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MasseyNews Photography by Anna Luengo

Julie Payette returns to Massey

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This huge crane appeared beside – sometimes even above – the College this year as the nine-storey Martin Prosperity Institute of the Rotman School of Management, scheduled to open in 2012, took shape next door. The construction caused complaints, especially from those living on the western side of the Quadrangle. In the words of one resident, “Not even ear plugs help, and sometimes even the ground shakes!”

here are many memorable evenings at Massey College, but few more memorable than the one on November 5, 2009, when astronaut Julie Payette, distinguished and loyal Alumna (’88), visited with four of her co-pilots from Space Shuttle Endeavour, whom she introduced to the College community. The eagerly anticipated evening was described by Master John Fraser in his pre-event notice as a “complicated” one (see page 36), and it included pre-dinner drinks and a film in the Common Room narrated live by the astronauts, as well as dinner in Ondaatje Hall. Also that evening, the College’s silver teaspoon – which, as we had reported in our last issue, had travelled with Ms. Payette into outer space in the summer of 2008 – was formally returned to us. Fittingly, kitchen staff member David Landaverde accepted the spoon back on behalf of the College. He had originally proposed the spoon as a suitable companion for the Endeavour trip and had gone, along with then retiring Pat Kennedy, to Cape Canaveral for the launch. The spoon, beautifully framed by the Canadian Space Agency, now holds a special place of honour in the Common Room. At one point in the evening, Ms. Payette spoke for her astronaut companions when she said: “I told my friends that this is the place where my dreams started to come to fruition and where I felt many of the possibilities that are now realized. How could anyone not love Massey

Julie Payette and Master John Fraser in the Common Room College? It is the most special place I know and we are all lucky to be associated with it.” Another special moment came when Senior Fellow Ursula Franklin stood up after the film and talk. Evoking the title of the 2009 Massey Lectures by Wade Davis, she told Julie and her colleagues that they had become the inspirational “wayfinders” for many people. See THE MASTER TACKLES – page 36

Fiftieth anniversary of first round of submissions of architectural plans for College This building should be capable of being seen in many ways, and of unfolding itself by degrees – probably never completely. It represents to the student within a condensed piece of the world that must accommodate all his changing moods and attitudes. It should be as many things as possible to as many people as possible.

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o read the opening words of the rationale accompanying the original drawings and plans for Massey College submitted by Ron Thom. His was one of four submissions presented on June 30, 1960 to the Trustees of the Massey Foundation: Vincent Massey; his sons Lionel and Hart; his brother Raymond; Raymond’s son Geoffrey; and Wilmot Broughall, an officer of the National Trust Company, which managed the finances of the Foundation.

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To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana • Sapere Aude • Dare to know

The three other submissions in this first round were from Carmen Corneil, Arthur Erickson, and John Parkin. A second round of submissions took place on October 15, 1960, at which time the decision to go with Thom’s revised plans was made. Douglas Shadbolt in his book Ron Thom, The Shaping of an Architect, wrote of this submission: “The plan form and massing are reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.” Images of Thom’s round 1 submission appear on pages 6 and 7.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.


The Master's Report 3 From the Master Emerita 5 Staff News 5 Journalism Fellowships 8 Journalism Fellows 9 Fellows’ Gaudy Prizes 10 Friendship with Finland 10 Junior Fellows in Israel 11 From the Lodging 12 Junior Fellows at Play 13 Walter Gordon Symposium 14 Junior Fellows Lecture Series 14 Quarter Century Fund 14 Massey Lectures: Wade Davis 15 Massey in the Media 16 Senior Fellows at Lunch 16 Alumni Association goes global 17 Toronto Alumni 17 News from the Library 18 Book History and Print Culture 18 Art: The Wisdom Windows 19 2009-2010 College Photo 20 Quadrangle Society Book Club 22 Writer-in-Residence 22 Clarkson Laureateships 23 Robertson Davies Plaque 24 Pendragon Ink Reports 24 Conversation with John Dirks 25 Reflections by Sara Shettleworth 27 Exposé: Mordecai Richler 28 Talisker Players 28 Scholars-at-Risk at Massey 29 Massey Grand Rounds 29 College Quiz 29 Nooks & Crannies 30 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize 30 Massey’s Associate Partners 31 Financial News 31 From the Decades: 1960s 33 From the Decades: 1970s 34 From the Decades: 1980s 35 Kitchen Creations 36 From the Decades: 1990s 37 Don of Hall 38 The Visitors’ Challenge 39

Running columns

Degrees Received 3 News of Alumni 3 Thank you, Donors! 4 News of Senior Fellows 15 Senior Residents 15 Senior Fellows Elected 15 News of Quadranglers 22 Publications 25 Spotlight on High Table 31 Marriages 34 Births 34 In Memoriam 34

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From the Editor

MasseyNews • 2009-2010 Photography by antHony luengo

Life at Massey College

what’s inside

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign

Contact Us

THE $2-million Visitors’ Challenge Campaign is now in the last of its three years. The response to date has been magnificent. Gifts have been given, with pledges totalling just under $1.8 million made or promised. This campaign is going to let us renew both resident and non-resident Junior Fellow facilities at the College, enhance our ability to support needy Junior Fellows through bursary enhancement, and maintain College traditions.

t seemed, just a few months ago, that there might be a big Rideau Hall Massey College 4 Devonshire Place story to report, but that was not to be. Master John Fraser remains with us, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2E1 no doubt with his own tales to tell about the experience, some to be http://masseycollege.ca recounted, we hope, in a future issue. In the meantime, we’ve reprinted an online piece on the topic from The Globe and Mail that you might have The Master missed. Do check it out on page 16. And, of course, there’s lots more – more John Fraser than ever, in fact – to inform, entertain, and enlighten you in this issue. For Tel: 416-978-8448 one thing, you’ll discover what Massey might have looked like if Ron Thom’s h jfraser@masseycollege.ca original proposal, submitted 50 years ago, in June 1960, had been accepted. Had it been, you could now be playing billiards in a room just about where college Assistant the pond is located. You won’t want to miss the wonderful illustrations on Danylo Dzwonyk pages 6 and 7 from Thom’s first pass. And be sure to look for the ghost of Tel: 416-978-2549 Fax: 416-971-3032 h ddzwonyk@masseycollege.ca Robertson Davies in our centre-spread community photo. He also appeared there in last year’s issue. He haunts us still, and we’d like to think that he’s right Administrator now in a nook or cranny somewhere in his beloved College – at the top of the Anna Luengo bell tower, perhaps? – reading about all that transpired this past year. Tel: 416-978-6606 Fax: 416-971-3032 As always, my appreciation extends to the many Massey community h annaluengo@masseycollege.ca members and College friends who contributed to this issue in one way or another – The Master, the Master Emerita, the Bursar, the Registrar, the Bursar Administrator, the Library Administrator, and Pat Kennedy, Secretary Emerita; Jill Clark Elizabeth MacCallum; College staff members Danylo Dzwonyk, Darlene Tel: 416-978-8447 Naranjo, and Tembeka Ndlovu; Senior Fellows Ian Alexander, Russell Brown, h jclark@masseycollege.ca John Dirks, Ursula Franklin, Judith Grant, Sara Shettleworth, and Jennifer Bursar’s Secretary Surridge; Senior Resident Dan White; Alumni Andrew Cunningham, Simon Tembeka Ndlovu Devereaux, Michiel Horn, Kari Maaren, Jacqueline Murray, and the many Tel: 416-978-2892 Fax: 416-978-1759 others who sent in their news; Junior Fellows Dylan Gordon, Jane Hilderman, h tndlovu@masseycollege.ca Heather Sheridan, and Matthew Strang; Quadranglers Douglas Bell, Ramsay Derry, and Charles Foran; Misha Shaal of the Gairdner Foundation; Sarah Hall LibrarY ADMINISTRATOR from Sarah Hall Glass Studio; and Mary McTeer of the Talisker Players. For P.J. MacDougall the photographs, thank you to Junior Fellows Salim Bamakhrama and Jemy Tel: 416-978-2893 Joseph, as well as to André Beneteau and Fernando Morales. h pjmacdougall@masseycollege.ca – Anthony Luengo, Editor Registrar

MasseyNews L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0 t o r o nt o • OC T O B E R 2 0 1 0

This is the 41st annual about life at Massey College. The 2010-2011 edition is scheduled for publication in the fall of 2011. Submissions may be sent to the aluengo@sympatico.ca, or by mail to the College, editor directly by e-mail no later than July 31, 2011. We also welcome any comments. MasseyNews thanks the staff at Print3 Yonge & Eglinton for their support and expertise. Editor: Anthony Luengo • Contributing Editor: Amy Maish • Desktop & Designer: Brian Dench

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HERE’S why the last $200,000 is almost exclusively dependent on Alumni support: • Nearly 80 per cent of the 204 Senior Fellows have given or pledged (to a total of $1,235,000 – this figure includes the $750,000 opening Challenge gifts). • Although the 213 members of the Quadrangle Society, who have already donated over $100,000 every year, were exempted from a direct appeal, they nevertheless were offered an opportunity to donate, and over 50 per cent did so (to a total of $350,000). • Our far-flung Alumni now number several thousand, and although there were some very generous gifts sent or pledged, less than two per cent have so far responded to the appeal (for a total of $145,000).

Mary Graham Tel: 416-978-2891 Fax: 416-971-3032 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

NOW is the chance for the Alumni of Massey College to make all the difference in this campaign begun so generously by Visitor Hal Jackman and Visitor Emerita Rose Wolfe. The gap in the final stage of any financial campaign is always the hardest to bridge. The Alumni of Massey College now have a chance to make good on all the positive feelings they have about their graduate college.

Catering Manager

Darlene Naranjo Tel: 416-978-2894 h dnaranjo@masseycollege.ca Porter’s Lodge

members of DINE at We alwaysthewelcome Massey Community to dine in Hall MASSEY before any functions All you need do is call the Porter at 416-978-2895 by 1.00 p.m. of the same day to make reservations On-line events calendar <http://masseycollege.ca/activities/events-calendar> To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Tel: 416-978-2895 h massey.porter@gmail.com

PLEASE give or pledge now! Use the form that comes with this issue of MasseyNews to consider your various options for giving, and then make your decision.

SUMMER RESIDENCE CO-ORDINATOR

Tel: 416-946-7843 Fax: 416-978-1759 h massey.summer@gmail.com Alumni

Kari Maaren Alumni Association President h kmaaren@gmail.com

Rose Wolfe and Hal Jackman and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

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Life at Massey College

(1924-2010)

by Ursula Franklin With the death of Boris Stoicheff, the world of learning lost one of its most distinguished citizens. Yet, over and above this loss, the Massey community felt an even deeper void: an influential elder and committed friend no longer with us. Officer of the Order of Canada, Fellow of many distinguished learned societies, recipient of numerous honorary degrees and medals, University Professor Emeritus, teacher and researcher extraordinaire, Boris Stoicheff was respected for his insights and scholarship, as well as loved for his integrity and unfailing helpfulness. Born in Macedonia in 1924, he grew up in Toronto, earning his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Toronto. Spectroscopy and all aspects of the interaction of matter and light remained the soil from which his rich original contributions grew. Science was the milieu in which Boris lived. To him it was part of our culture: advances were contributions to the common good, not sources of private gain. In his own words, “Each discovery is not merely an advance for science, but a contribution to all dimensions of our humanity.” Also deeply interested in the arts, Boris studied how certain painters explored light in their works. His cherished conversations with colleagues from the Humanities often took place here at Massey, where he founded and chaired monthly Senior Fellows’ luncheons that were designed to encourage informed interdisciplinary discourse. In 2002, Boris’s biography of Canadian Nobel laureate Gerhard Herzberg was published. Herzberg was his friend and mentor. There is much of Boris in this major contribution to the intellectual history of modern Canadian science: the philosophy of research that informed his conduct, the views on Canadian science policy he held, and the standards of international co-operation to which he adhered. Boris will be greatly missed – maybe nowhere more than at his beloved Massey College.

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From the Don of Hall by JANE HILDERMAN, 2009-10

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n more occasions than I dare count over the past year, I was faced with a surprisingly difficult question – perhaps the wording varied, but in its essence, it was always the same – “How is it being Don?” For those who know of my rural Western roots, you may not be surprised by my conclusion. Being the Don of Hall is much like a racing a chuckwagon: the horn sounds, you may be the “driver” in name, but in fact you are hanging on to the reins for dear life as you make your way around the track. You pray for no major accidents; you are completely dependent on your team of outriders to cross the finish line with you in order to succeed; and, of course, it’s all over in the blink of an eye. Perhaps this is a clever way of evading the question. But the truth is, it is difficult to put into words how enriching the Massey community has been, and the sense of fulfillment I’ve had while doing my best to serve it. I doubt I am the only one that has struggled to articulate the uniqueness of this community. Of course, when using “unique” and “Massey” together, the surface trappings immediately come to mind. Before I arrived, I had never been a connoisseur of port or snuff; it was always Johnny Appleseed at my dinner table – certainly not a Latin grace! And gowns were something I associated with ballrooms. Then there are the pinch-me moments at Massey, such as when you spend an evening with five (FIVE!) astronauts, or you witness dozens of new Canadians from as many different countries receive their citizenship right in your living room (that is, the Common Room). That, too, is unique.

But what is truly special about this place is that, despite the number of new people who flow in each year and the number who continue downstream, there remains an unshakeable sense of a tight-knit community that genuinely cares for each other. We celebrate each others’ successes and milestones. We also help each other through tougher times. This year, there was no shortage of hurdles, from the threat of a flu pandemic to ongoing Rotman construction. It was not easy dealing with all this, but we did so extremely well. I had the good fortune to travel to Israel in December with the Tanenbaum Fellows (see page 11). We saw and heard a great deal while we there. However, what I still find myself thinking about is how rare an opportunity it is for our own peers – young Israelis and Palestinians – to have a chance to sit down, preferably over a meal (as we so often do at Massey) and talk, confident that there will be mutual respect, no matter how heated the debate. Without this opportunity to establish common ground, without the vessel of a shared community, the opposite happens between the sides: disengagement, a key block in the building of mental barriers that cannot be so easily dismantled. I returned to Massey College from Israel appreciating this place, this community, more than ever. But it is not somewhere you stay forever. Thus, I have recognized that the only way I can move on without feeling more than a little heartbroken and forlorn, is to carry with me the values I have learned and lived here: of dialogue and exchange, of respect for diversity, and of fellowship. My hope is that whenever you depart, you will work to build a little Massey wherever you are, with whoever is there, through whatever you do. This way the world will be a little better off for our experiences here. I could not speak so highly of Massey without acknowledging the dedication of all the community members who made this year a success! From the Junior Fellowship: the LMF Co-Chairs and Committee members, House Committee, Junior Fellow Lecture Series Coordinators, Winter Ball Committee, Special Events Coordinators, Tutoring Committee, Community Service Community, NonResidents’ Committee, Wine Grazing Coordinators, Clothing Committee, Environmental Committee, Library Committee, Sports Committee, Choir, and all enthusiastic participants and volunteers. And Massey wouldn’t be what is was without the involvement of Senior Fellows, Alumni, Quadranglers, Journalism Fellows, the College Officers, the Master and his family, and our fantastic staff. Thank you many times over for your contributions! Finally, I extend my best wishes to John MacCormick, whom I am confident will be a chuckwagon driver/Don of Hall extraordinaire.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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orty-six does not seem like a particularly memorable number. Nevertheless, the academic year just past was Massey’s 46th and – apart from the remarkably irritating construction site right next door to accommodate the massive expansion of the Rotman School of Management – it was a wonderful, even memorable, year. That will be very apparent as you read this year’s MasseyNews. For the purposes of my annual report, I want to focus mostly on the past and a little bit on the future. During the year, for one reason or another, all of my predecessors in the office of Master appeared to come to the forefront. The Founding Master has a special High Table held in his honour each year, which is fitting and appropriate considering the contributions he made to our College. He presided over Massey’s affairs for its first 19 years with wit, gravitas, a dash of mischief, and great distinction, bringing honour and fame to this place well beyond our small geographic territory. Master Davies was also the focus of the first of a series of historic plaques initiated by the City of Toronto to honour its greatest citizens. There was a small but impressive ceremony outside the Master’s Lodgings when the plaque was unveiled by the mayor of Toronto, David Miller, and our wonderful Visitor, the Hon. H.N.R. Jackman (see page 24 for a photo of this occasion). Less celebrated on a regular basis, his successors have nonetheless also made indelible contributions, and I was so pleased that the College was able, one way or another, to celebrate them. When Master Davies stepped down as Master in 1981, there was a tough act to follow, but the second Master, Professor Patterson Hume, never faltered, even when he saw the parlous state of the finances and the narrowing scope of the Senior Fellowship. He set about to fix these two major blockages to our future with considerable resolution, tact, and personal sacrifice. It is not generally known, but for many years Master Hume gave up much of his salary to help the College’s bottom •

1963

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Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

BORIS STOICHEFF

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

International Spenser Society’s Colin Clout Award for Lifetime Achievement in Spenser and Renaissance Studies at the Society’s annual gathering held in conjunction with the Modern Language Association meeting in Philadelphia. In November, Purdue University held a Renaissance literature conference in his honour and that of Professor Michael Murrin’s of Chicago. Nohrnberg gave two of three plenary addresses at Purdue, his under the title “The ‘Mythical Method’ in Simile, Saga, Verse, and Prose.”

All degrees awarded by the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified.

FALL 2009 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Shelley Beal Sarah Copland Jacob Etches Dan Giang Toby Malone Joshua Nichols Tara Vongpaisal

The Master’s Report

MASTER OF ARTS Daniel Alati Charles Belanger Caitlin Burton Sarah Fornace Gordon Hawkins

line. He was not at all a rich man and his act should never have been countenanced by the Corporation, but he contributed financially nonetheless, and it got the College through a really rough spell. It is a matter of real satisfaction that Master Hume, despite the agues of age – his sight is much diminished and he has consented somewhat grudgingly to use a walking stick now – continues to come to the College, wearing the title of Master Emeritus with pride. THE MASTER’S — page 4 ALUMNI

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News of Senior Fellows begins on page 15, News of Quadranglers on page 22, and Publications on page 25.

JAMES NOHRNBERG received the

DEGREES RECEIVED

Fifteen other papers were presented by the honoree’s former students. Nohrnberg is a Professor at the Department of English, University of Virginia. h jcn@virginia.edu

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He also collaborated with his son Trevor on a paper and back-to-back lectures at the Canadian Mathematical Society in Fredericton, New Brunswick. He is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary, and Emeritus Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Western Ontario. h bruen@ucalgary.ca

43 years of marriage ______________

1970

AIDEN BRUEN celebrated 43 years

DEREK OPPEN recently retired.

RAVI RAVINDRA is Professor

Emeritus (Physics), Dalhousie University, Halifax. He lives in Ferguson’s Cover, Nova Scotia. h ravindra@eastlink.ca

of marriage to his wife, Katri, this year.

SPRING 2010 DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Honoris Causa (Concordia University) Julie Payette JURIS DOCTOR Tim Barrett Joshua Elcombe JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF ARTS Amara Gossin Jeff Rybak MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE Salim Bamakhrama MASTER OF MATHEMATICAL FINANCE Riyaad Dinath MASTER OF PUBLIC POLICY Jodie Bakker Please note that the following two names were missed from the listing in our last issue of Spring 2009 degrees received. Our sincerest apologies. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Caitlin Finlayson MASTER OF ARTS Christopher MacDonald

h mail@derekoppen.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Donations made between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Nora Adamson Howard Adelman Toshiko Adilman Bruce Alexander Ian Alexander Derek Allen Jocelyn Allen Richard Always Cristina Amon Carl Amrhein R. Jamie Anderson Aubie Angel David Angell James Appleyard Sally Armstrong James Arthur Philip Arthur Katherine Ashenburg Roger Bagnall Andrew Baines Cornelia Baines Helen Balfour Ian Bandeen Carolyn Barnes Donald Baronowski Isabel Bassett R. Beardsley Belinda Beaton Avie Bennett Daryl Bennett Jalynn Bennett Robert Bennett Alan Bernstein Suresh Bhalla Andrew Binkley Robert Birgeneau Sonja Bird Gloria Bishop John Bishop Michael Bliss Robert Boeckner Henry Borden Alan Borovoy Marian Botsford Fraser Walter Bowen Alan Bowker Diana Bradshaw Donald Brean Robin Breon Peter Brigg Alan Broadbent Stephen Brooke Aaron Brotman Carol Brough

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The Master’s Report from page 3

Whenever a Junior Fellow makes a real contact with him, either in informal chat in the Common Room, or sitting beside him at High Table, an animated connection is made. Earlier this year, Master Hume and I went to visit Professor Boris Stoicheff at his palliative care hospice shortly before the great physicist died (his obituary appears on page 38). Both men deployed courage and black humour at what General de Gaulle once called “the shipwreck of old age,” but this particular rendezvous was one of the most moving I had ever encountered. I have thought about it often after I drove Pat back to his home, where he cares for and protects Patricia Hume, his loyal and loving wife. I think it is because of an innate understanding of the unpredictable trajectory of life that the Master Emeritus’ approach to old age is so moving. That charming offbeat sense of humour (which delighted so many at High Table and occasionally discomforted others) has turned out to be his battle shield against the vicissitudes and challenges of the unrelenting process we all must face. It’s also why the Junior Fellows enjoy his company and why I rejoice whenever he comes to College events, or just drops by for lunch. I need hardly say that the Masters of our College have been a remarkably diverse lot. When Stefan Dupré, one of the University of Toronto’s most distinguished political scientists, became Acting Master in 1993 to give Master Ann Saddlemyer a much-needed sabbatical to deal with health issues, he set about educating Corporation on the necessities of fundraising. Thanks to him, a somewhat hidebound but proudly independent graduate college learned to grow up without the benefit of U of T’s development office raising its funds. •

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Master Dupré also deployed good humour to get across some of his more difficult points and decisions to the community. Consequently, by the time Master Saddlemyer returned in good health to resume her mastership, he had managed to aid her immeasurably in getting the College to accept the reality of its special situation with greater equanimity and effectiveness. It was a simple enough equation and message that Master Dupré left the Corporation, the Senior Fellowship, and its Alumni to ponder: “Take fundraising seriously or wither on the vine.” Master Dupré comes fairly often to College events, although not as much as we would like. He also handles the vicissitudes of age with courage and grace, and his Christian faith has been a source of great comfort to him. With great integrity and honesty, he has this past year let people know that he is now coping with the onset of Alzheimer’s. Not that anyone would notice; his unfailing courtesy and tact seem as untouched as his curiosity about the young and his presiding affection for the Junior Fellowship. Once again, courage is the hallmark, and my respect for Master Dupré, which was always high, is now even higher. When the Master Emerita, Ann Saddlemyer, came to town last spring to help with the Canadian launch of the Dictionary of Irish Biography (to which she was a crucial contributor), I hosted a lunch for her that included Masters Hume and Dupré, as well as many of the Senior Fellows and Alumni who were associated with her seven years as Master. She is, as all who know her appreciate, a warm and welcoming figure in the College’s history. During her years, the whole notion of community became her watchword and presiding ethos, and much of the joyous and communal atmosphere at Massey today can be traced back to her influence, especially the quantum leap made by women at Massey. Continued on page 6 ALUMNI

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JACK MacQUARRIE continues to

Lane Bishop, now retired from his

Ronald Stewart is Head of the

play in a variety of musical organizations and write a monthly column for a music magazine. He was made a member of the Chancellor’s Circle (U of T) this past year. He lives in Goodwood, Ontario, with his wife, Joan Andrews. h jmac@infinity.net

JOHN TSANG is a Clinical Professor, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, UBC. He lives in Vancouver with his wife, Eileen, and has two daughters, Katherine and Laura. h jtsang@interchange.ubc.ca

position at Honeywell International, relocated this past June to Kars, New Brunswick, with his wife, Diane. h Lane@LBishop.net

MARTIN O’MALLEY is a writer

living in Toronto. He is preparing a memoir based on diaries, and enjoys time with his grandchildren, Rhiannon, Noah, and Jamison. h martin.omalley@live.com

TERRILL THEMAN is a surgeon at

St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery, Temple University, in Philadelphia. h ttheman@hotmail.com

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Department of Environment and Geography at the University of Manitoba. He is one of the scientists developing the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) on climate extremes, and has been funded to do a cross-Canada speaking tour on this issue. As well, to better understand mountain precipitation, he carried out measurements on the distribution of snow and rain on Whistler Mountain just before and just after the last Winter Olympics. He continues to publish extensively in his field. h ronald_stewart@umanitoba.ca

JANE GLASSCO

Don in slippers

(1939-2010)

by SIMON DEVEREAUX

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ast night I dreamt I was at Massey College again. The place was vastly bigger than I remember. My legs seemed to be sunk in molasses, and I realized with despair that I was going to be hopelessly late for High Table, since simply getting across the quad was taking me an hour. Even so, I first stopped by the Porter’s Lodge to check my mail, which was piled high with mysteriously neglected items. Why did “Devereaux” share a box with someone named “Oppenheim”? Such are the eccentricities of dreams, and Massey – like all the best human institutions – is at its best when allowing space for dreams and eccentricity. For me, an early sign of belonging to the place was a communal TV set surrounded by people who, like my younger self, could name the title of a Star Trek episode before the main credit sequence. Not the more recent crop of shows – STNG, STDSN, etc. – but the original Kirk-Spock crew (or, as we must now call them, STOS). Those were innocent days: before Shatner further embarrassed himself and his country by plugging the nether-region benefits of wholegrain cereals on bus-stop posters. Not to mention wife #3 turning up drowned in the swimming pool. But I digress. For me, as I hope for everyone I shared it with, Massey was a place of both retreat and community, and of affirmation. The greatest affirmation for me was to be elected Don of Hall during my final year. To be sure, some of my affectations were no longer welcome. Daffy Duck in place of the rosette on my gown had to go. But another eccentricity was wonderfully endorsed. Timothy Findley, the guest of honour at High Table the night I assumed office, was sitting on a quad bench, contentedly puffing on a cigarette, when a passing Senior Fellow insisted that I could not assume the dignities of my position while wearing slippers instead of shoes. Findley responded, his cigarette punctuating the statement: “Wear the slippers!” End of debate. Of course, the main job of any Don of Hall is the daily recitation of grace before and after dinner. Of the three Dons I saw in action, I alone had the dubious distinction of once going completely blank. (Thanks, Steve, wherever you are, for saving my hide that night!) I also remember one Senior Fellow, on the eve of returning to his native Ireland, telling me how much he enjoyed my “ironic delivery of the grace”. Whatever could he have meant? And, come to think of it, weren’t these also the years we stopped thanking a Christian God for our daily bread and replaced Him/Her with the Massey Foundation (domus Massiensus)? Inevitably though, as a historian, one of the things I remember most vividly about my Massey years is what remarkable events were transpiring beyond its halls – the fall of the Berlin Wall, the failed coup in Moscow, the First Gulf War (the one with the other Bush; the one that ended, or at least stopped). My own feeble attempt to share in the flow of events involved the novelist Josef Škvorecký, who attended a High Table on the same day that Alexander Dubček reappeared in public to set the

1990s Simon Devereaux seal on the end of Communism in Czechoslovakia. “This must be a proud day for you,” I said very earnestly. Škvorecký smiled mischievously. “Not really,” he said. “Dubček was always a boring speaker.” With such bricks should all the windows of historical cliché be broken. Sometimes history arrived at our door. I remember vividly the late John Kenneth Galbraith coming to speak, as well as to set his generational seal of approval on then-premier Bob Rae’s ill-fated effort to revive deficit spending in an era of fiscal restraint. In the end, the image of Massey that most often comes to my mind – the one that arises unbidden and without obvious association – is the one which surely all of us saw most often without even thinking about it. It is the enormous picture in the Common Room: Icarus plunging from the sky, while the chariot of Helios roars on un-noticing through the heavens. Which of the two might we budding scholars have been meant to emulate? The answer, of course, was neither. Our intended model was the third, markedly less ostentatious figure in the picture – Daedalus, in whom ambition is balanced by modesty, and accomplishment is devoid of a prideful defiance of human limitations. I hope that all of you are as content in the life to which Massey helped lead you as am I. Simon Devereaux was a Junior Fellow from 1989 to 1992 and Don of Hall 1991-92. He was four-and-halfyears at the University of Queensland in Australia, and is now Associate Professor of History at the University of Victoria. His colleague and partner Andrea McKenzie was much amused to read some years ago in the Massey Newsletter that she was her husband’s first child! They are, in fact, the proud parents of five cats and a 2005 Toyota Echo. h devereau@uvic.ca

Jane Glassco, who died on April 28, 2010 after a courageous battle with Lou Gehrig’s Disease, was a founding member of The Quadrangle Society. Like her father, the late Hon. Walter Gordon, who was a founding Senior Fellow of the College, she was a challenger and didn’t hesitate to state her mind. Once, during a question period following the formal presentation of a Walter Gordon Symposium on Public Policy, she told a participant that not only was she wrong, but that she, Jane, was prepared to stomach her distaste of what was argued and explain the depth of the participant’s ignorance in private in order to avoid further embarrassment. To the Master, who was a good friend, she simply said: “Better luck next year, old boy. This one was a bummer!” If she could be gruff, she also had an expansive and generous heart. A great benefactor, she loved the give and take at Massey encounters, and was a particularly wonderful friend and adviser to whichever Junior Fellow was assigned to her in the mentorship program, even after she was afflicted with the debilitating effects of the disease that took her life. “She was the soul of commitment,” said Andrew Ignatieff, a fellow Quadrangler and her dear friend right to the end. “I know of very few people who gave over so much of their lives to their family, friends, and causes.” Those causes were legion: she was co-founder of the famous Tarragon Theatre with her late husband, Bill Glassco. An edgy journalist and filmmaker, her work was always allied to causes or people she believed in. Her philanthropy was widely dispersed, but had a presiding focus on Aboriginal causes. The only flaw Andrew Ignatieff would ascribe to her was an intolerance toward the Canada geese that taunted her regularly at her beautiful farm an hour north of her Toronto home. Master Fraser commented: “Jane Glassco’s wit, questioning spirit, and supportive affection will be sorely missed by the College she always supported. I have lost a wonderful friend and ally of five decades. When the Quadrangle Society was first conceived, she caught the idea in a flash and stayed the course with us to her very end. On behalf of the College, I extended our profound sympathies to all her family.”

a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear. To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

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And to posthumously rectify his omission from the official list of past Dons, we will also endow in Vince’s name an annual prize to be awarded to a member of the College community, at the discretion of the current Don of Hall.

ENA FRANCIS

(1933-2010)

by Anna Luengo Many Masseyites will fondly remember our dear server Ena Francis, who spent almost as many years at the College (1972-06) as Pat Kennedy had. When I joined the staff in 1995, Ena was very much in charge of serving breakfast and lunch, and she was known both for giving a hapless new Junior Fellow a shout for taking a glass of juice and a bowl of soup (definitely verboten in those days), as well as for turning a blind eye to the odd team-rower who needed extra calories. Originally from the Caribbean island of Grenada, Ena had immigrated to Canada several years before coming to Massey, and she and I regularly exchanged lyrics from various old calypsos that we had both grown up with. If she had been quarrelling about something right before I turned up for my morning coffee, some lines from the Mighty Sparrow, the Grenadian-born “Calypso King of the World,” would get her laughing, a wonderful resonating laugh that filled Ondaatje Hall. But it wasn’t only the rhythm of the Caribbean that endeared Ena to everyone around her. She was a warm presence, providing a listening ear to many, and never forgetting a face when one of our Alum turned up for a meal. When David Landaverde joined her, there was even more respect for “La Ena,” and he added some extra softness to complete the marvellous choreography of the servery. We carry on without Ena, but she will be deeply missed by those she touched during her many years of loyal service to our College.

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MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Kitchen Creations Kitchen Creations

From the Master Emerita

GRILLED BEEF TENDERLOIN STEAKS WITH A LIME-GORGONZOLA BUTTER ¾ cup soft unsalted butter ½ tbsp. Gorgonzola cheese 2 limes Pinch of fresh thyme Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

6 beef tenderloin steaks, cut 2 inches thick 3 tbsps. olive oil 1 tsp. sherry vinegar ½ tsp. roasted garlic

Place the softened butter in a bowl. Finely grate the zest of both limes and then juice them. Break up the gorgonzola cheese. Add all the zest, half the juice, and cheese to the butter. Using a spoon, blend the ingredients well, then mix in a pinch of thyme and season to taste with salt and pepper. Place the lime butter on a piece of parchment paper and roll into a thick log 6 inches long. Twist the ends of the parchment and refrigerate until firm. Approximately half an hour before cooking, take the steaks out of the fridge and marinate them in a dish with the remaining lime juice and sherry vinegar garlic and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper just before grilling. Grill on a medium-high barbecue until done as desired.

Chef Silvana Valdes

Serve with desired side dishes and top each steak with a slice of the lime butter.

Continued from page 1

The Master tackles a “complicated” evening How do you organize an evening that includes space-shuttle astronauts, government and academic VIPs, an assortment of Massey Fellows and other community members, a film and question period in an over-crowded Common Room, and the return of a College spoon? And all this with maximum security on Devonshire Place as the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall are reviewing troops just up the street at Varsity Stadium, not to speak of displaced Junior Fellows to feed and a Corporation High Table to follow 24 hours later. We thought this detailed and enthusiastic pre-event notice from the Master would give our readers a taste of what’s involved in organizing all this. It’s all, as he says, quite “complicated.” It just takes, we might add, a bit of panache. TO ALL JUNIOR FELLOWS FROM THE MASTER Next Thursday, our distinguished Alumna, astronaut Julie Payette, will be returning to Massey College with the entire crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavour STS 127: Mark Polansky, Chris Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, and Dave Wolf, along with their wives and senior officials from the Canadian Space Agency. The College has invited them all to join us for dinner in Ondaatje Hall and I have been landed with the task of organizing a complicated evening. But what’s a challenge if it’s not worth meeting! I am going to have to accommodate some Senior Fellows, the President of the university, our Visitor, members of the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, distinguished outside guests (like the LieutenantGovernor), and some Senior Fellows, so the following plan seems to be the fairest way I can come up with. (1) There will be seating for 40 resident Junior Fellows and 40 non-resident Junior Fellows. The remaining 44 seats will go the astronauts and all the others I have to accommodate. This will leave some residents without a meal here and we will organize one for them at Trinity College. Stay posted! (2) We will gather in the Common Room (gowns, please) at 6 p.m. for drinks and go up as usual at 6:30. I propose to put an astronaut at each table, along with other guests. The High Table will be divided in three and will feature officials of the space agencies at each of them. (3) After a two-course dinner, we will all go back to the Common Room to see a short film, narrated live by the

astronauts. There will be seats for the infirm (like me), but most of us will be crowding in and squatting on the floor. There will be time for questions. At the end of that exercise, the College’s silver teaspoon will be formally presented back to us having taken its historic trip to outer space, and I am proposing that David Landaverde, Pat Kennedy, and the Don of Hall will be there to accept it on behalf of the College. (4) Following all this, dessert and coffee will be served in the Upper Library, and the astronauts have promised to linger for informal discussions. (5) The same night during our event, and just up the street, the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall will be reviewing troops in Varsity Stadium. There will be massive security on the street, so please take notice of that. All in all, it should all make for a memorable and amusing night at Massey College and Devonshire Place. (6) The following night is Corporation High Table, and life is going to get confusing if we don’t separate the sign-ups. So, dear colleagues, please sign-up for the Payette evening by e-mail on a first-come, firstserved basis. If you don’t make it into Ondaatje Hall for dinner, Trinity College will feed you and just get back here in time for the film and post-prandials in the Upper Library. (7) Sgt. Hope in the Porter’s Lodge will take the sign-up for the Corporation High Table in the usual way starting next Monday. Thank you all for your co-operation. It promises to be a great evening.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause,

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s our current Master notes in his report, he hosted a lunch last spring for Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer, an occasion that delighted her. In her own words: “I was honoured to have the Master arrange a lunch party for me. It was good to see old friends and to hear of others. And, of course, it was good to see the College in such good hands!” She added that she was also in Toronto at Professor Saddlemyer that time to host the Canadian launch of the multi-volume Dictionary of Irish Biography for the Royal Irish Academy. This event took place at St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto. Professor Saddlemyer’s main project this past year was the completion of her edition of the correspondence of W. B. Yeats and his wife, George, for Oxford University Press. Much of this past summer was spent on the production details of this large volume, and we look forward to its publication in March 2011. While this work took up most of her time, the Master Emerita still managed to fit in teaching a course on the poetry of Yeats for the University of Victoria extension department in the winter, as well as a talk last January in Victoria to the Canadian Federation of University Women on writing a woman’s biography and a lecture this past April on the art of Edmund Dulac at the National Library of Ireland, in Dublin. •

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Professor Saddlemyer continues her connection with the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagara-on-the-Lake: in the past year she wrote program essays for two of Shaw’s plays – The Devil’s Disciple and John Bull’s Other Island – that were performed at this world-renowned festival. She also remained actively involved as one of the general editors of the Cornell Yeats, one more volume of which came out last year (just four volumes are left to complete this 32-volume series). Also published this past year was another volume in the Selected Irish Plays series, of which she is one of the General Editors. This series is published by Colin Smythe, where the Master Emerita also serves as a member of the editorial board, as she still is with a number of Canadian and international journals such as the Canadian Journal of Irish Studies and the Irish University Review.

