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LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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VOLUNTEER NEWS SUMMER LEARNING INSTITUTE SPOTLIGHT A behind-the-scenes look at the MOAS Summer Learning Institute video-making programs

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EXHIBIT FEATURES Great Impressions: The Intaglio Process and Napoleon: Empire and Heritage coming to MOAS this November

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HIGHWAYMEN: AFRICAN-AMERICAN FOLK ARTISTS OF FLORIDA Chief Curator Cynthia Duval explores the history of "The Highwaymen."

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FALL PULL-OUT CALENDAR

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ZACH IN TIME Tuscawilla: A Glimpse Into Florida's Past Zach Zacharias takes a journey through the unique and beautiful nature preserve that surrounds the Museum of Arts & Sciences

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GUILD NEWS Membership information and full details on this year's Festival of Trees Champagne Gala

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HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL Important information for the 51st Annual Halifax Art Festival being held November 2-3 in Downtown Daytona Beach

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OVER & OUT A Comet's Tale - Seth Mayo delivers cool facts about comets, specifically Comet ISON which may make an appearance near Earth this October

For the latest MOAS news and information, connect with us at Facebook.com/moasdaytona

vol. 33 no. 3


MOAS STAFF

LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Executive Director ANDREW SANDALL

Administration Staff RENE BELL ADAMS, Director of Communications SHERMAN COLEMAN, Director of Finance Eric Goire, Director of Operations JESSi JACKSON SMITH, Director of Grants and Development BRANDY MAHLER, Development Assistant Israel Taylor, Physical Plant Assistant Patricia Nikolla, Guest Relations Manager JENNIFER GILL, Visitor Services DAN MAYNARD, Facilities Assistant ROBERT WOHLRAB, Security and Visitor Services Tyler K. Adair, Security Lee Ashton, Security ROGER BOWERS, Security BILL CHRISTIAN, Security CODY ROGERS, Security ROY SHAFFER, JR., Coordinator - Dow Museum of Historic Houses

Curatorial Staff Cynthia Duval, Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts and Gary R. Libby Curator of Art J. ”Zach” Zacharias, Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History Seth Mayo, Curator of Astronomy Luis Zengotita, Science and Education Associate Eric Mauk, Collections Manager and Registrar Bonnie Jones, Conservator - Paintings Ed Van Hoose, Conservator - Furniture Executive Director Emeritus GARY R. LIBBY

Editor RENE BELL ADAMS Contributing Writers RENE BELL ADAMS CYNTHIA DUVAL Joan Horneff BRANDY MAHLER Pat Masotti-Abernathy Seth Mayo J. ”Zach” Zacharias Luis Zengotita Art Director NIKKI Mastando, MASTANDO MEDIA

4 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

MOAS board of trustees president, carol lively platig with MOAS Executive Director, Andrew Sandall enjoying the exhibit Highwaymen: African-American Folk Artists of Florida

Dear friends, Another wonderful Septembers with the Smithsonian has come to a close and we are thrilled with the variety of events, programming and activities which so many of you attended. We hope you all enjoyed it as ANDREW SANDALL much as we did. Created to share the benefits of our Smithsonian Affiliation with our community, our 3rd Annual Septembers with the Smithsonian was our most successful yet! This year, the Museum was pleased to feature an exhibition generously loaned by a fellow Smithsonian Affiliate museum, the Orange County Regional History Center. Highwaymen: African-American Folk Artists of Florida is on exhibition through mid-November here at MOAS. Of course, a highlight of this year’s events was the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra (SJMO) and their “Swingin’ with the Smithsonian” performance. In addition, MOAS Renaissance Society members enjoyed a special SJMO swing concert, complete with a dance floor. A special matinee concert for children, “Swingin’ with the Smithsonian Junior” was also added to the schedule this year, and offered the opportunity to enjoy a free performance for MOAS members and their children. At the beginning of September, I attended the Florida Association of Museums (FAM) Annual Conference. It was a great opportunity to meet colleagues and discuss the recovery of many institutions from the financial recession. It was also gratifying to discuss the growth of MOAS and to know we are positioned to “lead the charge,” as museums move further into the 21st century.

As you may have seen on your most recent visit, the future of the Museum of Arts & Sciences is rapidly taking shape…. At the end of September, MOAS was proud to announce a new project with the Root family, who are donating $1.2 million to restore and enhance the Root Family Museum at MOAS. We are excited to be working closely with them on this project, which includes both the preservation of the historic Silver Holly and Hiawatha railcars and enclosure of the rail shed, creating a large, multi-purpose air-conditioned space. This will also allow for the display of original artifacts in context with the railcars and will enhance visitor enjoyment of the exhibition, whatever the weather. This new interpretation will bring to the fore the family’s incredible story and will highlight in more detail the significance of the collection, which is a visitor favorite. This past August also saw the groundbreaking of the Planetarium, which is the first part of the West Wing rebuild. In addition, much progress continues to be made on the new Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Art, which is rapidly rising to its full height along Nova Road. The opportunities in front of the Museum right now seem limitless, with new and innovative offerings that will be of interest to the very youngest of our first time guests to our loyal members who have attended talks each month for years, and everyone in between. Be sure to look for updates on the progress of these exciting projects as well as upcoming exhibitions and programming on our website (www.moas.org) and on our Facebook page (Facebook.com/moasdaytona). Your continued support in the Museum’s mission to inspire, cultivate curiosity and promote lifelong learning in art, science and history is greatly appreciated. We look forward to seeing you around the Museum and at the Halifax Art Festival this fall!


BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND SPONSORS

2013 BOARD OF TRUSTEES Carol Lively Platig, President Jill Warren, Vice President Janet Jacobs, Assistant Vice President Cici Brown, Assistant Vice President Melinda Dawson, Secretary Chris Lydecker, Treasurer Amy Workowski, Assistant Treasurer Thomas Zane, Trustee Liaison Bridget Bergens Thurman Gillespy, Jr., M.D. Tom Hart Kim A. Klancke, M.D. Carl W. Lentz III, M.D. Dr. Evelyn Lynn Eileen McDermott Bill McMunn Allison Morris Zacharias Ellen O’Shaughnessy Cory Walker Linda Williams Barbara Young HONORARY TRUSTEES Miriam Blickman Anderson Bouchelle (Deceased) J. Hyatt Brown Alys Clancy (Deceased) Tippen Davidson (Deceased) Susan Feibleman Herbert Kerman (Deceased) Chapman Root (Deceased) Jan Thompson (Deceased)

MAJOR SPONSORS GOLD Bright House Networks Brown & Brown, Inc. Cici and Hyatt Brown Halifax Health Travel Host Magazine YP® Zgraph, Inc. SILVER Bethune-Cookman University Cobb Cole Daytona Beach News-Journal Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Ed and Pat Jackson Mastando Media NASCAR ® Gene and Diane Rogers BRONZE Bahama House Best Western Aku Tiki Inn Daytona International Speedway Encore Catering of Central Florida Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Consuelo and Richard Hartmann In Memory of Dolores Ann Sixma Dr. and Mrs. Kim A. Klancke Jill Simpkins and L. Gale Lemerand Jon Hall Chevrolet Gary R. Libby Trust Chris and Charlie Lydecker Publix Super Markets Charities David and Toni Slick SunTrust Bank University of Central Florida Tom and Sena Zane

REPRESENTATIVES Museum Guild Joan Horneff, President Junior League Laura Hill Reece Cuban Foundation Gary R. Libby Root Foundation Linda Hall

Arts & Sciences is published quarterly by the Museum of Arts & Sciences, 352 S. Nova Road, Daytona Beach, Florida 32114, telephone 386.255.0285, web site www.moas.org. Income from contributors helps offset a portion of the expense involved in the production of this publication.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM ABOUT THE MUSEUM OF ARTS AND SCIENCES The Museum of Arts and Sciences is a not-forprofit educational institution, chartered by the State of Florida in 1962 and accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. Museum collections and research include Cuban and Florida art, American fine and decorative arts, European fine and decorative arts, preColumbian and African artifacts, Pleistocene fossils, Florida history and regional natural history. Permanent and changing exhibitions, lectures, and classes highlight educational programs. The Museum houses changing arts and sciences exhibition galleries, permanent collection galleries, a gallery of American art, paintings, decorative arts and furniture, Cuban Fine and Folk Art Museum, a planetarium, library, the Frischer Sculpture Garden, maintains nature trails in a 90-acre preserve in adjacent Tuscawilla Park, and operates Gamble Place in Port Orange and the Dow Museum of Historic Houses in St. Augustine. The Museum also houses the Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum. The Museum of Arts and Sciences is recognized by the State of Florida as a major cultural institution and receives major funding from the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. Major Museum programs and activities for members, school children and the general public are also supported by grants from the County of Volusia, the Guild of the Museum of Arts and Sciences, the Junior League of Daytona Beach, Target®, Elfun Community Fund, and the UCF Educational Partnership. MUSEUM HOURS: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays The Museum of Arts and Sciences is committed to the Americans with Disabilities Act by making our facility and programs accessible to all people. If you have any special requirements, suggestions, or recommendations, please contact our representative, Andrew Sandall, at 386.255.0285. If you prefer, you may contact the Cultural Council of Volusia County representative at 386.257.6000, or the Division of Cultural Affairs, The Capitol, Tallahassee 850.487.2980, or TT 850.488.5779. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. THE TOLL FREE NUMBER IS 1.800.435.7352. Florida Registration #CH-1851

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES All inquiries regarding advertising should be directed to the MOAS Communications Department at 386.255.0285, ext. 320. ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 5


VOLUNTEER NEWS

Thank you to our Volunteer of the Quarter -

Summer Learning Institute Volunteers! Volunteers play a vital role in the success of the Museum’s annual Summer Learning Institute. Many of our volunteers were campers at one time in their lives and have spent many of their summers at MOAS. Our youth volunteers are tasked with many different activities to help our camp run smoothly from day to day.

Checking-in campers, assisting the teachers and working with Museum resources is a typical day in the life of a Summer Learning Institute volunteer. They are partners in helping our teachers provide the rich educational environment for which our Summer Learning Institute is known. Additionally, our MOAS student volunteers serve as positive role models to campers. We appreciate our student volunteers and thank them for helping to make our Summer Learning Institute a success year after year.

In Memoriam

Cathy Luwisch

Cathy Luwisch had been a volunteer at the Museum of Arts & Sciences since 2004. She worked at the Guest Relations Desk and welcomed visitors with a big smile.

Before coming to MOAS, Cathy worked at NBC Studios as a secretary. She was married to Ed Luwisch and together they had two daughters and three grandchildren. Everyone who worked with Cathy at the Museum has fond memories of her, especially her love of New York Times crossword puzzles. Cathy will be greatly missed by everyone at MOAS.

