standards and Tolerances was produced in collaboration with the Victorian Building Commission, the Office of Fair Trading NSW, the Tasmanian Government and the ACT Government. The Guide to Standards and Tolerances can be downloaded from the Building Commission website (www.buildingcommission.com.au) under their publications library. This publication has been designed by The Master Builders Association of the ACT and printed by New Millennium Print to comply with a very high standard of environmental performance as stipulated in the Good Environment Choice environmental labelling standard GECA 20 - Printers and Printed Matter www.geca.org.au/standardsregister.htm

By order of the Board

OHS Regulation In Force – 26 May The Occupational Health and Safety (General) Regulations 2007 was signed by the minister in November 2007 and comes into force on 26 May 2008. The Regulation provides for risk control, training for health and safety representatives, reporting of and record keeping in relation to dangerous occurrences at the workplace, and for particular duties and safety measures that relate to the management at workplaces of issues such as entry and exit from the workplace; the use of personal protective and safety equipment; the prevention of falls; safe surfaces and floors; noise, and the risk of hearing impairment, and emergency procedures in the workplace. The Regulation gives effect to national uniform occupational health and safety standards in relation to noise (National Standard for Occupational Noise [NOHSC:1007 (2000)]), and working in confined spaces (ASNZS 2865 – 2001: Safe Working in a Confined Space). A copy of the regulation is available on the ACT Work Cover website. Material informing business of their obligations under the new regulation is currently being developed and will be available on the Office of Regulatory Services website (www.workcover.act.gov.au) shortly.

Master Builders Association of the ACT 241 Northbourne Ave Lyneham Canberra ACT 2602 Tel: (02) 6247 2099 Fax: (02) 6249 8374 canberra@mba.org.au www.mba.org.au 00045

Notice is hereby given of a General Meeting of the members of MBA Group Training (ACT) Inc to be held in the Boardroom of the Master Builders of the ACT, 241 Northbourne Avenue, Lyneham, commencing at 5.30 pm on Thursday 29 May 2008.

On-Site Insight Edition 3 - 2008  

Newsletter, MBA

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