STAFF NEWS After the retirement of College Librarian Marie Korey last December, P.J. MacDougall assumed the new position of Library Administrator. We also welcomed a new Porter, Dan Speirs. Brian Maloney returned to the Print Room on a part-time basis to instruct students on the use of the presses, and to provide us with the unique and creative keepsakes enhancing special events. For private catered functions, if time permits, Brian is pleased to work with our members to create printed notices, for a fee, which contributes to library and printroom funding. Our new one-person IT department consists of Matt Glandfield, of Log-On Solutions, who joins us one day per week. He’s had a challenging task in updating our systems over the summer, which he accomplished with great patience and good humour.

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1975

1977

MICHAEL BRODIE lives in

DONALD BARONOWSKI is a

Playing George Sand_ _____________

Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is Chief Scientist, Verizon Communications (VSO). He was appointed to a second term to the Advisory Committee of The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. He delivered the keynote address, on “Understanding Our Digital Universe: Unleashing Natural Forces,” at the June 2009 IEEE International Conference on Cyber Engineering and Creating Value by Making Connections in Istanbul. h michael.brodie@verizon.com or www.michaelbrodie.com

Faculty Lecturer, Department of History, McGill University. He lives in Chateauguay, Quebec. h donald.baronowski@mcgill.ca

1976 BARRY MONSON is a Professor of

Mathematics, University of New Brunswick. He longs for an end to the busy work that more and more pollutes the intellectual environment. He and his wife, Milda, just celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary. Their younger daughter, Eva, is a graduate student at McGill and their older daughter, Rita, is a post-doctoral fellow at Cambridge. h bmonson@unb.ca

CAROLYN ROBERTS FINLAY,

Canada Music Week Coordinator for the British Columbia Registered Music Association, North Vancouver, commissioned and organized the premier performances of three pieces for piano by Dr. Stephen Chatman, Professor of Composition at UBC. She also performed in three biographical plays by former Ideas producer Don Mowatt as Clara Schumann, Olivia Clemens, and George Sand. The last was for a feature evening on Frederic Chopin and George Sand at the Bicentennial Chopin Festival held in Vancouver this past May.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Thank you, donors! Deryck Brown Robert Brown Russell Brown Francis Brunelle Robert Buchan Catherine Buck Ian Burgham Donald Burwash Brendan Calder David Cameron Teddy Cameron David Campbell Dona Campbell Joanna Campion CanadaHelps CBC Edmund Cape James Carley Rosann Cashin Wendy Cecil John Chamberlin David Chapman-Smith Barbara Charles Michael Charles Janet Charlton Mark Cheetham Emmanuel Chomski Marilyn Chotem Tara Chotem Ian Clark George Clarke Howard Clarke Stephen Clarkson Christine Clement Edward Coderre Andrew Cohen Judith Cohen George Connell Martin Connell Russell Connolly Eleanor Cook Anthony Coombes Brian Corman Jack Costello James Coutts Elizabeth Cowper Christopher Cowperthwaite David Cox Marcelle Cox Margaret Craik Phillip Crawley Patrick Crean Wilma Cromwell Crosbie Limited

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Life at Massey College

• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

The Master’s Report Thank you, donors! Abdallah Daar Gary Davis Natalie Davis William Davis Martha Deacon Philip Deck Dianne de Fenoyl Jon Dellandrea W. Delworth Etienne de Medicis Honor de Pencier Marni de Pencier Ramsay Derry Brenda Dinnick John Dirks Wendy Dobson Elizabeth Dowdeswell Rupert Duchesne Nana Duncan Dorothy Dunlop J. Stefan Dupré Michael Eagan Fredrik Eaton Noel Edison Peter Edwards Gordon Elliot Timothy Elliott Sheila Embleton Howard Engel Diana Ericson Gay Evans John Evans George Fallis Maureen Farrow Catherine Fauquier Anthony Feinstein Brian Felske Terence Finlay Patty Fischer Alison Fisher Derek Fisher James Fleck Patricia Fleming Albert's Foods Inc. Catherine Foote Charles Foran Julia Foster Ursula Franklin Danielle Fraser Jane Freeman Josephine Frayne Martin Friedland Colin Friesen Murray Frum Doreen Fumia

6

Hims, hymns, and a carrel apparition

from page 3

As you will read elsewhere in this issue, the Master Emerita continues making major contributions to scholarship. At that luncheon last spring, watching the animated, affectionate faces of those who loved her most at Massey, it was for me a real reminder of the layered contributions my predecessors have made at this good place. I honour them all and on behalf of the College – past, present and future – I also thank them. I say “layered” because these contributions form the firm foundation upon which Massey College draws its enormous strength and builds its future. We are now into the academic year 2010-11. In the year after this we will have reached the 50th anniversary of the granting of the provincial charter which launched Massey College on its unique trajectory in graduate and postgraduate community fellowship. The year following that will be the Golden Anniversary of the first year of Junior Fellowship. An official College history has been commissioned from Dr. Judith Skelton Grant, the biographer of Robertson Davies, and we have already begun some preliminary planning to make sure the anniversary is memorable. •

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by Andrew Cunningham

Our Alumni will be playing a major role in those events. Please stay connected to your College throughout the years. Please remember us generously in your gift giving. And, above all, please keep alive our worthy notions of •

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1981

Educational Consultant living in Red Deer, Alberta. Her first play, Fertile Choices, premiered this year. She also had her first solo art exhibit, The Secret Language of Roads. h boultbee@telusplanet.net

JIM GRIER is happy to report that

he was awarded a Killam Research Fellowship, as well as Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies to support his research on the origins of musical literacy in the medieval West, 900-1100.

JONATHAN HART is at the

scholarship, fellowship, community, and the connectness of all things and all people.

University of Alberta, where he holds the positions of Director,

Comparative Literature; Professor of English; and Adjunct Professor of History. He was recently an Invited Professor at Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris) and the Ricardo J. Quinones Distinguished Lecturer, ClaremontMcKenna. This past year, he was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard. h jonathanlockehart@gmail.com

BRUNO SCHERZINGER lives in

Richmond Hill, Ontario with his wife, Karen Jones, and their three children, Claire (18), Emily (16), and Peter (14). He is the Chief Technology Officer for Applanix Corporation and has a forthcoming Red Book on integrated systems. h BScherzinger@sympatico.ca

Sapere aude • Dare to know

MURRAY MAZER recently joined

Endeca as Vice-President, Distributed Development, after eight years as founder/ CTO/VP at Lumigent. He lives in Arlington Massachusetts, with his partner, Sylvia Peretz. h murray@mazer.org

1983 Throwing in the towel_ ____________

RON THOMPSON saw the light in

2007 and threw in the towel on corporate life. He is pursuing his long-standing interest in creative writing and completed two novels that he is trying to publish. He lives in Toronto with his wife, Jacquie, and daughter, Kaitlin. h rgt11@sympatico.ca

was going to start with my best College anecdote concerning the Elvis bust, but Steve Bearne beat me to it two MasseyNews issues back. Fortunately, though, there are plenty of second-string anecdotes to share. There was, for instance, the time when tensions between feminists and traditionalists in the alto and soprano sections of the College Choir briefly reached a boiling point. The progressive choristers declared that they would no longer sing gender-specific words, a policy that produced a jarring drop in volume whenever a he, his, or him came along, as they not infrequently do in hymns and madrigals. I forget how this was resolved but I do recollect that despite a diversity of strongly held views on politics, religion, and the proper location for the College television, we Masseyites were more united than divided by issues. The greatest of all common causes, at least in the early years, must surely have been the universally unappreciated College food. On that distasteful subject I will offer what is not so much an anecdote as an observation – namely that through all the years since, a mere minute’s meditation on the culinary words horseradish, tapioca, and Salisbury steak has sufficed to make anything served to me taste like a gift from the gods. Of course, meals at Massey were about so much more than eating (at any rate, this was how the administration defended the Salisbury steak). I recall, for example, the evening that the Junior Fellows hosted Barbara Frum at “Low Table,” a now much-changed College tradition in which an illustrious guest would join us for an ordinary dinner and then give a talk in the Upper Library. Ms. Frum was, needless to say, a particularly distinguished invitee, so distinguished, in fact, that we Canadians could not summon up the nerve to join her at her designated table. So there she sat, forlorn and almost alone, until rescued at the last moment by the fortuitous arrival in Hall of a friendly group of American Junior Fellows, who had likely never heard of her and who in any event were not inclined to be much impressed (let alone intimidated) by anything Canadian. Rounding out this memorable evening was Ms. Frum’s famous reply, in the post-lecture Q & A, to Steve Bearne’s detailed criticism of scientific inaccuracies in The Journal’s coverage of the Challenger disaster: “We’re not on closed circuit to an engineering faculty.” I hasten to add that Steve did eventually recover from this and even served a year as Don of Hall, during which he assigned the task of organizing Low Tables to me, knowing full well that this might mean the end of them forever.

VINCENT DEL BUONO

(1949-2010)

I

1979 GLYNIS WILSON BOULTBEE is an

by Ian Alexander

1980s Andrew Cunningham A final recollection dates from my fourth and final year as a Junior Fellow. One afternoon, Robert Janes and I were studying down in the carrels. It was our last semester of law school and we quite frankly had had enough of it. It was always work, work, work. Here was a fine spring day and we lawyers were, as usual, the only ones stuck down in the basement studying. Tossing aside our half-finished essays, we let it all out. No aspect of the law school experience was spared, up to and including the faculty themselves, whose moral, intellectual, and sartorial shortcomings were brilliantly lampooned. Cathartic though this must have been, it all came to a dead halt when, out of the darkness (ensured even in daytime by Ron Thom’s love of dim lighting) there appeared without warning a figure whose ghostly stealth and pale countenance seemed to have sprung straight from the imagination of our Founding Master. “Boys, I’m trying to get some work done. I like to come down here because no one disturbs me,” the thing announced, rather too gently, I thought, and in a voice that was startlingly like ... well, come to think of it, startlingly like that of then outgoing University of Toronto Faculty of Law Dean (and incoming University of Toronto President) J. R. S. Prichard, whose facial expressions and general comportment it also brilliantly mimicked. After a moment’s reflection, everything that could be said having been said, the pallid ghost and the red-faced students returned to their studies in stunned silence. Andrew Cunningham was a Junior Fellow from 1986-90. He is a lawyer in the Toronto office of Stikeman Elliott LLP.

Sapere Aude •Dare to Know

Vincent Del Buono, who died on April 13, 2010 at the age of 60, was a Resident Junior Fellow of Massey College, 1973-75. He is the only former Don of Hall whose name is not listed on the board that hangs behind the grace pulpit in Ondaatje Hall. The reason for this apparent oversight is that 1974-75 was, as the Founding Master rather portentously christened it, “The Year of the Two Hall Dons.” The phrase comes from “The Perils of the Double Sign,” one of Davies’ Christmas ghost stories. In this particular story, Vince appears as what, indeed, he was in real life: a practitioner of two arcane disciplines – some might call them complementary black arts – law and astrology. Vince went on to a distinguished career, in Canada and abroad, in the fields of criminal justice, human rights, and the rule of law. Among numerous highlights, he was the Founding President of two international institutions for criminal law reform, served as Deputy Secretary-General of Amnesty International in London, and led the British Council’s Access to Justice program in Nigeria, for which he was honoured by investiture into the Order of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. (He was equally proud of his traditional Nigerian titles: The King’s Law Maker and The Emir’s Chief Mediator.) At the time of his death, he was CEO of the Niagara 1812 Bicentennial Legacy Council. Over the years, Vince held academic appointments at, among other institutions, York, McGill, UBC, the University of Ottawa, and the State University of New York at Buffalo. In spite of his busy and peripatetic life, Vince retained close ties to Massey. In 2004, he was especially proud to be one of four inaugural recipients of the College’s Clarkson Laureateship for Public Service. In honour of his many achievements – and his larger-than-life personality – friends and colleagues are organizing the Vincent M. Del Buono Visiting Fellowship in International Justice and Human Rights, to be based at Massey College.

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Cecil Hahn (’95) and Alorani Martin – July 31, 2010 Rachel Pulfer (’09) and Karim Bardeesy (’09) – March 27, 2010 Jordan Thomson (’06) and Laura Weir – August 28, 2010

BIRTHS Emmi Elizabeth Wang Ping Du Mont – adopted March 10, 2009, a second daughter for Janice Du Mont (’91) Sophie – May 10, 2010, to Alon Eizenman (’04) Jan Matias – May 27, 2009, to Jan Eperjesi (’04) Wyatt Patrick Carlyle – July 8, 2010, to Amy Maish (’95) and Drake Carlyle, a brother for Archie Ash Cormac Michael James Malone – September 18, 2009, to Meg Logue Malone (’07) and Toby Malone (’06) Jeremy Carson Nohrnberg – April 10, 2010, a brother for Madeline and fourth grandchild for James Nornberg (’63) Ava Chanel – April 1, 2010, a sister for Calista Rose and granddaughter for Sabina Calais Stone (’91)

In Memoriam We regret to announce the passing of the following members of our community. Gerald Robert Brown Quadrangler, ’98-’09 on November 4, 2009 Geoffrey Clark Senior Resident ’81-’82 Vincent Del Buono Junior Fellow, ’73-’75 on April 13, 2010 Ena Francis Kitchen Server, ’72-’06 on April 19, 2010 Andres Jaaku Junior Fellow, ’66-’68 on January 3, 2010 Jane Lockhart (Gordon) Glassco Quadrangler, ’97-’10 on April 28, 2010 Boris Stoicheff Senior Fellow, ’89-’10 on April 15, 2010

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From the Massey College Archives, photography by Anthony Luengo

Marriages

Conversation and community by Jacqueline Murray

I

have been asked with amazing frequency how I learned to speak with ease to a wide variety of people. I always attribute this to my years at Massey, a community characterized by conviviality. From the first moment I entered the gates, life at Massey was a swirl of encounters with fascinating people. Much of the College conviviality was centred on the JCR. How many of us learned how to carry a cup of morning coffee down the stairs from Hall to the JCR without spilling? This was a real challenge given the fluid dynamics of those teacups, as a physicist kindly explained! And then there was the sherry before dinner. Who had ever drunk sherry before? Nonetheless, we all learned to love it at Massey! Our pastimes were communal and inclusive. There was a squash tree for the athletically inclined. Killer croquet in the quad was equally ruthless, if requiring considerably less exertion. More surprising, perhaps, was the competitiveness of the Scrabble tournament. A dozen spectators might hover around watching as words were played with the same prowess as a Stanley Cup final. Then there were poetry nights in the Upper Library, when each person read two or three poems, leaving the rest of us to ponder their meaning to the reader. Wondering about just who were one’s “fellow Fellows” (a term popularized by Michael Wex) was also evident in the great baby picture sweepstakes. Then there was the night of the federal election that Joe Clark lost. Suddenly, the whole College was filled with political junkies, and we moved two or three televisions into the JCR. Never before has there been a TV in precincts dedicated to collegial discourse and chess. Was this the thin edge of the wedge? I am sure that many of us from the seventies and early eighties still find the notion of a permanent TV in the Common Room astonishing. When Brideshead Revisited premiered on PBS, we repaired to the basement in evening dress, champagne in hand! Dining always provided an opportunity to stretch one’s mind and expand one’s horizons. In the Hall, the custom of assuming whatever chair was free promised amazing and unpredictable discussion, dependant only on the serendipity of who arrived when. Where else would a medieval historian hear a med student describe his first encounter with a cadaver or an organist explain how to make a lute. Not all meal-time conversation was necessarily elevating, of course. Idle chatter might occupy those lingering after lunch, as they watched others hone their skills at capturing, in upside-down water glasses, the nasty wasps that plagued the Hall every fall. How many wasps can a Junior Fellow trap in a single glass? I wonder now, with belated concern, about whatever happened when the staff were later confronted with all those angry insects? Almost as fearsome as those wasps was the prospect of taking one’s turn at the High Table. These were always events of great import, as we watched the individuals selected to join the High Table manoeuvre, with varying levels of finesse, discomfort, or obliviousness, among the Master, the eminent guests, and the Senior Fellows. Then, of course, there was the trial by manners posed by the postprandial table in the Upper Library. In those days, the old rituals of cigars and snuff still pertained and countless

Thank you, donors!

1970s Jacqueline Murray Junior Fellows suffered the worse for the volatile combination of sherry, wine, good food, port, cheese, snuff, and cigars. Yet through it all was the wide ranging, intriguing, and engaging conversation with the extraordinary people who came to Massey. I lived at Massey during its first great transition (second, if you count the admission of women to the Junior Fellowship). I mean the retirement of Robertson Davies and the appointment of Patterson Hume as the second Master. I always admired Pat Hume’s fearlessness in following someone who had made an indelible imprint on the fabric of College life. It was an interesting transition, gentle, incremental, scarcely noticeable at first. Then, at the Christmas Gaudy, the ghost story was replaced by a light-operatic rendering of the famous Santayana lines circling the Hall. Nothing can ever quite match a version of “Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable ….” worthy of Gilbert and Sullivan. It is conversation and community that I remember most fondly. The multidisciplinary perspectives on the world that distinguished Massey continue to inform my outlook, as do the Massey values of bridging the academy and society and integrating knowledge in the service of society. These are the values of Massey College that shaped us, influenced our paths, and have made us who we are. And these are the values than continue to guide this remarkable community. And, of course, the ability to engage with diverse beings, honed in the JCR, always comes in handy! Jacqueline Murray was a Junior Fellow from 1979-83. After earning her Ph.D. in Medieval Studies, she spent 13 years at the University of Windsor teaching History and serving as Director of the Humanities Research Group. She then moved to Guelph, where she was Dean of Arts and is now Professor of History. She is involved with groups promoting human rights and women’s education in the developing world.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Drawings from Ron Thom’s round 1 submissions for Massey College, June 30, 1960. On the facing page, Thom’s original plan for Ondaatje Hall, featuring a pitched roof. Immediately above is the south elevation, on Hoskin Avenue, as he first envisioned it. Thom’s original plans also called for public rooms, including one for billiards, thrusting into the Quadrangle in place of the pond that we have today (inset above). •

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1984 DEBORAH KENNEDY is a Professor of English at St. Mary’s University, Halifax. h deborah.kennedy@smu.ca

Booing oil tankers ________________

ANTHONY PERL completed his first

full term as Director of Urban Studies at Simon Fraser University. He published a second edition of Transport Revolutions: Moving People and Freight Without Oil, and was invited to give papers on transportation policy over the past year or so at the East-West Center in Honolulu, the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management at New York University, the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy in

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Saskatchewan, the University of Oregon, and the Central Alberta Economic Partnership in Red Deer, Alberta. Speaking at the JohnsonShoyama School had special resonance because Massey Senior Resident Al Johnson had served on Perl’s Ph.D. supervisory committee, and provided a great deal of mentoring during his graduate studies. Perl lives happily with his wife, Andrea (Banks), on the shores of Burrard Inlet, cheering the cruise ships that sail by in summer and booing the oil tankers. h aperl@sfu.ca

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University. He lives in Bloomfield, New Jersey. h mbaur@fordham.edu

1987 DIANE ENGLISH is Director of Policy, Parks and Recreation Ontario.

h diane.english@sympatico.ca ROBERT I. THOMPSON is Associate

Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, and was just appointed department head for a five-year term. h rthompso@ucalgary.ca

1988 DAVID EARN is Professor of

1985 MICHAEL BAUR is Associate

Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Law, Fordham

Mathematics, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University. h earn@math.mcmaster.ca

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

Galin Foundation Heather Gardiner Jane Gaskell John Geiger Hugh Gemmell Meric Gertler Douglas Gibson Graeme Gibson Pamela Gibson Luke Gilgan Jane Glassco John Godfrey Mary Godfrey Gary Goldberg David Goldbloom Edward Goldfarb Joanna Goldfarb Greta Golick Paul Gooch Cynthia Good Alice Goodfellow-Mennacher Mary Goodwin Allan Gotlieb Katherine Govier Catherine Graham Ronald Graham Jack Granatstein Judith Grant John Gray James Greene Edward Greenspan Kathleen Griffin Scott Griffin Franklyn Griffiths Phyllis Grosskurth Marc Grynpas Richard Gwyn Beth Haddon Cecil Hahn Roger Hall Francess Halpenny Rick Halpern C. M. Harding William Harris Joan Harrison Elizabeth Harvey Lynn Hasher Kerry Hawkins Maggie Hayes Sandra Hazan Nona Heaslip Chantal Hébert Colette Hegarty John Heintz Ralph Heintzman Gerald Helleiner Peter Herrndorf

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Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Shira Herzog Ernest Hillen David Hilton Mimi Hollenberg Thomas Homer-Dixon Michiel Horn and Cornelia Shuh Chaviva Hosek Margret Hovanec James Hume Martin Hunter Adèle Hurley Linda Hutcheon Michael Hutcheon The Janet Hutchison Foundation Robert Hyland Frank Iacobucci Andres Jaaku Henry Jackman Maruja Jackman Heather Jackson David James Norman Jewison Prabhat Jha Robert Johnstone George Jonas Charles Jones Yuriy Kachanov Kahanoff Foundation Christine Karcza Martin Katz Alison Keith Merrijoy Kelner Bruce Kidd Thomas Kierans Elizabeth Kilbourn-Mackie Thomas King Stanislav Kirschbaum George Kitching David Klausner Pia Kleber Martin Knelman Terrence Knight Jeffrey Kofman Judith Korthals Eva Kushner O. Kuskis Sonia Labatt Anne Lancashire Susan Lang Peter Large John Lawson Julian Lebenhaft

8

• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

First Scotiabank/CJFE Journalism Fellow at Massey

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n September 2009, Eric Lemus became our first Scotiabank/CJFE Journalism Fellow. Eric is a reporter for LaPagina.com in El Salvador and regularly covers stories for BBC Mundo. He joined the Canadian Journalism Fellows in all their activities and audited classes at the University of Toronto. For the first time in the Journalism Fellowship Program, Scotiabank generously funded a four-month fellowship for a Latin American journalist, which was run in association with Canadian Journalists for Freedom of Expression (CJFE). Eric dropped comfortably into life at the College and made many friends among his fellow journalists and the Junior Fellows. We enjoyed his company for just one term and were sad to see him leave before Christmas. However, we didn’t quite let him go so quickly. In February, we invited him to join Marina Jiménez, Rachel Pulfer, Kevin Robertson, Ivan Semeniuk, and College Administrator Anna Luengo in Mexico City for a very full week. In Eric’s speech about his fellowship at the annual CJFE Gala in Toronto, he articulated strongly what the fellowship means to a Latin American journalist. This is part of what he said: …when CJFE and Massey College particularly chose somebody from Central America and a reporter from the smallest country in the isthmus, it was for me a great hope for our region. Perhaps we don’t pass unnoticed. To the south of the Rio Grande, there are serious risks and threats that we thought were things of the past. The violence continues and each day there is modernizing of the mechanisms of terror to gag the press, which mostly relies on selfcensorship. It is therefore necessary that the press in Canada squints past the Rio Grande not •

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JULIE PAYETTE was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

1989 One of the year’s top ten classical recordings _ _____________________

EVE EGOYAN was recently elected

a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and was one of 50 Canadian performers and conductors given the designation of CMC Ambassador by the Canadian Music Centre. Her last CD, Simple Lines of Enquiry – a world premiere recording of a one-hour long Canadian composition performed by a Canadian pianist on a Canadian label funded by the Canada Council for the Arts –

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only because of what happens there, but also because of how those events affect Canada. We are too close to Canada to be ignored. This is why I feel that the continuation of the Latin American fellowship is of utmost importance.

Massey Journalism Fellowship named in honour of Val Ross

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t the annual gala of the Canadian Journalism Val Ross Foundation (CJF) last June 10, Master John Fraser announced the inauguration of the Kierans-Janigan Journalism Fellowship in honour of Val Ross, former Globe and Mail writer and Southam Journalism Fellow (1997-98) at Massey College. Ms. Ross died in February 2008. The benefactors of the fellowship are Tom Kierans, Chair of the governing board of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and his wife, journalist-writer Mary Janigan. The first recipient of the fellowship was also announced at the CJF gala: Elizabeth Church, education reporter for The Globe and Mail.

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was selected as one of this year’s top ten classical recordings by Alex Ross, one of the world’s most renowned classical music reviewers. h emu@interlog.com

1991 CATHERINE MORONEY graduated

from the University of Southern California with an M.Sc. in Computer Science. She is a scientific software engineer at the Jet Propulsion Lab, analyzing satellite data, and lives in Pasadena, California. h Catherine.M.Moroney@jpl.nasa.gov

SABINA CALAIS STONE (née Watts)

is a retired Clinical Researcher at McMaster University. Her beloved son, Jamie Thomas Watts, passed away in

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2006. Her three grandchildren (Justin, Calista, and Ava) keep her moving forward one day at a time. h sabinastone@sympatico.ca

1993 JOHN GRAHAM is a Professor at

the Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary. He lives in Calgary with his wife, Susan, and their son and daughter. h jrgraham@ucalgary.ca

1994 BYRON HORNER is President,

CopperLion Capital (Private Equity Fund). He lives in Vancouver with his wife, Nicole Bradbury, and their two children, Wesley and Cyrus. h byronhorner@hotmail.com

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

I

by Michiel Horn

first saw Massey College on a muggy September evening in 1963. The night porter gave me my keys, pointed me to my room, and wished me goodnight. “I have a large study-sitting room and an adjoining bedroom of generous proportions,” I wrote in my diary: “I’m pleased.” After unpacking, I sank into a suedeupholstered armchair (luxury!), returned to the novel I had started on the plane from Vancouver, then read until three. The following morning I rose too late for breakfast, but even before lunch I began meeting other Junior Fellows. All of us were new to Massey, of course, but some knew the city or the University of Toronto or both. David Trott (to whom I felt drawn as a fellow British Columbian) took me downtown and introduced me to A & A and Sam the Record Man. David Hobbs, Mel Pelt, and Lorie Waisberg, history majors all, offered valuable information about courses and professors. In the JCR one evening before dinner, Robertson Davies, the Master, welcomed us to the College, told us a bit about its history, and said we were rarely privileged to be the first group of Junior Fellows. He hit one wrong note. Fearing we would talk about “women and horses,” he said he would post weekly dinner conversation topics. This did not last long, because Junior Fellows soon started offering their own ribald alternatives. The opening Gaudy took place soon after, the highlight being a theatrical performance in which Vincent Massey, the Visitor, and Bob Dinsmore, a student in English, played leading roles. That night saw a good deal of exuberant partying, with Robin Green, a suave Southam Fellow on leave from The Globe and Mail, distinguishing himself as host. Among his guests, I seem to recall, was Raymond Massey, but I’m not certain. Early in the term, Rosemary Speirs, a history graduate student, led some women students into the quad in a protest against the exclusion of women. Davies joined them and spoke to Rosemary, his greying mane bent over her red hair, as the group circled the quad several times. She told me later he had advised them to find a female patron to found a college for women. Some Junior Fellows objected to the demonstration, and one, Jay Ford, launched a Rosemary Speirs limerick contest. I don’t recall the entries, but I do remember an evening of drinking in the JCR to console Jay over the breakup of his engagement to Margaret Atwood. Besides Davies, the truly memorable people included Vincent Massey, an austere, courteous patrician, and the porter, Norman McCracken, with his waxed moustache and parade-ground voice. Among the Senior Fellows, three stood out: Bill Dobson, sinologist and brilliant raconteur; Robert Finch, a courtly poet and scholar of French; and Tuzo Wilson, a jovial geophysicist who demonstrated the theory of continental drift by using his spoon to move the circles of fat floating on his soup. We were all feeling our way that first year, but by the second a community was taking shape. Playing a key role in this was a new arrival, Ken Windsor, a thoroughly amiable historian who took over Robin’s role as host and expanded on it. He lived in House II-18 for two years, and his parties became legendary. Of greater significance was his part in forming a Junior Fellows’ organization and what in time became the Lionel Massey Fund.

1960s

Spotlight on High Table Ms. Anna Porter Publisher and Author Ms. Rachel Pulfer Webster/McConnell Journalism Fellow Ms. Jennifer Puncher Film Production Mr. Michael Redhill Writer-in-Residence Mr. Kevin Robertson CBC/Radio-Canada Journalism Fellow Mr. Nicholas Rundall Publishing Professor Stephen Rupp Spanish Literature Mr. John Ralston Saul Author

Michiel Horn The High Tables, the Christmas Gaudy, and the Christmas Dance were important events in defining College life. Moira Whalon, the Master’s super-competent secretary, organized the first two. At the Gaudy, Finch read a poem composed for the occasion, and Davies read a ghost story. The annual Christmas ghost story quickly became the central attraction of subsequent gaudies. A highlight of the dances, organized by a student committee, were the skits, directed initially by Brenda Davies and then by a future playwright, Rob Fothergill. And who can forget croquet in the quad? Initiated in the spring of 1964, it was still going strong years later. In 1966, Rob and Sami Gupta made a short movie, Oddballs, immortalizing the game. Its stars were Rod Thornley and Michael Daschtschuk, a chemical engineer with a wicked eye for parking your ball where you had no play at all. Davies appeared as Master and match starter. I think of my four years as a Junior Fellow with great pleasure. The building was (and is) splendid and many of the people in it well worth knowing. Not everything was perfect in the early days. Amenities now taken for granted, such as the laundry room, the games room, and the television set, were absent at first. The men-only atmosphere was limiting. But those were the days of my youth, and I look back nostalgically on them, the College, and the people I met there. Some of them became friends for life. I learned a lot and I enjoyed myself. Who can ask for more? Michiel Horn was a Junior Fellow from 1963 to 1967. He taught Canadian history for many years at Glendon College, York University, where he is Professor Emeritus and University Historian. In 1984, he married Cornelia Schuh, a Junior Fellow from 1974-1977, whom he met at a Massey College function, and they have two sons. Since 2007 he has been an Associate Senior Fellow.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Mr. Neil Seeman Health Mr. Ivan Semeniuk Associate Journalism Fellow Mr. Joey Slinger Journalist The Hon. Mr. Greg Sorbara Ontario Provincial Parliament Ms. Dianna Symonds Publishing Mrs. Judy Tanenbaum Philanthropy Mr. Larry Tanenbaum Sports and Entertainment Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalf Foundation Innovation Fellow Mr. R.H. Thomson Actor Mrs. Cindy Thorburn Volunteerism Mr. Thomas Thornquist Dr. Alexander Van Tulleken Medicine His Excellency Dr. George Witschel Ambassador of Germany to Canada Mr. Thomas Wayman Author Dr. Albert Wu Senior Resident, Ophthalmology

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Life at Massey College

from page 31 Health Strategy Innovation Cell Under the

Professor Ann Hutchison English Her Excellency Ingrid Iremark Ambassador of Sweden to Canada Mr. Michael Jackson Civil Service The Hon. Henry N.R. Jackman College Visitor Dr. Christine Jamieson Senior Resident, Theological Studies Ms. Marina Jiménez St. Clair Balfour Journalism Fellow Mr. C. David Johnson Actor Dr. Val Marie Johnson Senior Resident, Sociology Ms. Diane Juricevic Senior Resident, Law Professor Anne Lancashire English Professor Ian Lancashire English Mr. Eric Lemus Scotiabank/CJFE Fellow His Excellency Erik Vilstrup Lorenzen Ambassador of Denmark to Canada Mr. Michael MacMillan Samara Foundation Dr. Rosemary Marchant Medicine Ms. Laurie Matheson Mr. John McGreevy Film Production Mrs. Ria McMurtry The Hon. Roy McMurtry Former Chief Justice of Ontario The Hon. Peter Milliken Speaker of the House of Commons Dr. Norman Murray Canadian Institute of Theoretical Physics Mr. Alexander Neef Canadian Opera Company Mrs. Eloise Neef Mrs. Marjatta Piipponen His Excellency Mr. Risto Piipponen Ambassador of Finland to Canada

32

enthusiastic leadership of Neil Seeman, this small group of researchers, funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health, is seeking new ways to help fund medical health programs in Ontario. Its research, which only began a couple of years ago, has already been heralded in The Economist and other leading professional and general journals. It also provides part-time work for Junior Fellows out of its offices in the Gatehouse (the former Porter’s Lodge).

Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) CITA maintains three guest rooms at the

College, and through them we have a steady infusion of young academics and graduate students visiting Toronto from all over the world. Scholars-at-Risk Massey College, in partnership with the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto, founded this important organization, which provides timely and crucial assistance to both established scholars and graduate students caught out in their own countries by sectarian violence, racial discrimination, or dictatorship. The program is run out of House V by College Administrator Anna Luengo. The Massey Philanthropy Roundtable Newly created last year by Senior Fellows Peter Warrian (Lupina Foundation) and Shira Herzog (Kahanoff Canadian Foundation), this umbrella organization of nearly all the private foundations in Canada will be meeting regularly at Massey (where its headquarters office will be maintained), as well as other places around the country. Its mandate is to organize seminars and research to help private foundations do their work better. In welcoming them to the College, Master John Fraser pointed out that Massey was created by a private foundation and has been supported throughout its near-half century in countless ways by many of the foundations which are members of the Roundtable. The Massey Lectures The College continues to be

proud of its longstanding partnership (since 1965) with CBC Radio’s Ideas, whose executive producer is Senior Fellow Bernie Lucht, and with House of Anansi publishers (and its chair, Quadrangler Scott Griffin), which publishes these outstanding lectures by renowned thinkers of our time. Book History and Print Culture One of the most

successful collaborative programs at any Canadian university, Book History and Print Culture has been welcomed at Massey since its inception nearly a decade ago, and it makes extensive use of our library holdings, printing presses, and seminar rooms. Many of its students are or become Junior Fellows and the range of its presentations has attracted many scholars to our College. (See page 18 for more on BHPC.)

Journalism Fellows 2009-2010

Pendragon Ink Located in House III, this

organization attends to the literary estate of our Founding Master and is run by Master Davies’ widow, Brenda Davies, and their daughter, Senior Fellow Jennifer Surridge. (Pendragon Ink’s annual update to our readers appears on page 24.)

Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Massey’s associate partners

Jack McClelland Writer-in-Residence Named after

the founder of the famous Canadian publishing house McClelland & Stewart, this one-term appointment to the university is always housed at Massey, either in an office (if he or she is from Toronto) or in a Senior Suite. As distinguished Senior Residents, they partake fully in College life and are usually very patient and helpful with ambitious authors or poets in the Junior Fellowship. (You can read about last year’s Writer-inResidence on page 22.)

Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program

Formerly the Southam Fellowships, this innovative program – originally modelled on the Neiman Fellowships at Harvard – has been part of College life since its founding in 1963. Each year, a new crop of mid-career journalists get an academic year off from the grind of daily journalism, and they mix with the Junior and Senior Fellows, creating exciting intellectual encounters during the year and life-long friendships thereafter. The program is run out of House V by College Administrator Anna Luengo. Griffin Poetry Prize Each year, the eminent judges

(Left-right) St. Clair Balfour Fellow Marina Jiménez (The Globe and Mail, Toronto), Associate Fellow Ivan Semeniuk (Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Physics, University of Toronto), Webster/McConnell Fellow Rachel Pulfer (Canadian Business), CBC/Radio-Canada Fellow Kevin Robertson (CBC/Radio-Canada), Scotiabank/CJFE Fellow Eric Lemus (La Pagina.com, El Salvador). A full report on the activities of the 2009-10 Journalism Fellows can be found in Owl, available in hard copy from the College Administrator, Anna Luengo, or online at <http://masseycolleg.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/OWL_2010.pdf>.

and executive of the world’s most important poetry prize gather at Massey College to choose their winners for the upcoming year. The prize was founded by Quadrangler Scott Griffin.

Faber School of Writing New to us this year, the

Faber Academy has been assisting poets and fiction writers of great promise for many years at their schools in London and New York. Supported by the famous British publishing house Faber and Faber, the school chose Massey College for its seminars in Canada because of our long tradition of supporting writers and the written word. (Information on the inaugural courses, in poetry and novel writing, can be found at http://www.faber.co.uk/article/2010/5/ becoming-a-poet-toronto and http://www.faber.co.uk/ article/2010/4/writing-a-novel-toronto.)

College Quiz from page 29 Vincent Massey wrote this in December 1959 in a letter to Claude Bissell, President of the University of Toronto. Two months later, in February 1960, four architects, including Ron Thom, were invited to submit preliminary drawings for the proposed institution. Each competitor was to be paid $3000 for submitting.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

Drawing by David Levine

Spotlight on High Table

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

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1996

1997

STEVE KIRCHGRABER moved

ANTONIO ROSSINI is an Associate

from New York City to St. Louis, Missouri, last June to join the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He is Manager in the Bank Supervision and Regulation Division. h contactsfk@gmail.com

ISABEL VINCENT is an investigative

reporter at the New York Post, where her reporting recently resulted in the resignation of Congressman Charles Rangel from his post as chairman of the powerful taxwriting Ways and Means Committee. Vincent’s fourth book, Gilded Lily: Lily Safra, The Making of One of the World’s Wealthiest Widows, was recently published in New York.