6 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

SUMMER LEARNING INSTITUTE SPOTLIGHT

Lights! Camera! Action! VIDEO PRODUCTION FUN at MOAS

V

BY: Luis Zengotita, Science and Education Associate

ideo is a perfect blend of art and science. Here at MOAS we offer several different options to discover the possibilities of this medium in our annual Summer Learning Institute, sponsored by Bright House Networks. “Claymation,” “Short Movie Making” and “The MOAS Challenge” are three of these offerings and many of their components are shared. All use cameras to capture the action and require a set and “actors,” as well as directors. Also, a good dose of creativity is definitely a key ingredient. In the Claymation class, students create and manipulate their actors as well as the miniature set. We use nondrying clay in a dozen colors that can be mixed to make additional new colors. I remind the students that the tiny sculpture should look impressive and needs to be able to withstand thousands of movements. Even using the best technical program available it still takes at least two hours to record one minute of film. Upon completion of their film, students use Macintosh computers to change speed, remove any unwanted shots and add sound.

In “Short Movie Making” the students “employ” other students as live actors the sets are much larger! The advantage is that the filming takes far less time. The students were asked to shoot a documentary, commercial, true story, original story and a special effects short film. This year was the first time a student chose to create and direct a scary movie. Reality shows are in high demand and MOAS has its own called “The MOAS Challenge.” This class is comprised of two groups. One group that competes in a series of games - they are the stars; the other does the work of creating the games, shooting the film and editing - even making the soundtrack. The stars are placed in two teams. This year the teams represented the Tuscawilla Preserve and Children’s Museum. If you are interested in seeing who won this year, watch it on our YouTube channel. All of the class videos are found at youtube.com/user/MoasChallenge.


EXHIBIT FEATURES

COMING THIS NOVEMBER TO MOAS

By Cynthia Duval, Chief Curator, Curator of Decorative Arts and Gary R. Libby Curator of Art

GREAT IMPRESSIONS:

The Intaglio Process

This fascinating exhibition of printed material from the MOAS Collection contains a wide range of representative examples from the 17th through 20th centuries, their ideological concepts and artistry captured in the main on handmade paper and expressed through etching, wood and metal engraving, aquatints and lithography. There are architectural studies, portraits and figural groups, landscapes, seascapes and city scenes, caricatures and natural history studies; artists include Rembrandt, Piranesi, Audubon, Hogarth, Manet, Renoir and Dali, the enfant terrible of surrealism.

opens november 22, 2013

Napoleon:

EMPIRE AND HERITAGE Coming to power in 1799 as First Consul of France, Napoleon molded his new regime on the glories of ancient Rome, using its symbolism to propagate this power; some of his most influential achievements were in the decorative arts. This exhibition, besides revealing his character and the personalities of his family members and descendants, is filled with reference to the period through a plethora of objets d’art and images, mostly from the MOAS Collection, that speak to us of the classical world of Leda and the Swan, of Psyche, the victors of the first Olympic Games, the architecture of Rome and the Aegean and of Egypt with its mysterious hieroglyphics. This is a ‘must see’ exhibition for everyone who loves a rattling good story of the romance and drama of greatness, what it can mean and its resultant achievements.

opens november 16, 2013

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EXHIBIT FEATURE

ON DISPLAY THROUGH NOVEMBER 17, 2013

HIGHWAYMEN:

AFRICAN-AMERICAN FOLK ARTISTS OF FLORIDA By Cynthia Duval, Chief Curator, Curator of Decorative Arts and Gary R. Libby Curator of Art

name, “The Highwaymen,” first appeared in the 1995 article in the magazine Antiques and Art Around Florida.

As “outsiders” from the world of trained artists, they found

the doors of art galleries and collectors closed to them

until well into the mid-20th century and thus formed entrepreneurial habits of

selling by the roadside or door to door. Sunset on the Everglades, Harold Newton

This exhibition of landscape

paintings by untrained African American entrepreneur-artists

from the Fort Pierce area is

extraordinary in that it illustrates the inspiration, creativity and

energy of a unique group of

men and one woman gathered

together in the racially unsettled times of Florida in the 1950s;

determined to raise themselves

above their then expected role of citrus grove laborers.

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Throughout the 1950s to 1980s, they persevered with both their style and subject matter which focused on - and never varied from - the natural world of Florida’s raw and wondrous landscape and its pristine wetlands. As “outsiders” from the world of trained artists such as those in the 19th century Hudson River School, they found the doors of art galleries and collectors closed to them until well into the mid-20th century; they thus formed entrepreneurial habits of selling by the roadside or door to door - sometimes even out of the trunks of their cars. The group’s descriptive

Today, their richly evocative and expressive landscapes are prized as part of the history of Florida’s landscape painting as well as for their recordings of Florida’s once pristine lands. The use of “found” materials from roadside construction sites has added colorful and textural individuality to paintings painted on scraps of old board and Masonite and framed with strips of crown molding. MOAS welcomes these visions of Florida; they are an important addition to our understanding of the creative process, and we thank the Orange County Regional History Center for this generous loan.


“Just because we’re grandparents doesn’t mean we have to look like we are.” “Of course we take care of our skin. We eat a balanced diet, never use harsh chemicals or soaps and excercise daily. However, the strong effects of wind, sun and atmosphere have taken it’s toll. We needed something else”. Schedule your consultation and understand which surgical and nonsurgical procedure will best help you reach your desired goal.

Board Cer tified Plastic Surgeon

Schedule a consultation today and understand which of our surgical or non-surgical procedures will best help you reach your desired goal.

Carl W. Lentz III, M.D., F.A.C.S.

Phone: 386.252.8051 • email: info@drlentz.com • www.drlentz.com 1040 W. Int ’l Speedway Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114


Y D O B A E P E TH SOME OF OUR UPCOMING

SHOWS

NOVEMBER 24

Clint Black

FEBRUARY 5

APRIL 15

Lily Tomlin Comedy

Million Dollar Quartet

Golden Dragon Acrobats

FEBRUARY 18

Memphis

MAY 3

The Addams Family

NOVEMBER 30

FEBRUARY 27

PLUS MORE!

NOVEMBER 29

Hello, Dolly! Hell

Celtic Woman PeabodyDaytona.com /peabodyauditorium DAYTONA BEACH • 386-671-3460

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fall exhibits Now through November 17, 2013

Richly evocative and expressive landscapes prized as part of the history of Florida’s landscape painting as well as for their recordings of Florida’s once pristine lands. On loan from the Orange County Regional History Center.

Great Impressions: The Intaglio Process Opens November 22, 2013

This fascinating exhibition of printed material from the MOAS Collection contains a wide range of representative examples from the 17th through 20th centuries, their ideological concepts and artistry captured in the main on handmade paper and expressed through etching, wood and metal engraving. Artists include Rembrandt, Piranesi, Audubon, Hogarth, Manet, Renoir and Dali, the enfant terrible of surrealism.

14 18 ARTS ARTS & & SCIENCES SCIENCES MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER JANUARY

Highwaymen: African-American Folk Artists of Florida

51st Annual Halifax Art Festival November 2-3, 2013

Celebrating its 51st anniversary, the Halifax Art Festival is the 2nd oldest continual art festival in the state of Florida. Held on Beach Street in Downtown Daytona Beach, the festival showcases the works of over 230 fine artists and artisans from all over the country. Offering live entertainment, a student art competition, children’s activities, fine dining in many local restaurants and cafés, HAF is a premier annual event in Central Florida. Read more on page 26 or visit www.halifaxartfestival.org

Napoleon: Empire and Heritage Opens November 16, 2013 Coming to power in 1799 as First Consul of France, Napoleon molded his new regime on the glories of ancient Rome, using its symbolism to propagate this power; some of his most influential achievements were in the decorative arts. This exhibition is filled with reference to the period through a plethora of objets d’art and images that speak to us of the classical world.

Exhibits and dates subject to change.


FALL PROGRAMS ADULT PROGRAMMING

october October 15 1:30pm-2:30pm The Fall Season and the Tuscawilla Preserve Take a leisurely stroll through the Kim A. Klancke, M.D., and Marsha L. Klancke Environmental Education Complex in Tuscawilla with Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James "Zach" Zacharias, and discover the beauty of the Fall season in this rare and unique ecosystem. Free for members or with paid admission October 18 2:00pm-3:00pm Porch Talk at Gamble Place: Audubon in Florida Learn about John James Audubon’s Florida travels throughout the peninsula to collect water birds for his “Birds of America” book. Free for members or $5.00 for nonmembers, cash only, rsvp recommended 386.255.0285 October 19 6:30pm-8:30pm Museum at Night: Astronomy at the Ponce Inlet Lighthouse with the Museum of Arts and Sciences Climb the lighthouse and view the rising full moon, enjoy stargazing through the MOAS telescopes with Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo; learn and discover with 10 hands-on astronomy stations $1.50 for ages 11 and under and $5.00 for ages 12+ Teacher appreciation night for all public and private school teachers with ID Contact MOAS at 386.255.0285 or Mary Wentzel, Ponce Inlet Lighthouse Programs Manager, at 386-761-1821 ext. 18 October 26 6:00pm-10:00pm 13th Annual Night of the Paranormal Join us for a spooky night of ghosts, goblins, psychics and other paranormal activity. Enjoy an evening filled with unusual and bewitching tales beyond the natural and scientific laws of human understanding. Presentations will begin at 6:30pm. $5.00 for members and $7.00 for non-members

november November 5 2:00pm-3:30pm Antiques in the Home Join Chief Curator and Curator of

November 6 10:00am-3:00pm Homeschool Day at MOAS Join us for a special day of discovery for homeschool students and their families. Join us for planetarium shows, tours and demonstrations. See www.moas.org for details. $5.00 per student and each family member

November 15 3:00pm-4:30pm Nature Walk at Gamble Place Reconnect with nature and stroll Gamble Place’s wide trails with Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zach” Zacharias, and discover the unique plants, animals and ecosystems that make up this pristine 190-acre preserve. Free for members or $5.00 for nonmembers, cash only, rsvp recommended 386.255.0285

November 7 3:45pm-4:45pm Meet Me in the Planetarium: Comets As Comet ISON approaches our Sun, come learn about these fascinating icy bodies with Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo.   Free for members or with paid admission

November 21 2:00pm-3:30pm Welcome To Napoleon Join Chief Curator, Cynthia Duval, for a first look at Napoleon: Empire and Heritage. Free for members or with paid admission

Decorative Arts, Cynthia Duval, and discover how antiques reveal stories of the past. Free for members or with paid admission

Florida Time Machine

A Selection of Fascinating Florida History Tales November 7, 2013 3:00pm-4:00pm The Forts of St. Augustine: From Wood to Coquina with Steve Voguit, Assistant Professor of History and Geography, Flagler College Join Professor Voguit and learn about the long tradition of fort building in St. Augustine. Discover the many early wooden forts and the massive medieval stone fortification that symbolized the clash of nations and has overlooked the St. Augustine waterfront for more than 300 years. Florida Time Machine programs are free to the public and are held at the Museum of Arts & Sciences. Funding for this program was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent those of the Florida Humanities Council or the National Endowment for the Humanities.