Professor and Director of the Humanities Research Group at the University of Windsor. h arossini@uwindsor.ca

1999

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Canada’s Voice: The Public Life of John Wendell Holmes, was shortlisted for the Dafoe Prize, which recognizes the best book on Canada or Canada and the world. He lives in Toronto. h chapnick@cfc.dnd.ca

DAVID MILLER left radio current

BENJAMIN SHINEWALD moved

back to Toronto. He is National Executive Director and General Counsel, Canadian Jewish Congress. h benjamin.shinewald@gmail.com

2000

affairs for radio news. He is Morning News Editor, CBC Radio News, Yellowknife, and recently completed a year-long sabbatical living in Spain, mostly Galicia. h davidcameronmiller@gmail.com

JONATHAN GOUVEIA is Vice-

ADAM CHAPNICK is Deputy Director of Education, Canadian Forces College, and Associate Professor, Defence Studies, Royal Military College of Canada. His book,

President, Real Estate Transactions, New York City Economic Development Corporation. He lives in New York City. h jgouveia@nycedc.com

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Thank you, donors! Keith Leckie Mary Jo Leddy Yew-Thong Leong Patrick LeSage Malcolm Lester Jill Levenson Daniel Levia Michael Levine Joyce Lewis Peter Lewis Christopher Lind Patti and Earl Linzon William Littler Katharine Lochnan John Loosemore Keith Lowe John Lownsbrough Anthony Luengo Shirley Ma Joan MacCallum Jocelyn Macdonald Valarie MacDonald Anthony MacFarlane John Macfarlane Joseph MacInnis Eluned MacMillan Margaret MacMillan Malcolm MacRury Athar Malik David Malone Vijai Mariyampillai Dow Marmur Michael Marrus Lorna Marsden Peter Martin Roger Martin Sandra Martin Clive Mason David Mason Judith Matthews Jill Matus Kathryn McCain W. Kenneth McCarter Marcia McClung Lloyd McCoomb Lynn McDonald Barbara McDougall Ivan McFarlane Mary McGeer Michael McGillion Mark McGowan Roderick McInnes Frank McKenna Helen McLean Mark McLean Stuart McLean

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Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Roy McMurtry James McPherson Catherine McQueen Rosemary Meier Kelly Meighen Sarah Mennell Patricia Merivale Sarianna Metso Jane Millgate Arthur Millward John Monahan Peter Moon Carole Moore John Moore Dunstan Morey Sue Mortimer Javad Mostaghimi David Mowbray Linda Munk Heather Munro-Blum Scott Murray Sioban Nelson Glen Norcliffe Urs Obrist Derek Oland Peter Oliver James Orbinski Anne Osler Sylvia Ostry Gilles Ouellette David Pantalony Mary Ann Parker Roger Parkinson Charles Pascal Louis Pauly Peter Pauly Anthony Pawson Julie Payette Derek Penslar John Pepall Anthony Perl Douglas Perovic Susan Perren Allan Peterkin David Peterson Heather Peterson Gaylanne Phelan Richard Piatti Gordon Pinsent Elizabeth Place Jerrold Plotnick John Polanyi Wai Keung Poon Frank Potter Julian Porter

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MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Massey’s associate partners grow in scope and numbers

Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy night

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umerous prizes were presented to Junior Fellows at the 2009 Fellows’ Gaudy night, the last High Table for the academic year. The long-standing Moira Whalon Prize honours a Junior Fellow who – in the opinion of the Master and Officers, Don of Hall, and Junior Fellow members of the House Committee – has contributed most to the College spirit and values. Named in honour of Massey’s first Secretary of Corporation (and Robertson Davies’ long-time assistant), the prize consists of a first edition copy of a Davies work (presented by Pendragon Ink) and a cheque for $1,000. The prize was awarded to Paul Furgale. The second long-standing award is the Morris Wayman Prize, given to the Junior Fellow who did the most to explain his or her work to the community, or fostered interdisciplinary understanding. The prize, awarded to Patrick Boyle, consists of a reference book, a plaque, and a cheque for $1,000, and is named after the late Professor Morris Wayman from the University of Toronto. His son, poet Tom Wayman, was Writer-inResidence in 1996. He and his family set up the prize in Professor Wayman’s honour. The Don of Hall Prize, for outstanding contribution by a Junior Fellow to the Junior Fellowship, was presented to Sarah Knudson; and the Registrar’s Award, for outstanding •

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DAVID PANTALONY is Curator,

Canada Science and Technology Museum, and Adjunct Professor, Department of History, University of Ottawa. h dpantalony@technomuses.ca

ROBERT McGILL recently

completed his Junior Fellowship at Harvard University. He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of English, University of Toronto. h robert.mcgill@utoronto.ca

2003 Elisa Chan is a fourth-year

Resident, Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto.

contribution to the Massey community, went to Salim Bamakhrama. On this Gaudy night, funds provided by an anonymous Senior Fellow donor are used to give a reference book prize, along with a plaque printed on our presses, to every Junior Fellow who “has completed the work to become a doctor of the university.” Recipients were Shelley Beal (Book History/Print Culture), Ela Beres (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Andrew

Binkley (Juris Doctor), Sarah Copland (English), Jack Cunningham (History), Jackie Feke (History and Philosophy of Science and Technology), Ben Fortescue (Physics), Dan Giang (Physics), Ari Kopolovic (Juris Doctor), George Kovacs (Classics), Toby Malone (Drama), Josh Nichols (Philosophy), David Reibetanz (English), Janna Rosales (Religious Studies), and Jorge TorresSolis (Biomedical Engineering).

Fifteen-Year Fellowship with Finland by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

We have never taken our friendship with Finland for granted, but the decade and a half of bonding seems to have flown by. Every year since 1995, our Journalism Fellows have been invited by the Finnish Foreign Ministry and the Finnish Embassy in Ottawa on a week’s trip to Helsinki and one other city in Finland, with virtually all expenses paid. What a fitting end to the annual fellowships, the aim of which is to broaden horizons! Last March 25, we celebrated the 15-year link with Finland with a seminar and lunch in our Upper Library and Common Room. Professors Abraham Rotstein and Pekka Sinervo made opening remarks, Professor Sheila Embleton moderated, and former Journalism Fellows Kevin Sylvester and Marcus Gee spoke respectively on “Why I Think Finland Is Good at Hockey” and “Helsinki, No Mean City.” Master Fraser sat in conversation with Mr. Risto Pipponen, the Finnish Ambassador to Canada. A panel discussion followed – former Journalism Fellow Sheree-Lee Olson spoke on getting a feel for Finnish design; Lisa Rochon, architectural columnist for The Globe and Mail, talked about “The Impact of Finnish Architecture”; and Senior Fellow Brigitte Shim addressed “The Impact of the Competition for Toronto’s City Hall.” (This fall, City Hall, designed by Finnish architect Viljo Revell, celebrates its 45th anniversary.) By the end of the lunch, the bond was further tightened, and Patricia Dodge of the Finnish Embassy pledged to keep the connection alive.

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He and his wife, Erin, welcomed their first child this year. h aeizenman@stikeman.com

JOHN ASALONE is co-founder of

Solar For Veterans, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing information on solar energy careers to military veterans. He is an energy economist at Booz Allen Hamilton, and lives in Washington, DC. h jasalone@gmail.com

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Winner of Triple-S Salud Prize_ ______

JAN EPERJESI received the 2010

DON BUTLER celebrated turning 60 this year. He is a Senior Writer for the Ottawa Citizen and recently married his long-time partner, Christina Spencer. h dbutler@thecitizen.canwest.com

ALON EIZENMAN is a municipal and planning Law Associate at Stikeman Elliott LLP in Toronto.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

Triple-S Salud (Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association) Prize for Best Overall Clinical Performance During Medical School, Escuela de Medicina San Juan Bautista, Puerto Rico. Her M.D. degree was conferred summa cum laude and she was appointed as OBGYN house officer (PGY-1), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University. She lives in Durham, North Carolina with her new son. h jan.eperjesi@duke.edu

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assey has always welcomed appropriate partners to share in the life and vision of the College. In 1963, for example, the Graduate School of Drama took up residence in several offices beside the Round Room, and for a period it looked as if a small but prestigious medical museum would be its successor. The Southam Journalism Fellowship Program was also located at Massey in 1963. At various other times, other organizations became attached and often maintained offices or rooms. Over the past 15 years, the list of associate partners has grown dramatically, although most people are unaware of how extensive it now is. Below is that list. In one way or another, each partner helps us fulfill our mandate to be a bridge community between town and gown, especially in the three broad academic streams Massey is committed to supporting: the humanities, sciences, and professions. The Gairdner Foundation One of the most important

international institutes supporting medical research, this foundation has been at Massey for over a decade under the dynamic leadership of Senior Fellow Dr. John Dirks. Each year, Dr. Dirks brings eminent researchers from all over the world to the College. (More on this partner in our conversation with Dr. Dirks on page 25.)

Friends of the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) Senior Fellow Dr. Aubie Angel

heads up this important support group for CIHR, which conducts annual seminars and fundraisers. Dr. Angel also started the Massey Grand Rounds, which brings together all of Massey’s Junior and Senior Fellows involved in any aspect of health studies for both intimate seminars and an annual university-wide colloquium on an important aspect of health research, administration, or ethics. (See page 29 for news of last year’s Massey Grand Rounds.)

Lupina Foundation This is a private foundation

begun in 2000 to support societal and medical research and innovation. Its bursaries and fellowships are widely dispersed in interdisciplinary and cross-jurisdictional studies, which is why Massey College has provided such a congenial and welcoming home. The leadership is shared between Senior Fellow Peter Warrian and his wife, Dr. Margret Hovanec. A number of Massey Junior Fellows have benefited from direct support in their research. Continued on page 32

by Jill Clark, Bursar

his was a year of change. The challenges created by the market recession spurred us to reassess our sources of revenue and consider ways to reduce our ongoing maintenance costs. With the entire College involved, the process has been a resounding success. Both operations in the year end 2010 and the budget for 2010-11 are balanced, while The Visitors’ Challenge pledges continued to be honoured with $174,657 received. As in the past, the members of our community continue to generously support all elements of College life. The Quadrangle Society exceeded all prior years by a record $120,000. A new initiative for Senior Fellows, to contribute to the College by increasing their use of our catering service and donating to operating funds, was well supported. Two generous donations were given to support the new Kierans-Janigan Journalism Fellow, in honour of Val Ross, and a Kahanoff Journalism Fellow. These funds are in addition to the endowed Gordon Fisher, Webster McConnell, and the partially endowed St.Clair-Balfour Journalism Fellows. And thanks to the

CBC, we have annual support for another Journalism Fellow. The catering department increased revenue by $100,000 under the management of Darlene Naranjo. She kept the costs down so profits could subsidize College operations. This could only be achieved with the loyal support of our cooks, Silvana Valdes and Darren Diabo, Steward Greg Cerson, and each individual on the kitchen staff who made it their priority to offer excellent food and service while watching costs. The resident Junior Fellows also played a part in turning our finances around. They graciously accepted the loss of bursaries in the fall of 2009, when endowments were not paid out, and will contribute to increased revenues with fees that were raised to match U of T’s comparable rates for 2010-2011. There are still challenges in resuming bursaries to the level of 2008, but we expect to pay out at a rate of 80% this year, allowing Massey to accumulate funding for distribution in the future. Rentals of offices and the Summer Rental Program both contributed to balancing our budget. The 2009

Throughout the academic year, the College hosts fortnightly High Table Dinners, at which distinguished guests rub shoulders with our Junior Fellows and Alumni. The following is our list of specially invited guests for 2009-10. Mr. Peter Allen Philanthropist Mr. Karim Bardeesy Senior Resident, Journalism Ms. Lise Brandi-Hansen Mr. Alan Broadbent Philanthropy Mrs. Judy Broadbent Philanthropy Ms. Brenda Bury Artist The Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson Former Governor General of Canada

Financial news

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Spotlight on High Table

summer had sales of over $165,000, a record, and Chris MacDonald and Ankita Jauhari, our innkeepers, have hinted that their 2010 goal is to reach $200,000. The practice of renting vacant student rooms has turned into a successful B & B business, with some of the profit slated to subsidize student bursaries in the coming year – an incentive to send your guests to Massey. The IT department has also seen change. Matt Glandfield has been added to part-time staff to ensure our systems are maintained at an improved standard, but at almost half the cost. He has had many challenges in replacing antiquated systems on a tight budget, but we anticipate our new equipment and software will be running smoothly this year, with improved reporting capabilities. Your invoices will eventually come! The changes, and there were many more, were initiated and supported by all members of the staff, students, and the community at large, making it a positive experience. The challenge will be to maintain our initiatives and keep our books balanced. Thanks to you all for your continued support.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Mr. Michael Cooke Journalism Professor Brian Corman Dean, School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto Mrs. Linda Corman Librarian, Trinity College Ms. Sarah Corman Law Professor Chandler Davis Mathematics Mrs. Kathleen Davis Professor Natalie Zemon Davis History The Hon. William Davis Former Premier of Ontario Mr. Michael Enright Broadcast Journalist Dr. Nancy Epstein Ophthalmology Dr. Brad Faught History Dr. George Georgopoulos York Fellow, Economics Ms. Julie Hope Television

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Nooks & Crannies Like Ontario, Massey College offers “more to discover” for those adventurous enough to strike out beyond the well-trodden paths of familiar spaces such as the Common Room and the Quadrangle. Once again, we head into what, for probably most Masseyites, except those identified below, is terra incognita. Who knows what worlds of wonder await in our choice this year of a very vertical and, at once, both prominent and secretive place?

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The CLOCK &

Photography by Anthony Luengo

aybe it’s location and height that make the College clock and bell tower such a magnet for a special group of Junior Fellows. And there is always a special group... every year. The instinct, not passed on by anyone, is in the DNA. It may also have to do with the fact that the narrow gate entrance just inside the tower is locked, or is supposed to be, and that alone – to some – is a provocation and a challenge. Every weekday during term, come wind, weather, sleet, or snow, the Senior Day Porter and the Night Porters religiously trudge from the Porter’s Lodge at 8 a.m., 12:15 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. to ring the St. Catherine Bell to summon residents to meals at Ondaatje Hall. We say “religiously” because the 8 a.m. bell is particularly important for our neighbours at the Roman Catholic chapel in the Newman Centre: they piggy-back on it to summon the faithful to the 8 a.m. Mass, putting a special onus for promptness on the Day Porter’s duties. The bell is tolled officially on Remembrance Day and whenever a College worthy dies. In a more joyous celebration, it is rung to herald the official start of a new Don of Hall’s regime. And, more or less, that should be about it for the tower and its bell, now officially known as Thom’s Tower, honouring the architect of the College, who is remembered with an elegant slate plaque affixed to its side so that all who enter the premises can see it. The tower is a great, if covert, gathering place for those prone to practical jokes. There is the hilarious account of a huge banner lowered from the top to greet Vincent Massey’s arrival at the College. It read Défense d’uriner, causing great consternation and forever defining the word pandemonium. Perhaps this is why the tower is both so appealing to the mischievous and so alarming to the administration. Master Fraser remembers being kicked awake by Elizabeth MacCallum at 3 a.m. one morning over a decade ago because a random group of College revellers – well nourished by

BELL TOWER

“high spirits” – were singing Irish folk songs and American Civil War anthems at full volume. “Someone’s going to get killed soon,” Ms. MacCallum shouted in the Master’s ear. “You’ve got to go.” By the time he got his dressing gown on and made an appearance in the Quad, all revellers had fled, but one – the Irish folk song expert – was caught at the top of the locked gate inside the tower’s entranceway. Jumping clumsily down, he ripped his pants as he tried to pick himself up from the ground. His colourful phraseology was quickly tempered when he realized the slippered feet he was perusing were attached to the legs and body of the Master. A short but decisive conversation ensued. Master Fraser was also the victim – a more appreciative one this time – of a prank on his 60th birthday, on June 5, 2004. All College residents awoke to the sight of the tower’s clock face being altered so that each hour read “60.” Actually, this being Massey, they all read “LX.” It took nearly seven months to find out how Junior Fellows managed this feat. Eventually it emerged during a Don of Hall’s speech on Gaudy Night that a Junior Fellow with experience in rock climbing and “repelling” was lowered by ropes from the top of the tower. (You can get there through an internal ladder system, but you usually have to go past a family of raccoons.) Administrators are terrified of accidents to impromptu climbers and always discourage it. On the other hand, Master Fraser has himself climbed the tower and reports that it affords one of the best 360-degree panoramic views of the campus. The last time he tried it two years ago, he reports he found a student U of T ID card that belonged to a Junior Fellow of the day. “How on earth could it get all the way up there?” asked the Master when he returned it to the Junior Fellow (at dinner, during announcements). “That’s a real mystery,” said the grateful Junior Fellow as he repossessed his card and hardly blinked an eye. “Maybe it was transported there by the ghost of Robertson Davies.”

Neville Poy Vivienne Poy Dorothy Pringle Brenda Proulx John Pullerits Alanna Quinn

Back row (left-right): Noah Shack (Canada Israel Committee), Rami Shoucri (Junior Fellow), Bryan Watson (Chevening Scholar), Jodie Bakker (Junior Fellow), Massih Moayedi (Junior Fellow), Jessica Duffin Wolfe (Junior Fellow), Dylan Gordon (Junior Fellow), Jonathan Schneiderman (Canada Israel Committee), Jane Hilderman (Junior Fellow); Front row (left-right): Judy Tanenbaum, Larry Tanenbaum, John Fraser

Junior Fellows travel to Israel by Jane Hilderman

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rom December 6-14, 2009, six Massey Junior Fellows experienced a unique and intense educational visit to Israel in the company of five Canadian Rhodes scholars, two Canadian Chevening scholars, and one Mandela Rhodes scholar from South Africa. Together, the group travelled the country, from Tel Aviv’s Mediterranean shores to the Dead Sea, from the northern Golan Heights to southern Sderot, and to the heart of Jerusalem. While doing so, they also traversed the histories, cultures, religions, and politics of the region. The breadth of speakers – including journalists, politicians, civil servants, academics, •

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Athar Malik is an Associate,

The Winner of the 2009 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize

Intellectual Property Group, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP (Toronto). h athar.malik@utoronto.ca

by Matthew Strang, Junior Fellow

JOSHUA BEN DAVID NICHOLS is

(G)host with the most: For whom the Bull’s Bells Toll… I am here to give you a true tale of the state All about the inner workings of this supposed silver plate If dead men tell no tales Then best ye be warned I is not that dead I wails No, for I, Davies, am alive and true That’s right kids for I live here with you! I pushed Natalie down the stairs And it was I who gave you all those icy glares I am the one who makes your cake always crumble And I am the one that keeps that fourth Master ever so humble The hook-ups of Massey’s romance so enchanted Have also been due to me as I fore-planted Libby & Bryant, Gordon & Naoko, the bench and Kate It was me who caused you all to find your mate 30

Thank you, donors!

It is I that keeps the port tasting mediocre And it is me that ensures Jeff always loses at poker Yes, Davies is behind the Whipped Cream boy-band factory And the agent that makes Cherries on Top so satisfactory It is I that stations Rotman’s army of millions building at your gate And I that ensure the 120 junior fellows have a full plate I that oversee the books go from red to black, not Tembeka and Jill And I that pressure the JFs to pay their much-overdue bill It is I that continues the backwash in the residents’ toilet bowls And I that causes Joe and Kelly to plunge the many leaky holes Essentially what I am trying to have you all behold Is that it is me for whom the beefy bull’s bells toll And that I will be both your friend and foe as the first and final Massey bastard So all of you tonight will now and forever more know not to judge a book by its Master

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

an SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. He celebrated his third wedding anniversary with his wife, Eva Joensuu, this past year. h Joshua.nichols@utoronto.ca

2005 MARCINKU KEDZIOR is Co-Director of the design firm KURU Studio and Co-Editor of Scapegoat: Architecture, Landscape, and Political Economy. In July, he was appointed full-time Professor, Bachelor of Interior Design and Industrial Design, Humber

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businessmen, soldiers, and university students – illuminated the complex challenges and opportunities faced by Israeli and Palestinian communities today. Enlightening debate and good food intermingled at every stop. On their return, the Junior Fellows gave a debriefing presentation for members of the Massey community in which they shared their experience and insights. They all agreed that it was a trip of personal discovery – an opportunity made possible thanks to Massey Quadranglers Larry and Judy Tanenbaum, who are shown above with the Israel group at the College High Table on February 11, 2010. ALUMNI

School of Applied Technology. He was also involved in the design of the new rooftop podium at Toronto City Hall, the first phase of the revitalization of Nathan Phillips Square. This was opened in May (for information and photos, see http:// www.branchplant.com/landscape/ agoratheatre_podium.html). h marcinku.kedzior@gmail.com

SCOTT YOUNG moved, with his

current laboratory, from Stanford University to the University of Southern California in August 2009. He is a Postdoctoral Research Associate specializing in biomedical engineering and human movement disorders. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Helen Chow.

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2006 JAMES BRADSHAW is a

reporter with The Globe and Mail and lives in Toronto. h jem.bradshaw@gmail.com

JORDAN THOMSON is Special

Advisor to the Director General, Refugee Affairs Branch of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. He lives in Ottawa and is engaged to Laura Weir.

TARA VONGPAISAL is an

Assistant Professor of Psychology at Grant MacEwan University and lives in Edmonton. h tara.vongpaisal@utoronto.ca

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Robert Rabinovitch Vivian Rakoff Joan Randall Lola Rasminsky Gerald Rayner Tamara Rebanks Anthony Redpath Chesley Rees Douglas Reeve Bambi Reeves Gilbert Reid Jonathon Reid Donald Rickerd Catherine Riggall Jean Riley Morton Ritts Gordon Rixon William Roberts David Robertson Judith Robertson Sheila Robinson Thomas Robinson Jonathan Rose Janet Rossant Sandra Rotman Andrea Russell Aubrey Russell Peter Russell Robert Sachter Richard Sadleir Ann Saddlemyer Edward Safarian John Ralston Saul Lionel Schipper Mike Schwindt Clayton Scott David Scott Iain Scott Robin Sears Ellen Seligmann John Sewell Jack Shapiro Robert Sharpe Geraldine Sharpe Sandra Shaul Gerald Sheff

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Life at Massey College

LawrenceTanenbaum Ethel Teitelbaum Gordon Teskey Terrill Theman Douglas Thompson R. Paul Thompson R. H. Thomson Craig Thorburn William Thorsell Joseph Thywissen Toronto Community Foundation Vincent Tovell William Toye

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by Elizabeth MacCallum

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hen last heard from, the oldsters in the Master’s Lodging were trying to keep at least one step ahead of our Namibian ward Wisy Namaseb, the Master’s last and final attempt at fathering a teenage male. Wisy, son of Levi Nemaseb, a memorable Alum, adjusted all too quickly to Canada, and made us realize that an entire generation had passed by in the six years since we couldn’t keep up with our own teenagers. Shortly before leaving, Wisy managed to escape from summer camp to play a final soccer game in Toronto, unbeknownst to his so-called guardians. His departure to Africa, a day later than the first attempt (I’ll spare you the details) had the air of a 5 a.m. Keystone Cops farce. Now safely home, Wisy is at the University of Cape Town in an undergraduate commerce program. Learning that he is maintaining his all too familiar soccer-to-studies ratio, we were surprised not to see him on TV at the World Cup. I should say we have missed Wisy in the Lodging, now known as House VII (House VI being the oxymoron for non-residents), but we now have an older son in the form of Saul Rae Fellow Dr. Alexander Van Tulleken. Also the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, Alexander has been compiling an unusual Oxford handbook for medical workers in extreme conditions, like Darfur, to which he has returned to assess needs for treatment centres in new zones of conflict. The book does not deal with the obvious like malaria, but with the unexpected problems: a local interpreter hiding his ignorance of different dialects during consultations, for example; or the need to provide facilities for ablutions and prayer for Muslims waiting in eight-hour lineups. At least we don’t have to worry about Dr. Van Tulleken getting corrupted by wicked Toronto. Thanks to Senior Fellows Bob Rae and David Cameron, Rohan Edrisinha, a Sri Lankan civil rights lawyer, found refuge in Canada during the dangerous government crackdown last fall. A perfect house guest, he taught at the Law School until it was safe for him to return home, but not until after he presented us with the best Ceylon tea. We were glad to have Clara Fraser, number three daughter, move back home at Christmas after finishing her degree at Concordia. Molly Bloom, now old enough

to be the Venerable College Dog, perked up with the return of Clara’s enthusiasm, as did the rest of us in House VII. It had been a difficult autumn with the precipitous, unexpected death of John’s sister, Barrie Chavel, and two very good friends within two weeks. Clara arrived bewildered about what to do next with her political science degree, which includes a minor in Middle Eastern Studies and Arabic, as well as some religious studies thrown in for good measure. She networked around town with a style that left her father’s similar skills looking lacklustre. As a result, Clara begins her M.A. at Ryerson in Urban Development after a summer working for her cousin’s construction business, learning something useful for a change. Along with Clara and Alexander Van Tulleken coming and going, our amazing veteran housekeeper, Norma Briones, has provided clean sheets for a steady stream of guests. Sir Peter Clarke, former Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, came to launch his book on Keynes. He and his wife, Maria Tippett, the biographer of Emily Carr, enjoyed our guestroom, not to speak of Norma’s wonderful hospitality (she even provided them with sumptuous teas to entertain their friends). They visited at the same time as Tom Ringer, a godson of the Master and a former pro tem family member during an undergrad year. Many Junior Fellows – among them Janna Rosales, Anna Shamaeva, Joe Culpepper, Myles Leslie, and George Kovacs – also stayed over for convocations and thesis defences, or simply to collect their coveted dictionary at the final Gaudy. Andrew Graham, Master of Balliol College, Massey’s inspiration, and his wife, Peggoty, also came to stay, along with distinguished diplomats, living proof of Massey’s international character if anyone ever doubted it. Danish Ambassador His Excellency Erik Vilstrip Lorenzen and his wife, Lise Brandi-Hansen, were guests at a High Table honouring Denmark’s sponsorship of the Journalism Fellows’ week there as government guests. It was bittersweet when Her Excellency Ingrid Iremark and her loyal supporter and husband, Thomas Lindquist, came for a final time before they returned to Sweden, where Ingrid was posted to the palace to orchestrate press relations for the wedding of the Crown Princess (a royal event sadly missed by the Master).

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Scholars-at-Risk at Massey by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

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or the past few years, the names Clement Jumbe and Moain Sadeq have been familiar to many people at the College. Both were Scholars-at-Risk, with Clement living at the College for three years as a Junior Fellow until April 2010, when he moved to Grad House. He is now working on his last year of doctoral work on HIV/AIDS education, and we fortunately still get to see him periodically when he heads here for some necessary distraction. Formerly Director of the Department of Antiquities in Gaza, Moain Sadeq filled his time teaching both at Near and Middle Eastern

Civilizations and at the Mississauga campus of U of T, as well as being a research associate at the Royal Ontario Museum. In this last capacity and thanks to a grant from the Aurea Foundation, he evaluated and catalogued the major portion of the ROM’s collection of Mamluk pottery. On the basis of his talks in the community related to the history of the Middle East, he was also invited to lecture at Centennial College, where he delivered a speech at their spring convocation ceremony. Moain left this August to take up a three-year teaching appointment at University of Qatar, in Doha. His family will be with him, and we

look forward to his visits back to Toronto, as well as his permanent return to Canada three years hence. This fall, Dr. José David Arango joins us as a Scholar-at-Risk. Dr. Arango is from Colombia, where he taught Philosophy and Linguistics. He fled his country under threat to himself and his family, and was accepted as a refugee in Canada in 2008. He lives in Toronto with his wife and two daughters. Some of you may have met Dr. Arango last year when he was honing his English skills with the help of then Junior Fellow Joshua Nicholls. We know that he will be as happy to reconnect with the College as we are in seeing him return. In association with Scholar-at-Risk New York, we are now working to bring a Rwandan geographer into the Scholar-at-Risk Fellowship. With luck, he will be here by the end of 2010, and we will be in a position to report on this in the next MasseyNews.

Massey Grand Rounds Since April 2006, Massey Junior Fellows in the Health Sciences have been meeting monthly to discuss current topics and professional issues in the format of the Massey Grand Rounds (MGR). The fourth of these annual symposia took place last April 21 in the Upper Library, organized by Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Carla Pajak, Judith Seary, and Rami Shoucri. Focusing on “Responsible Use of Advanced Technologies in Medicine,” this year’s session covered issues of accountability in the development and delivery of high-tech diagnostics in medicine, the screening of newborns, global nutritional health, and system design. There was also a panel discussion on social networking and advances in information technology to assist patient and community care. Among the distinguished presenters and panellists were keynote speaker Dr. Leslie Levin, Senior Scientific, Medical, and Health Technology Advisor to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, and Head of the Medical Advisory Secretariat; Senior Fellow/Corporation Dr. Kim Vicente, Founding Director of the Cognitive Engineering Laboratory at the University of Toronto; Dr. Fiona Miller of the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation at the University of Toronto; and Dr. Kaveh Shojania, Director of the University of Toronto Centre for Patient Safety. The Grand Rounds was sponsored by Massey College, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Toronto, the Quarter Century Fund, the Quadrangle Society, and the Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FCIHR).

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Drawing by David Levine

From the Lodging

Thank you, donors! Geraldine Sherman Brigitte Shim David Silcox Louis Siminovitch Pekka Sinervo Peter Singer Caspar Sinnige Ernest Sirluck David Sisam Bev Skidmore Philip Slayton John Slinger Mark Smith Carolyn Smyth Elizabeth Smyth Harley Smyth Donavan Snelleman Jules Solomon Marc Somerville Martine Sorin Rosemary Speirs James Spence Katherine Spence Cathy Spoel Mark Stabile Elise Stanley Mark Starowicz Robert Steiner Don Stevenson Andrew Stewart Nalini Stewart Brian Stock Boris Stoicheff Susan Straiton Alexander Stuart Ambury Stuart Bernadette Sulgit Alan Sullivan Jennifer Surridge Sylvia Sutherland Thomas Symons

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

College Quiz The purpose of the institution would not be to simply house a group of graduate students, but to select the best men available and to form a distinguished collegiate community.

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Who wrote this to whom and when? Check page 32 for answers. •

Marla B. Sokoloski (with C. Lucas), “Molecular Basis for Plasticity in

Robert I. Thompson (with G. B. Andresen et al), “Evaporative Cooling of

—, “Social Interactions in ‘Simple’ Model Systems,” Neuron, 65:780-794.

— (with D. Ahrensmeier et al), “Labatorials at the University of Calgary: In Pursuit of Effective Small Group Instruction Within Large Registration Physics Service Courses,” Physics in Canada, 65 (4), 2009: 214-216.

Anti-Social Behaviour,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 10, 2009: 6351-6356.

Kim Solga (with D.J. Hopkins and Shelley Orr), Performance and the City. Basingstoke: UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

—, Violence Against Women in Early Modern Performance: Invisible Acts. Basingstoke: UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Ronald Stewart (with J. Hanesiak et al), “Storm Studies in the Arctic:

The Meteorological Field Project,” Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, 2010: 47-68.

Jordan Thompson (with J.G. Reitz, R. Banerjee, and M. Phan), “Race,

Religion, and the Social Integration of New Immigrant Minorities in Canada,” International Migration Review, 43 (4), 2009: 695-726.

Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures,” Physical Review Letters, 105, 2010: 013003.

John Tsang, “The DNR Order: What Does It Mean?,” Clinical Medicine

Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, 4, 2010: 15-23.

— (with W.J.E. Lamm and E.R. Swenson), “Regional CO2 tension Quantitatively Mediates Homeostatic Redistribution of Ventilation Following Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism in Pigs,” Journal of Applied Physiology, 107, 2009: 755-762.

Isabel Vincent, Gilded Lily: Lily Safra, The Making of One of the World’s Wealthiest Widows. New York: Harper, 2010.

Tara Vongpaisal, “Children with Cochlear Implants Recognize Their Mother’s Voice,” Ear & Hearing, 31, 2010: 555-566.

LODGING NEWS – page 24

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

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Life at Massey College

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Master once demanded kickback from Mordecai Richler Five years of fine music at Massey

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by Elizabeth MacCallum

he Talisker Players, our College’s Musicians-in-Residence since 2005, are an eclectic and lively group that fit in perfectly with Massey life (including private coaching sessions, which few know about). The Players are most memorable for their performances at the Christmas Gaudy, the Quadrangle Society Tea Party, the Feast for the Founding Master, and the occasional chapel service. One of their outstanding pieces is “Tenebrae,” Osvaldo Golijov’s haunting call for peace for soprano, clarinet, and string quartet. It is a featured work on Where Words and Music Meet: Talisker Players at Massey College, a CD generously sponsored by Senior Fellows David and Vivian Campbell. Recorded with great care and precision, this collection is a unique mix of instruments and solo voices that shows off the fine music the Players have honed over a decade of performances. The CD is available from the Porter and at L’Atelier Grigorian on Yorkville Ave, in Toronto. As well, free tickets for their concert series of music and readings at Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church, on Bloor Street, are available to our Junior Fellows, who make up their most enthusiastic audiences there and at the College. The Talisker have become such a part of the fabric of Massey that our community members now hire them to perform at weddings, funerals, birthdays, and other occasions. Always accommodating and helpful far beyond the call, they continue to enrich our lives. We’re very lucky to have them here. (Tickets for the performances of the Talisker Players are available at uofttix.ca or by calling 416-978-8849. For more information, you may contact words.music@taliskerplayers.ca, call 416-466-1800, or go online at www.taliskerplayers.ca.) •

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FAX TO: JOHN FRASER a.k.a. MASSEY MASTER PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL NO PEEKING Dear Master Fraser, I am grateful for your offer of the job of Massey’s writer-in-rez. However, I am troubled by your demand that I kick back 20 percent of my salary to you in cash. Is this a time-honoured Massey tradition, or one of your innovations?.... I would also like to acknowledge receipt of those three Massey computers, and once I have disposed of this lot, I will forward the usual cheque. Meanwhile, I would like more details – and a price list – for the wines available from Massey’s fabled cellars.

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Michael R. Marrus, Some Measure of Justice: The Holocaust Era

Restitution Campaign of the 1990s. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2009.

Jill L. Matus, “George Eliot,” in The Cambridge Companion to English

Novelists, Adrian Poole, ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009: 225-241.

—, Shock, Memory and the Unconscious in Victorian Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Marina Nemat, After Tehran: A Life Reclaimed. Toronto: Penguin, 2010. James Nohrnberg, “Eight Reflections of Tennyson’s ‘Ulysses,’” in Victorian

Poetry: Tennyson at Two Hundred, Herbert F. Tucker, guest ed., 47 (1), Spring 2009: 101-150.

—, “Supplementing Spenser’s Supplement, a Masque in Several Scenes: Eight Literary-Critical Meditations on a Renaissance Numen Called ‘Mutabilitie,’” in Celebrating Mutabilitie, Jane Grogan, ed. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2010: 85-135.

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While the primary responsibility of MasseyNews is to provide information, not to investigate and expose, material comes our way from time to time that we feel obligated to publish, even though it may reflect poorly on the College or its members. The excerpts below are from a confidential fax sent by Mordecai Richler in 1995 to the then recently appointed new Master. We thank Quadrangler and author Charles Foran for providing us with this sensitive material. It appears, for an even wider audience to read in its full form, in Mr. Foran’s new biography on Richler, Mordecai: The Life & Times.

Best wishes, Mordecai

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David Pantalony, Altered Sensations: Rudolph Koenig’s Acoustical Workshop in Nineteenth-Century Paris. New York: Springer, 2009.

J. Russell Perkin, Theology and the Victorian Novel. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2009.

Anthony Perl, Transport Revolutions: Moving People and Freight Without Oil. Gabriola Island, BC: New Society Publishers, 2010.

Ravi Ravindra, The Wisdom of Patañjali’s Yoga Sutras: A New Translation and Guide. Sandpoint, ID: Morning Light Press, 2009.

B. I. Savan (with S. Flicker, B. Kolenda, and M. Mildenberger), “How to

Facilitate (or Discourage) Community-Based Research: Recommendations Based on a Canadian Survey,” Local Environment 14 (8), 2009: 783-796.

Neil Seeman (with Patrick Luciani), XXL: Obesity and the Limits of Shame. Toronto: Centre for Public Management, University of Toronto, 2010.

Pekka Sinervo (with T. Aaltonen et al), “Combination of Tevatron Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the W+W- Decay Mode,” Physical Review Letters, 104, Febuary, 2010: 061802, available at http://arxiv.org/ pdf/1001.4162.

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Junior Fellows at play Each year, our Junior Fellows elect a Lionel Massey Fund Committee, locally and fondly known as the LMF. The goal of the committee is to foster a collegial atmosphere with a calendar of social activities. 2009-10 co-chairs Cait Dmitriew, Kate Galloway, Dylan Gordon, Jordan Guthrie, and Alex Kocylum report on the year’s proceedings.