November 12 3:00pm-4:00pm On the Road with the Highwaymen Learn about the life and times of the Highwaymen with Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zach” Zacharias, and learn about the unique importance of these self-taught African American landscape artists. Free for members or with paid admission

december December 6 2:00pm-3:00pm Porch Talk at Gamble Place: Florida’s East Coast Pirates The East Coast of Florida has a long history of piracy dating back to 1586. Learn about the pirate attacks on St. Augustine and the surrounding waters with Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zach” Zacharias. Free for members or $5.00 for nonmembers, cash only, rsvp recommended 386.255.0285 December 10 2:00pm-3:30pm Napoleon and His Women Join Chief Curator, Cynthia Duval, to hear about some of Napoleon’s private adventures. Free for members or with paid admission December 12 3:45pm-4:30pm The Basics of Stargazing Join Curator of Astronomy, Seth Mayo, in the planetarium as he explores the fundamentals of our night sky. As you gaze at the beautiful planetarium star field, Seth will cover concepts that include constellations, the zodiac, ecliptic, star brightness and the daily and annual motions of celestial objects. Free for members or with paid admission December 14 3:00pm-5:00pm An Afternoon with Florida History: “The Great American Civil War: The War of Northern Aggression - Brothers Fighting Brothers” Commemorating the 150th Anniversary


of the Civil War and the Gettysburg Address, Professor Joseph Vetter will present a diary of this remarkable event, describing his “enlistment and experience” as a reenactor. To commemorate Pearl Harbor Day, a tribute and some special guest heroes will honor veterans and active duty military personnel. $3.00 for members and $5.00 for non-members December 16 2:00pm-3:30pm Coffee, Chocolates and Collections: MOAS Trivia Day Join Chief Curator, Cynthia Duval, and Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zach” Zacharias, and try your hand at MOAS trivia. Discover unusual facts about the collections on display. Free for members or with paid admission

january January 9 3:00pm-4:00pm The Nature of Art Join Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts, Cynthia Duval, to discover how all art evolves from the natural world and discover the role nature plays in art. Free for members or with paid admission January 18 10:30am-3:00pm Family Art Festival Day Bring the whole family for a funfilled day of family art classes, tours, LEGO® challenges, demonstrations, prizes, contests, planetarium shows and more. More details at www. moas.org $10.00 for member families and $15.00 for non-member families January 29 3:00pm-4:00pm Florida’s Long Lost Roadside Tourist Attractions Join Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zach” Zacharias, for a unique look at this forgotten history and discover the lost roadside attractions that once dotted Florida from end to end. Did you ever visit the Pirates World Theme Park or the Seville Peacock Farm? Free for members or with paid admission

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CHILDREN'S PROGRAMMING

october October 3 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 1 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members

vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members October 17 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Materials Engineering Discover how to develop stronger building materials. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

October 3 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Surveying Students will learn how to document and record the land and its attributes. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members

October 24 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 4 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members

October 10 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 2 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members

October 24 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Coastal Engineering Discover how coastal areas are being managed and protected. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

October 10 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Environmental Engineering Learn how to develop ways to improve the environment. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members

October 31 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 5 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members

October 17 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 3 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated

October 31 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Transportation Engineering


We are going to learn what keeps people moving all over the world. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

november November 7 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 6 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members November 7 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Urban Engineering The science of creating spaces for the growing population to live, work and flourish. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers November 9 1:00pm-1:30pm MOAS Family Event Child Night Sky Tour Explore the night sky in the Planetarium with a live tour led by a young junior astronomer. Free for members or with paid admission November 9 6:30pm-11:30pm Ages 4-13 MOAS Parents' Night Out Drop your children off for their night at the Museum. We will conduct handson experiments, explore the Children’s Museum, host special tours in the galleries and even watch a movie in our auditorium. Tickets purchased before November 5 will be $15.00 for members/$18.00 for nonmembers per child Tickets purchased after November 5 will be $25.00 for members/$28.00 for nonmembers per child November 14 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 7 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members November 14 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Structural Engineering Learn best practices employed when

designing and building structures. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers November 21 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 8 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for nonmembers November 21 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Hydraulic Engineering Learn how engineers collect and manage water as a natural resource. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

december December 5 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 9 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for nonmembers December 5 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Food Engineering Learn about processed foods. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

December 12 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 10 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members December 12 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Software Engineer Discover how the software we use every day is developed. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers December 19 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 11 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members December 19 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Social Engineering This science focuses on how to drive large groups of people into action. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for nonmembers

january January 9 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 12 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated


vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members January 9 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Football We will explore the science, art and history of this sport. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members January 16 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 13 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members January 16 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Soccer We will study the art, science and history of this sport. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members January 23 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 14 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members

Kindly RSVP with payment by November 22, 2013 Number of individual tickets ______ @ $45 I am unable to attend but want to contribute: $____________ Please select one entrĂŠe selection for each attendee: Fish____ Chicken____ Vegetarian____

Name(s): ________________________________________________ Address:__________________________________________________ City, State, Zip: _____________________________________________ Phone: ______________________E-mail: _______________________ Please charge my credit card: ___MasterCard ___Visa ___American Express ___Discover Card Number:________________________________Exp. Date: _______Security Code______

January 23 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Baseball We will study the art, science and history of the great American pastime. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members January 30 12:30pm-1:30pm Ages 13-15 Robotics 2.0 (Session 15 of 15) Join us to create a new remotely operated vehicle. The class will study design, durability and computer programming. $5.00 for members/$10.00 for non-members January 30 1:30pm-3:30pm Ages 7-13 Golf We will study the history, science and art of this sport. $10.00 for members/$15.00 for non-members

Signature: _____________________________________________________________

I have enclosed a check or money order for: $____________

MAIL REPLY AND PAYMENT TO: MUSEUM OF ARTS & SCIENCES, 352 S. NOVA RD., DAYTONA BEACH, FL 32114 For more information, contact MOAS at 386.255.0285

18 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

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For the latest MOAS news and information, connect with us at Facebook.com/moasdaytona or visit moas.org and sign up for our e-newsletter.