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his year was a fantastic social success, with a great crop of incoming Junior Fellows and the return of some of our most broad-minded, funloving, and hard-working peers from years past. We also had a year with a great deal of involvement from the College community beyond the Junior Fellowship: Senior Residents, Journalism Fellows, and Senior Fellows not only often attended, but also contributed to, the year’s events. Our term began with Masseypalooza, featuring the talented Massey ladies “Cherries on Top.” Given the funding emergency of the time, this one-day music festival and barbecue in the quad replaced the customary summer trips. Despite further reductions to the orientation week budget, levels of participation and fun remained high. The always awe-inspiring Scavenger Hunt reached new heights of creativity: particularly appealing to the judges were the heart-felt “love letters to the LMF,” replete with innuendoes and double entendres that demonstrated our College’s long-held love of the word while raising it to new lows. Another innovation was the accidental encouragement of mass bathing in the pond. The sight of dozens of frenzied Junior Fellows frolicking among the fountains will not soon be forgotten, particularly by Elizabeth MacCallum, whose water lilies luckily went undamaged. The annual Thanksgiving Dinner expanded to two organic free-range birds this year, cooked to crispy perfection by the LMF co-chairs and committee members, feeding the largest gathering of the Massey community for this event to date. Only a few short weeks later came the Halloween party, with costumes judged by Michael Valpy (winners: Junior Fellows Dane Smith and Rüdiger Willenberg as The Space Spoon and Alumna Julie Payette). The annual Pumpkin Carving contest was won by House II, whose rendition of a post-Low Table Junior Fellow, complete with watery eyes and evidence of morning-after nausea, greatly pleased our supremely qualified judges, The Honourable Mr. Justice Robert J. Sharpe and Geraldine Sharpe, justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal and former Registrar of the College, respectively. Their pick was surely just because, aided by an unusually party-hardy (and work-hardy!) Fellowship,

this year’s LMF revivified the post-High Table Low Table parties, holding one after every formal event. These frequently attracted visiting luminaries whose party days were generally thought to be well behind them, and House V’s January extravaganza deserves special mention in this regard. Featuring numerous theme rooms, as well as an icy invention of questionable repute referred to as the “shot luge,” this night will no doubt live long in the memories of many. The year’s talent shows, the Coffee House and Tea Hut, were also outstanding. Paul Furgale and Joe Culpepper introduced an impromptu PowerPoint face-off to the first term’s program, with each delivering a lecture based on slides prepared in advanced by their opponent, sight unseen. Dylan Gordon and Gordon Hawkins hope to have made this a tradition with their reprise of the event in the second term. Barry Rowe directed the production of memorable and unusually artistic LMF videos, the first a naturalistic look at the inhabitants of the College entitled Planet Earth: Massey, the second a black-and-white silent dramatization of the travails of an incoming Junior Fellow, allegorized in the figure of a dancing Massey Bull. Most important and noteworthy, however, was the involvement of those outside the Junior Fellowship in the year’s events. Senior Fellow David James worked with us to put on his annual line dance following the New Year; Journalism Fellow Rachel Pulfer and now-husband Karim Bardeesy were common attendees at many events, and, like Senior Resident Val Marie Johnson, often helped with successfully running them. The 2010-11 Don of Hall John MacCormick also never missed a chance to assist, and members of next year’s LMF – including for perhaps the first time ever a Senior Resident, Albert Wu, as well as Junior Fellow Rüdiger Willenberg – also helped with our events and organized some of their own. It is to the credit of the Fellowship and the College community that this year was so inclusive, inspiring – and fun! Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! John Tsang G. Tucker Carolyn Tuohy John Turner William Turner Christopher Twigge-Molecey Daniel Utrecht Michael Valpy Henry van Driel Kim Vicente Diane Walker Kenneth Walker Ian Wallace Michael Walsh Patrick Walshe Germaine Warkentin Peter Warrian Judith Watt-Watson Alex Waugh Cynthia Webb Ian Webb Norman Webster Harriet (Sis) Weld Grace Westcott Bruce Westwood Pamela Wheaton Rodney White Alan Whiteley Catherine Whiteside Blossom Wigdor Mary Williamson Lois Wilson Gavin Wimalasena The Windward Foundation Martin Wine Warren Winkler Richard Winter Eleanor Wittlin Rose Wolfe Judith Wolfson Lucy Woodward Janet Wright Joan York Marion York James Young Adam Zimmerman Moses Znaimer

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Reflections by Sara Shettleworth

Life at Massey College

Senior Residents In 2009-10, Massey was home to the following Senior Residents. Warmly welcomed, they were active members of our community during the year. Dr. Naomi Adelson Anthropology Dr. Aubie Angel Medicine Mr. Daniel Baird Writing Mr. Karim Bardeesy Journalism Mr. Francis Brunelle Healthcare Consulting Professor Stephen Clarkson Political Science Dr. John Dirks Medicine Professor Ursula Franklin Physics/Metallurgy Dr. George Georgopoulos Economics Mr. Rudyard Griffiths Dominion Institute Ms. Guannan Guo Finance and Economics Mr. Stephen Herbert Healthcare Services Dr. Margret Hovanec Lupina Foundation Dr. Christine Jamieson Theology Dr. Val Marie Johnson Sociology Ms. Diane Juricevic Law Mr. Patrick Luciani Salospeakers Mr. Philip Marchand Journalism Professor Michael Marrus History Dr. James Maskalyk Medicine Dr. Rosemary Meier Psychiatry Ms. Marina Nemat, Aurea Fellow, Writing

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Walter Gordon Massey Symposium addresses emotion and public policy

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he 2010 Walter Gordon Massey Symposium, entitled “Private Emotion/Public Policy,” took place at the Isabel Bader Theatre, University of Toronto, on March 16. Featured on the panel were David Pizarro, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Cornell University; Christina Tarnopolsky, Assistant Professor of Political Science at McGill University; and Senior Fellow Bob Rae, Member of Parliament and former premier of Ontario. Frances Lankin, President and CEO of the United Way of Toronto, moderated. The symposium panel addressed issues related to how people arrive at judgements about moral responsibility, how known or unknown biases may affect these judgements, and how policy makers can know, understand, and deal with the emotions that motivate the public at a given moment. A video of the evening’s session may be viewed at http://www.theglobeandmail. com/news/opinions/we-cannot-be-emotionless-but-weare-capable-of-rational-debate/article1501380. There were also two invitation-only follow-up sessions in the Upper Library on March 17, attended by several government officials, academics, and others who play important roles in policy making. Panellists for the session on “Measuring the Mood and Getting the Message Out” were Frank Graves, the founder of EKOS and one of Canada’s most influential pollsters; Quadrangler Trina McQueen, a major player in Canadian broadcasting who has held executive positions at CTV and CBC; Peter Byrne, the founding partner of Bensimon-Byrne and one of Canada’s most successful marketers; and Senior Fellow Jane Freeman, an expert on rhetoric from the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies. The second panel addressed the topic “Perspectives on Dealing with Highly Emotional Issues.” This panel featured Senior Fellow Roy McMurtry, the former Chief Justice of Ontario, former Attorney General of Ontario, and Chancellor of York University; Solange Lefebvre, Chair of Religion, Culture, and Society at the University of Montreal, and a specialist on reasonable accommodation and questions of nationalism;

and Senior Fellow Ralph Heintzman, a former senior federal public servant and head of the Office of Public Service Values and Ethics. Senior Fellow Janice Stein, Director of the Munk Centre for International Studies, moderated the morning’s proceedings. Inaugurated in 1990 in honour of the distinguished Canadian statesman and public servant, the late Honourable Walter Gordon, the annual symposium is made possible by generously granted seed monies from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation. In 2009, the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) at the University of Toronto became a partner in the Symposium. The main organizers of the 2010 event were Junior Fellows Hanah Chapman, Tim Harrison, and James McKee; SPPG students Viola Dessanti and Lisa Rae; Senior Fellow Michael Valpy; and Anna Luengo, College Administrator. The next Walter Gordon Symposium is “Democracy & Expertise – and Politics” and will take place at the Isabel Bader Theatre on March 22, 2011.

QUARTER CENTURY FUND The endowed Quarter Century Fund (QFC) continues to give funding to the Junior Fellows for events and items that enhance student life at Massey. The QCF student representatives accept proposals from all Massey students and vote to approve items for the current year budget, which this past year was $6,500. This provided support for the AGO pass, opera tickets, the Massey Grand Rounds, the annual ski trip, alternative wine grazing, and raclette night. The Junior Fellows also added a successful and highly entertaining event, “Massey Presents,” an arts gala benefit at the Church of the Holy Trinity, in downtown Toronto, for their chosen charity, Romero House for Refugees. The evening raised over $3,000. A description, photographs, and videos of the evening’s proceedings can be viewed at http://www.mcpresents.blogspot.com.

This lecture series had another very successful year with the following presentations:

• Salim Bamakhrama, “Contemporary Arts Colony for the Banff Centre: Infilling Nature’s Canvas with New Modes of Artistic Production” • Peter Buchanan, “English in the Age of Vikings, Monks, and Kings” • Rob Fraser, “What Health Care Workers Don’t Know About the Internet” • Elizabeth Harper-Clark, “Hubble, Bubble, Boil, and Trouble: Simulating How Stars Blow Apart Nebulae” • Gordon Hawkins, “All the Questions About the Internet You Were Afraid or Embarrassed to Ask”

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ppropriately enough given Massey’s history, my association with the College can be traced to an association with Magdalen College, Oxford, in the winter of 1995. By then I had been at the University of Toronto for over 25 years, as a graduate student, post doc, and faculty member busy doing research while raising two children. Probably like many students and faculty in the sciences, about all I knew of the university was my big self-contained department and a few close colleagues in a related department. Even as a reader of Robertson Davies’ novels, I knew little about most of the university east of St. George Street. Magdalen College comes into the story because I had the great good fortune to have a Visiting Fellowship there in the winter of 1995. This meant not only spending part of a sabbatical continuing collaborative research with colleagues in Oxford, but also, because my family did not come along, living in the College and eating lunch and dinner with the Fellows. Once I recovered from regarding daily High Table dinners as alien and intimidating ordeals, the whole experience turned out to be some of the most fun I’d had in ages. Where, I began to wonder, was it possible at U of T to meet and converse with historians, philosophers, chemists, doctors, and members of the clergy – in short, to connect with the broader intellectual life of the university? Oh yes, there was Massey College. Maybe that was such a place…. So when I came home I set out to learn more, and it didn’t take long, and only a little nagging, before my colleague, Senior Fellow Gus Craik, was •

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• Yonsue Kim, “Standardizing Exoticism” • Sarah Knudson, “Relationship Advice Books and Their Readers: 50 years of ‘Sexpert’ Guidance” • Massieh Moayedi, “Brain Imaging of Chronic Pain” • Cillian O’Hogan, “The Novel Before the Novel: Fiction in Antiquity” • Barry Rowe, “The Banach-Tarski Paradox: How Mathematicians Save Money at the Grocery Store” • Angela Schwarzkopf, “An Exploration of the Modern Harp” • Minako Uchino, “Learning About Japanese Food Culture Through Interactive Experiences” • Talia Zajac: “Anna Yaroslavna: The Forgotten Queen of France”

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

taking me to the ritual meeting and lunch with John Fraser. One thing has led to another and now, having to my amazement and delight been elected to a second term on Corporation, I am looking forward to many more years of association with Massey. Of course, I have not been disappointed in Massey as a place to find what I first stumbled into at Magdalen. Indeed, ongoing association with members of one’s own university is even more rewarding than passing acquaintance. My favourite Massey moments include many excellent High Tables, book groups, and Senior Fellows’ lunches, perhaps most memorable of which was my own talk on animal behaviour. It was the only presentation I have ever had to give without slides. It has also been very rewarding to see two of my own students, John Ratcliffe (alias Batman) and Noam Miller, a recent Don of Hall and Bach cantata director, as valued Junior Fellows. And the Magdalen connection has not been lost either. I’m sure when Heather Jackson succeeded me in the same Visiting Fellowship and asked for my insights into its mysteries, neither of us dreamt we’d one day be meeting regularly in a not-so-different College in Canada. Originally from Maine and an alumna of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, Senior Fellow Sara Shettleworth is now proudly Canadian and a member of the Departments of Psychology and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, where she spent her whole career. A Professor Emerita since 2009, she continues to ponder the mysteries of animal minds, to write, and to teach graduate students. She has been a member of Massey since 1997.

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Jonathan Hart, City of the End of Things: Lectures on Civilization and

Mary Jo Leddy, Our Friendly Local Terrorist. Toronto: Between the Lines,

—, Shakespeare: Poetry, History, and Culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

Athar K. Malik, “Cross-Border Use of Evidence in IP Litigation: Beware the

Empire. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Massey Junior Fellows Lecture Series

• Heather Andres, “The Greenland Ice Sheet: Mass Changes Since the Industrial Revolution”

“Reflections” is a regular feature of MasseyNews. In this brief piece, a longstanding, prominent member of our community reflects on her association with the College. The content and approach are entirely at the discretion of the writer.

Michiel Horn, (trans. from Flemish), Years of the Elephant, by Willy

Linthout. Wisbech, UK: Fanfare, and Rasquera, Spain: Ponent Mon, 2009.

Val Marie Johnson (co-ed with Michele Byers), The “CSI Effect:”

Television, Crime, and Governance. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2009.

— (co-ed with Diane Crocker), Poverty, Regulation, and Social Justice: Readings on the Criminalization of Poverty. Blackpoint, NS: Fernwood Publishing, 2010.

Deborah Kennedy, “British Portraits of Women Reading,” 1650-1850:

Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, 16, 2009: 65-85.

Thomas R. Klassen (co-ed. with Jae-jin Yang), Retirement, Work and Pensions in Ageing Korea. Abingdon: Routledge, 2010.

2010.

Deemed Undertaking Rule in Canada,” Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice, Vol. 4, No. 10, October 2009: 699-701, available at http://jiplp. oxfordjournals.org/content/4/10/699.full.pdf+html?sid=e16ffc05-0c9a-4ed6922e-f8e334291c57

—, “Deemed Undertakings in Canada: A Default Rule with Big Implications for Cross-Border or Parallel International IP Litigation,” Intellectual Property, Vol. XV, No. 1, November 2009: 927.

Christina Mancuso (lead analyst), “Long Term Care Risk Adjusted Quality Indicators,” Ontario Health Quality Council. Provincial Results available at http://www.ohqc.ca/en/ltc_prov_results.php, and Individual Home Results at http://www.ohqc.ca/en/ltc_homes.php.

— (lead analyst), “Profile of Residents in Continuing Care Facilities 2007-2008,” Canadian Institute for Health Information. Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS) Quick Statistics available at http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/ en/ donwnloads/ccrs_quickstats_2007_e.xls.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Convesation with from page 25 John Dirks They were held at the University of British Columbia, the University of Alberta, York University, the University of Ottawa, Université de Sherbrooke, Dalhousie University, and the Montreal Neurological Institute. These were very well attended by faculty, students, biotechnology representatives, members of the legal and business communities, and government representatives. And the other major part? That would be our National Program that takes place at 20 universities across Canada. Part of it is our outreach program for senior high school students, which has been in place since 2000. These take place annually during a Gairdner Week in October. In 2009, for example, students in Saskatoon had the opportunity to hear and ask questions of Dr. David Sackett, one of seven award winners. Nearly 300 high school students attended that Saskatoon session and about 800 a session in Winnipeg. The intent of this outreach program is to encourage students to enter science programs at the postsecondary level. I notice that “Canada” has now been added to the official title of the Gairdner Awards. What’s behind that? Yes, that was a key change last year, calling them the Canada Gairdner Awards for the first time. That’s meant to reflect a major development in branding the awards as Canadian.

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Also, to underline their importance, we have raised the award to each laureate to $100,000, up from $30,000. Our funding overall has grown tremendously – from $3 million to $26 million in just one year. As to our reputation, we’re now widely considered as granting of the world’s most prestigious science awards, ranked by some as just below the Nobel. Who are your major supporters? Financially, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is our biggest. The governments of Alberta and Ontario are also major supporters. The University of Toronto stands out, especially for its support during the 50th Anniversary celebrations. President David Naylor played a very important role in making those a success on the U of T campus. How are you ever going to top what happened last year? [laughs] We can’t really. Although, aside from (and after) the main celebrations, I should mention attending the Nobel awards in Stockholm last December. That was a glorious way of ending a truly amazing year. Before we finish our conversation, I should ask you how you became involved with the Gairdner Foundation and, for that matter, with Massey College. I started as a Gairdner jury member in 1982 while I was Head of the Department of

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Ian Clark (with Greg Moran, Michael L. Skolnik, and David Trick), Academic

Transformation: The Forces Reshaping Higher Education in Ontario. Queen’s Policy Studies. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2009.

—, “A Taxpayer View of University Funding: Steve and Di’s Evening on the Internet,” University Affairs, March 8, 2010 [Available online at http://www. universityaffairs.ca/a-taxpayers-view-of-university-funding.aspx]

Audra Diptee, From Africa to Jamaica: The Making of an Atlantic Slave Society, 1776-1807. Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2010.

Robin Elliott (co-ed with Gordon E. Smith), Music Traditions, Cultures, and Contexts, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2010.

—, “Robertson Davies and Music,” University of Toronto Quarterly, vol. 78, no. 4 (Fall 2009): 1029-52.

J. Caitlin Finlayson, “The Boundaries of Genre: Translating Shakespeare in Johnston and Weldele’s Julius,” in Teaching the Graphic Novel, Stephen Tabachnick, ed. New York: MLA, 2009: 188-199.

CharlES Foran, Mordecai: The Life & Times. Toronto: Knopf Canada, 2010.

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Medicine at UBC. I continued in that role when I moved to U of T in 1987 to become Dean of Medicine. After the deanship ended in 1993, I became part-time President of the Gairdner Foundation. Three years later, in 1997, I moved into an office at Massey College. We were a small operation here at the beginning but as we internationalized the Foundation, we outgrew our original quarters. We now have four separate offices and Sheila Robinson and our staff are active at Massey College. You must find Massey a good place to be for yourself and the Foundation. Definitely! There’s no other place I know that so easily facilitates interdisciplinary exchanges, not to speak of the town/gown connections that John Fraser has so masterfully built through the Quadrangle Society. I’ve also had the privilege to work closely with Ursula Franklin since 1998 on the Roundtables in Science and Medicine. Not to speak of all our impressive Junior Fellows. I can’t think of a better academic place anywhere than Massey College. Thanks so much you for taking some time from your very busy schedule to talk with us today. My pleasure.

Editor’s Note: More information on the Gairdner Foundation can be found at www.gairdner.org

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Camilla Gibb, The Beauty of Humanity Movement. Toronto: Doubleday Canada, 2010.

David Goldbloom (with Pier Bryden), “Dr. Goldbloom, Am I Crazy?”

Maclean’s, Vol. 123, Number 20, May 31, 2010: 46-49. [Available online at http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/05/27/dr-goldbloom-am-i-crazy]

— (ed.), Psychiatric Clinical Skills, Revised 1st Edition. Toronto: CAMH, 2010.

Katherine Govier, The Ghost Brush. Toronto: Harper Collins, 2010. John R. Graham (with A. Al-Krenawi), Helping Professional Practice with

Indigenous Peoples: The Bedouin-Arab Case. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2009.

— (with M.E. Jones and M. Shier), “Tipping Points: What Participants Found Valuable in Labour Market Training Programmes for Vulnerable Groups,” International Journal of Social Welfare, 19 (1): 2010: 63-72.

Charlotte Gray, Gold Diggers, Striking It Rich in the Klondike. Toronto: HarperCollins, 2010.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Wade Davis delivers 2009 Massey Lectures

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nce again, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), House of Anansi Press, and Massey College co-sponsored Canada’s most important lecture series, the five-part Massey Lectures. In October 2009, the lectures, entitled The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World, were delivered by Wade Davis, award-winning anthropologist, ethnobotanist, filmmaker, and photographer. He is also a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. The first of the public presentations, “Season of the Brown Hyena,” took place at the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, in Yellowknife. The subsequent four lectures – “The Wayfinders,” “Peoples of the Anaconda,” “Sacred Geography,” and “Century of the Wind” – were delivered respectively in Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal, and Toronto. The last lecture took place in Convocation Hall, at the University of Toronto, on October 31, and all five lectures were broadcast in their entirety on the CBC Radio One program Ideas. Davis’s lectures illustrated how, in his own words, ancient cultures “teach us that there other options, other possibilities, other ways of interacting with the earth…an idea that can only fill us with hope.” The Master hosted a reception in the Common Room of the College at the end of the last public lecture in Toronto. The recipient of numerous awards and honours, including the Lowell Thomas Medal from the Explorers Club and the Lannan Foundation Prize for literary nonfiction, Davis has published numerous scientific and popular articles, and his books include The Serpent and the Rainbow, Light at the Edge of the World, and The Wayfinders, the book version of the Massey Lectures. •

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MARGARET ATWOOD was given the Crystal Award at

Senior Residents Mr. Tim Plumptre Public Policy Mr. Michael Redhill Writer-in-Residence Ms. Sheila Robinson Gairdner Foundation Professor Abraham Rotstein Economics Mr. Neil Seeman Health System Policy Mr. Olivier Sorin French Literature Mrs. Jennifer Surridge Pendragon Ink Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalfe Foundation Fellow Mr. Michael Valpy Journalism Dr. Peter Warrian Lupina Foundation Mr. Ian Webb Finance

Wade Davis The book version, lecture transcripts, and a fiveCD set of the 2008 Massey Lectures can be ordered from the CBC at < http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/ massey-lectures/2009/11/02/massey-lectures-2009-thewayfinders-why-ancient-wisdom-matters-in-themodern-world>, or from House of Anansi Press at < http://www.anansi.ca/titles.cfm?pub_id=1359>. •

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President of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve, and was Visiting Professor, the 10th Annual Research Conference, Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. h howard.clarke@utoronto.ca

the 2010 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The award honours artists who are making a significant cultural contribution to improving life on Earth. As well this past year, Atwood shared the US$1 million Dan David Prize STEPHEN CLARKSON was appointed a Member of the with Indian-Bengali novelist Amitav Ghosh. The prize is Order of Canada. endowed by the Dan David Foundation at Tel Aviv NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS was awarded the Holberg University. The prize judges noted that Atwood’s work, International Memorial Prize, given by the Norwegian parliament among other achievements, “enabled, for the first time, the for outstanding scholarly work. The prestigious award is worth emergence of a defined Canadian identity.” $785,000, and she plans to donate some of this to rare-book RUSSELL MORTON BROWN and Donna Bennett libraries and organizations that support graduate students. launched the newest edition of their anthology of JANICE DU MONT was promoted to Associate Professor, Canadian literature at Massey this past April. Dalla Lana School of Public Health. She is at the Women’s h rbrown@chass.utoronto.ca College Research Institute in Toronto, and she recently MICHAEL CHARLES, former Dean of the Faculty of adopted a second daughter. h janicedumont@hotmail.com Engineering and Professor Emeritus, started his presidency DAVID GOLDBLOOM was elected a Fellow of the Canadian of the Canadian Academy of Engineering in June 2010. Psychiatric Association and appointed Vice-Chair, Stratford

HOWARD CLARKE is a pediatric plastic surgeon living in Toronto and a Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. During the past year, he was appointed

Professor Dan White Book History and Print Culture Dr. Albert Wu Medicine

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED: 2009-10 All academic addresses are at the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified. Samina Kahn Ahmed Bursar Emerita

Donna Bennett Department of English Doris Bergen Chancellor Rose Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies Dr. Monica Boyd Department of Sociology Linda Corman Nicholls Librarian and Director of the John W. Graham Library, Trinity College C. Brad Faught Department of History, Tyndale University College

Shakespeare Festival of Canada. His son, Daniel, was a Junior Fellow at Massey College this past year. h david_goldbloom@camh

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED: 2009-10 Shira Hirzog President and Chief Executive Officer, The Kahanoff Foundation Brian D. Hodges Vice-Chair for Education and International Affairs, Department of Psychiatry Thomas J. Hudson President and Scientific Director, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research Marilyn J. Legge Associate Professor of Christian Ethics, Emmanuel College Wendy Levinson Sir John and Lady Eaton Professor and Chair of Medicine George Logan Professor Emeritus, Department of English Queen’s University Barbara Sherwood Lollar Adjunct Professor, Department of Chemistry Minelle K. Mahtani Associate Professor, Geography and Program in Journalism Mayo Moran Dean, Faculty of Law Peter Nesselroth Professor Emeritus of French and Comparative Literature James Paupst Physician, Consultant, Author John Reibetanz Department of English Brian Silverman J.R.S. Prichard and Ann Wilson Chair in Management, Rotman School of Management Richard Wernham Philanthropist and President, Soutterham Investments Ltd. Catharine Whiteside Dean, Faculty of Medicine Kenneth Whyte Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Maclean’s Magazine Adam H. Zimmerman Philanthropist and Former Chief Executive Officer, Noranda Inc.

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Masse� in the Media When the College pops up in the mass media, we’d like members of our community to hear about it. Please let us know if you spot something of significance on Massey in a newspaper or magazine, or on television or the Web. This year, our offering, “Too much to wish for,” first appeared on The Globe and Mail’s website on June 26, 2010. We are grateful to Doug Bell for permission to reprint his piece. Next week or sometime shortly thereafter, Stephen Harper will replace Michaëlle Jean as Governor General with somebody else. If I had to guess, this somebody else will among other things not be a Haitian immigrant or a woman or somebody who makes a point of denigrating any aspect of Tory policies held dear by the base in Red Deer. If I were, say, Naomi Klein, I wouldn’t be waiting by the phone. The names bandied about to date — at least in The Globe — are John de Chastelaine, David Crombie, Hugh Segal, Willie Littlechild, David Johnston, Peter Milliken and Rick Hansen. The most intriguing name on The Globe’s list (in itself a likely disqualification) is John Fraser. Fraser is a former editor of Saturday Night magazine and Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto. Where the others all have a faint whiff of dull normal

As GG, Fraser would reflect this country’s essential weirdness back to itself in a sophisticated, satiric manner and he’d have a jolly time doing it. Yes, he’d puff himself up and wear the ridiculous outfits and kowtow to the Queen, but he’d do it all with a certain wit and flinty glint in the eye decidedly lacking in our last two Vice Regals. Wouldn’t it be great to have a GG who could tell a funny story, keep his speeches short and to the point, and take the piss out of his subjects and himself at the same time? Clearly too much to wish for.

Senior Fellows at lunch The speakers this past year at the well-attended monthly lunches were: • Aubie Angel, “Jack Spratt Was Right – It’s Epigenetics, You I---t!” • Alan Broadbent, "Urban Nation: How Immigration and Urbanization Converged to Make Canada's Cities Strong, and How Confederation Conspires to Make Them Weak" • Stephen Clarkson, “High Times: How Ecstasy from Canada, Cocaine from Mexico, and the Insatiable American Narcotics Market Are Turning the NAFTA Dream into a North American Nightmare” • John Fraser and Henry Van Driel, “The Contributions of Boris Stoicheff to Science and Life at Massey College” • David Goldbloom, “The Mental Health Commission of Canada Is Two Years Old: Walking, Talking, and Running” • Roy McMurtry [topic unavailable at time of going to press] • Rodney White, “Canada and Climate Change: Making up for Lost Time” •

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LINDA HUTCHEON won one of the two annual $50,000 Canada Council of the Arts Molson Prizes, which are intended “to encourage Canadians of outstanding achievement in the fields of the Arts, the Humanities or the Social Sciences to make further contribution to the cultural or intellectual heritage of Canada.”

ANNE LANCASHIRE has launched the public-access

database “Mayors and Sheriffs of London 1190-1558” (MASL: http://masl.library.utoronto.ca), a researched reference list, with sources cited, of London mayors, wardens, and sheriffs, together with the guilds/ companies to which they belonged. The list will be extended to the present day. h anne@chass.utoronto.ca

JAMES ORBINSKI was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

RICHARD PELTIER won the 2010 Bower Award, one of

the international science community’s most prestigious honours, awarded by the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia. His citation noted his contribution to “fundamental advances in the understanding of Earth Systems.”

Conversation with John Dirks

(Crombie and Segal both have discernable senses of humour but at the end of the day are essentially company men), Fraser is practically a Dadaist. He writes a mean column (in both senses). Politically, he’s almost impossible to pigeon hole. He enjoys satire (he’s one of the few officially sanctioned sorts who will admit to missing Frank magazine). And last but far from least, he is close to and understands the weird mix of colonial insecurity, relentless ambition and hubris that led Conrad Lord Black of Crossharbour from Britain’s upper chamber to FCI Coleman (inmate # 18330-424). And if you think that Tubby’s rise and fall isn’t the quintessentially Canadian story, brother, you ought to turn over your passport and seek citizenship elsewhere.

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President of the Gairdner Foundation since 1993, John Dirks received his B.Sc. and M.D. from the University of Manitoba, then moved on to a distinguished career at McGill University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Toronto, holding major administrative positions as Director of Nephrology at McGill, Head of the Department of Medicine at UBC, and Dean of Medicine at U of T. In 2005, Dr. Dirks was awarded the NFK International Medal by the National Kidney Foundation and the Roscoe Robinson Award by the International Society of Nephrology for his contribution to nephrology education. He has published 155 peer-reviewed papers in his field, was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 2006, and was granted an Honorary D.Sc. from the University of Manitoba in 2009. In 2009, he also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Biotechnology Initiative (TBI). Since 1997, John Dirks and the Gairdner Foundation have been based at Massey College. He is also a Senior Fellow and member of the College Corporation. We spoke with him this past June in his office at Massey, just before he took off to his summer home on Prince Edward Island. Congratulations on the 50th anniversary of the Gairdner Foundation in 2009. Please tell us a bit about the celebrations for this milestone. Thank you. The celebrations were very successful, culminating in three days of lectures, forums, roundtables, and Q & A sessions in Toronto attended by around 4000 people altogether. And, of course, there was the 50th Anniversary Award Dinner last October, honouring our seven award recipients for 2009. That was a wonderful affair that also featured a remarkable rendition by baritone Russell Braun of an aria from Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro.

ALLAN PETERKIN was named the Head of the Program in Narrative and Healthcare Humanities at the University of Toronto in June.

JANET ROSSANT was awarded a Premier’s Summit

Award for her work on cancer and stem-cell biology.

BETH SAVAN was cross-appointed to the Department of Geography. h b.savan@utoronto.ca

BARBARA SHERWOOD LOLLAR was named University Professor. h bslollar@chem.utoronto.ca

PEKKA SINERVO is the newly appointed Senior VicePresident, Research, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. h Pekka.Sinervo@utoronto.ca

MARLA B. SOKOLOWSKI was named University Professor. h marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca

THOMAS SYMONS was appointed Chair of the Ontario Heritage Trust in March 2010.

Michael Valpy continues his work on a history of

p u b l i c at i o n s

Who were your presenters over the three days in Toronto? It was, in fact, the largest gathering ever in Canada of the world’s top scientists and a huge undertaking. Fifty of these presented in Toronto. Among the presenters and attendees were 60 past winners of the Gairdner Award and seven new ones. Twenty-two of these later won Nobel Prizes. No fewer than 76 Gairdner Award winners altogether have subsequently won the Nobel. We are very proud of that. I might add that we had hoped to have

p u b l i c at i o n s

Prime Minister Harper at the day of the annual Toronto Canada Gairdner Awards gala dinner proceedings, but we were upstaged by the arrival in Canada of the Olympic Flame. You described the Toronto events as “culminating.” What preceded them? There were two other major parts. We organized seven symposia across the country between March and November last year. CONVERSATION – page 26

p u b l i c at i o n s

Margaret Atwood, The Year of the Flood. Toronto, McClelland &

— (co-ed with David L.Wehlau), Error-Correcting Codes, Finite Geometries and Cryptography. Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society, 2010.

Michael Baur, “Aquinas on Law and Natural Law,” in The Oxford Handbook

Adam Chapnick (with Craig Stone), Academic Writing for Military

Stewart, 2009.

to Aquinas, Brian Davies and Eleonore Stump, eds. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

—, “Can Natural Law Thinking Be Made Credible in Our Contemporary Context?,” in Freiheit, Natur, Religion: Studien zur Sozialethik, Christian Spieβ, ed. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 2010.

Michael L. Brodie, “John Mylopoulos: Sowing Seeds of Conceptual

Modelling” in Conceptual Modeling: Foundations and Applications, Alexander T. Borgida, Vinay K. Chaudhri, Paolo Giorgini, and Eric S. Yu, eds. New York: Springer, 2009: 1-9

Russell Morton Brown (co-ed. with Donna Bennett), An Anthology of Canadian Literature in English. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010.

Aiden Buen (with Trevor Buen), “The Basics of Bases,” The Mathematical Intelligencer, 32 (2), May 2010: 49-55.

Personnel. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 2009.

— (co-ed with Kim Richard Nossal), Special Issue of International Journal 65, 2, Spring 2010.

Mark A. Cheetham, “The Crystal Interface in Contemporary Art:

Metaphors of the Organic and Inorganic,” Leonardo 43: 3, June 2010: 250-256.

—, “The Grandfather Clause: Panofsky, Kant, and Disciplinary Cosmopolitanism,” Journal of Art Historiography, Number 1, December 2009: 1-13.

Howard M. Clarke (with J.C. Lin, A. Schwentker-Colizza, and C.G. Curtis),

“Final Results of Grafting Versus Neurolysis in Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 123 (3), 2009, 939-948.

— (with G.H. Borschel), “Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 124 (1S), 2009: 144e-155e.

public intellectuals in Canada.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

25


From the Lodging from page 12

Other old friends like Quadrangler and writer Ernest Hillen stayed over for College events, and poet and now novelist Tom Wayman, one of our most popular writers-inresidence, came from Calgary to launch his new book. Felicitously, he was in time to present the Morris Wayman Award to brilliant trumpeter Patrick Boyle, the Junior Fellow who was deemed to have best shared his unique skills and knowledge to benefit the community last year. Tom himself had established this award some years ago to honour his father. And then there were the unexpected guests like the fine craftsmen who were in a jam for time while installing Sarah Hall’s spectacular Wisdom Windows in the Upper Library, which they had created under her guidance in their German atelier. The older Fraser girls are not in residence, though Jessie, a rising theatre director, follows the footsteps of director Atom Egoyan by portering part time to keep the wolf from the door. And Kate, who continues to expand her impressive work at Schools Without Borders, sometimes uses Massey facilities for the original arts programs she creates for potential leaders among Toronto youth. And so, after another whirlwind Massey year, John and I headed off for France Easter night to see friends and accompany the Journalism Fellows on their trip to Finland, a long-standing program thanks to the Finnish government, and then on to Denmark. Despite snow in Copenhagen when it was too hot in Toronto, we ignored our vertigo and climbed a 45-metre high windmill on Samsø, a model of energy self-sufficiency. With Senior Fellow David Robertson and his partner, Peter Ron, we also visited Denmark’s largest organ builder near the German border, a family enterprise run by a cousin of Peter’s. While John then went off to Britain and back to Massey to work, I walked the Camino, the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostella. I must admit, though, that it was only Camino Lite. A van carried our suitcases and often us, but we did walk over 100 kilometres in under two weeks, a big distance for someone who could scarcely make it to the subway station a few years ago. Smug that all my ridiculous training had paid off, and grinning from ear to ear, I walked for hours, drinking in the countryside and the rain, admiring the rustic villages and sophisticated towns, and the glorious abundance of Romanesque architecture. It was so wonderful I am already plotting a more serious, less lite effort next spring. Who knows what will have happened in House VII by then? 24

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

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National: Alexandra Sorin alexandrasorin@gmail.com Toronto: Kari Maaren kmaaren@gmail.com St. John’s: Janna Rosales janna.rosales@utoronto.ca Ottawa: Ralph Heintzman Ralph.Heintzman@uOttawa.ca Peterborough: George Kovacs gakovacs@trentu.ca

On March 4, 2010, Toronto mayor David Miller and College Visitor The Hon. Henry N.R. Jackman unveiled an historical plaque outside the Master’s Lodging noting that Robertson Davies lived there from 1963-81. A reception followed afterwards in the Common Room.

Victoria/Vancouver: Ian Alexander ianalexan@gmail.com

Pendragon Ink Reports

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London, England: Tom Hickman TomHickman@blackstonechambers.com

by JENNIFER SURRIDGE

e mentioned in last year’s report that John Krisak and Reed Needles would be mounting a one-man show on the life and work of Robertson Davies. This was performed at Hart House in March 2010 and many people were delighted to hear Davies’ work spoken again. Reed Needles certainly gave the right feeling, and it was a wonderful tribute. We’re also happy to announce that a six-hour television mini series will be made from Davies’ novel Fifth Business. There have been attempts to make a film of this novel for many years, but this time it is looking very promising. We have seen a completed screen play, and a producer and director are now involved in the project. They are hoping to start filming in December 2011. There will be more news here when we have it. We were very happy to see the publication last fall of the papers from “Reconsidering Roberston Davies,” the symposium held on November 23-25, 2006 at Massey College. A very brief excerpt from the introduction to this publication is provided on the right, and more detailed information on its contents can be found at the University of Toronto Quarterly website at <http:// utpjournals.metapress.com/content/ j001gq122575/ ?p=5d177314b297432996fbd84f 1ae2d39f&pi=2>. We were also delighted to see that the City of Toronto installed a plaque on the Master’s Lodgings of the College to tell all passersby that Robertson Davies lived there. It is wonderful that the City now has an ongoing program to mark the places were our artists lived. The day it was unveiled was a thrilling one for us and was very well attended. A photo of this event can be found above on this page. In 2008, Mrs. Brenda Davies sold her house in the country. One of the largest items in the house was Robertson Davies’ library. It was purchased by Hugh Anson-Cartwright. Recently, Queen’s University announced that Hugh had

made a large donation to them of books from Davies library’ in his father’s name, Reginald Anson-Cartwright, a 1904 graduate of the Queen’s School of Mining. They will be shelved just as they were in the house, using the catalogue that I put together for Davies and completed after his death. Hugh said he had made the gift because he did not know of another author who used his library so extensively in his writing. It is a fantastic gift for Queen’s and a great tribute to Hugh. For further information on this donation, see <www. library.queensu.ca/ robertsondavies>.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

From the introduction by Donna Bennett and Russell Morton Brown to “Reconsidering Roberston Davies,” a collection of papers published in the University of Toronto Quarterly, Fall 2009 issue. Our conference led us to reflect on the relevance of our setting, Massey College – which may be the most complex of Davies’ artistic creations. Brought into being out of whole cloth and by quotation, with an instant “tradition” inserted at its conception in 1961, the College is a stage set that allows dialogues to take place. Most are improvised, while some, like the symposium – initiated by John Fraser, the current Master of Massey – that brought this special issue into being, are scripted by its speakers. Davies established the terms of this ongoing drama by ensuring that Massey was made up of diverse people and disciplines, deliberately moving experts out of their isolated areas of expertise and into one another’s company and allowing individuals who differ in their ways of understanding the world to agree to a set of conventions that melds them into a loosely framed society. In Massey, Davies may thus have created the clerisy for which he longed.