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Tuscawilla: A Glimpse into Florida's Past BY: J. ”Zach” Zacharias Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History

Museum of Arts & Sciences guests have the rare and wonderful opportunity to connect with nature by taking a stroll on the boardwalk through the magnificent Kim A. Klancke, M.D., and Marsha L. Klancke Environmental Education Complex in Tuscawilla Preserve. This time of year is an opportune time to see the changes in this unique wetland world. Even here, in Daytona Beach’s humid subtropical clime, the observer can experience the beginnings of fall.

20 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE


W

hen October’s winds blow through the canopy each year, the leaves of Tuscawilla’s deciduous trees float down to the forest floor like giant, multi-colored snowflakes. The lush, full, green leaves will return with April’s spring rains. Any standing water remaining on the forest floor will quietly disappear into the aquifer below as the winter dry season slowly approaches. Residents of Central Florida are fortunate enough to experience this natural environment as it was thousands of years ago. We can be thankful that, in 1948, the Council of Garden Clubs of the Halifax District led the grassroots preservation efforts to protect this park. They were instrumental in preserving this island of mature hardwoods for future generations.

ECOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE

Tuscawilla’s ecological importance cannot be overstated. Here, state law protects seven species of plants – including the rare shoestring fern, sabal palm and yaupon holly. Located only 2 miles from the ocean, this urban oasis is perpetually alive with the birds, reptiles, butterflies and small mammals that make it their home. This park is an important refuge and safe haven for these animals - without it, they would vanish from the area. The Preserve also serves as an important stopping point for migratory birds, who feed and rest as they make their journey south for the winter. Additionally, Tuscawilla marks the southern extent in the United States for two species of trees - the box elder and the red buckeye. It is the northernmost boundary for lime prickly ash tree and wild coffee plant. Years of economic development and urban pressure have whittled this amazing junglelike forest wetland to 90 acres surrounding the Museum. The boardwalk in Tuscawilla is a rare and special place where guests can safely experience and observe such an ecosystem in its natural state and get a glimpse into Florida’s past, when it was untouched by humans. When the Seminoles lived in the area, they named this area “Tuscawilla” meaning “sour water.” The Preserve is characterized by short periods of flooding in the summer and a dry forest floor in the fall and winter. When flooded, the water has a tea-like appearance due to tannins created by debris of fallen leaves and other rotting vegetation. When fall arrives, the

TUSCAWILLA BOARDWALK


ZACH IN TIME

TUSCAWILLA: A GLIMPSE INTO FLORIDA'S PAST

Residents of Central Florida are fortunate enough to experience this natural environment as it was thousands of years ago. We can be thankful that, in 1948, the Council of Garden Clubs of the Halifax District led the grassroots preservation efforts to protect this park.

forest dries out and the so-called sour water disappears until the cycle begins again.

and shaped by shifting sea levels over the last 115,000 years.

A COASTAL HYDRIC HAMMOCK

Tuscawilla Preserve is classified as a “coastal hydric hammock” and is a highly endangered ecosystem. Originally, it ranged from Flagler County to Edgewater in length. Its eastern boundary was the Halifax River and its western edge ran just west of present day Nova Road. The Preserve abuts a geological formation called the Atlantic Coastal Ridge - an ancient sand dune line that runs for miles north and south. Mainland High School, one block west of the Museum, sits on top of the ridge. MOAS and Tuscawilla reside on a flat space of land below this ridge called the Silver Bluff Terrace. At one point, Tuscawilla Preserve and the surrounding area was an ancient lagoon ecosystem with a sea level 10-15 feet higher than at present day. These ancient geological features were carved out

22 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

SABAL PALM

There are many components that characterize a coastal hydric hammock - a forest of towering hardwood trees of ash, laurel oak, pignut hickory and sweetgum. Trees with shallow root systems such as these battle each other to reach the top of the canopy in order to

collect the sunlight necessary for photosynthesis. The defining tree in a coastal hydric hammock is the cabbage or sabal palm. It is the dominant tree in this ecosystem and it, too, reaches for the sky among the giant hardwoods for precious sunlight. They grow unusually tall and skinny in Tuscawilla, reaching as high as 70 feet to reach the canopy. Just below the canopy is the “understory,” where a common small evergreen tree called the yaupon holly can be found. This tree is important for its fruit, which is consumed by many birds and animals including mockingbirds, sapsuckers, American robins, armadillos, squirrels and raccoons. The tree was important for ancient peoples in the area, too - the native Timucua used the leaves to create a harsh tea called the “black drink” or “cassina.” The sacred brew was for male-only purification rites and unity rituals causing the person consuming it to vomit. Europeans observed this and named it Illex


vomitoria in Latin. The active ingredients in the drink are caffeine and the bitter tasting theobromine, which is also found in chocolate. From the understory to the forest floor, Tuscawilla is home to one of the largest populations of humidity-loving Florida box turtles in the county. These members of the tortoise family date back before dinosaurs to the Permian Age 300 million years ago and, amazingly, survived all the mass extinction events. These living fossils are well camouflaged in the Preserve, but can be heard rustling through the leaf litter. The Florida box turtle is an omnivore and feeds on insects, spiders, worms, grasses, mosses and berries. These protected animals can live in the forest for 30-40 years – it is illegal to take them from the wild. A majestic moss-covered tree canopy, a thick understory of plants, and a beautiful boardwalk await the visitor who wishes to step back in time for a look at Florida’s past. Here, you can catch a brief glimpse of the wilderness that brought tourists to Florida over 100 years ago. As development continues along Florida’s coastline, parks and preserves like this become increasingly important. Tuscawilla Preserve is a treasure, indeed, and we hope you will enjoy your next stroll through Florida history along the boardwalk!

ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE 23


GUILD NEWS

MEETING, FALL EVENTS & MORE

Join

The Festive Season is Approaching By Joan Horneff

From events to hospitality to programming, the Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences has something for you. Get acquainted with like-minded people who have a common goal. Our regularly scheduled meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month from September to May at the Museum of Arts & Sciences located at 352 South Nova Road in Daytona Beach, Florida. Our meetings start at 10:00 a.m. with a social immediately followed by a program and the Guild meeting.

Guild Events and

Volunteer Opportunities The Guild sponsors many exciting events, including: THE HALIFAX ARTS FESTIVAL FESTIVAL OF TREES CHILDREN’S MUSEUM GOLF CLASSIC MARDI GRAS/CASINO NIGHT ARTFUL INTERLUDES Select your activities or committees of interest when you submit your Guild Application.

Applications are available at

www.moas.org

24 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

The MOAS Guild is getting ready for our busiest time of year. The committees for our two biggest fundraisers, the Halifax Art Festival and the Festival of Trees, are working hard to ensure their success and achieve the Guilds’ Fundraising Goals. We invite everyone to attend these wonderful events. They have become long-standing traditions eagerly anticipated by everyone in and around Central Florida! We also invite non-members to attend our meetings and consider joining our group. We meet the second Tuesday of each month at 10:00am at the Museum of Arts & Sciences. We invite you to read our online calendar (www.moas.org) and call the contact person for any event you are interested in attending. As this festive season approaches, the Guild members wish everyone the happiest of Holidays. It is the time of year I reflect on the things I have to be thankful for. The Museum of Arts and Sciences and my Guild friends are certainly among them. Remember, giving to others makes you feel great and is good for your health. I hope to see you at the Halifax Art Festival and at the Festival of Trees Gala.

Guild Membership Meeting Tuesday, November 12 Program begins at 10:30 a.m. in Root Hall at MOAS Digital master, Craig Cavaluzzi, will fascinate and delight us with the near-magic results of his artistry using digital tools. In his hands, cherished photographs thought to be lost to the effects of age or damage can be restored and then duplicated. New drawings or paintings can be digitally reproduced from their originals with state-of-the-art accuracy using archival inks on archival canvas or paper media. New and innovative works of art may be created using purely digital techniques.  All of these creative processes will be explained and “before and after” examples illustrating each method will be on display. All are invited to bring in your original artwork or photographs for consultation.


Champagne Gala Kicks off the Festival of Trees

O

n Thursday, November 14, at 6pm, the Guild of the Museum of Arts and Sciences invites you to join us at the Museum to celebrate the Festival of Trees. This glorious holiday tradition is in its ninth year and promises to be more fun than ever before. The Celebration begins with a “Sparkling Champagne Gala.” The “Gala” offers fun for everyone. There’s always an abundance of complimentary champagne and food to sample. Over twenty area restaurants from Ormond Beach to New Smyrna will be providing everything from hors d’oeuvres to Tapas to decadent desserts.

By Pat Masotti-Abernathy

You and your friends will enjoy holiday music while sipping champagne and strolling through the many fully decorated Christmas trees displayed throughout Root Hall. The table-top trees and wreaths are donated by Michaels at The Pavilion in Port Orange and decorated by Guild members. They will be available for immediate purchase. The four- to seven-foot designer-decorated trees, donated by local area businesses, will be up for silent auction during the entire Festival and will go to the highest bidders at the conclusion of

the Festival on Sunday, December 1. The “Sparkling Champagne Gala” is $45 per person. Reservations are requested and can be placed by calling Jennie Palmer at (386)236-9810. The Festival of Trees is open to the public with the price of admission to the Museum starting Friday, November 15, through Saturday, November 30. For more information on the Festival of Trees or Museum hours, please refer to www.MOAS.org

The “Gala” offers fun for everyone. There’s always an abundance of complimentary champagne and food to sample.


2013 HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL

DATES AND DETAILS

SHE'S 51 AND STILL GOING STRONG!

2013 Halifax Art Festival By Pat Masotti-Abernathy

On November 2nd and 3rd, the Halifax Art Festival begins another 50 years of bringing artists and artisans from all over the United States to historic downtown Beach Street to display and sell their art. The 51st Festival has something for everyone from the casual art lover to the serious collector. This year, over 200 juried artists and artisans are expected to exhibit their creations of original two-dimensional art, photography, sculpture, jewelry, textiles, ceramics, wood, glass, and metal sculpture for purchase. To promote seasoned as well as emerging artists and craftsmen, the Festival will have two distinct exhibit areas. The first area will be Fine Arts & Fine Crafts which will be juried, judged and eligible for over $25,000 in prize money and approximately $10,000 in Patron Awards. The second area will be juried Crafts which will not be eligible for award money. Patron Awards support the artists and artisans who participate in the Festival as well as raise money for the Museum of Arts and Sciences (MOAS), which the Guild supports. In addition, these generous commitments enable the Guild to attract more artists to the Festival. Call Halifax Art Festival Chairman, Gloria Keay, for Patron Contribution information at 386.453.7380 or visit us at www.HalifaxArtFestival.org. Judging will be conducted on Saturday morning by Cynthia Cardona Melendez, Curator of Collections at the Orange County Regional History Center, Orlando, Florida; and Ruth Grim, Curator of Exhibitions at the Appleton Museum of Art in Ocala, Florida. All awards and prize money will be announced at Saturday night’s Artist Reception. Our younger audience will enjoy painting in the Little Van Gogh area as well as viewing the Student Art Exhibit and Competition. Students of all ages from the Volusia County public school system and area private schools will be participating and competing for cash awards totaling $4,000 and provided by The Wessel Foundation. Serving as Judge, Cynthia Duval, MOAS Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts, will announce the winners at Sunday’s Student Art Reception. After the Festival closes on Sunday, the winning art will be on display in Root Hall at the Museum of Arts and Sciences for two weeks. The art then travels to the Art Haus in South Daytona for another two weeks.