Alumni Association goes global

Massey Alumni International

Cape Town: Cathleen Powell cathleen.powell@utoronto.ca

by John Fraser, Master

n preparation for the 50th anniversary celebrations in two years time, the College has begun an ambitious program to build up a solid Alumni Association with chapters across the country and internationally. The idea is to find willing Alumni partners in a city or a country where sufficient numbers of Aumni have homes and, through them, to begin the business of an annual get-together, and possibly more frequent encounters, depending on the enthusiasm and volunteerism shown. The process began in Toronto, where the long-established, largely Toronto-based, Alumni Association, so ably maintained by its chair, Kari Maaren, has now become the Toronto Chapter. It has its own executive and has long been busy, as you will see in a separate report below. On the left is the inaugural list of chapters of the new association, along with the names and e-mail contact information for those Alumni who have kindly offered to help begin the new era. As this is a work in progress, we are looking for

volunteers among our far-flung Alumni to sign on. Within a year we also hope to have representatives in Halifax, London (Ontario), Winnipeg, Edmonton, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Accra, and New Delhi. There isn’t to be too much work involved: an annual dinner with a speaker, perhaps, and occasional pub nights or other outings. The idea is to foster fellowship and interdisciplinarity – Massey’s perpetual assignment! – and to help maintain links to the College. If you would like to join one of these groups, or indeed if you would like to start one in your city or area, please contact me (jfraser@ masseycollege.ca) or Pat Kennedy (pat.kennedy@ utoronto.ca), and we will help in the organization, including a search to see what Alumni there are in your bailiwick. This is an exciting development and my hope is that, by the beginning of the College’s 50th anniversary, there will be regular reports on Alumni events from across the country and around the world.

From the Alumni Association, Toronto Chapter

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Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Photography by Fernando Morales, The Globe and Mail

Life at Massey College

by Kari Maaren

attendance was stronger than ast year was a very usual. interesting one for the The Alumni listserv is now Massey College Alumni a force to be reckoned with, Association, as it marked a keeping many Alumni shift in the structure of the informed about Massey news Executive. In the winter of and events. The website is also 2010, as Master Fraser reports going strong. After some on this page, he launched new difficulties last year, it has international chapters of the successfully migrated to a new Association. If you are server, and the address of the interested in helping Alexandra site is now http://www. Sorin with the coordination of masseycollege.ca/alumni. If you these new bodies, I encourage wish to sign up for the listserv, you to contact her at you will find instructions on alexandrasorin@gmail.com. this site, which also offers news, She would be very happy to a list of upcoming events, a hear from you. Alexandra is comic about the College, and also, with the help of Pat various other interesting little Kennedy, working to set up an features. Any questions about Alumni database that will Kari Maaren the website or the Toronto eventually include contact chapter in general can be directed to me at information for as many Alumni as Pat can find. kmaaren@gmail.com. Work on the database is expected to continue In the upcoming year, the Toronto chapter through this fall and possibly into the winter. plans to be more active. Members of the The Toronto chapter of the Alumni Executive now include Michael McGillion, Association remains intact, of course, and has the Katherine Verhagen, Smadar Peretz, Jennifer same responsibilities as it did before. Due to Konieczny, Jacqueline To, Alexandra Sorin, members’ general unavailability, it was less active Rosemary Marchant, and Natalie Papoutsis, than usual last year, but some Alumni did get with yours truly as president. Andrew Eckford together occasionally and they made ambitious and Brenda Didyk, two long-time members, plans to be carried out this year. We held a games night in conjunction with the LMF, and members retired from the Executive last year. We very much miss them, and thank them for their years of our Executive attended the annual Alumni/ of participation. Quadrangler/ Journalist Gala, at which Alumni

Renowned Canadian actor R.H. Thomson was guest speaker on March 6, 2010 at the annual gala dinner hosted by the Alumni Association, the Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program, and the Quadrangle Society. Deeply concerned about the future of the CBC, he spoke passionately about the dangers of increasing commercialization of the space of public broadcasting.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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News from the Library

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

by P.J. MacDougall, Library Administrator

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s the saying goes, “The only constant is change,” and the Massey Library was no exception to the rule this year. In December 2009, Marie Korey, the College’s highly respected Librarian and scholar of the history of the book, took early retirement. Devoting her considerable expertise to developing and defining the Robertson Davies Library and its connection to scholarly communities both within and outside the University of Toronto for nearly two decades, Marie will be continuing with her ongoing research on the activities of the nineteenthcentury British printing firm of Vizetelly & Company. The College is grateful for Marie’s outstanding achievements in shaping the Library into the world-class research resource that it is today. In October, Marie was interviewed by the writer/broadcaster/ bibliophile Nigel Beale for his Biblio File “Nota Bene Books” at http://nigelbeale. com. In addition to supervising a group of apprentices in the print room this year, she also taught a course for the U of T’s undergraduate Book and Media Studies Program and supervised Imre Rosza, a student in Visual Studies, in his project “Concept Gutenberg Press” (http://fisher. library.utoronto.ca/news/concept-gutenbergpress). Marie is also a member of the Graduate Department of English, where a reception was held in her honour last March. In January, I was appointed to the new position of Library Administrator at the College, and Mr. Brian Maloney returned

Image from proofs for The Fables of Esope translated out of Frensshe into Englysshe by William Caxton with engravings on wood by Agnes Miller Parker, published in 1931 by The Gregynog Press. Proofs donated to the Library by Robertson Davies. part-time to contribute his extensive skills in maintaining and operating our collection of nineteenth-century printing presses. Brian also teaches Typography and History of Graphic Design at Humber College, and will be leading demonstrations, workshops, and tours with the presses. Although change is always inevitable, the Library’s role as a research centre for the study of book history and print culture will continue unabated for many years to come.

Book History and Print Culture Program (BHPC) turns ten by Dan White, Director, BHPC Program

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oused at Massey since its inception, BHPC (http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca) is turning ten years old this year, so it is only fitting that we should be growing into a worldclass centre for research and teaching while retaining all of the excitement of a young program in a dynamic and rapidly developing field. We now draw our students from 13 participating units around U of T, with the majority coming from the iSchool and the Department of English. What brings our diverse community together is a shared interest in the physical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the book, past, present, and future. With Massey’s working printing room, where the Printer, Brian Maloney, keeps his doors open, the College provides a wonderful home, so we’d like to take this opportunity to tell the readers of MasseyNews a little bit about the past year in the life of the Program. The year got off to a bang when the university hosted the major conference in the field, the 2009 meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP). One of the main organizers was Massey’s own Marie Korey, former Librarian of the Robertson Davies Library. The conference featured five days 18

of presentations by 180 scholars from around the world on the theme of “Tradition & Innovation: The State of Book History,” including an opening plenary lecture by Massey Senior Fellow and BHPC faculty member Natalie Davis. We’re also pleased to report that seven BHPC students and three of our alums delivered papers. By all accounts, this was a particularly exciting year for the regular activities of the Program. Professor Alan Galey (iSchool) led “Introduction to Book History,” our required seminar, which, in addition to its regular meetings, included a series of guest speakers along with guided class visits to the ROM’s Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition, the Internet Archive’s digitization facility in Robarts, and both Massey College Press and Coach House Press. Professor Deidre Lynch (English) taught the advanced seminar in book history on the topic “Used Books: Doing Things with Print in Eighteenthand Nineteenth-Century Britain.” At the annual “Librorum” in December, we were treated to three exciting student presentations: Lindsey Eckert (English) told us about her “NineteenthCentury British Literary Annuals: An Online Exhibition of Materials from the University of

Toronto” (http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca/ annuals/index.html), an exhibition, also mounted at the E. J. Pratt Library, that included holdings from the Massey Library; Jann G. Marson Jr. (Art) discussed “Subversion of the Surrealist Revolution: A Critical Bibliography of Selected Works Published by Marcel Mariën 1944-1975”; and Kyle Wyatt (English) described his research on “Trends in U.S. Literary Maps, 1898-1960.” In late February the Graduate Student Colloquium, organized by Lindsey Eckert and Claire Battershill on the theme of “New Materialities: Recycling, Reusing, and Reediting Texts,” featured nine wonderful papers by graduate students and a keynote by Professor Paul Keen (Carleton). In closing, for their years of service to BHPC I’d like to extend my warm gratitude to Marie Korey, who is not only one of the founders of the Program, but also a distinguished scholar in the field of book history, and to P.J. MacDougall, who has worked wonders as the Program’s Administrative Coordinator and who now assumes new responsibilities as Library Administrator. With the generous support of the College, we are very pleased to welcome our new Coordinator, Gillian Northgrave.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Clarkson Award

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athy Powell came to Massey College and the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto three years ago. She came from her native South Africa, along with her strong consciousness of its complex history of tragedy, hope, defiance, cruelty, and redemption. She came here with a warm heart already disciplined in some of the realities of everyday life in her country. A deep involvement and support for Marsh Memorial Childrens’ Home, for example, grew out of a specific challenge when her heart was touched by two beggar children who came knocking at her door looking for food. What happened next is typical of our laureate: she wasn’t content to offer food and a few words of comfort. She committed herself to these kids, products of a broken home, and took on the responsibility of seeing to it that they got the help they needed to struggle toward a less desperate life. And then she made sure it stayed that way. She made a promise and she kept it. Far away in Canada, she’s still keeping it. That same capacious heart she brings to her life in Canada. Whether it is helping out at Romero House, where refugee claimants are given shelter and a welcome home until they can get properly settled, or making sure a colleague who is depressed or is a victim of harassment or abuse is properly attended to, Cathy Powell makes sure in unostentatious ways that she is always on the path of service. She is, in the words of Professor Ursula Franklin, “an anchor for this College,” and her moral certitude coupled with a generous spirit ensures that we do not stray into uncertain waters. The Clarkson Laureateships honour great public acts of conspicuous service; they also honour quiet, effective, and often selfeffacing constancy. Madame Clarkson, we present to you the 2010 Laureate for Public Service – Cathleen Powell, a woman of courage and conviction.

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obert Holmes Thomson, better known nationally as R.H.Thomson, is a Canadian television, film, and stage actor of prodigious productivity. He has received numerous awards and honours for his

professional skills and he has been a member of the Quadrangle Society of Massey College almost from its inception 15 years ago. On three occasions, he has regaled the College with readings from Robertson Davies’ ghost stories at the annual Feast for the Founding Master. But great and honoured actor that he is, that is not why he is standing before us tonight. He is here because he represents the very best tradition of the citizen advocate, someone who takes from his personal and professional lives a strong sense of commitment to the world around him, especially at its margins, its flaws, and even its tendency to forgetfulness. An outspoken advocate for arts and culture in Canada, he was artistic producer for Toronto’s World Stage and is the co-founder of ShakespeareWorks, an educational theatre project dedicated to making Shakespeare accessible to young people. He has also served as Chairman of the Artists’ leadership Council of the International Network for Cultural Diversity. Perhaps his most moving and dramatic intervention into our lives came not from the stage, but from the realization that the sacrifice of the Canadians who died in the First World War was rapidly receding from public consciousness. Out of the vortex of his own family history – seven uncles perished in the trenches, four from one family alone – a sense of loss haunted him, as well as dismay as memory receded. From this dismay, he and a colleague created two years ago a unique project that saw the evocation of every single Canadian service man or woman who died in that war. The names were projected throughout several days at the National War Memorial in Ottawa and in Trafalgar Square, in London, and it touched people deeply.

The 2010-11 Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service Call for Nominations ❖ Named in honour of the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, former Governor General of Canada, the Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service seeks to honour each year a member of the Massey College community whose conspicuous commitment to public service is worthy of emulation and appreciation. Nominations may be made by any member of the College community. This includes the Senior and Junior Fellowship, members of the Alumni Association and the Quadrangle Society, and College staff. Nominations should be in the form of a letter or e-mail to the College Registrar, Mary Graham, and arrive no later than January 31, 2011. Nominators should explain succinctly why they think someone is worthy of the Clarkson Laureateship and, where appropriate, supply any supporting evidence and/or names of supporting nominators. Please send nominations to:

“Memory is what makes us human,” R.H. Thomson tells us. “Memory has to be unearthed and dealt with or we are not human.” Currently, he is campaigning hard to preserve the integrity and independence of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before the memory of its former excellence fades entirely away. This is a man who does not take on small causes. Madame Clarkson, we present to you the 2010 Clarkson Laureate for Public Service – Robert Holmes Thomson, a great actor and a loyal citizen.

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Ms. Mary Graham Registrar’s Office Massey College 4 Devonshire Place Toronto Ontario M5S 2E1 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

❖ 23


Life at Massey College

Quadrangle Society Book Club Report by RAMSAY DERRY

he book club at Massey College is organized by the Quadrangle Society, but it is open to the whole Massey community – current and emeriti Senior Fellows, Journalism and Junior Fellows and Alumni, as well as Quadranglers. Its meetings have become an increasingly popular forum for all the different categories of Massey people to gather and exchange ideas. Our meetings are held in the Upper Library at 7:45 p.m. once a month from October to May, usually (but not always) the first Monday. Two or three times a year we send out an e-mail (and snail-mail) newsletter with updated schedules and additional information about the books to all members of the Quadrangle Society and to anyone else who would like it. (Please let the Master’s office know if you would like to be on this mailing list.) Our 2009-10 season opened with The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill presented by the author and introduced by Senior Fellow Emeritus and former U of T president Dr. John Evans. In November, we acknowledged the Darwin bicentennial year with a discussion of neo-Darwinian Richard Dawkins’ The Selfish Gene, presented by Dr. Rosemary Marchant, a Massey Alumna. Our December choice, Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent by Andrew Nikiforuk, was a contentious subject, skillfully presented by

Senior Fellow the Hon. John Godfrey. We began the New Year with John Updike’s uncharacteristic novel about the Abstract Expressionist painters of the 1950s, Seek Her Face, presented by Senior Fellow and abstract artist the Hon. Justice James Spence. Claire Battershill was the first Massey Junior Fellow to make a presentation to the book club, Stella Gibbons’s 1932 comic novel Cold Comfort Farm. Our March book, Desert Queen: The Extraordinary Life of Gertrude Bell – Adventuress, Advisor to Kings, Ally of Lawrence

MASSEY COLLEGE QUADRANGLE SOCIETY BOOK CLUB 2010-11

Karl Jaffar is semi-retired and living in

Toronto. He successfully defeated the proposed demolition of the heritage Garden Court Apartments on Bayview Avenue, Toronto, for the Leaside Ratepayers, and wrote a history of the cottage community of Bona Vista for the Lake of Bays Heritage Foundation. karl.jaffar@rogers.com

Ivan McFarlane was elected College Council President of the College of Psychologists of Ontario.

R.H. Thomson was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

22

�rt at �asse�: The Wisdom Windows

Monday, November 22, 2010 Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (James Carley)

Monday, January 10, 2011 The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama by David Remnick (David Halton)

Monday, February 7, 2011 The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany (Judy Stoffman)

Monday, March 7, 2011 The Watch that Ends of Night by Hugh MacLennan (Jean Riley)

Monday, April 4, 2011 TBA

Monday, May 2, 2011 Gala Dinner: John Irving, Guest Speaker

Michael Redhill named Writer-in-Residence at College Photo from www.playwrightscanada.com

novel about Hokusai and his daughter (see listing on page 26).

Monday, November 1, 2010 Solar by Ian McEwan (John Polanyi)

Marian Botsford Fraser won the

Katherine Govier recently published a

Presenters in parentheses below

Monday, October 4, 2010 Gold Diggers: Striking it Rich in the Klondike by Charlotte Gray (Presentation by the author)

News of Quadranglers first prize for Creative Nonfiction in the 2009 CBC Literary Awards for her piece “The Rise,” described by the jury as “skillfully crafted” and “reminiscent of Alice Munro.” The piece was subsequently published in enRoute magazine and is accessible at http:// enroute.aircanada.com/en/articles/the-rise.

of Arabia by Janet Wallach, was an especially popular choice presented by Quadrangler Megan Harris. “Charles Ritchie: The Man and His Diaries,” a comparison of Charles Ritchie’s published diaries with the originals, was presented by Quadrangle members Ramsay Derry in co-operation with Judith Robertson and the vocal assistance of Alex Derry. In May, our gala dinner speaker was two-time Giller Award winner M.G. Vassanji, one of Canada’s most distinguished writers and a former nuclear physicist.

L

ast year, Michael Redhill was named the Jack McClelland Writer-in-Residence, taking up that position during the second term. Redhill has published six collections of poetry, including Light-Crossing; two novels, Martin Sloane and Consolation; Fidelity, a collection of short fiction; and three plays. Among other awards, he was winner of the 2007 City of Toronto Book Award for Consolation, the 2002 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize (Canadian-Caribbean Region) for Martin Sloane, and the 2000 Dora Award for Best New Play for Building Jerusalem. He is also publisher of the literary journal Brick. The Writer-in-Residence Program is jointly sponsored by Massey College and the Department of English at the University of Toronto. In addition to offering seminars on creative writing through the Department of English, the writers make themselves available to members of the Massey community for consultations on writing. Past writers in the program include Austin Clark, Kildare Dobbs, Marilyn Dumont, David Gilmour, Steven Heighton, Don McKay, Jane Urquhart, and Tom Wayman.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

L

ast year, in this regular feature space, we presented a stunning detail from the Wisdom Windows, then being created at the Glasmalerei Peters studio, in Paderborn, Germany, of Canadian glass artist Sarah Hall. Above are the breathtaking completed windows, which were unveiled in the Upper Library last December 1, with special guests of honour, Visitor Emerita Rose Wolfe and Senior Fellow Ursula Franklin. As noted last year, the windows honour these two outstanding members of the Massey community and, through them, the contributions of all women at Massey, including Moira Whalon, long-time assistant to Robertson Davies, Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer, astronaut Julie Payette, former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson, and author Margaret Atwood. The nine windows are each 222 cm high and 36 cm wide, and are composed of richly coloured layers of fused glass that result in a highly textured, sculptural surface. Last year, we included part of a quotation on light from Ursula Franklin that is embedded in the glass. Also embedded is a quote from the Hebrew Scriptures, Proverbs Chapter 6, Verse 20, chosen by Rose Wolfe and depicted in the form of a ray of light:

Photography by André Beneteau, Courtesy of Sarah Hall Studio

T

My son, keep the commandment of thy father, and forsake not the teaching of thy mother. Bind them continually upon thy heart, tie them about thy neck. When thou walkest, it shall lead thee; when thou liest down, it shall watch over thee; and when thou awakest, it shall talk with thee. For the commandment is a lamp, and the teaching is light. To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

19


MasseyNews MasseyNews• •2005 2009-2010 - 2006 • Massey College, Toronto Photography by Richard Bell & Associates Inc

The Annual Newsletter Life of at Massey College

�asse� College

2009-2010

BACK ROW (left-right) David Cape, Christopher McDonald, Peter Buchanan, Danylo Dzwonyk, Kevin Robertson, Leonel Abaroa, Tyler Flatt, Ashish Deshwar, Linda van Waes, Hanah Chapman, Judith Seary, Eric Lemus, Niel Seeman, Moain Sadeq, Joshua Elcombe SEVENTH ROW (left-right) Andrew Baines, Jordan Poppenk, Taylor Martin, Ariel Zylberman, Don Summerville, David Matthews, Tim Harrison, Patrick Boyle, Paul Furgale, Matthew Lincoln, Katie Mullins, Salim Bamakhrama, Pui Wing Tam, Minako Uchino, Jeff Rybak, Gordon Hawkins, Arya Ghadimi, Ivan Semeniuk, Peter Lewis, Brian Corman, Clement Jumbe, Jane Hilderman, David Robertson SIXTH ROW (left-right) Bess Doyle, Rami Shoucri, Jordan Guthrie, Manveen Puri, Parneet Kahlon, Raili Lakanen, Naoko Shida, Heather Sheridan, Patricia Greve, Yonsue Kim, Libby Harper-Clark, Leanne Carroll, Kate Galloway, Margaret Olszewski, Sarah Cappeliez, John Geiger, Marina Jiménez, Val Johnson, Christine Jamieson, Talia Zajac, Maygan McGuire, Tembeka Ndlovu, Shelley Beal, John Polanyi FIFTH ROW (seated, left-right) Don Rickerd, Pia Kleber, Ursula Franklin, ichael Valpy, Davis James, Cornelia Baines, Mary Graham, John Fraser, Elizabeth MacCallum, Vincent Tovell, Christopher Lind, Pat Thompson, Michael Charles, David Silcox, George Kapelos, Jill Clark FOURTH ROW (left-right) Darragh McGee, Olivier Sorin, Utako Tanebe, Meghan Ho, Rachel Pulfer, Karim Bardeesy, Susan Bilynskyj, Sarah Knudson, Cathleen Powell, Chad Stauber THIRD ROW (left-right) William Morrison, Gillian Reiss, Ilene Solomon, Dylan Gordon, Kenneth Lam, Elizabeth Klaiber, Ruediger Willenberg, Barry Rowe, Julia Lockhart, Jennifer Amadio, Clarissa Binkley SECOND ROW (left-right) Luis Vena, Matthew Godwin, Rob Fraser, Akwasi Owusu Behpah, Dane Smith, Jodie Bakker, Sang Ik Song, John MacCormick, Eric Laforest, Albert Wu FRONT ROW (left-right) Jemy Joseph, Massieh Moayedi, Lewis Reis, David Pereira, Matthew Strang 20

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

21


Life at Massey College

Quadrangle Society Book Club Report by RAMSAY DERRY

he book club at Massey College is organized by the Quadrangle Society, but it is open to the whole Massey community – current and emeriti Senior Fellows, Journalism and Junior Fellows and Alumni, as well as Quadranglers. Its meetings have become an increasingly popular forum for all the different categories of Massey people to gather and exchange ideas. Our meetings are held in the Upper Library at 7:45 p.m. once a month from October to May, usually (but not always) the first Monday. Two or three times a year we send out an e-mail (and snail-mail) newsletter with updated schedules and additional information about the books to all members of the Quadrangle Society and to anyone else who would like it. (Please let the Master’s office know if you would like to be on this mailing list.) Our 2009-10 season opened with The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill presented by the author and introduced by Senior Fellow Emeritus and former U of T president Dr. John Evans. In November, we acknowledged the Darwin bicentennial year with a discussion of neo-Darwinian Richard Dawkins’ The Selfish Gene, presented by Dr. Rosemary Marchant, a Massey Alumna. Our December choice, Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent by Andrew Nikiforuk, was a contentious subject, skillfully presented by

Senior Fellow the Hon. John Godfrey. We began the New Year with John Updike’s uncharacteristic novel about the Abstract Expressionist painters of the 1950s, Seek Her Face, presented by Senior Fellow and abstract artist the Hon. Justice James Spence. Claire Battershill was the first Massey Junior Fellow to make a presentation to the book club, Stella Gibbons’s 1932 comic novel Cold Comfort Farm. Our March book, Desert Queen: The Extraordinary Life of Gertrude Bell – Adventuress, Advisor to Kings, Ally of Lawrence

MASSEY COLLEGE QUADRANGLE SOCIETY BOOK CLUB 2010-11

Karl Jaffar is semi-retired and living in

Toronto. He successfully defeated the proposed demolition of the heritage Garden Court Apartments on Bayview Avenue, Toronto, for the Leaside Ratepayers, and wrote a history of the cottage community of Bona Vista for the Lake of Bays Heritage Foundation. karl.jaffar@rogers.com

Ivan McFarlane was elected College Council President of the College of Psychologists of Ontario.

R.H. Thomson was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

22

�rt at �asse�: The Wisdom Windows

Monday, November 22, 2010 Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (James Carley)

Monday, January 10, 2011 The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama by David Remnick (David Halton)

Monday, February 7, 2011 The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany (Judy Stoffman)

Monday, March 7, 2011 The Watch that Ends of Night by Hugh MacLennan (Jean Riley)

Monday, April 4, 2011 TBA

Monday, May 2, 2011 Gala Dinner: John Irving, Guest Speaker

Michael Redhill named Writer-in-Residence at College Photo from www.playwrightscanada.com

novel about Hokusai and his daughter (see listing on page 26).

Monday, November 1, 2010 Solar by Ian McEwan (John Polanyi)

Marian Botsford Fraser won the

Katherine Govier recently published a

Presenters in parentheses below

Monday, October 4, 2010 Gold Diggers: Striking it Rich in the Klondike by Charlotte Gray (Presentation by the author)

News of Quadranglers first prize for Creative Nonfiction in the 2009 CBC Literary Awards for her piece “The Rise,” described by the jury as “skillfully crafted” and “reminiscent of Alice Munro.” The piece was subsequently published in enRoute magazine and is accessible at http:// enroute.aircanada.com/en/articles/the-rise.

of Arabia by Janet Wallach, was an especially popular choice presented by Quadrangler Megan Harris. “Charles Ritchie: The Man and His Diaries,” a comparison of Charles Ritchie’s published diaries with the originals, was presented by Quadrangle members Ramsay Derry in co-operation with Judith Robertson and the vocal assistance of Alex Derry. In May, our gala dinner speaker was two-time Giller Award winner M.G. Vassanji, one of Canada’s most distinguished writers and a former nuclear physicist.

L

ast year, Michael Redhill was named the Jack McClelland Writer-in-Residence, taking up that position during the second term. Redhill has published six collections of poetry, including Light-Crossing; two novels, Martin Sloane and Consolation; Fidelity, a collection of short fiction; and three plays. Among other awards, he was winner of the 2007 City of Toronto Book Award for Consolation, the 2002 Commonwealth Writer’s Prize (Canadian-Caribbean Region) for Martin Sloane, and the 2000 Dora Award for Best New Play for Building Jerusalem. He is also publisher of the literary journal Brick. The Writer-in-Residence Program is jointly sponsored by Massey College and the Department of English at the University of Toronto. In addition to offering seminars on creative writing through the Department of English, the writers make themselves available to members of the Massey community for consultations on writing. Past writers in the program include Austin Clark, Kildare Dobbs, Marilyn Dumont, David Gilmour, Steven Heighton, Don McKay, Jane Urquhart, and Tom Wayman.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

L

ast year, in this regular feature space, we presented a stunning detail from the Wisdom Windows, then being created at the Glasmalerei Peters studio, in Paderborn, Germany, of Canadian glass artist Sarah Hall. Above are the breathtaking completed windows, which were unveiled in the Upper Library last December 1, with special guests of honour, Visitor Emerita Rose Wolfe and Senior Fellow Ursula Franklin. As noted last year, the windows honour these two outstanding members of the Massey community and, through them, the contributions of all women at Massey, including Moira Whalon, long-time assistant to Robertson Davies, Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer, astronaut Julie Payette, former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson, and author Margaret Atwood. The nine windows are each 222 cm high and 36 cm wide, and are composed of richly coloured layers of fused glass that result in a highly textured, sculptural surface. Last year, we included part of a quotation on light from Ursula Franklin that is embedded in the glass. Also embedded is a quote from the Hebrew Scriptures, Proverbs Chapter 6, Verse 20, chosen by Rose Wolfe and depicted in the form of a ray of light:

Photography by André Beneteau, Courtesy of Sarah Hall Studio

T

My son, keep the commandment of thy father, and forsake not the teaching of thy mother. Bind them continually upon thy heart, tie them about thy neck. When thou walkest, it shall lead thee; when thou liest down, it shall watch over thee; and when thou awakest, it shall talk with thee. For the commandment is a lamp, and the teaching is light. To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

19


News from the Library

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

by P.J. MacDougall, Library Administrator

A

s the saying goes, “The only constant is change,” and the Massey Library was no exception to the rule this year. In December 2009, Marie Korey, the College’s highly respected Librarian and scholar of the history of the book, took early retirement. Devoting her considerable expertise to developing and defining the Robertson Davies Library and its connection to scholarly communities both within and outside the University of Toronto for nearly two decades, Marie will be continuing with her ongoing research on the activities of the nineteenthcentury British printing firm of Vizetelly & Company. The College is grateful for Marie’s outstanding achievements in shaping the Library into the world-class research resource that it is today. In October, Marie was interviewed by the writer/broadcaster/ bibliophile Nigel Beale for his Biblio File “Nota Bene Books” at http://nigelbeale. com. In addition to supervising a group of apprentices in the print room this year, she also taught a course for the U of T’s undergraduate Book and Media Studies Program and supervised Imre Rosza, a student in Visual Studies, in his project “Concept Gutenberg Press” (http://fisher. library.utoronto.ca/news/concept-gutenbergpress). Marie is also a member of the Graduate Department of English, where a reception was held in her honour last March. In January, I was appointed to the new position of Library Administrator at the College, and Mr. Brian Maloney returned

Image from proofs for The Fables of Esope translated out of Frensshe into Englysshe by William Caxton with engravings on wood by Agnes Miller Parker, published in 1931 by The Gregynog Press. Proofs donated to the Library by Robertson Davies. part-time to contribute his extensive skills in maintaining and operating our collection of nineteenth-century printing presses. Brian also teaches Typography and History of Graphic Design at Humber College, and will be leading demonstrations, workshops, and tours with the presses. Although change is always inevitable, the Library’s role as a research centre for the study of book history and print culture will continue unabated for many years to come.

Book History and Print Culture Program (BHPC) turns ten by Dan White, Director, BHPC Program

H

oused at Massey since its inception, BHPC (http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca) is turning ten years old this year, so it is only fitting that we should be growing into a worldclass centre for research and teaching while retaining all of the excitement of a young program in a dynamic and rapidly developing field. We now draw our students from 13 participating units around U of T, with the majority coming from the iSchool and the Department of English. What brings our diverse community together is a shared interest in the physical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the book, past, present, and future. With Massey’s working printing room, where the Printer, Brian Maloney, keeps his doors open, the College provides a wonderful home, so we’d like to take this opportunity to tell the readers of MasseyNews a little bit about the past year in the life of the Program. The year got off to a bang when the university hosted the major conference in the field, the 2009 meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP). One of the main organizers was Massey’s own Marie Korey, former Librarian of the Robertson Davies Library. The conference featured five days 18

of presentations by 180 scholars from around the world on the theme of “Tradition & Innovation: The State of Book History,” including an opening plenary lecture by Massey Senior Fellow and BHPC faculty member Natalie Davis. We’re also pleased to report that seven BHPC students and three of our alums delivered papers. By all accounts, this was a particularly exciting year for the regular activities of the Program. Professor Alan Galey (iSchool) led “Introduction to Book History,” our required seminar, which, in addition to its regular meetings, included a series of guest speakers along with guided class visits to the ROM’s Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition, the Internet Archive’s digitization facility in Robarts, and both Massey College Press and Coach House Press. Professor Deidre Lynch (English) taught the advanced seminar in book history on the topic “Used Books: Doing Things with Print in Eighteenthand Nineteenth-Century Britain.” At the annual “Librorum” in December, we were treated to three exciting student presentations: Lindsey Eckert (English) told us about her “NineteenthCentury British Literary Annuals: An Online Exhibition of Materials from the University of

Toronto” (http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca/ annuals/index.html), an exhibition, also mounted at the E. J. Pratt Library, that included holdings from the Massey Library; Jann G. Marson Jr. (Art) discussed “Subversion of the Surrealist Revolution: A Critical Bibliography of Selected Works Published by Marcel Mariën 1944-1975”; and Kyle Wyatt (English) described his research on “Trends in U.S. Literary Maps, 1898-1960.” In late February the Graduate Student Colloquium, organized by Lindsey Eckert and Claire Battershill on the theme of “New Materialities: Recycling, Reusing, and Reediting Texts,” featured nine wonderful papers by graduate students and a keynote by Professor Paul Keen (Carleton). In closing, for their years of service to BHPC I’d like to extend my warm gratitude to Marie Korey, who is not only one of the founders of the Program, but also a distinguished scholar in the field of book history, and to P.J. MacDougall, who has worked wonders as the Program’s Administrative Coordinator and who now assumes new responsibilities as Library Administrator. With the generous support of the College, we are very pleased to welcome our new Coordinator, Gillian Northgrave.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Clarkson Award

C

athy Powell came to Massey College and the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto three years ago. She came from her native South Africa, along with her strong consciousness of its complex history of tragedy, hope, defiance, cruelty, and redemption. She came here with a warm heart already disciplined in some of the realities of everyday life in her country. A deep involvement and support for Marsh Memorial Childrens’ Home, for example, grew out of a specific challenge when her heart was touched by two beggar children who came knocking at her door looking for food. What happened next is typical of our laureate: she wasn’t content to offer food and a few words of comfort. She committed herself to these kids, products of a broken home, and took on the responsibility of seeing to it that they got the help they needed to struggle toward a less desperate life. And then she made sure it stayed that way. She made a promise and she kept it. Far away in Canada, she’s still keeping it. That same capacious heart she brings to her life in Canada. Whether it is helping out at Romero House, where refugee claimants are given shelter and a welcome home until they can get properly settled, or making sure a colleague who is depressed or is a victim of harassment or abuse is properly attended to, Cathy Powell makes sure in unostentatious ways that she is always on the path of service. She is, in the words of Professor Ursula Franklin, “an anchor for this College,” and her moral certitude coupled with a generous spirit ensures that we do not stray into uncertain waters. The Clarkson Laureateships honour great public acts of conspicuous service; they also honour quiet, effective, and often selfeffacing constancy. Madame Clarkson, we present to you the 2010 Laureate for Public Service – Cathleen Powell, a woman of courage and conviction.

R

obert Holmes Thomson, better known nationally as R.H.Thomson, is a Canadian television, film, and stage actor of prodigious productivity. He has received numerous awards and honours for his

professional skills and he has been a member of the Quadrangle Society of Massey College almost from its inception 15 years ago. On three occasions, he has regaled the College with readings from Robertson Davies’ ghost stories at the annual Feast for the Founding Master. But great and honoured actor that he is, that is not why he is standing before us tonight. He is here because he represents the very best tradition of the citizen advocate, someone who takes from his personal and professional lives a strong sense of commitment to the world around him, especially at its margins, its flaws, and even its tendency to forgetfulness. An outspoken advocate for arts and culture in Canada, he was artistic producer for Toronto’s World Stage and is the co-founder of ShakespeareWorks, an educational theatre project dedicated to making Shakespeare accessible to young people. He has also served as Chairman of the Artists’ leadership Council of the International Network for Cultural Diversity. Perhaps his most moving and dramatic intervention into our lives came not from the stage, but from the realization that the sacrifice of the Canadians who died in the First World War was rapidly receding from public consciousness. Out of the vortex of his own family history – seven uncles perished in the trenches, four from one family alone – a sense of loss haunted him, as well as dismay as memory receded. From this dismay, he and a colleague created two years ago a unique project that saw the evocation of every single Canadian service man or woman who died in that war. The names were projected throughout several days at the National War Memorial in Ottawa and in Trafalgar Square, in London, and it touched people deeply.

The 2010-11 Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service Call for Nominations ❖ Named in honour of the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, former Governor General of Canada, the Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service seeks to honour each year a member of the Massey College community whose conspicuous commitment to public service is worthy of emulation and appreciation. Nominations may be made by any member of the College community. This includes the Senior and Junior Fellowship, members of the Alumni Association and the Quadrangle Society, and College staff. Nominations should be in the form of a letter or e-mail to the College Registrar, Mary Graham, and arrive no later than January 31, 2011. Nominators should explain succinctly why they think someone is worthy of the Clarkson Laureateship and, where appropriate, supply any supporting evidence and/or names of supporting nominators. Please send nominations to:

“Memory is what makes us human,” R.H. Thomson tells us. “Memory has to be unearthed and dealt with or we are not human.” Currently, he is campaigning hard to preserve the integrity and independence of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before the memory of its former excellence fades entirely away. This is a man who does not take on small causes. Madame Clarkson, we present to you the 2010 Clarkson Laureate for Public Service – Robert Holmes Thomson, a great actor and a loyal citizen.