26 ARTS & SCIENCES MAGAZINE

THE BROKEN DOCK, RAY BRILLI Official ARTWORK FOR THE 2013 HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL T-SHIRT

The 51st annual Halifax Art Festival is the second oldest continual art festival in the state of Florida. It is presented by the Guild of the Museum of Arts & Sciences and sponsored by the Daytona Downtown Development Authority, TD Bank and Bright House Networks. The Festival is a major fundraiser for the Museum of Arts and Sciences and also benefits its Charles and Linda Williams Children’s Museum.

For more information about the Halifax Art Festival, visit HalifaxArtFestival.org

NOVEMBER 2-3, 2013


386


BY: SETH MAYO, CURATOR OF ASTRONOMY

COMA

OVER AND OUT

The central mass or core made up of a mixture of ice, gas, and dust. This feature of a comet is usually quite small compared to its overall size. ISON's own nucleus has been estimated to measure about 3 miles across.

The sun's solar wind and pressure can cause the gas and dust of the coma to stretch thousands and even millions of miles - in fact, multiple tails can be present.

TAIL

Comet ISON was discovered as recently as September of 2012 by two Russian astronomers, Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok, in Kislovodsk, Russia. The comet's name comes from the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON), an organized group of observatories from countries around the world that searches for near Earth objects (NEOs) in space. The official designation for comet ISON is C/2012 S1, given by the International Astronomical Union.

NUCLEUS

Discovery of Comet ISON

The wispy glow of gas and dust that forms an atmosphere around the comet's nucleus, created by the sun's radiation that also evaporates its contents. In the case of ISON, its own coma may extend more than 3,000 miles across.

Comets are roughly the size of a small town.

- NASA

COMET ISON TIMELINE SEPTEMBER 2012

JANUARY 2013

APRIL 2013

AUGUST 2013

Comet ISON was discovered by astronomers Vitali Nevski and Artyom Novichonok in Kislovodsk, Russia, with a 15.7 inch reflecting telescope.

Space-based telescopes began observing ISON as it neared the inner Solar System. NASA's Swift Telescope was able to image the comet - allowing scientists to make estimates on the amount of ice and dust that were evaporating from its surface.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope obtained some of the most detailed views of ISON on April 10th. This helped to make size estimates.

ISON crossed a threshold in astronomy called the frost line, where it encountered a level of solar radiation that will either brighten the comet or evaporate it.

28 32ARTS ARTS&&SCIENCES SCIENCESMAGAZINE MAGAZINE


A COMET'S TALE As we wrap up the year 2013, hopeful gazers will be searching the sky for a [potentially] brilliant comet known popularly as ISON. This otherworldly body has a chance to make an appearance in our November and December skies, but; due to its unpredictability, astronomers speculate that ISON will either put on one of the most spectacular celestial shows in decade… or will completely fizzle out as the sun’s intense radiation could cause it to break apart. Either way, knowing that ISON is nearing the sun provides a great learning opportunity about the mysteries of outer solar system objects.

What is a Comet? Sometimes likened to dirty snowballs, comets are considered to be “small solar system bodies.” Made up of early solar system ingredients - ice, frozen gas, dust and rocky materials, comets can measure hundreds to thousands of feet across. Their orbits are very irregular and it may take anywhere between several years to millions of years for them to travel around the sun. When a comet closes in on the sun, they light up as solar radiation heats up the gas and dust. It is thought that much of the water found on Earth may derive from the bombardment of comets billions of years ago.

This diagram shows comet ISON's orbital path through the inner solar system. The blue dot indicates the comet's position on December 11, 2013 if it survives its sun grazing passage. Image Credit: NASA/JPL

OCTOBER 2013

NOVEMBER 2013

DECEMBER 2013

The comet will make its closest approach to Mars, possibly allowing some of the Martian rovers to take snapshots. If ISON is still intact, this is the point where it may slowly begin to make an appearance in the Earth’s dawn sky - towards the east, in the constellation Leo, the lion.

This month will hold the most dramatic moments for ISON as it continues to make a downward trek toward the sun in the east during early morning - through the constellation Virgo. If the comet brightens up, it could begin to become visible to the naked eye or at least through binoculars near the end of the month, just above the sun in the east. On November 28th, ISON will make its closest approach, or perihelion, around the sun, coming within 700,000 miles of its hot surface.

If ISON survives its dangerously close passage around the sun, it could remain visible in the dawn and evening skies throughout the month. As the year comes to a close, ISON will start to dim as it passes through the constellations Serpens and Hercules, making its way northward to the Big and Little Dippers.


Let thee speak!

2013-2014

6 2 n d •S E A S O N

November 17 | Estonian National Symphony Orchestra January 24 | Donizetti’s The Elixir of Love Teatro Lirico D’Europa January 26 | Haifa Symphony Orchestra of Israel February 7 | Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra February 9 | Moiseyev Siberian Dancers February 28 | Don Quixote • Moscow Festival Ballet

More info at

386.253.2901 or dbss.org


MORE WAYS TO SEARCH. MORE WAYS TO FIND. Proud Supporter of the Museum of Arts & Sciences Theatres. One of the many things you can find with YPmobileŽ app on your mobile device, YP.comSM site and YP Real Yellow PagesSM directory. Š 2012 YP Intellectual Property LLC. All rights reserved. YP, the YP logo and all other YP marks contained herein are trademarks of YP Intellectual Property LLC and/or YP affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners. 12-21969 PNT_08/27/2012


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2013 fallmag lores  

Arts & Sciences Magazine, Fall 2013 edition

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