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Ms. Mary Graham Registrar’s Office Massey College 4 Devonshire Place Toronto Ontario M5S 2E1 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

❖ 23


From the Lodging from page 12

Other old friends like Quadrangler and writer Ernest Hillen stayed over for College events, and poet and now novelist Tom Wayman, one of our most popular writers-inresidence, came from Calgary to launch his new book. Felicitously, he was in time to present the Morris Wayman Award to brilliant trumpeter Patrick Boyle, the Junior Fellow who was deemed to have best shared his unique skills and knowledge to benefit the community last year. Tom himself had established this award some years ago to honour his father. And then there were the unexpected guests like the fine craftsmen who were in a jam for time while installing Sarah Hall’s spectacular Wisdom Windows in the Upper Library, which they had created under her guidance in their German atelier. The older Fraser girls are not in residence, though Jessie, a rising theatre director, follows the footsteps of director Atom Egoyan by portering part time to keep the wolf from the door. And Kate, who continues to expand her impressive work at Schools Without Borders, sometimes uses Massey facilities for the original arts programs she creates for potential leaders among Toronto youth. And so, after another whirlwind Massey year, John and I headed off for France Easter night to see friends and accompany the Journalism Fellows on their trip to Finland, a long-standing program thanks to the Finnish government, and then on to Denmark. Despite snow in Copenhagen when it was too hot in Toronto, we ignored our vertigo and climbed a 45-metre high windmill on Samsø, a model of energy self-sufficiency. With Senior Fellow David Robertson and his partner, Peter Ron, we also visited Denmark’s largest organ builder near the German border, a family enterprise run by a cousin of Peter’s. While John then went off to Britain and back to Massey to work, I walked the Camino, the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostella. I must admit, though, that it was only Camino Lite. A van carried our suitcases and often us, but we did walk over 100 kilometres in under two weeks, a big distance for someone who could scarcely make it to the subway station a few years ago. Smug that all my ridiculous training had paid off, and grinning from ear to ear, I walked for hours, drinking in the countryside and the rain, admiring the rustic villages and sophisticated towns, and the glorious abundance of Romanesque architecture. It was so wonderful I am already plotting a more serious, less lite effort next spring. Who knows what will have happened in House VII by then? 24

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

I

National: Alexandra Sorin alexandrasorin@gmail.com Toronto: Kari Maaren kmaaren@gmail.com St. John’s: Janna Rosales janna.rosales@utoronto.ca Ottawa: Ralph Heintzman Ralph.Heintzman@uOttawa.ca Peterborough: George Kovacs gakovacs@trentu.ca

On March 4, 2010, Toronto mayor David Miller and College Visitor The Hon. Henry N.R. Jackman unveiled an historical plaque outside the Master’s Lodging noting that Robertson Davies lived there from 1963-81. A reception followed afterwards in the Common Room.

Victoria/Vancouver: Ian Alexander ianalexan@gmail.com

Pendragon Ink Reports

W

London, England: Tom Hickman TomHickman@blackstonechambers.com

by JENNIFER SURRIDGE

e mentioned in last year’s report that John Krisak and Reed Needles would be mounting a one-man show on the life and work of Robertson Davies. This was performed at Hart House in March 2010 and many people were delighted to hear Davies’ work spoken again. Reed Needles certainly gave the right feeling, and it was a wonderful tribute. We’re also happy to announce that a six-hour television mini series will be made from Davies’ novel Fifth Business. There have been attempts to make a film of this novel for many years, but this time it is looking very promising. We have seen a completed screen play, and a producer and director are now involved in the project. They are hoping to start filming in December 2011. There will be more news here when we have it. We were very happy to see the publication last fall of the papers from “Reconsidering Roberston Davies,” the symposium held on November 23-25, 2006 at Massey College. A very brief excerpt from the introduction to this publication is provided on the right, and more detailed information on its contents can be found at the University of Toronto Quarterly website at <http:// utpjournals.metapress.com/content/ j001gq122575/ ?p=5d177314b297432996fbd84f 1ae2d39f&pi=2>. We were also delighted to see that the City of Toronto installed a plaque on the Master’s Lodgings of the College to tell all passersby that Robertson Davies lived there. It is wonderful that the City now has an ongoing program to mark the places were our artists lived. The day it was unveiled was a thrilling one for us and was very well attended. A photo of this event can be found above on this page. In 2008, Mrs. Brenda Davies sold her house in the country. One of the largest items in the house was Robertson Davies’ library. It was purchased by Hugh Anson-Cartwright. Recently, Queen’s University announced that Hugh had

made a large donation to them of books from Davies library’ in his father’s name, Reginald Anson-Cartwright, a 1904 graduate of the Queen’s School of Mining. They will be shelved just as they were in the house, using the catalogue that I put together for Davies and completed after his death. Hugh said he had made the gift because he did not know of another author who used his library so extensively in his writing. It is a fantastic gift for Queen’s and a great tribute to Hugh. For further information on this donation, see <www. library.queensu.ca/ robertsondavies>.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

From the introduction by Donna Bennett and Russell Morton Brown to “Reconsidering Roberston Davies,” a collection of papers published in the University of Toronto Quarterly, Fall 2009 issue. Our conference led us to reflect on the relevance of our setting, Massey College – which may be the most complex of Davies’ artistic creations. Brought into being out of whole cloth and by quotation, with an instant “tradition” inserted at its conception in 1961, the College is a stage set that allows dialogues to take place. Most are improvised, while some, like the symposium – initiated by John Fraser, the current Master of Massey – that brought this special issue into being, are scripted by its speakers. Davies established the terms of this ongoing drama by ensuring that Massey was made up of diverse people and disciplines, deliberately moving experts out of their isolated areas of expertise and into one another’s company and allowing individuals who differ in their ways of understanding the world to agree to a set of conventions that melds them into a loosely framed society. In Massey, Davies may thus have created the clerisy for which he longed.

Alumni Association goes global

Massey Alumni International

Cape Town: Cathleen Powell cathleen.powell@utoronto.ca

by John Fraser, Master

n preparation for the 50th anniversary celebrations in two years time, the College has begun an ambitious program to build up a solid Alumni Association with chapters across the country and internationally. The idea is to find willing Alumni partners in a city or a country where sufficient numbers of Aumni have homes and, through them, to begin the business of an annual get-together, and possibly more frequent encounters, depending on the enthusiasm and volunteerism shown. The process began in Toronto, where the long-established, largely Toronto-based, Alumni Association, so ably maintained by its chair, Kari Maaren, has now become the Toronto Chapter. It has its own executive and has long been busy, as you will see in a separate report below. On the left is the inaugural list of chapters of the new association, along with the names and e-mail contact information for those Alumni who have kindly offered to help begin the new era. As this is a work in progress, we are looking for

volunteers among our far-flung Alumni to sign on. Within a year we also hope to have representatives in Halifax, London (Ontario), Winnipeg, Edmonton, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Accra, and New Delhi. There isn’t to be too much work involved: an annual dinner with a speaker, perhaps, and occasional pub nights or other outings. The idea is to foster fellowship and interdisciplinarity – Massey’s perpetual assignment! – and to help maintain links to the College. If you would like to join one of these groups, or indeed if you would like to start one in your city or area, please contact me (jfraser@ masseycollege.ca) or Pat Kennedy (pat.kennedy@ utoronto.ca), and we will help in the organization, including a search to see what Alumni there are in your bailiwick. This is an exciting development and my hope is that, by the beginning of the College’s 50th anniversary, there will be regular reports on Alumni events from across the country and around the world.

From the Alumni Association, Toronto Chapter

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Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Photography by Fernando Morales, The Globe and Mail

Life at Massey College

by Kari Maaren

attendance was stronger than ast year was a very usual. interesting one for the The Alumni listserv is now Massey College Alumni a force to be reckoned with, Association, as it marked a keeping many Alumni shift in the structure of the informed about Massey news Executive. In the winter of and events. The website is also 2010, as Master Fraser reports going strong. After some on this page, he launched new difficulties last year, it has international chapters of the successfully migrated to a new Association. If you are server, and the address of the interested in helping Alexandra site is now http://www. Sorin with the coordination of masseycollege.ca/alumni. If you these new bodies, I encourage wish to sign up for the listserv, you to contact her at you will find instructions on alexandrasorin@gmail.com. this site, which also offers news, She would be very happy to a list of upcoming events, a hear from you. Alexandra is comic about the College, and also, with the help of Pat various other interesting little Kennedy, working to set up an features. Any questions about Alumni database that will Kari Maaren the website or the Toronto eventually include contact chapter in general can be directed to me at information for as many Alumni as Pat can find. kmaaren@gmail.com. Work on the database is expected to continue In the upcoming year, the Toronto chapter through this fall and possibly into the winter. plans to be more active. Members of the The Toronto chapter of the Alumni Executive now include Michael McGillion, Association remains intact, of course, and has the Katherine Verhagen, Smadar Peretz, Jennifer same responsibilities as it did before. Due to Konieczny, Jacqueline To, Alexandra Sorin, members’ general unavailability, it was less active Rosemary Marchant, and Natalie Papoutsis, than usual last year, but some Alumni did get with yours truly as president. Andrew Eckford together occasionally and they made ambitious and Brenda Didyk, two long-time members, plans to be carried out this year. We held a games night in conjunction with the LMF, and members retired from the Executive last year. We very much miss them, and thank them for their years of our Executive attended the annual Alumni/ of participation. Quadrangler/ Journalist Gala, at which Alumni

Renowned Canadian actor R.H. Thomson was guest speaker on March 6, 2010 at the annual gala dinner hosted by the Alumni Association, the Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program, and the Quadrangle Society. Deeply concerned about the future of the CBC, he spoke passionately about the dangers of increasing commercialization of the space of public broadcasting.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED: 2009-10 Shira Hirzog President and Chief Executive Officer, The Kahanoff Foundation Brian D. Hodges Vice-Chair for Education and International Affairs, Department of Psychiatry Thomas J. Hudson President and Scientific Director, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research Marilyn J. Legge Associate Professor of Christian Ethics, Emmanuel College Wendy Levinson Sir John and Lady Eaton Professor and Chair of Medicine George Logan Professor Emeritus, Department of English Queen’s University Barbara Sherwood Lollar Adjunct Professor, Department of Chemistry Minelle K. Mahtani Associate Professor, Geography and Program in Journalism Mayo Moran Dean, Faculty of Law Peter Nesselroth Professor Emeritus of French and Comparative Literature James Paupst Physician, Consultant, Author John Reibetanz Department of English Brian Silverman J.R.S. Prichard and Ann Wilson Chair in Management, Rotman School of Management Richard Wernham Philanthropist and President, Soutterham Investments Ltd. Catharine Whiteside Dean, Faculty of Medicine Kenneth Whyte Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, Maclean’s Magazine Adam H. Zimmerman Philanthropist and Former Chief Executive Officer, Noranda Inc.

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Masse� in the Media When the College pops up in the mass media, we’d like members of our community to hear about it. Please let us know if you spot something of significance on Massey in a newspaper or magazine, or on television or the Web. This year, our offering, “Too much to wish for,” first appeared on The Globe and Mail’s website on June 26, 2010. We are grateful to Doug Bell for permission to reprint his piece. Next week or sometime shortly thereafter, Stephen Harper will replace Michaëlle Jean as Governor General with somebody else. If I had to guess, this somebody else will among other things not be a Haitian immigrant or a woman or somebody who makes a point of denigrating any aspect of Tory policies held dear by the base in Red Deer. If I were, say, Naomi Klein, I wouldn’t be waiting by the phone. The names bandied about to date — at least in The Globe — are John de Chastelaine, David Crombie, Hugh Segal, Willie Littlechild, David Johnston, Peter Milliken and Rick Hansen. The most intriguing name on The Globe’s list (in itself a likely disqualification) is John Fraser. Fraser is a former editor of Saturday Night magazine and Master of Massey College at the University of Toronto. Where the others all have a faint whiff of dull normal

As GG, Fraser would reflect this country’s essential weirdness back to itself in a sophisticated, satiric manner and he’d have a jolly time doing it. Yes, he’d puff himself up and wear the ridiculous outfits and kowtow to the Queen, but he’d do it all with a certain wit and flinty glint in the eye decidedly lacking in our last two Vice Regals. Wouldn’t it be great to have a GG who could tell a funny story, keep his speeches short and to the point, and take the piss out of his subjects and himself at the same time? Clearly too much to wish for.

Senior Fellows at lunch The speakers this past year at the well-attended monthly lunches were: • Aubie Angel, “Jack Spratt Was Right – It’s Epigenetics, You I---t!” • Alan Broadbent, "Urban Nation: How Immigration and Urbanization Converged to Make Canada's Cities Strong, and How Confederation Conspires to Make Them Weak" • Stephen Clarkson, “High Times: How Ecstasy from Canada, Cocaine from Mexico, and the Insatiable American Narcotics Market Are Turning the NAFTA Dream into a North American Nightmare” • John Fraser and Henry Van Driel, “The Contributions of Boris Stoicheff to Science and Life at Massey College” • David Goldbloom, “The Mental Health Commission of Canada Is Two Years Old: Walking, Talking, and Running” • Roy McMurtry [topic unavailable at time of going to press] • Rodney White, “Canada and Climate Change: Making up for Lost Time” •

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LINDA HUTCHEON won one of the two annual $50,000 Canada Council of the Arts Molson Prizes, which are intended “to encourage Canadians of outstanding achievement in the fields of the Arts, the Humanities or the Social Sciences to make further contribution to the cultural or intellectual heritage of Canada.”

ANNE LANCASHIRE has launched the public-access

database “Mayors and Sheriffs of London 1190-1558” (MASL: http://masl.library.utoronto.ca), a researched reference list, with sources cited, of London mayors, wardens, and sheriffs, together with the guilds/ companies to which they belonged. The list will be extended to the present day. h anne@chass.utoronto.ca

JAMES ORBINSKI was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

RICHARD PELTIER won the 2010 Bower Award, one of

the international science community’s most prestigious honours, awarded by the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia. His citation noted his contribution to “fundamental advances in the understanding of Earth Systems.”

Conversation with John Dirks

(Crombie and Segal both have discernable senses of humour but at the end of the day are essentially company men), Fraser is practically a Dadaist. He writes a mean column (in both senses). Politically, he’s almost impossible to pigeon hole. He enjoys satire (he’s one of the few officially sanctioned sorts who will admit to missing Frank magazine). And last but far from least, he is close to and understands the weird mix of colonial insecurity, relentless ambition and hubris that led Conrad Lord Black of Crossharbour from Britain’s upper chamber to FCI Coleman (inmate # 18330-424). And if you think that Tubby’s rise and fall isn’t the quintessentially Canadian story, brother, you ought to turn over your passport and seek citizenship elsewhere.

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President of the Gairdner Foundation since 1993, John Dirks received his B.Sc. and M.D. from the University of Manitoba, then moved on to a distinguished career at McGill University, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Toronto, holding major administrative positions as Director of Nephrology at McGill, Head of the Department of Medicine at UBC, and Dean of Medicine at U of T. In 2005, Dr. Dirks was awarded the NFK International Medal by the National Kidney Foundation and the Roscoe Robinson Award by the International Society of Nephrology for his contribution to nephrology education. He has published 155 peer-reviewed papers in his field, was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 2006, and was granted an Honorary D.Sc. from the University of Manitoba in 2009. In 2009, he also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Biotechnology Initiative (TBI). Since 1997, John Dirks and the Gairdner Foundation have been based at Massey College. He is also a Senior Fellow and member of the College Corporation. We spoke with him this past June in his office at Massey, just before he took off to his summer home on Prince Edward Island. Congratulations on the 50th anniversary of the Gairdner Foundation in 2009. Please tell us a bit about the celebrations for this milestone. Thank you. The celebrations were very successful, culminating in three days of lectures, forums, roundtables, and Q & A sessions in Toronto attended by around 4000 people altogether. And, of course, there was the 50th Anniversary Award Dinner last October, honouring our seven award recipients for 2009. That was a wonderful affair that also featured a remarkable rendition by baritone Russell Braun of an aria from Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro.

ALLAN PETERKIN was named the Head of the Program in Narrative and Healthcare Humanities at the University of Toronto in June.

JANET ROSSANT was awarded a Premier’s Summit

Award for her work on cancer and stem-cell biology.

BETH SAVAN was cross-appointed to the Department of Geography. h b.savan@utoronto.ca

BARBARA SHERWOOD LOLLAR was named University Professor. h bslollar@chem.utoronto.ca

PEKKA SINERVO is the newly appointed Senior VicePresident, Research, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research. h Pekka.Sinervo@utoronto.ca

MARLA B. SOKOLOWSKI was named University Professor. h marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca

THOMAS SYMONS was appointed Chair of the Ontario Heritage Trust in March 2010.

Michael Valpy continues his work on a history of

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Who were your presenters over the three days in Toronto? It was, in fact, the largest gathering ever in Canada of the world’s top scientists and a huge undertaking. Fifty of these presented in Toronto. Among the presenters and attendees were 60 past winners of the Gairdner Award and seven new ones. Twenty-two of these later won Nobel Prizes. No fewer than 76 Gairdner Award winners altogether have subsequently won the Nobel. We are very proud of that. I might add that we had hoped to have

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Prime Minister Harper at the day of the annual Toronto Canada Gairdner Awards gala dinner proceedings, but we were upstaged by the arrival in Canada of the Olympic Flame. You described the Toronto events as “culminating.” What preceded them? There were two other major parts. We organized seven symposia across the country between March and November last year. CONVERSATION – page 26

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Margaret Atwood, The Year of the Flood. Toronto, McClelland &

— (co-ed with David L.Wehlau), Error-Correcting Codes, Finite Geometries and Cryptography. Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society, 2010.

Michael Baur, “Aquinas on Law and Natural Law,” in The Oxford Handbook

Adam Chapnick (with Craig Stone), Academic Writing for Military

Stewart, 2009.

to Aquinas, Brian Davies and Eleonore Stump, eds. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.

—, “Can Natural Law Thinking Be Made Credible in Our Contemporary Context?,” in Freiheit, Natur, Religion: Studien zur Sozialethik, Christian Spieβ, ed. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 2010.

Michael L. Brodie, “John Mylopoulos: Sowing Seeds of Conceptual

Modelling” in Conceptual Modeling: Foundations and Applications, Alexander T. Borgida, Vinay K. Chaudhri, Paolo Giorgini, and Eric S. Yu, eds. New York: Springer, 2009: 1-9

Russell Morton Brown (co-ed. with Donna Bennett), An Anthology of Canadian Literature in English. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010.

Aiden Buen (with Trevor Buen), “The Basics of Bases,” The Mathematical Intelligencer, 32 (2), May 2010: 49-55.

Personnel. Ottawa: University of Ottawa Press, 2009.

— (co-ed with Kim Richard Nossal), Special Issue of International Journal 65, 2, Spring 2010.

Mark A. Cheetham, “The Crystal Interface in Contemporary Art:

Metaphors of the Organic and Inorganic,” Leonardo 43: 3, June 2010: 250-256.

—, “The Grandfather Clause: Panofsky, Kant, and Disciplinary Cosmopolitanism,” Journal of Art Historiography, Number 1, December 2009: 1-13.

Howard M. Clarke (with J.C. Lin, A. Schwentker-Colizza, and C.G. Curtis),

“Final Results of Grafting Versus Neurolysis in Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 123 (3), 2009, 939-948.

— (with G.H. Borschel), “Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 124 (1S), 2009: 144e-155e.

public intellectuals in Canada.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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Convesation with from page 25 John Dirks They were held at the University of British Columbia, the University of Alberta, York University, the University of Ottawa, Université de Sherbrooke, Dalhousie University, and the Montreal Neurological Institute. These were very well attended by faculty, students, biotechnology representatives, members of the legal and business communities, and government representatives. And the other major part? That would be our National Program that takes place at 20 universities across Canada. Part of it is our outreach program for senior high school students, which has been in place since 2000. These take place annually during a Gairdner Week in October. In 2009, for example, students in Saskatoon had the opportunity to hear and ask questions of Dr. David Sackett, one of seven award winners. Nearly 300 high school students attended that Saskatoon session and about 800 a session in Winnipeg. The intent of this outreach program is to encourage students to enter science programs at the postsecondary level. I notice that “Canada” has now been added to the official title of the Gairdner Awards. What’s behind that? Yes, that was a key change last year, calling them the Canada Gairdner Awards for the first time. That’s meant to reflect a major development in branding the awards as Canadian.

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Also, to underline their importance, we have raised the award to each laureate to $100,000, up from $30,000. Our funding overall has grown tremendously – from $3 million to $26 million in just one year. As to our reputation, we’re now widely considered as granting of the world’s most prestigious science awards, ranked by some as just below the Nobel. Who are your major supporters? Financially, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) is our biggest. The governments of Alberta and Ontario are also major supporters. The University of Toronto stands out, especially for its support during the 50th Anniversary celebrations. President David Naylor played a very important role in making those a success on the U of T campus. How are you ever going to top what happened last year? [laughs] We can’t really. Although, aside from (and after) the main celebrations, I should mention attending the Nobel awards in Stockholm last December. That was a glorious way of ending a truly amazing year. Before we finish our conversation, I should ask you how you became involved with the Gairdner Foundation and, for that matter, with Massey College. I started as a Gairdner jury member in 1982 while I was Head of the Department of

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Ian Clark (with Greg Moran, Michael L. Skolnik, and David Trick), Academic

Transformation: The Forces Reshaping Higher Education in Ontario. Queen’s Policy Studies. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2009.

—, “A Taxpayer View of University Funding: Steve and Di’s Evening on the Internet,” University Affairs, March 8, 2010 [Available online at http://www. universityaffairs.ca/a-taxpayers-view-of-university-funding.aspx]

Audra Diptee, From Africa to Jamaica: The Making of an Atlantic Slave Society, 1776-1807. Gainsville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2010.

Robin Elliott (co-ed with Gordon E. Smith), Music Traditions, Cultures, and Contexts, Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2010.

—, “Robertson Davies and Music,” University of Toronto Quarterly, vol. 78, no. 4 (Fall 2009): 1029-52.

J. Caitlin Finlayson, “The Boundaries of Genre: Translating Shakespeare in Johnston and Weldele’s Julius,” in Teaching the Graphic Novel, Stephen Tabachnick, ed. New York: MLA, 2009: 188-199.

CharlES Foran, Mordecai: The Life & Times. Toronto: Knopf Canada, 2010.

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Medicine at UBC. I continued in that role when I moved to U of T in 1987 to become Dean of Medicine. After the deanship ended in 1993, I became part-time President of the Gairdner Foundation. Three years later, in 1997, I moved into an office at Massey College. We were a small operation here at the beginning but as we internationalized the Foundation, we outgrew our original quarters. We now have four separate offices and Sheila Robinson and our staff are active at Massey College. You must find Massey a good place to be for yourself and the Foundation. Definitely! There’s no other place I know that so easily facilitates interdisciplinary exchanges, not to speak of the town/gown connections that John Fraser has so masterfully built through the Quadrangle Society. I’ve also had the privilege to work closely with Ursula Franklin since 1998 on the Roundtables in Science and Medicine. Not to speak of all our impressive Junior Fellows. I can’t think of a better academic place anywhere than Massey College. Thanks so much you for taking some time from your very busy schedule to talk with us today. My pleasure.

Editor’s Note: More information on the Gairdner Foundation can be found at www.gairdner.org

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Camilla Gibb, The Beauty of Humanity Movement. Toronto: Doubleday Canada, 2010.

David Goldbloom (with Pier Bryden), “Dr. Goldbloom, Am I Crazy?”

Maclean’s, Vol. 123, Number 20, May 31, 2010: 46-49. [Available online at http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/05/27/dr-goldbloom-am-i-crazy]

— (ed.), Psychiatric Clinical Skills, Revised 1st Edition. Toronto: CAMH, 2010.

Katherine Govier, The Ghost Brush. Toronto: Harper Collins, 2010. John R. Graham (with A. Al-Krenawi), Helping Professional Practice with

Indigenous Peoples: The Bedouin-Arab Case. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 2009.

— (with M.E. Jones and M. Shier), “Tipping Points: What Participants Found Valuable in Labour Market Training Programmes for Vulnerable Groups,” International Journal of Social Welfare, 19 (1): 2010: 63-72.

Charlotte Gray, Gold Diggers, Striking It Rich in the Klondike. Toronto: HarperCollins, 2010.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Wade Davis delivers 2009 Massey Lectures

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nce again, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), House of Anansi Press, and Massey College co-sponsored Canada’s most important lecture series, the five-part Massey Lectures. In October 2009, the lectures, entitled The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World, were delivered by Wade Davis, award-winning anthropologist, ethnobotanist, filmmaker, and photographer. He is also a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. The first of the public presentations, “Season of the Brown Hyena,” took place at the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, in Yellowknife. The subsequent four lectures – “The Wayfinders,” “Peoples of the Anaconda,” “Sacred Geography,” and “Century of the Wind” – were delivered respectively in Vancouver, Halifax, Montreal, and Toronto. The last lecture took place in Convocation Hall, at the University of Toronto, on October 31, and all five lectures were broadcast in their entirety on the CBC Radio One program Ideas. Davis’s lectures illustrated how, in his own words, ancient cultures “teach us that there other options, other possibilities, other ways of interacting with the earth…an idea that can only fill us with hope.” The Master hosted a reception in the Common Room of the College at the end of the last public lecture in Toronto. The recipient of numerous awards and honours, including the Lowell Thomas Medal from the Explorers Club and the Lannan Foundation Prize for literary nonfiction, Davis has published numerous scientific and popular articles, and his books include The Serpent and the Rainbow, Light at the Edge of the World, and The Wayfinders, the book version of the Massey Lectures. •

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MARGARET ATWOOD was given the Crystal Award at

Senior Residents Mr. Tim Plumptre Public Policy Mr. Michael Redhill Writer-in-Residence Ms. Sheila Robinson Gairdner Foundation Professor Abraham Rotstein Economics Mr. Neil Seeman Health System Policy Mr. Olivier Sorin French Literature Mrs. Jennifer Surridge Pendragon Ink Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalfe Foundation Fellow Mr. Michael Valpy Journalism Dr. Peter Warrian Lupina Foundation Mr. Ian Webb Finance

Wade Davis The book version, lecture transcripts, and a fiveCD set of the 2008 Massey Lectures can be ordered from the CBC at < http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/ massey-lectures/2009/11/02/massey-lectures-2009-thewayfinders-why-ancient-wisdom-matters-in-themodern-world>, or from House of Anansi Press at < http://www.anansi.ca/titles.cfm?pub_id=1359>. •

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President of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve, and was Visiting Professor, the 10th Annual Research Conference, Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. h howard.clarke@utoronto.ca

the 2010 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The award honours artists who are making a significant cultural contribution to improving life on Earth. As well this past year, Atwood shared the US$1 million Dan David Prize STEPHEN CLARKSON was appointed a Member of the with Indian-Bengali novelist Amitav Ghosh. The prize is Order of Canada. endowed by the Dan David Foundation at Tel Aviv NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS was awarded the Holberg University. The prize judges noted that Atwood’s work, International Memorial Prize, given by the Norwegian parliament among other achievements, “enabled, for the first time, the for outstanding scholarly work. The prestigious award is worth emergence of a defined Canadian identity.” $785,000, and she plans to donate some of this to rare-book RUSSELL MORTON BROWN and Donna Bennett libraries and organizations that support graduate students. launched the newest edition of their anthology of JANICE DU MONT was promoted to Associate Professor, Canadian literature at Massey this past April. Dalla Lana School of Public Health. She is at the Women’s h rbrown@chass.utoronto.ca College Research Institute in Toronto, and she recently MICHAEL CHARLES, former Dean of the Faculty of adopted a second daughter. h janicedumont@hotmail.com Engineering and Professor Emeritus, started his presidency DAVID GOLDBLOOM was elected a Fellow of the Canadian of the Canadian Academy of Engineering in June 2010. Psychiatric Association and appointed Vice-Chair, Stratford

HOWARD CLARKE is a pediatric plastic surgeon living in Toronto and a Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. During the past year, he was appointed

Professor Dan White Book History and Print Culture Dr. Albert Wu Medicine

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED: 2009-10 All academic addresses are at the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified. Samina Kahn Ahmed Bursar Emerita

Donna Bennett Department of English Doris Bergen Chancellor Rose Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies Dr. Monica Boyd Department of Sociology Linda Corman Nicholls Librarian and Director of the John W. Graham Library, Trinity College C. Brad Faught Department of History, Tyndale University College

Shakespeare Festival of Canada. His son, Daniel, was a Junior Fellow at Massey College this past year. h david_goldbloom@camh

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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Reflections by Sara Shettleworth

Life at Massey College

Senior Residents In 2009-10, Massey was home to the following Senior Residents. Warmly welcomed, they were active members of our community during the year. Dr. Naomi Adelson Anthropology Dr. Aubie Angel Medicine Mr. Daniel Baird Writing Mr. Karim Bardeesy Journalism Mr. Francis Brunelle Healthcare Consulting Professor Stephen Clarkson Political Science Dr. John Dirks Medicine Professor Ursula Franklin Physics/Metallurgy Dr. George Georgopoulos Economics Mr. Rudyard Griffiths Dominion Institute Ms. Guannan Guo Finance and Economics Mr. Stephen Herbert Healthcare Services Dr. Margret Hovanec Lupina Foundation Dr. Christine Jamieson Theology Dr. Val Marie Johnson Sociology Ms. Diane Juricevic Law Mr. Patrick Luciani Salospeakers Mr. Philip Marchand Journalism Professor Michael Marrus History Dr. James Maskalyk Medicine Dr. Rosemary Meier Psychiatry Ms. Marina Nemat, Aurea Fellow, Writing

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Walter Gordon Massey Symposium addresses emotion and public policy

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he 2010 Walter Gordon Massey Symposium, entitled “Private Emotion/Public Policy,” took place at the Isabel Bader Theatre, University of Toronto, on March 16. Featured on the panel were David Pizarro, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Cornell University; Christina Tarnopolsky, Assistant Professor of Political Science at McGill University; and Senior Fellow Bob Rae, Member of Parliament and former premier of Ontario. Frances Lankin, President and CEO of the United Way of Toronto, moderated. The symposium panel addressed issues related to how people arrive at judgements about moral responsibility, how known or unknown biases may affect these judgements, and how policy makers can know, understand, and deal with the emotions that motivate the public at a given moment. A video of the evening’s session may be viewed at http://www.theglobeandmail. com/news/opinions/we-cannot-be-emotionless-but-weare-capable-of-rational-debate/article1501380. There were also two invitation-only follow-up sessions in the Upper Library on March 17, attended by several government officials, academics, and others who play important roles in policy making. Panellists for the session on “Measuring the Mood and Getting the Message Out” were Frank Graves, the founder of EKOS and one of Canada’s most influential pollsters; Quadrangler Trina McQueen, a major player in Canadian broadcasting who has held executive positions at CTV and CBC; Peter Byrne, the founding partner of Bensimon-Byrne and one of Canada’s most successful marketers; and Senior Fellow Jane Freeman, an expert on rhetoric from the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies. The second panel addressed the topic “Perspectives on Dealing with Highly Emotional Issues.” This panel featured Senior Fellow Roy McMurtry, the former Chief Justice of Ontario, former Attorney General of Ontario, and Chancellor of York University; Solange Lefebvre, Chair of Religion, Culture, and Society at the University of Montreal, and a specialist on reasonable accommodation and questions of nationalism;

and Senior Fellow Ralph Heintzman, a former senior federal public servant and head of the Office of Public Service Values and Ethics. Senior Fellow Janice Stein, Director of the Munk Centre for International Studies, moderated the morning’s proceedings. Inaugurated in 1990 in honour of the distinguished Canadian statesman and public servant, the late Honourable Walter Gordon, the annual symposium is made possible by generously granted seed monies from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation. In 2009, the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) at the University of Toronto became a partner in the Symposium. The main organizers of the 2010 event were Junior Fellows Hanah Chapman, Tim Harrison, and James McKee; SPPG students Viola Dessanti and Lisa Rae; Senior Fellow Michael Valpy; and Anna Luengo, College Administrator. The next Walter Gordon Symposium is “Democracy & Expertise – and Politics” and will take place at the Isabel Bader Theatre on March 22, 2011.

QUARTER CENTURY FUND The endowed Quarter Century Fund (QFC) continues to give funding to the Junior Fellows for events and items that enhance student life at Massey. The QCF student representatives accept proposals from all Massey students and vote to approve items for the current year budget, which this past year was $6,500. This provided support for the AGO pass, opera tickets, the Massey Grand Rounds, the annual ski trip, alternative wine grazing, and raclette night. The Junior Fellows also added a successful and highly entertaining event, “Massey Presents,” an arts gala benefit at the Church of the Holy Trinity, in downtown Toronto, for their chosen charity, Romero House for Refugees. The evening raised over $3,000. A description, photographs, and videos of the evening’s proceedings can be viewed at http://www.mcpresents.blogspot.com.

This lecture series had another very successful year with the following presentations:

• Salim Bamakhrama, “Contemporary Arts Colony for the Banff Centre: Infilling Nature’s Canvas with New Modes of Artistic Production” • Peter Buchanan, “English in the Age of Vikings, Monks, and Kings” • Rob Fraser, “What Health Care Workers Don’t Know About the Internet” • Elizabeth Harper-Clark, “Hubble, Bubble, Boil, and Trouble: Simulating How Stars Blow Apart Nebulae” • Gordon Hawkins, “All the Questions About the Internet You Were Afraid or Embarrassed to Ask”

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ppropriately enough given Massey’s history, my association with the College can be traced to an association with Magdalen College, Oxford, in the winter of 1995. By then I had been at the University of Toronto for over 25 years, as a graduate student, post doc, and faculty member busy doing research while raising two children. Probably like many students and faculty in the sciences, about all I knew of the university was my big self-contained department and a few close colleagues in a related department. Even as a reader of Robertson Davies’ novels, I knew little about most of the university east of St. George Street. Magdalen College comes into the story because I had the great good fortune to have a Visiting Fellowship there in the winter of 1995. This meant not only spending part of a sabbatical continuing collaborative research with colleagues in Oxford, but also, because my family did not come along, living in the College and eating lunch and dinner with the Fellows. Once I recovered from regarding daily High Table dinners as alien and intimidating ordeals, the whole experience turned out to be some of the most fun I’d had in ages. Where, I began to wonder, was it possible at U of T to meet and converse with historians, philosophers, chemists, doctors, and members of the clergy – in short, to connect with the broader intellectual life of the university? Oh yes, there was Massey College. Maybe that was such a place…. So when I came home I set out to learn more, and it didn’t take long, and only a little nagging, before my colleague, Senior Fellow Gus Craik, was •

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• Yonsue Kim, “Standardizing Exoticism” • Sarah Knudson, “Relationship Advice Books and Their Readers: 50 years of ‘Sexpert’ Guidance” • Massieh Moayedi, “Brain Imaging of Chronic Pain” • Cillian O’Hogan, “The Novel Before the Novel: Fiction in Antiquity” • Barry Rowe, “The Banach-Tarski Paradox: How Mathematicians Save Money at the Grocery Store” • Angela Schwarzkopf, “An Exploration of the Modern Harp” • Minako Uchino, “Learning About Japanese Food Culture Through Interactive Experiences” • Talia Zajac: “Anna Yaroslavna: The Forgotten Queen of France”

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

taking me to the ritual meeting and lunch with John Fraser. One thing has led to another and now, having to my amazement and delight been elected to a second term on Corporation, I am looking forward to many more years of association with Massey. Of course, I have not been disappointed in Massey as a place to find what I first stumbled into at Magdalen. Indeed, ongoing association with members of one’s own university is even more rewarding than passing acquaintance. My favourite Massey moments include many excellent High Tables, book groups, and Senior Fellows’ lunches, perhaps most memorable of which was my own talk on animal behaviour. It was the only presentation I have ever had to give without slides. It has also been very rewarding to see two of my own students, John Ratcliffe (alias Batman) and Noam Miller, a recent Don of Hall and Bach cantata director, as valued Junior Fellows. And the Magdalen connection has not been lost either. I’m sure when Heather Jackson succeeded me in the same Visiting Fellowship and asked for my insights into its mysteries, neither of us dreamt we’d one day be meeting regularly in a not-so-different College in Canada. Originally from Maine and an alumna of Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, Senior Fellow Sara Shettleworth is now proudly Canadian and a member of the Departments of Psychology and of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, where she spent her whole career. A Professor Emerita since 2009, she continues to ponder the mysteries of animal minds, to write, and to teach graduate students. She has been a member of Massey since 1997.

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Jonathan Hart, City of the End of Things: Lectures on Civilization and

Mary Jo Leddy, Our Friendly Local Terrorist. Toronto: Between the Lines,

—, Shakespeare: Poetry, History, and Culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

Athar K. Malik, “Cross-Border Use of Evidence in IP Litigation: Beware the

Empire. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Massey Junior Fellows Lecture Series

• Heather Andres, “The Greenland Ice Sheet: Mass Changes Since the Industrial Revolution”

“Reflections” is a regular feature of MasseyNews. In this brief piece, a longstanding, prominent member of our community reflects on her association with the College. The content and approach are entirely at the discretion of the writer.

Michiel Horn, (trans. from Flemish), Years of the Elephant, by Willy

Linthout. Wisbech, UK: Fanfare, and Rasquera, Spain: Ponent Mon, 2009.

Val Marie Johnson (co-ed with Michele Byers), The “CSI Effect:”

Television, Crime, and Governance. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2009.

— (co-ed with Diane Crocker), Poverty, Regulation, and Social Justice: Readings on the Criminalization of Poverty. Blackpoint, NS: Fernwood Publishing, 2010.

Deborah Kennedy, “British Portraits of Women Reading,” 1650-1850:

Ideas, Aesthetics, and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, 16, 2009: 65-85.

Thomas R. Klassen (co-ed. with Jae-jin Yang), Retirement, Work and Pensions in Ageing Korea. Abingdon: Routledge, 2010.

2010.

Deemed Undertaking Rule in Canada,” Journal of Intellectual Property Law & Practice, Vol. 4, No. 10, October 2009: 699-701, available at http://jiplp. oxfordjournals.org/content/4/10/699.full.pdf+html?sid=e16ffc05-0c9a-4ed6922e-f8e334291c57

—, “Deemed Undertakings in Canada: A Default Rule with Big Implications for Cross-Border or Parallel International IP Litigation,” Intellectual Property, Vol. XV, No. 1, November 2009: 927.

Christina Mancuso (lead analyst), “Long Term Care Risk Adjusted Quality Indicators,” Ontario Health Quality Council. Provincial Results available at http://www.ohqc.ca/en/ltc_prov_results.php, and Individual Home Results at http://www.ohqc.ca/en/ltc_homes.php.

— (lead analyst), “Profile of Residents in Continuing Care Facilities 2007-2008,” Canadian Institute for Health Information. Continuing Care Reporting System (CCRS) Quick Statistics available at http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/ en/ donwnloads/ccrs_quickstats_2007_e.xls.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Life at Massey College

! é s o p Ex

Master once demanded kickback from Mordecai Richler Five years of fine music at Massey

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by Elizabeth MacCallum

he Talisker Players, our College’s Musicians-in-Residence since 2005, are an eclectic and lively group that fit in perfectly with Massey life (including private coaching sessions, which few know about). The Players are most memorable for their performances at the Christmas Gaudy, the Quadrangle Society Tea Party, the Feast for the Founding Master, and the occasional chapel service. One of their outstanding pieces is “Tenebrae,” Osvaldo Golijov’s haunting call for peace for soprano, clarinet, and string quartet. It is a featured work on Where Words and Music Meet: Talisker Players at Massey College, a CD generously sponsored by Senior Fellows David and Vivian Campbell. Recorded with great care and precision, this collection is a unique mix of instruments and solo voices that shows off the fine music the Players have honed over a decade of performances. The CD is available from the Porter and at L’Atelier Grigorian on Yorkville Ave, in Toronto. As well, free tickets for their concert series of music and readings at Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church, on Bloor Street, are available to our Junior Fellows, who make up their most enthusiastic audiences there and at the College. The Talisker have become such a part of the fabric of Massey that our community members now hire them to perform at weddings, funerals, birthdays, and other occasions. Always accommodating and helpful far beyond the call, they continue to enrich our lives. We’re very lucky to have them here. (Tickets for the performances of the Talisker Players are available at uofttix.ca or by calling 416-978-8849. For more information, you may contact words.music@taliskerplayers.ca, call 416-466-1800, or go online at www.taliskerplayers.ca.) •

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FAX TO: JOHN FRASER a.k.a. MASSEY MASTER PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL NO PEEKING Dear Master Fraser, I am grateful for your offer of the job of Massey’s writer-in-rez. However, I am troubled by your demand that I kick back 20 percent of my salary to you in cash. Is this a time-honoured Massey tradition, or one of your innovations?.... I would also like to acknowledge receipt of those three Massey computers, and once I have disposed of this lot, I will forward the usual cheque. Meanwhile, I would like more details – and a price list – for the wines available from Massey’s fabled cellars.

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Michael R. Marrus, Some Measure of Justice: The Holocaust Era

Restitution Campaign of the 1990s. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press, 2009.

Jill L. Matus, “George Eliot,” in The Cambridge Companion to English

Novelists, Adrian Poole, ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009: 225-241.

—, Shock, Memory and the Unconscious in Victorian Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

Marina Nemat, After Tehran: A Life Reclaimed. Toronto: Penguin, 2010. James Nohrnberg, “Eight Reflections of Tennyson’s ‘Ulysses,’” in Victorian

Poetry: Tennyson at Two Hundred, Herbert F. Tucker, guest ed., 47 (1), Spring 2009: 101-150.

—, “Supplementing Spenser’s Supplement, a Masque in Several Scenes: Eight Literary-Critical Meditations on a Renaissance Numen Called ‘Mutabilitie,’” in Celebrating Mutabilitie, Jane Grogan, ed. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2010: 85-135.

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While the primary responsibility of MasseyNews is to provide information, not to investigate and expose, material comes our way from time to time that we feel obligated to publish, even though it may reflect poorly on the College or its members. The excerpts below are from a confidential fax sent by Mordecai Richler in 1995 to the then recently appointed new Master. We thank Quadrangler and author Charles Foran for providing us with this sensitive material. It appears, for an even wider audience to read in its full form, in Mr. Foran’s new biography on Richler, Mordecai: The Life & Times.

Best wishes, Mordecai

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David Pantalony, Altered Sensations: Rudolph Koenig’s Acoustical Workshop in Nineteenth-Century Paris. New York: Springer, 2009.

J. Russell Perkin, Theology and the Victorian Novel. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2009.

Anthony Perl, Transport Revolutions: Moving People and Freight Without Oil. Gabriola Island, BC: New Society Publishers, 2010.

Ravi Ravindra, The Wisdom of Patañjali’s Yoga Sutras: A New Translation and Guide. Sandpoint, ID: Morning Light Press, 2009.

B. I. Savan (with S. Flicker, B. Kolenda, and M. Mildenberger), “How to

Facilitate (or Discourage) Community-Based Research: Recommendations Based on a Canadian Survey,” Local Environment 14 (8), 2009: 783-796.

Neil Seeman (with Patrick Luciani), XXL: Obesity and the Limits of Shame. Toronto: Centre for Public Management, University of Toronto, 2010.

Pekka Sinervo (with T. Aaltonen et al), “Combination of Tevatron Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the W+W- Decay Mode,” Physical Review Letters, 104, Febuary, 2010: 061802, available at http://arxiv.org/ pdf/1001.4162.

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Junior Fellows at play Each year, our Junior Fellows elect a Lionel Massey Fund Committee, locally and fondly known as the LMF. The goal of the committee is to foster a collegial atmosphere with a calendar of social activities. 2009-10 co-chairs Cait Dmitriew, Kate Galloway, Dylan Gordon, Jordan Guthrie, and Alex Kocylum report on the year’s proceedings.

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his year was a fantastic social success, with a great crop of incoming Junior Fellows and the return of some of our most broad-minded, funloving, and hard-working peers from years past. We also had a year with a great deal of involvement from the College community beyond the Junior Fellowship: Senior Residents, Journalism Fellows, and Senior Fellows not only often attended, but also contributed to, the year’s events. Our term began with Masseypalooza, featuring the talented Massey ladies “Cherries on Top.” Given the funding emergency of the time, this one-day music festival and barbecue in the quad replaced the customary summer trips. Despite further reductions to the orientation week budget, levels of participation and fun remained high. The always awe-inspiring Scavenger Hunt reached new heights of creativity: particularly appealing to the judges were the heart-felt “love letters to the LMF,” replete with innuendoes and double entendres that demonstrated our College’s long-held love of the word while raising it to new lows. Another innovation was the accidental encouragement of mass bathing in the pond. The sight of dozens of frenzied Junior Fellows frolicking among the fountains will not soon be forgotten, particularly by Elizabeth MacCallum, whose water lilies luckily went undamaged. The annual Thanksgiving Dinner expanded to two organic free-range birds this year, cooked to crispy perfection by the LMF co-chairs and committee members, feeding the largest gathering of the Massey community for this event to date. Only a few short weeks later came the Halloween party, with costumes judged by Michael Valpy (winners: Junior Fellows Dane Smith and Rüdiger Willenberg as The Space Spoon and Alumna Julie Payette). The annual Pumpkin Carving contest was won by House II, whose rendition of a post-Low Table Junior Fellow, complete with watery eyes and evidence of morning-after nausea, greatly pleased our supremely qualified judges, The Honourable Mr. Justice Robert J. Sharpe and Geraldine Sharpe, justice of the Ontario Court of Appeal and former Registrar of the College, respectively. Their pick was surely just because, aided by an unusually party-hardy (and work-hardy!) Fellowship,

this year’s LMF revivified the post-High Table Low Table parties, holding one after every formal event. These frequently attracted visiting luminaries whose party days were generally thought to be well behind them, and House V’s January extravaganza deserves special mention in this regard. Featuring numerous theme rooms, as well as an icy invention of questionable repute referred to as the “shot luge,” this night will no doubt live long in the memories of many. The year’s talent shows, the Coffee House and Tea Hut, were also outstanding. Paul Furgale and Joe Culpepper introduced an impromptu PowerPoint face-off to the first term’s program, with each delivering a lecture based on slides prepared in advanced by their opponent, sight unseen. Dylan Gordon and Gordon Hawkins hope to have made this a tradition with their reprise of the event in the second term. Barry Rowe directed the production of memorable and unusually artistic LMF videos, the first a naturalistic look at the inhabitants of the College entitled Planet Earth: Massey, the second a black-and-white silent dramatization of the travails of an incoming Junior Fellow, allegorized in the figure of a dancing Massey Bull. Most important and noteworthy, however, was the involvement of those outside the Junior Fellowship in the year’s events. Senior Fellow David James worked with us to put on his annual line dance following the New Year; Journalism Fellow Rachel Pulfer and now-husband Karim Bardeesy were common attendees at many events, and, like Senior Resident Val Marie Johnson, often helped with successfully running them. The 2010-11 Don of Hall John MacCormick also never missed a chance to assist, and members of next year’s LMF – including for perhaps the first time ever a Senior Resident, Albert Wu, as well as Junior Fellow Rüdiger Willenberg – also helped with our events and organized some of their own. It is to the credit of the Fellowship and the College community that this year was so inclusive, inspiring – and fun! Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! John Tsang G. Tucker Carolyn Tuohy John Turner William Turner Christopher Twigge-Molecey Daniel Utrecht Michael Valpy Henry van Driel Kim Vicente Diane Walker Kenneth Walker Ian Wallace Michael Walsh Patrick Walshe Germaine Warkentin Peter Warrian Judith Watt-Watson Alex Waugh Cynthia Webb Ian Webb Norman Webster Harriet (Sis) Weld Grace Westcott Bruce Westwood Pamela Wheaton Rodney White Alan Whiteley Catherine Whiteside Blossom Wigdor Mary Williamson Lois Wilson Gavin Wimalasena The Windward Foundation Martin Wine Warren Winkler Richard Winter Eleanor Wittlin Rose Wolfe Judith Wolfson Lucy Woodward Janet Wright Joan York Marion York James Young Adam Zimmerman Moses Znaimer

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Life at Massey College

LawrenceTanenbaum Ethel Teitelbaum Gordon Teskey Terrill Theman Douglas Thompson R. Paul Thompson R. H. Thomson Craig Thorburn William Thorsell Joseph Thywissen Toronto Community Foundation Vincent Tovell William Toye

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by Elizabeth MacCallum

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hen last heard from, the oldsters in the Master’s Lodging were trying to keep at least one step ahead of our Namibian ward Wisy Namaseb, the Master’s last and final attempt at fathering a teenage male. Wisy, son of Levi Nemaseb, a memorable Alum, adjusted all too quickly to Canada, and made us realize that an entire generation had passed by in the six years since we couldn’t keep up with our own teenagers. Shortly before leaving, Wisy managed to escape from summer camp to play a final soccer game in Toronto, unbeknownst to his so-called guardians. His departure to Africa, a day later than the first attempt (I’ll spare you the details) had the air of a 5 a.m. Keystone Cops farce. Now safely home, Wisy is at the University of Cape Town in an undergraduate commerce program. Learning that he is maintaining his all too familiar soccer-to-studies ratio, we were surprised not to see him on TV at the World Cup. I should say we have missed Wisy in the Lodging, now known as House VII (House VI being the oxymoron for non-residents), but we now have an older son in the form of Saul Rae Fellow Dr. Alexander Van Tulleken. Also the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship, Alexander has been compiling an unusual Oxford handbook for medical workers in extreme conditions, like Darfur, to which he has returned to assess needs for treatment centres in new zones of conflict. The book does not deal with the obvious like malaria, but with the unexpected problems: a local interpreter hiding his ignorance of different dialects during consultations, for example; or the need to provide facilities for ablutions and prayer for Muslims waiting in eight-hour lineups. At least we don’t have to worry about Dr. Van Tulleken getting corrupted by wicked Toronto. Thanks to Senior Fellows Bob Rae and David Cameron, Rohan Edrisinha, a Sri Lankan civil rights lawyer, found refuge in Canada during the dangerous government crackdown last fall. A perfect house guest, he taught at the Law School until it was safe for him to return home, but not until after he presented us with the best Ceylon tea. We were glad to have Clara Fraser, number three daughter, move back home at Christmas after finishing her degree at Concordia. Molly Bloom, now old enough

to be the Venerable College Dog, perked up with the return of Clara’s enthusiasm, as did the rest of us in House VII. It had been a difficult autumn with the precipitous, unexpected death of John’s sister, Barrie Chavel, and two very good friends within two weeks. Clara arrived bewildered about what to do next with her political science degree, which includes a minor in Middle Eastern Studies and Arabic, as well as some religious studies thrown in for good measure. She networked around town with a style that left her father’s similar skills looking lacklustre. As a result, Clara begins her M.A. at Ryerson in Urban Development after a summer working for her cousin’s construction business, learning something useful for a change. Along with Clara and Alexander Van Tulleken coming and going, our amazing veteran housekeeper, Norma Briones, has provided clean sheets for a steady stream of guests. Sir Peter Clarke, former Master of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, came to launch his book on Keynes. He and his wife, Maria Tippett, the biographer of Emily Carr, enjoyed our guestroom, not to speak of Norma’s wonderful hospitality (she even provided them with sumptuous teas to entertain their friends). They visited at the same time as Tom Ringer, a godson of the Master and a former pro tem family member during an undergrad year. Many Junior Fellows – among them Janna Rosales, Anna Shamaeva, Joe Culpepper, Myles Leslie, and George Kovacs – also stayed over for convocations and thesis defences, or simply to collect their coveted dictionary at the final Gaudy. Andrew Graham, Master of Balliol College, Massey’s inspiration, and his wife, Peggoty, also came to stay, along with distinguished diplomats, living proof of Massey’s international character if anyone ever doubted it. Danish Ambassador His Excellency Erik Vilstrip Lorenzen and his wife, Lise Brandi-Hansen, were guests at a High Table honouring Denmark’s sponsorship of the Journalism Fellows’ week there as government guests. It was bittersweet when Her Excellency Ingrid Iremark and her loyal supporter and husband, Thomas Lindquist, came for a final time before they returned to Sweden, where Ingrid was posted to the palace to orchestrate press relations for the wedding of the Crown Princess (a royal event sadly missed by the Master).

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Scholars-at-Risk at Massey by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

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or the past few years, the names Clement Jumbe and Moain Sadeq have been familiar to many people at the College. Both were Scholars-at-Risk, with Clement living at the College for three years as a Junior Fellow until April 2010, when he moved to Grad House. He is now working on his last year of doctoral work on HIV/AIDS education, and we fortunately still get to see him periodically when he heads here for some necessary distraction. Formerly Director of the Department of Antiquities in Gaza, Moain Sadeq filled his time teaching both at Near and Middle Eastern

Civilizations and at the Mississauga campus of U of T, as well as being a research associate at the Royal Ontario Museum. In this last capacity and thanks to a grant from the Aurea Foundation, he evaluated and catalogued the major portion of the ROM’s collection of Mamluk pottery. On the basis of his talks in the community related to the history of the Middle East, he was also invited to lecture at Centennial College, where he delivered a speech at their spring convocation ceremony. Moain left this August to take up a three-year teaching appointment at University of Qatar, in Doha. His family will be with him, and we

look forward to his visits back to Toronto, as well as his permanent return to Canada three years hence. This fall, Dr. José David Arango joins us as a Scholar-at-Risk. Dr. Arango is from Colombia, where he taught Philosophy and Linguistics. He fled his country under threat to himself and his family, and was accepted as a refugee in Canada in 2008. He lives in Toronto with his wife and two daughters. Some of you may have met Dr. Arango last year when he was honing his English skills with the help of then Junior Fellow Joshua Nicholls. We know that he will be as happy to reconnect with the College as we are in seeing him return. In association with Scholar-at-Risk New York, we are now working to bring a Rwandan geographer into the Scholar-at-Risk Fellowship. With luck, he will be here by the end of 2010, and we will be in a position to report on this in the next MasseyNews.

Massey Grand Rounds Since April 2006, Massey Junior Fellows in the Health Sciences have been meeting monthly to discuss current topics and professional issues in the format of the Massey Grand Rounds (MGR). The fourth of these annual symposia took place last April 21 in the Upper Library, organized by Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Carla Pajak, Judith Seary, and Rami Shoucri. Focusing on “Responsible Use of Advanced Technologies in Medicine,” this year’s session covered issues of accountability in the development and delivery of high-tech diagnostics in medicine, the screening of newborns, global nutritional health, and system design. There was also a panel discussion on social networking and advances in information technology to assist patient and community care. Among the distinguished presenters and panellists were keynote speaker Dr. Leslie Levin, Senior Scientific, Medical, and Health Technology Advisor to the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, and Head of the Medical Advisory Secretariat; Senior Fellow/Corporation Dr. Kim Vicente, Founding Director of the Cognitive Engineering Laboratory at the University of Toronto; Dr. Fiona Miller of the Department of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation at the University of Toronto; and Dr. Kaveh Shojania, Director of the University of Toronto Centre for Patient Safety. The Grand Rounds was sponsored by Massey College, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Toronto, the Quarter Century Fund, the Quadrangle Society, and the Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FCIHR).

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Drawing by David Levine

From the Lodging

Thank you, donors! Geraldine Sherman Brigitte Shim David Silcox Louis Siminovitch Pekka Sinervo Peter Singer Caspar Sinnige Ernest Sirluck David Sisam Bev Skidmore Philip Slayton John Slinger Mark Smith Carolyn Smyth Elizabeth Smyth Harley Smyth Donavan Snelleman Jules Solomon Marc Somerville Martine Sorin Rosemary Speirs James Spence Katherine Spence Cathy Spoel Mark Stabile Elise Stanley Mark Starowicz Robert Steiner Don Stevenson Andrew Stewart Nalini Stewart Brian Stock Boris Stoicheff Susan Straiton Alexander Stuart Ambury Stuart Bernadette Sulgit Alan Sullivan Jennifer Surridge Sylvia Sutherland Thomas Symons

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

College Quiz The purpose of the institution would not be to simply house a group of graduate students, but to select the best men available and to form a distinguished collegiate community.

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Who wrote this to whom and when? Check page 32 for answers. •

Marla B. Sokoloski (with C. Lucas), “Molecular Basis for Plasticity in

Robert I. Thompson (with G. B. Andresen et al), “Evaporative Cooling of

—, “Social Interactions in ‘Simple’ Model Systems,” Neuron, 65:780-794.

— (with D. Ahrensmeier et al), “Labatorials at the University of Calgary: In Pursuit of Effective Small Group Instruction Within Large Registration Physics Service Courses,” Physics in Canada, 65 (4), 2009: 214-216.

Anti-Social Behaviour,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 10, 2009: 6351-6356.

Kim Solga (with D.J. Hopkins and Shelley Orr), Performance and the City. Basingstoke: UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

—, Violence Against Women in Early Modern Performance: Invisible Acts. Basingstoke: UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

Ronald Stewart (with J. Hanesiak et al), “Storm Studies in the Arctic:

The Meteorological Field Project,” Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, 2010: 47-68.

Jordan Thompson (with J.G. Reitz, R. Banerjee, and M. Phan), “Race,

Religion, and the Social Integration of New Immigrant Minorities in Canada,” International Migration Review, 43 (4), 2009: 695-726.

Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures,” Physical Review Letters, 105, 2010: 013003.

John Tsang, “The DNR Order: What Does It Mean?,” Clinical Medicine

Insights: Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine, 4, 2010: 15-23.

— (with W.J.E. Lamm and E.R. Swenson), “Regional CO2 tension Quantitatively Mediates Homeostatic Redistribution of Ventilation Following Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism in Pigs,” Journal of Applied Physiology, 107, 2009: 755-762.

Isabel Vincent, Gilded Lily: Lily Safra, The Making of One of the World’s Wealthiest Widows. New York: Harper, 2010.

Tara Vongpaisal, “Children with Cochlear Implants Recognize Their Mother’s Voice,” Ear & Hearing, 31, 2010: 555-566.

LODGING NEWS – page 24

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

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Nooks & Crannies Like Ontario, Massey College offers “more to discover” for those adventurous enough to strike out beyond the well-trodden paths of familiar spaces such as the Common Room and the Quadrangle. Once again, we head into what, for probably most Masseyites, except those identified below, is terra incognita. Who knows what worlds of wonder await in our choice this year of a very vertical and, at once, both prominent and secretive place?

M

The CLOCK &

Photography by Anthony Luengo

aybe it’s location and height that make the College clock and bell tower such a magnet for a special group of Junior Fellows. And there is always a special group... every year. The instinct, not passed on by anyone, is in the DNA. It may also have to do with the fact that the narrow gate entrance just inside the tower is locked, or is supposed to be, and that alone – to some – is a provocation and a challenge. Every weekday during term, come wind, weather, sleet, or snow, the Senior Day Porter and the Night Porters religiously trudge from the Porter’s Lodge at 8 a.m., 12:15 p.m., and 6:30 p.m. to ring the St. Catherine Bell to summon residents to meals at Ondaatje Hall. We say “religiously” because the 8 a.m. bell is particularly important for our neighbours at the Roman Catholic chapel in the Newman Centre: they piggy-back on it to summon the faithful to the 8 a.m. Mass, putting a special onus for promptness on the Day Porter’s duties. The bell is tolled officially on Remembrance Day and whenever a College worthy dies. In a more joyous celebration, it is rung to herald the official start of a new Don of Hall’s regime. And, more or less, that should be about it for the tower and its bell, now officially known as Thom’s Tower, honouring the architect of the College, who is remembered with an elegant slate plaque affixed to its side so that all who enter the premises can see it. The tower is a great, if covert, gathering place for those prone to practical jokes. There is the hilarious account of a huge banner lowered from the top to greet Vincent Massey’s arrival at the College. It read Défense d’uriner, causing great consternation and forever defining the word pandemonium. Perhaps this is why the tower is both so appealing to the mischievous and so alarming to the administration. Master Fraser remembers being kicked awake by Elizabeth MacCallum at 3 a.m. one morning over a decade ago because a random group of College revellers – well nourished by

BELL TOWER

“high spirits” – were singing Irish folk songs and American Civil War anthems at full volume. “Someone’s going to get killed soon,” Ms. MacCallum shouted in the Master’s ear. “You’ve got to go.” By the time he got his dressing gown on and made an appearance in the Quad, all revellers had fled, but one – the Irish folk song expert – was caught at the top of the locked gate inside the tower’s entranceway. Jumping clumsily down, he ripped his pants as he tried to pick himself up from the ground. His colourful phraseology was quickly tempered when he realized the slippered feet he was perusing were attached to the legs and body of the Master. A short but decisive conversation ensued. Master Fraser was also the victim – a more appreciative one this time – of a prank on his 60th birthday, on June 5, 2004. All College residents awoke to the sight of the tower’s clock face being altered so that each hour read “60.” Actually, this being Massey, they all read “LX.” It took nearly seven months to find out how Junior Fellows managed this feat. Eventually it emerged during a Don of Hall’s speech on Gaudy Night that a Junior Fellow with experience in rock climbing and “repelling” was lowered by ropes from the top of the tower. (You can get there through an internal ladder system, but you usually have to go past a family of raccoons.) Administrators are terrified of accidents to impromptu climbers and always discourage it. On the other hand, Master Fraser has himself climbed the tower and reports that it affords one of the best 360-degree panoramic views of the campus. The last time he tried it two years ago, he reports he found a student U of T ID card that belonged to a Junior Fellow of the day. “How on earth could it get all the way up there?” asked the Master when he returned it to the Junior Fellow (at dinner, during announcements). “That’s a real mystery,” said the grateful Junior Fellow as he repossessed his card and hardly blinked an eye. “Maybe it was transported there by the ghost of Robertson Davies.”

Neville Poy Vivienne Poy Dorothy Pringle Brenda Proulx John Pullerits Alanna Quinn

Back row (left-right): Noah Shack (Canada Israel Committee), Rami Shoucri (Junior Fellow), Bryan Watson (Chevening Scholar), Jodie Bakker (Junior Fellow), Massih Moayedi (Junior Fellow), Jessica Duffin Wolfe (Junior Fellow), Dylan Gordon (Junior Fellow), Jonathan Schneiderman (Canada Israel Committee), Jane Hilderman (Junior Fellow); Front row (left-right): Judy Tanenbaum, Larry Tanenbaum, John Fraser

Junior Fellows travel to Israel by Jane Hilderman

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rom December 6-14, 2009, six Massey Junior Fellows experienced a unique and intense educational visit to Israel in the company of five Canadian Rhodes scholars, two Canadian Chevening scholars, and one Mandela Rhodes scholar from South Africa. Together, the group travelled the country, from Tel Aviv’s Mediterranean shores to the Dead Sea, from the northern Golan Heights to southern Sderot, and to the heart of Jerusalem. While doing so, they also traversed the histories, cultures, religions, and politics of the region. The breadth of speakers – including journalists, politicians, civil servants, academics, •

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Athar Malik is an Associate,

The Winner of the 2009 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize

Intellectual Property Group, Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP (Toronto). h athar.malik@utoronto.ca

by Matthew Strang, Junior Fellow

JOSHUA BEN DAVID NICHOLS is

(G)host with the most: For whom the Bull’s Bells Toll… I am here to give you a true tale of the state All about the inner workings of this supposed silver plate If dead men tell no tales Then best ye be warned I is not that dead I wails No, for I, Davies, am alive and true That’s right kids for I live here with you! I pushed Natalie down the stairs And it was I who gave you all those icy glares I am the one who makes your cake always crumble And I am the one that keeps that fourth Master ever so humble The hook-ups of Massey’s romance so enchanted Have also been due to me as I fore-planted Libby & Bryant, Gordon & Naoko, the bench and Kate It was me who caused you all to find your mate 30

Thank you, donors!

It is I that keeps the port tasting mediocre And it is me that ensures Jeff always loses at poker Yes, Davies is behind the Whipped Cream boy-band factory And the agent that makes Cherries on Top so satisfactory It is I that stations Rotman’s army of millions building at your gate And I that ensure the 120 junior fellows have a full plate I that oversee the books go from red to black, not Tembeka and Jill And I that pressure the JFs to pay their much-overdue bill It is I that continues the backwash in the residents’ toilet bowls And I that causes Joe and Kelly to plunge the many leaky holes Essentially what I am trying to have you all behold Is that it is me for whom the beefy bull’s bells toll And that I will be both your friend and foe as the first and final Massey bastard So all of you tonight will now and forever more know not to judge a book by its Master

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

an SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Law, University of Victoria. He celebrated his third wedding anniversary with his wife, Eva Joensuu, this past year. h Joshua.nichols@utoronto.ca

2005 MARCINKU KEDZIOR is Co-Director of the design firm KURU Studio and Co-Editor of Scapegoat: Architecture, Landscape, and Political Economy. In July, he was appointed full-time Professor, Bachelor of Interior Design and Industrial Design, Humber

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businessmen, soldiers, and university students – illuminated the complex challenges and opportunities faced by Israeli and Palestinian communities today. Enlightening debate and good food intermingled at every stop. On their return, the Junior Fellows gave a debriefing presentation for members of the Massey community in which they shared their experience and insights. They all agreed that it was a trip of personal discovery – an opportunity made possible thanks to Massey Quadranglers Larry and Judy Tanenbaum, who are shown above with the Israel group at the College High Table on February 11, 2010. ALUMNI

School of Applied Technology. He was also involved in the design of the new rooftop podium at Toronto City Hall, the first phase of the revitalization of Nathan Phillips Square. This was opened in May (for information and photos, see http:// www.branchplant.com/landscape/ agoratheatre_podium.html). h marcinku.kedzior@gmail.com

SCOTT YOUNG moved, with his

current laboratory, from Stanford University to the University of Southern California in August 2009. He is a Postdoctoral Research Associate specializing in biomedical engineering and human movement disorders. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Helen Chow.

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2006 JAMES BRADSHAW is a

reporter with The Globe and Mail and lives in Toronto. h jem.bradshaw@gmail.com

JORDAN THOMSON is Special

Advisor to the Director General, Refugee Affairs Branch of Citizenship and Immigration Canada. He lives in Ottawa and is engaged to Laura Weir.

TARA VONGPAISAL is an

Assistant Professor of Psychology at Grant MacEwan University and lives in Edmonton. h tara.vongpaisal@utoronto.ca

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Robert Rabinovitch Vivian Rakoff Joan Randall Lola Rasminsky Gerald Rayner Tamara Rebanks Anthony Redpath Chesley Rees Douglas Reeve Bambi Reeves Gilbert Reid Jonathon Reid Donald Rickerd Catherine Riggall Jean Riley Morton Ritts Gordon Rixon William Roberts David Robertson Judith Robertson Sheila Robinson Thomas Robinson Jonathan Rose Janet Rossant Sandra Rotman Andrea Russell Aubrey Russell Peter Russell Robert Sachter Richard Sadleir Ann Saddlemyer Edward Safarian John Ralston Saul Lionel Schipper Mike Schwindt Clayton Scott David Scott Iain Scott Robin Sears Ellen Seligmann John Sewell Jack Shapiro Robert Sharpe Geraldine Sharpe Sandra Shaul Gerald Sheff

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Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Roy McMurtry James McPherson Catherine McQueen Rosemary Meier Kelly Meighen Sarah Mennell Patricia Merivale Sarianna Metso Jane Millgate Arthur Millward John Monahan Peter Moon Carole Moore John Moore Dunstan Morey Sue Mortimer Javad Mostaghimi David Mowbray Linda Munk Heather Munro-Blum Scott Murray Sioban Nelson Glen Norcliffe Urs Obrist Derek Oland Peter Oliver James Orbinski Anne Osler Sylvia Ostry Gilles Ouellette David Pantalony Mary Ann Parker Roger Parkinson Charles Pascal Louis Pauly Peter Pauly Anthony Pawson Julie Payette Derek Penslar John Pepall Anthony Perl Douglas Perovic Susan Perren Allan Peterkin David Peterson Heather Peterson Gaylanne Phelan Richard Piatti Gordon Pinsent Elizabeth Place Jerrold Plotnick John Polanyi Wai Keung Poon Frank Potter Julian Porter

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MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Massey’s associate partners grow in scope and numbers

Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy night

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umerous prizes were presented to Junior Fellows at the 2009 Fellows’ Gaudy night, the last High Table for the academic year. The long-standing Moira Whalon Prize honours a Junior Fellow who – in the opinion of the Master and Officers, Don of Hall, and Junior Fellow members of the House Committee – has contributed most to the College spirit and values. Named in honour of Massey’s first Secretary of Corporation (and Robertson Davies’ long-time assistant), the prize consists of a first edition copy of a Davies work (presented by Pendragon Ink) and a cheque for $1,000. The prize was awarded to Paul Furgale. The second long-standing award is the Morris Wayman Prize, given to the Junior Fellow who did the most to explain his or her work to the community, or fostered interdisciplinary understanding. The prize, awarded to Patrick Boyle, consists of a reference book, a plaque, and a cheque for $1,000, and is named after the late Professor Morris Wayman from the University of Toronto. His son, poet Tom Wayman, was Writer-inResidence in 1996. He and his family set up the prize in Professor Wayman’s honour. The Don of Hall Prize, for outstanding contribution by a Junior Fellow to the Junior Fellowship, was presented to Sarah Knudson; and the Registrar’s Award, for outstanding •

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DAVID PANTALONY is Curator,

Canada Science and Technology Museum, and Adjunct Professor, Department of History, University of Ottawa. h dpantalony@technomuses.ca

ROBERT McGILL recently

completed his Junior Fellowship at Harvard University. He is an Assistant Professor at the Department of English, University of Toronto. h robert.mcgill@utoronto.ca

2003 Elisa Chan is a fourth-year

Resident, Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto.

contribution to the Massey community, went to Salim Bamakhrama. On this Gaudy night, funds provided by an anonymous Senior Fellow donor are used to give a reference book prize, along with a plaque printed on our presses, to every Junior Fellow who “has completed the work to become a doctor of the university.” Recipients were Shelley Beal (Book History/Print Culture), Ela Beres (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Andrew

Binkley (Juris Doctor), Sarah Copland (English), Jack Cunningham (History), Jackie Feke (History and Philosophy of Science and Technology), Ben Fortescue (Physics), Dan Giang (Physics), Ari Kopolovic (Juris Doctor), George Kovacs (Classics), Toby Malone (Drama), Josh Nichols (Philosophy), David Reibetanz (English), Janna Rosales (Religious Studies), and Jorge TorresSolis (Biomedical Engineering).

Fifteen-Year Fellowship with Finland by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

We have never taken our friendship with Finland for granted, but the decade and a half of bonding seems to have flown by. Every year since 1995, our Journalism Fellows have been invited by the Finnish Foreign Ministry and the Finnish Embassy in Ottawa on a week’s trip to Helsinki and one other city in Finland, with virtually all expenses paid. What a fitting end to the annual fellowships, the aim of which is to broaden horizons! Last March 25, we celebrated the 15-year link with Finland with a seminar and lunch in our Upper Library and Common Room. Professors Abraham Rotstein and Pekka Sinervo made opening remarks, Professor Sheila Embleton moderated, and former Journalism Fellows Kevin Sylvester and Marcus Gee spoke respectively on “Why I Think Finland Is Good at Hockey” and “Helsinki, No Mean City.” Master Fraser sat in conversation with Mr. Risto Pipponen, the Finnish Ambassador to Canada. A panel discussion followed – former Journalism Fellow Sheree-Lee Olson spoke on getting a feel for Finnish design; Lisa Rochon, architectural columnist for The Globe and Mail, talked about “The Impact of Finnish Architecture”; and Senior Fellow Brigitte Shim addressed “The Impact of the Competition for Toronto’s City Hall.” (This fall, City Hall, designed by Finnish architect Viljo Revell, celebrates its 45th anniversary.) By the end of the lunch, the bond was further tightened, and Patricia Dodge of the Finnish Embassy pledged to keep the connection alive.

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He and his wife, Erin, welcomed their first child this year. h aeizenman@stikeman.com

JOHN ASALONE is co-founder of

Solar For Veterans, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing information on solar energy careers to military veterans. He is an energy economist at Booz Allen Hamilton, and lives in Washington, DC. h jasalone@gmail.com

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Winner of Triple-S Salud Prize_ ______

JAN EPERJESI received the 2010

DON BUTLER celebrated turning 60 this year. He is a Senior Writer for the Ottawa Citizen and recently married his long-time partner, Christina Spencer. h dbutler@thecitizen.canwest.com

ALON EIZENMAN is a municipal and planning Law Associate at Stikeman Elliott LLP in Toronto.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

Triple-S Salud (Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association) Prize for Best Overall Clinical Performance During Medical School, Escuela de Medicina San Juan Bautista, Puerto Rico. Her M.D. degree was conferred summa cum laude and she was appointed as OBGYN house officer (PGY-1), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University. She lives in Durham, North Carolina with her new son. h jan.eperjesi@duke.edu

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assey has always welcomed appropriate partners to share in the life and vision of the College. In 1963, for example, the Graduate School of Drama took up residence in several offices beside the Round Room, and for a period it looked as if a small but prestigious medical museum would be its successor. The Southam Journalism Fellowship Program was also located at Massey in 1963. At various other times, other organizations became attached and often maintained offices or rooms. Over the past 15 years, the list of associate partners has grown dramatically, although most people are unaware of how extensive it now is. Below is that list. In one way or another, each partner helps us fulfill our mandate to be a bridge community between town and gown, especially in the three broad academic streams Massey is committed to supporting: the humanities, sciences, and professions. The Gairdner Foundation One of the most important

international institutes supporting medical research, this foundation has been at Massey for over a decade under the dynamic leadership of Senior Fellow Dr. John Dirks. Each year, Dr. Dirks brings eminent researchers from all over the world to the College. (More on this partner in our conversation with Dr. Dirks on page 25.)

Friends of the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) Senior Fellow Dr. Aubie Angel

heads up this important support group for CIHR, which conducts annual seminars and fundraisers. Dr. Angel also started the Massey Grand Rounds, which brings together all of Massey’s Junior and Senior Fellows involved in any aspect of health studies for both intimate seminars and an annual university-wide colloquium on an important aspect of health research, administration, or ethics. (See page 29 for news of last year’s Massey Grand Rounds.)

Lupina Foundation This is a private foundation

begun in 2000 to support societal and medical research and innovation. Its bursaries and fellowships are widely dispersed in interdisciplinary and cross-jurisdictional studies, which is why Massey College has provided such a congenial and welcoming home. The leadership is shared between Senior Fellow Peter Warrian and his wife, Dr. Margret Hovanec. A number of Massey Junior Fellows have benefited from direct support in their research. Continued on page 32

by Jill Clark, Bursar

his was a year of change. The challenges created by the market recession spurred us to reassess our sources of revenue and consider ways to reduce our ongoing maintenance costs. With the entire College involved, the process has been a resounding success. Both operations in the year end 2010 and the budget for 2010-11 are balanced, while The Visitors’ Challenge pledges continued to be honoured with $174,657 received. As in the past, the members of our community continue to generously support all elements of College life. The Quadrangle Society exceeded all prior years by a record $120,000. A new initiative for Senior Fellows, to contribute to the College by increasing their use of our catering service and donating to operating funds, was well supported. Two generous donations were given to support the new Kierans-Janigan Journalism Fellow, in honour of Val Ross, and a Kahanoff Journalism Fellow. These funds are in addition to the endowed Gordon Fisher, Webster McConnell, and the partially endowed St.Clair-Balfour Journalism Fellows. And thanks to the

CBC, we have annual support for another Journalism Fellow. The catering department increased revenue by $100,000 under the management of Darlene Naranjo. She kept the costs down so profits could subsidize College operations. This could only be achieved with the loyal support of our cooks, Silvana Valdes and Darren Diabo, Steward Greg Cerson, and each individual on the kitchen staff who made it their priority to offer excellent food and service while watching costs. The resident Junior Fellows also played a part in turning our finances around. They graciously accepted the loss of bursaries in the fall of 2009, when endowments were not paid out, and will contribute to increased revenues with fees that were raised to match U of T’s comparable rates for 2010-2011. There are still challenges in resuming bursaries to the level of 2008, but we expect to pay out at a rate of 80% this year, allowing Massey to accumulate funding for distribution in the future. Rentals of offices and the Summer Rental Program both contributed to balancing our budget. The 2009

Throughout the academic year, the College hosts fortnightly High Table Dinners, at which distinguished guests rub shoulders with our Junior Fellows and Alumni. The following is our list of specially invited guests for 2009-10. Mr. Peter Allen Philanthropist Mr. Karim Bardeesy Senior Resident, Journalism Ms. Lise Brandi-Hansen Mr. Alan Broadbent Philanthropy Mrs. Judy Broadbent Philanthropy Ms. Brenda Bury Artist The Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson Former Governor General of Canada

Financial news

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Spotlight on High Table

summer had sales of over $165,000, a record, and Chris MacDonald and Ankita Jauhari, our innkeepers, have hinted that their 2010 goal is to reach $200,000. The practice of renting vacant student rooms has turned into a successful B & B business, with some of the profit slated to subsidize student bursaries in the coming year – an incentive to send your guests to Massey. The IT department has also seen change. Matt Glandfield has been added to part-time staff to ensure our systems are maintained at an improved standard, but at almost half the cost. He has had many challenges in replacing antiquated systems on a tight budget, but we anticipate our new equipment and software will be running smoothly this year, with improved reporting capabilities. Your invoices will eventually come! The changes, and there were many more, were initiated and supported by all members of the staff, students, and the community at large, making it a positive experience. The challenge will be to maintain our initiatives and keep our books balanced. Thanks to you all for your continued support.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Mr. Michael Cooke Journalism Professor Brian Corman Dean, School of Graduate Studies, University of Toronto Mrs. Linda Corman Librarian, Trinity College Ms. Sarah Corman Law Professor Chandler Davis Mathematics Mrs. Kathleen Davis Professor Natalie Zemon Davis History The Hon. William Davis Former Premier of Ontario Mr. Michael Enright Broadcast Journalist Dr. Nancy Epstein Ophthalmology Dr. Brad Faught History Dr. George Georgopoulos York Fellow, Economics Ms. Julie Hope Television

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Life at Massey College

from page 31 Health Strategy Innovation Cell Under the

Professor Ann Hutchison English Her Excellency Ingrid Iremark Ambassador of Sweden to Canada Mr. Michael Jackson Civil Service The Hon. Henry N.R. Jackman College Visitor Dr. Christine Jamieson Senior Resident, Theological Studies Ms. Marina Jiménez St. Clair Balfour Journalism Fellow Mr. C. David Johnson Actor Dr. Val Marie Johnson Senior Resident, Sociology Ms. Diane Juricevic Senior Resident, Law Professor Anne Lancashire English Professor Ian Lancashire English Mr. Eric Lemus Scotiabank/CJFE Fellow His Excellency Erik Vilstrup Lorenzen Ambassador of Denmark to Canada Mr. Michael MacMillan Samara Foundation Dr. Rosemary Marchant Medicine Ms. Laurie Matheson Mr. John McGreevy Film Production Mrs. Ria McMurtry The Hon. Roy McMurtry Former Chief Justice of Ontario The Hon. Peter Milliken Speaker of the House of Commons Dr. Norman Murray Canadian Institute of Theoretical Physics Mr. Alexander Neef Canadian Opera Company Mrs. Eloise Neef Mrs. Marjatta Piipponen His Excellency Mr. Risto Piipponen Ambassador of Finland to Canada

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enthusiastic leadership of Neil Seeman, this small group of researchers, funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health, is seeking new ways to help fund medical health programs in Ontario. Its research, which only began a couple of years ago, has already been heralded in The Economist and other leading professional and general journals. It also provides part-time work for Junior Fellows out of its offices in the Gatehouse (the former Porter’s Lodge).

Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics (CITA) CITA maintains three guest rooms at the

College, and through them we have a steady infusion of young academics and graduate students visiting Toronto from all over the world. Scholars-at-Risk Massey College, in partnership with the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto, founded this important organization, which provides timely and crucial assistance to both established scholars and graduate students caught out in their own countries by sectarian violence, racial discrimination, or dictatorship. The program is run out of House V by College Administrator Anna Luengo. The Massey Philanthropy Roundtable Newly created last year by Senior Fellows Peter Warrian (Lupina Foundation) and Shira Herzog (Kahanoff Canadian Foundation), this umbrella organization of nearly all the private foundations in Canada will be meeting regularly at Massey (where its headquarters office will be maintained), as well as other places around the country. Its mandate is to organize seminars and research to help private foundations do their work better. In welcoming them to the College, Master John Fraser pointed out that Massey was created by a private foundation and has been supported throughout its near-half century in countless ways by many of the foundations which are members of the Roundtable. The Massey Lectures The College continues to be

proud of its longstanding partnership (since 1965) with CBC Radio’s Ideas, whose executive producer is Senior Fellow Bernie Lucht, and with House of Anansi publishers (and its chair, Quadrangler Scott Griffin), which publishes these outstanding lectures by renowned thinkers of our time. Book History and Print Culture One of the most

successful collaborative programs at any Canadian university, Book History and Print Culture has been welcomed at Massey since its inception nearly a decade ago, and it makes extensive use of our library holdings, printing presses, and seminar rooms. Many of its students are or become Junior Fellows and the range of its presentations has attracted many scholars to our College. (See page 18 for more on BHPC.)

Journalism Fellows 2009-2010

Pendragon Ink Located in House III, this

organization attends to the literary estate of our Founding Master and is run by Master Davies’ widow, Brenda Davies, and their daughter, Senior Fellow Jennifer Surridge. (Pendragon Ink’s annual update to our readers appears on page 24.)

Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Massey’s associate partners

Jack McClelland Writer-in-Residence Named after

the founder of the famous Canadian publishing house McClelland & Stewart, this one-term appointment to the university is always housed at Massey, either in an office (if he or she is from Toronto) or in a Senior Suite. As distinguished Senior Residents, they partake fully in College life and are usually very patient and helpful with ambitious authors or poets in the Junior Fellowship. (You can read about last year’s Writer-inResidence on page 22.)

Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program

Formerly the Southam Fellowships, this innovative program – originally modelled on the Neiman Fellowships at Harvard – has been part of College life since its founding in 1963. Each year, a new crop of mid-career journalists get an academic year off from the grind of daily journalism, and they mix with the Junior and Senior Fellows, creating exciting intellectual encounters during the year and life-long friendships thereafter. The program is run out of House V by College Administrator Anna Luengo. Griffin Poetry Prize Each year, the eminent judges

(Left-right) St. Clair Balfour Fellow Marina Jiménez (The Globe and Mail, Toronto), Associate Fellow Ivan Semeniuk (Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Physics, University of Toronto), Webster/McConnell Fellow Rachel Pulfer (Canadian Business), CBC/Radio-Canada Fellow Kevin Robertson (CBC/Radio-Canada), Scotiabank/CJFE Fellow Eric Lemus (La Pagina.com, El Salvador). A full report on the activities of the 2009-10 Journalism Fellows can be found in Owl, available in hard copy from the College Administrator, Anna Luengo, or online at <http://masseycolleg.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/OWL_2010.pdf>.

and executive of the world’s most important poetry prize gather at Massey College to choose their winners for the upcoming year. The prize was founded by Quadrangler Scott Griffin.

Faber School of Writing New to us this year, the

Faber Academy has been assisting poets and fiction writers of great promise for many years at their schools in London and New York. Supported by the famous British publishing house Faber and Faber, the school chose Massey College for its seminars in Canada because of our long tradition of supporting writers and the written word. (Information on the inaugural courses, in poetry and novel writing, can be found at http://www.faber.co.uk/article/2010/5/ becoming-a-poet-toronto and http://www.faber.co.uk/ article/2010/4/writing-a-novel-toronto.)

College Quiz from page 29 Vincent Massey wrote this in December 1959 in a letter to Claude Bissell, President of the University of Toronto. Two months later, in February 1960, four architects, including Ron Thom, were invited to submit preliminary drawings for the proposed institution. Each competitor was to be paid $3000 for submitting.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

Drawing by David Levine

Spotlight on High Table

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

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1996

1997

STEVE KIRCHGRABER moved

ANTONIO ROSSINI is an Associate

from New York City to St. Louis, Missouri, last June to join the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. He is Manager in the Bank Supervision and Regulation Division. h contactsfk@gmail.com

ISABEL VINCENT is an investigative

reporter at the New York Post, where her reporting recently resulted in the resignation of Congressman Charles Rangel from his post as chairman of the powerful taxwriting Ways and Means Committee. Vincent’s fourth book, Gilded Lily: Lily Safra, The Making of One of the World’s Wealthiest Widows, was recently published in New York.

Professor and Director of the Humanities Research Group at the University of Windsor. h arossini@uwindsor.ca

1999

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Canada’s Voice: The Public Life of John Wendell Holmes, was shortlisted for the Dafoe Prize, which recognizes the best book on Canada or Canada and the world. He lives in Toronto. h chapnick@cfc.dnd.ca

DAVID MILLER left radio current

BENJAMIN SHINEWALD moved

back to Toronto. He is National Executive Director and General Counsel, Canadian Jewish Congress. h benjamin.shinewald@gmail.com

2000

affairs for radio news. He is Morning News Editor, CBC Radio News, Yellowknife, and recently completed a year-long sabbatical living in Spain, mostly Galicia. h davidcameronmiller@gmail.com

JONATHAN GOUVEIA is Vice-

ADAM CHAPNICK is Deputy Director of Education, Canadian Forces College, and Associate Professor, Defence Studies, Royal Military College of Canada. His book,

President, Real Estate Transactions, New York City Economic Development Corporation. He lives in New York City. h jgouveia@nycedc.com

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Thank you, donors! Keith Leckie Mary Jo Leddy Yew-Thong Leong Patrick LeSage Malcolm Lester Jill Levenson Daniel Levia Michael Levine Joyce Lewis Peter Lewis Christopher Lind Patti and Earl Linzon William Littler Katharine Lochnan John Loosemore Keith Lowe John Lownsbrough Anthony Luengo Shirley Ma Joan MacCallum Jocelyn Macdonald Valarie MacDonald Anthony MacFarlane John Macfarlane Joseph MacInnis Eluned MacMillan Margaret MacMillan Malcolm MacRury Athar Malik David Malone Vijai Mariyampillai Dow Marmur Michael Marrus Lorna Marsden Peter Martin Roger Martin Sandra Martin Clive Mason David Mason Judith Matthews Jill Matus Kathryn McCain W. Kenneth McCarter Marcia McClung Lloyd McCoomb Lynn McDonald Barbara McDougall Ivan McFarlane Mary McGeer Michael McGillion Mark McGowan Roderick McInnes Frank McKenna Helen McLean Mark McLean Stuart McLean

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Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Shira Herzog Ernest Hillen David Hilton Mimi Hollenberg Thomas Homer-Dixon Michiel Horn and Cornelia Shuh Chaviva Hosek Margret Hovanec James Hume Martin Hunter Adèle Hurley Linda Hutcheon Michael Hutcheon The Janet Hutchison Foundation Robert Hyland Frank Iacobucci Andres Jaaku Henry Jackman Maruja Jackman Heather Jackson David James Norman Jewison Prabhat Jha Robert Johnstone George Jonas Charles Jones Yuriy Kachanov Kahanoff Foundation Christine Karcza Martin Katz Alison Keith Merrijoy Kelner Bruce Kidd Thomas Kierans Elizabeth Kilbourn-Mackie Thomas King Stanislav Kirschbaum George Kitching David Klausner Pia Kleber Martin Knelman Terrence Knight Jeffrey Kofman Judith Korthals Eva Kushner O. Kuskis Sonia Labatt Anne Lancashire Susan Lang Peter Large John Lawson Julian Lebenhaft

8

• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

First Scotiabank/CJFE Journalism Fellow at Massey

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n September 2009, Eric Lemus became our first Scotiabank/CJFE Journalism Fellow. Eric is a reporter for LaPagina.com in El Salvador and regularly covers stories for BBC Mundo. He joined the Canadian Journalism Fellows in all their activities and audited classes at the University of Toronto. For the first time in the Journalism Fellowship Program, Scotiabank generously funded a four-month fellowship for a Latin American journalist, which was run in association with Canadian Journalists for Freedom of Expression (CJFE). Eric dropped comfortably into life at the College and made many friends among his fellow journalists and the Junior Fellows. We enjoyed his company for just one term and were sad to see him leave before Christmas. However, we didn’t quite let him go so quickly. In February, we invited him to join Marina Jiménez, Rachel Pulfer, Kevin Robertson, Ivan Semeniuk, and College Administrator Anna Luengo in Mexico City for a very full week. In Eric’s speech about his fellowship at the annual CJFE Gala in Toronto, he articulated strongly what the fellowship means to a Latin American journalist. This is part of what he said: …when CJFE and Massey College particularly chose somebody from Central America and a reporter from the smallest country in the isthmus, it was for me a great hope for our region. Perhaps we don’t pass unnoticed. To the south of the Rio Grande, there are serious risks and threats that we thought were things of the past. The violence continues and each day there is modernizing of the mechanisms of terror to gag the press, which mostly relies on selfcensorship. It is therefore necessary that the press in Canada squints past the Rio Grande not •

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JULIE PAYETTE was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

1989 One of the year’s top ten classical recordings _ _____________________

EVE EGOYAN was recently elected

a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and was one of 50 Canadian performers and conductors given the designation of CMC Ambassador by the Canadian Music Centre. Her last CD, Simple Lines of Enquiry – a world premiere recording of a one-hour long Canadian composition performed by a Canadian pianist on a Canadian label funded by the Canada Council for the Arts –

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only because of what happens there, but also because of how those events affect Canada. We are too close to Canada to be ignored. This is why I feel that the continuation of the Latin American fellowship is of utmost importance.

Massey Journalism Fellowship named in honour of Val Ross

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t the annual gala of the Canadian Journalism Val Ross Foundation (CJF) last June 10, Master John Fraser announced the inauguration of the Kierans-Janigan Journalism Fellowship in honour of Val Ross, former Globe and Mail writer and Southam Journalism Fellow (1997-98) at Massey College. Ms. Ross died in February 2008. The benefactors of the fellowship are Tom Kierans, Chair of the governing board of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and his wife, journalist-writer Mary Janigan. The first recipient of the fellowship was also announced at the CJF gala: Elizabeth Church, education reporter for The Globe and Mail.

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was selected as one of this year’s top ten classical recordings by Alex Ross, one of the world’s most renowned classical music reviewers. h emu@interlog.com

1991 CATHERINE MORONEY graduated

from the University of Southern California with an M.Sc. in Computer Science. She is a scientific software engineer at the Jet Propulsion Lab, analyzing satellite data, and lives in Pasadena, California. h Catherine.M.Moroney@jpl.nasa.gov

SABINA CALAIS STONE (née Watts)

is a retired Clinical Researcher at McMaster University. Her beloved son, Jamie Thomas Watts, passed away in

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2006. Her three grandchildren (Justin, Calista, and Ava) keep her moving forward one day at a time. h sabinastone@sympatico.ca

1993 JOHN GRAHAM is a Professor at

the Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary. He lives in Calgary with his wife, Susan, and their son and daughter. h jrgraham@ucalgary.ca

1994 BYRON HORNER is President,

CopperLion Capital (Private Equity Fund). He lives in Vancouver with his wife, Nicole Bradbury, and their two children, Wesley and Cyrus. h byronhorner@hotmail.com

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

I

by Michiel Horn

first saw Massey College on a muggy September evening in 1963. The night porter gave me my keys, pointed me to my room, and wished me goodnight. “I have a large study-sitting room and an adjoining bedroom of generous proportions,” I wrote in my diary: “I’m pleased.” After unpacking, I sank into a suedeupholstered armchair (luxury!), returned to the novel I had started on the plane from Vancouver, then read until three. The following morning I rose too late for breakfast, but even before lunch I began meeting other Junior Fellows. All of us were new to Massey, of course, but some knew the city or the University of Toronto or both. David Trott (to whom I felt drawn as a fellow British Columbian) took me downtown and introduced me to A & A and Sam the Record Man. David Hobbs, Mel Pelt, and Lorie Waisberg, history majors all, offered valuable information about courses and professors. In the JCR one evening before dinner, Robertson Davies, the Master, welcomed us to the College, told us a bit about its history, and said we were rarely privileged to be the first group of Junior Fellows. He hit one wrong note. Fearing we would talk about “women and horses,” he said he would post weekly dinner conversation topics. This did not last long, because Junior Fellows soon started offering their own ribald alternatives. The opening Gaudy took place soon after, the highlight being a theatrical performance in which Vincent Massey, the Visitor, and Bob Dinsmore, a student in English, played leading roles. That night saw a good deal of exuberant partying, with Robin Green, a suave Southam Fellow on leave from The Globe and Mail, distinguishing himself as host. Among his guests, I seem to recall, was Raymond Massey, but I’m not certain. Early in the term, Rosemary Speirs, a history graduate student, led some women students into the quad in a protest against the exclusion of women. Davies joined them and spoke to Rosemary, his greying mane bent over her red hair, as the group circled the quad several times. She told me later he had advised them to find a female patron to found a college for women. Some Junior Fellows objected to the demonstration, and one, Jay Ford, launched a Rosemary Speirs limerick contest. I don’t recall the entries, but I do remember an evening of drinking in the JCR to console Jay over the breakup of his engagement to Margaret Atwood. Besides Davies, the truly memorable people included Vincent Massey, an austere, courteous patrician, and the porter, Norman McCracken, with his waxed moustache and parade-ground voice. Among the Senior Fellows, three stood out: Bill Dobson, sinologist and brilliant raconteur; Robert Finch, a courtly poet and scholar of French; and Tuzo Wilson, a jovial geophysicist who demonstrated the theory of continental drift by using his spoon to move the circles of fat floating on his soup. We were all feeling our way that first year, but by the second a community was taking shape. Playing a key role in this was a new arrival, Ken Windsor, a thoroughly amiable historian who took over Robin’s role as host and expanded on it. He lived in House II-18 for two years, and his parties became legendary. Of greater significance was his part in forming a Junior Fellows’ organization and what in time became the Lionel Massey Fund.

1960s

Spotlight on High Table Ms. Anna Porter Publisher and Author Ms. Rachel Pulfer Webster/McConnell Journalism Fellow Ms. Jennifer Puncher Film Production Mr. Michael Redhill Writer-in-Residence Mr. Kevin Robertson CBC/Radio-Canada Journalism Fellow Mr. Nicholas Rundall Publishing Professor Stephen Rupp Spanish Literature Mr. John Ralston Saul Author

Michiel Horn The High Tables, the Christmas Gaudy, and the Christmas Dance were important events in defining College life. Moira Whalon, the Master’s super-competent secretary, organized the first two. At the Gaudy, Finch read a poem composed for the occasion, and Davies read a ghost story. The annual Christmas ghost story quickly became the central attraction of subsequent gaudies. A highlight of the dances, organized by a student committee, were the skits, directed initially by Brenda Davies and then by a future playwright, Rob Fothergill. And who can forget croquet in the quad? Initiated in the spring of 1964, it was still going strong years later. In 1966, Rob and Sami Gupta made a short movie, Oddballs, immortalizing the game. Its stars were Rod Thornley and Michael Daschtschuk, a chemical engineer with a wicked eye for parking your ball where you had no play at all. Davies appeared as Master and match starter. I think of my four years as a Junior Fellow with great pleasure. The building was (and is) splendid and many of the people in it well worth knowing. Not everything was perfect in the early days. Amenities now taken for granted, such as the laundry room, the games room, and the television set, were absent at first. The men-only atmosphere was limiting. But those were the days of my youth, and I look back nostalgically on them, the College, and the people I met there. Some of them became friends for life. I learned a lot and I enjoyed myself. Who can ask for more? Michiel Horn was a Junior Fellow from 1963 to 1967. He taught Canadian history for many years at Glendon College, York University, where he is Professor Emeritus and University Historian. In 1984, he married Cornelia Schuh, a Junior Fellow from 1974-1977, whom he met at a Massey College function, and they have two sons. Since 2007 he has been an Associate Senior Fellow.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Mr. Neil Seeman Health Mr. Ivan Semeniuk Associate Journalism Fellow Mr. Joey Slinger Journalist The Hon. Mr. Greg Sorbara Ontario Provincial Parliament Ms. Dianna Symonds Publishing Mrs. Judy Tanenbaum Philanthropy Mr. Larry Tanenbaum Sports and Entertainment Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalf Foundation Innovation Fellow Mr. R.H. Thomson Actor Mrs. Cindy Thorburn Volunteerism Mr. Thomas Thornquist Dr. Alexander Van Tulleken Medicine His Excellency Dr. George Witschel Ambassador of Germany to Canada Mr. Thomas Wayman Author Dr. Albert Wu Senior Resident, Ophthalmology

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Cecil Hahn (’95) and Alorani Martin – July 31, 2010 Rachel Pulfer (’09) and Karim Bardeesy (’09) – March 27, 2010 Jordan Thomson (’06) and Laura Weir – August 28, 2010

BIRTHS Emmi Elizabeth Wang Ping Du Mont – adopted March 10, 2009, a second daughter for Janice Du Mont (’91) Sophie – May 10, 2010, to Alon Eizenman (’04) Jan Matias – May 27, 2009, to Jan Eperjesi (’04) Wyatt Patrick Carlyle – July 8, 2010, to Amy Maish (’95) and Drake Carlyle, a brother for Archie Ash Cormac Michael James Malone – September 18, 2009, to Meg Logue Malone (’07) and Toby Malone (’06) Jeremy Carson Nohrnberg – April 10, 2010, a brother for Madeline and fourth grandchild for James Nornberg (’63) Ava Chanel – April 1, 2010, a sister for Calista Rose and granddaughter for Sabina Calais Stone (’91)

In Memoriam We regret to announce the passing of the following members of our community. Gerald Robert Brown Quadrangler, ’98-’09 on November 4, 2009 Geoffrey Clark Senior Resident ’81-’82 Vincent Del Buono Junior Fellow, ’73-’75 on April 13, 2010 Ena Francis Kitchen Server, ’72-’06 on April 19, 2010 Andres Jaaku Junior Fellow, ’66-’68 on January 3, 2010 Jane Lockhart (Gordon) Glassco Quadrangler, ’97-’10 on April 28, 2010 Boris Stoicheff Senior Fellow, ’89-’10 on April 15, 2010

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From the Massey College Archives, photography by Anthony Luengo

Marriages

Conversation and community by Jacqueline Murray

I

have been asked with amazing frequency how I learned to speak with ease to a wide variety of people. I always attribute this to my years at Massey, a community characterized by conviviality. From the first moment I entered the gates, life at Massey was a swirl of encounters with fascinating people. Much of the College conviviality was centred on the JCR. How many of us learned how to carry a cup of morning coffee down the stairs from Hall to the JCR without spilling? This was a real challenge given the fluid dynamics of those teacups, as a physicist kindly explained! And then there was the sherry before dinner. Who had ever drunk sherry before? Nonetheless, we all learned to love it at Massey! Our pastimes were communal and inclusive. There was a squash tree for the athletically inclined. Killer croquet in the quad was equally ruthless, if requiring considerably less exertion. More surprising, perhaps, was the competitiveness of the Scrabble tournament. A dozen spectators might hover around watching as words were played with the same prowess as a Stanley Cup final. Then there were poetry nights in the Upper Library, when each person read two or three poems, leaving the rest of us to ponder their meaning to the reader. Wondering about just who were one’s “fellow Fellows” (a term popularized by Michael Wex) was also evident in the great baby picture sweepstakes. Then there was the night of the federal election that Joe Clark lost. Suddenly, the whole College was filled with political junkies, and we moved two or three televisions into the JCR. Never before has there been a TV in precincts dedicated to collegial discourse and chess. Was this the thin edge of the wedge? I am sure that many of us from the seventies and early eighties still find the notion of a permanent TV in the Common Room astonishing. When Brideshead Revisited premiered on PBS, we repaired to the basement in evening dress, champagne in hand! Dining always provided an opportunity to stretch one’s mind and expand one’s horizons. In the Hall, the custom of assuming whatever chair was free promised amazing and unpredictable discussion, dependant only on the serendipity of who arrived when. Where else would a medieval historian hear a med student describe his first encounter with a cadaver or an organist explain how to make a lute. Not all meal-time conversation was necessarily elevating, of course. Idle chatter might occupy those lingering after lunch, as they watched others hone their skills at capturing, in upside-down water glasses, the nasty wasps that plagued the Hall every fall. How many wasps can a Junior Fellow trap in a single glass? I wonder now, with belated concern, about whatever happened when the staff were later confronted with all those angry insects? Almost as fearsome as those wasps was the prospect of taking one’s turn at the High Table. These were always events of great import, as we watched the individuals selected to join the High Table manoeuvre, with varying levels of finesse, discomfort, or obliviousness, among the Master, the eminent guests, and the Senior Fellows. Then, of course, there was the trial by manners posed by the postprandial table in the Upper Library. In those days, the old rituals of cigars and snuff still pertained and countless

Thank you, donors!

1970s Jacqueline Murray Junior Fellows suffered the worse for the volatile combination of sherry, wine, good food, port, cheese, snuff, and cigars. Yet through it all was the wide ranging, intriguing, and engaging conversation with the extraordinary people who came to Massey. I lived at Massey during its first great transition (second, if you count the admission of women to the Junior Fellowship). I mean the retirement of Robertson Davies and the appointment of Patterson Hume as the second Master. I always admired Pat Hume’s fearlessness in following someone who had made an indelible imprint on the fabric of College life. It was an interesting transition, gentle, incremental, scarcely noticeable at first. Then, at the Christmas Gaudy, the ghost story was replaced by a light-operatic rendering of the famous Santayana lines circling the Hall. Nothing can ever quite match a version of “Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable ….” worthy of Gilbert and Sullivan. It is conversation and community that I remember most fondly. The multidisciplinary perspectives on the world that distinguished Massey continue to inform my outlook, as do the Massey values of bridging the academy and society and integrating knowledge in the service of society. These are the values of Massey College that shaped us, influenced our paths, and have made us who we are. And these are the values than continue to guide this remarkable community. And, of course, the ability to engage with diverse beings, honed in the JCR, always comes in handy! Jacqueline Murray was a Junior Fellow from 1979-83. After earning her Ph.D. in Medieval Studies, she spent 13 years at the University of Windsor teaching History and serving as Director of the Humanities Research Group. She then moved to Guelph, where she was Dean of Arts and is now Professor of History. She is involved with groups promoting human rights and women’s education in the developing world.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Drawings from Ron Thom’s round 1 submissions for Massey College, June 30, 1960. On the facing page, Thom’s original plan for Ondaatje Hall, featuring a pitched roof. Immediately above is the south elevation, on Hoskin Avenue, as he first envisioned it. Thom’s original plans also called for public rooms, including one for billiards, thrusting into the Quadrangle in place of the pond that we have today (inset above). •

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1984 DEBORAH KENNEDY is a Professor of English at St. Mary’s University, Halifax. h deborah.kennedy@smu.ca

Booing oil tankers ________________

ANTHONY PERL completed his first

full term as Director of Urban Studies at Simon Fraser University. He published a second edition of Transport Revolutions: Moving People and Freight Without Oil, and was invited to give papers on transportation policy over the past year or so at the East-West Center in Honolulu, the Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management at New York University, the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy in

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Saskatchewan, the University of Oregon, and the Central Alberta Economic Partnership in Red Deer, Alberta. Speaking at the JohnsonShoyama School had special resonance because Massey Senior Resident Al Johnson had served on Perl’s Ph.D. supervisory committee, and provided a great deal of mentoring during his graduate studies. Perl lives happily with his wife, Andrea (Banks), on the shores of Burrard Inlet, cheering the cruise ships that sail by in summer and booing the oil tankers. h aperl@sfu.ca

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University. He lives in Bloomfield, New Jersey. h mbaur@fordham.edu

1987 DIANE ENGLISH is Director of Policy, Parks and Recreation Ontario.

h diane.english@sympatico.ca ROBERT I. THOMPSON is Associate

Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, and was just appointed department head for a five-year term. h rthompso@ucalgary.ca

1988 DAVID EARN is Professor of

1985 MICHAEL BAUR is Associate

Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Law, Fordham

Mathematics, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University. h earn@math.mcmaster.ca

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

Galin Foundation Heather Gardiner Jane Gaskell John Geiger Hugh Gemmell Meric Gertler Douglas Gibson Graeme Gibson Pamela Gibson Luke Gilgan Jane Glassco John Godfrey Mary Godfrey Gary Goldberg David Goldbloom Edward Goldfarb Joanna Goldfarb Greta Golick Paul Gooch Cynthia Good Alice Goodfellow-Mennacher Mary Goodwin Allan Gotlieb Katherine Govier Catherine Graham Ronald Graham Jack Granatstein Judith Grant John Gray James Greene Edward Greenspan Kathleen Griffin Scott Griffin Franklyn Griffiths Phyllis Grosskurth Marc Grynpas Richard Gwyn Beth Haddon Cecil Hahn Roger Hall Francess Halpenny Rick Halpern C. M. Harding William Harris Joan Harrison Elizabeth Harvey Lynn Hasher Kerry Hawkins Maggie Hayes Sandra Hazan Nona Heaslip Chantal Hébert Colette Hegarty John Heintz Ralph Heintzman Gerald Helleiner Peter Herrndorf

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Life at Massey College

• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

The Master’s Report Thank you, donors! Abdallah Daar Gary Davis Natalie Davis William Davis Martha Deacon Philip Deck Dianne de Fenoyl Jon Dellandrea W. Delworth Etienne de Medicis Honor de Pencier Marni de Pencier Ramsay Derry Brenda Dinnick John Dirks Wendy Dobson Elizabeth Dowdeswell Rupert Duchesne Nana Duncan Dorothy Dunlop J. Stefan Dupré Michael Eagan Fredrik Eaton Noel Edison Peter Edwards Gordon Elliot Timothy Elliott Sheila Embleton Howard Engel Diana Ericson Gay Evans John Evans George Fallis Maureen Farrow Catherine Fauquier Anthony Feinstein Brian Felske Terence Finlay Patty Fischer Alison Fisher Derek Fisher James Fleck Patricia Fleming Albert's Foods Inc. Catherine Foote Charles Foran Julia Foster Ursula Franklin Danielle Fraser Jane Freeman Josephine Frayne Martin Friedland Colin Friesen Murray Frum Doreen Fumia

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Hims, hymns, and a carrel apparition

from page 3

As you will read elsewhere in this issue, the Master Emerita continues making major contributions to scholarship. At that luncheon last spring, watching the animated, affectionate faces of those who loved her most at Massey, it was for me a real reminder of the layered contributions my predecessors have made at this good place. I honour them all and on behalf of the College – past, present and future – I also thank them. I say “layered” because these contributions form the firm foundation upon which Massey College draws its enormous strength and builds its future. We are now into the academic year 2010-11. In the year after this we will have reached the 50th anniversary of the granting of the provincial charter which launched Massey College on its unique trajectory in graduate and postgraduate community fellowship. The year following that will be the Golden Anniversary of the first year of Junior Fellowship. An official College history has been commissioned from Dr. Judith Skelton Grant, the biographer of Robertson Davies, and we have already begun some preliminary planning to make sure the anniversary is memorable. •

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by Andrew Cunningham

Our Alumni will be playing a major role in those events. Please stay connected to your College throughout the years. Please remember us generously in your gift giving. And, above all, please keep alive our worthy notions of •

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1981

Educational Consultant living in Red Deer, Alberta. Her first play, Fertile Choices, premiered this year. She also had her first solo art exhibit, The Secret Language of Roads. h boultbee@telusplanet.net

JIM GRIER is happy to report that

he was awarded a Killam Research Fellowship, as well as Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Council of Learned Societies to support his research on the origins of musical literacy in the medieval West, 900-1100.

JONATHAN HART is at the

scholarship, fellowship, community, and the connectness of all things and all people.

University of Alberta, where he holds the positions of Director,

Comparative Literature; Professor of English; and Adjunct Professor of History. He was recently an Invited Professor at Sorbonne Nouvelle (Paris) and the Ricardo J. Quinones Distinguished Lecturer, ClaremontMcKenna. This past year, he was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard. h jonathanlockehart@gmail.com

BRUNO SCHERZINGER lives in

Richmond Hill, Ontario with his wife, Karen Jones, and their three children, Claire (18), Emily (16), and Peter (14). He is the Chief Technology Officer for Applanix Corporation and has a forthcoming Red Book on integrated systems. h BScherzinger@sympatico.ca

Sapere aude • Dare to know

MURRAY MAZER recently joined

Endeca as Vice-President, Distributed Development, after eight years as founder/ CTO/VP at Lumigent. He lives in Arlington Massachusetts, with his partner, Sylvia Peretz. h murray@mazer.org

1983 Throwing in the towel_ ____________

RON THOMPSON saw the light in

2007 and threw in the towel on corporate life. He is pursuing his long-standing interest in creative writing and completed two novels that he is trying to publish. He lives in Toronto with his wife, Jacquie, and daughter, Kaitlin. h rgt11@sympatico.ca

was going to start with my best College anecdote concerning the Elvis bust, but Steve Bearne beat me to it two MasseyNews issues back. Fortunately, though, there are plenty of second-string anecdotes to share. There was, for instance, the time when tensions between feminists and traditionalists in the alto and soprano sections of the College Choir briefly reached a boiling point. The progressive choristers declared that they would no longer sing gender-specific words, a policy that produced a jarring drop in volume whenever a he, his, or him came along, as they not infrequently do in hymns and madrigals. I forget how this was resolved but I do recollect that despite a diversity of strongly held views on politics, religion, and the proper location for the College television, we Masseyites were more united than divided by issues. The greatest of all common causes, at least in the early years, must surely have been the universally unappreciated College food. On that distasteful subject I will offer what is not so much an anecdote as an observation – namely that through all the years since, a mere minute’s meditation on the culinary words horseradish, tapioca, and Salisbury steak has sufficed to make anything served to me taste like a gift from the gods. Of course, meals at Massey were about so much more than eating (at any rate, this was how the administration defended the Salisbury steak). I recall, for example, the evening that the Junior Fellows hosted Barbara Frum at “Low Table,” a now much-changed College tradition in which an illustrious guest would join us for an ordinary dinner and then give a talk in the Upper Library. Ms. Frum was, needless to say, a particularly distinguished invitee, so distinguished, in fact, that we Canadians could not summon up the nerve to join her at her designated table. So there she sat, forlorn and almost alone, until rescued at the last moment by the fortuitous arrival in Hall of a friendly group of American Junior Fellows, who had likely never heard of her and who in any event were not inclined to be much impressed (let alone intimidated) by anything Canadian. Rounding out this memorable evening was Ms. Frum’s famous reply, in the post-lecture Q & A, to Steve Bearne’s detailed criticism of scientific inaccuracies in The Journal’s coverage of the Challenger disaster: “We’re not on closed circuit to an engineering faculty.” I hasten to add that Steve did eventually recover from this and even served a year as Don of Hall, during which he assigned the task of organizing Low Tables to me, knowing full well that this might mean the end of them forever.

VINCENT DEL BUONO

(1949-2010)

I

1979 GLYNIS WILSON BOULTBEE is an

by Ian Alexander

1980s Andrew Cunningham A final recollection dates from my fourth and final year as a Junior Fellow. One afternoon, Robert Janes and I were studying down in the carrels. It was our last semester of law school and we quite frankly had had enough of it. It was always work, work, work. Here was a fine spring day and we lawyers were, as usual, the only ones stuck down in the basement studying. Tossing aside our half-finished essays, we let it all out. No aspect of the law school experience was spared, up to and including the faculty themselves, whose moral, intellectual, and sartorial shortcomings were brilliantly lampooned. Cathartic though this must have been, it all came to a dead halt when, out of the darkness (ensured even in daytime by Ron Thom’s love of dim lighting) there appeared without warning a figure whose ghostly stealth and pale countenance seemed to have sprung straight from the imagination of our Founding Master. “Boys, I’m trying to get some work done. I like to come down here because no one disturbs me,” the thing announced, rather too gently, I thought, and in a voice that was startlingly like ... well, come to think of it, startlingly like that of then outgoing University of Toronto Faculty of Law Dean (and incoming University of Toronto President) J. R. S. Prichard, whose facial expressions and general comportment it also brilliantly mimicked. After a moment’s reflection, everything that could be said having been said, the pallid ghost and the red-faced students returned to their studies in stunned silence. Andrew Cunningham was a Junior Fellow from 1986-90. He is a lawyer in the Toronto office of Stikeman Elliott LLP.

Sapere Aude •Dare to Know

Vincent Del Buono, who died on April 13, 2010 at the age of 60, was a Resident Junior Fellow of Massey College, 1973-75. He is the only former Don of Hall whose name is not listed on the board that hangs behind the grace pulpit in Ondaatje Hall. The reason for this apparent oversight is that 1974-75 was, as the Founding Master rather portentously christened it, “The Year of the Two Hall Dons.” The phrase comes from “The Perils of the Double Sign,” one of Davies’ Christmas ghost stories. In this particular story, Vince appears as what, indeed, he was in real life: a practitioner of two arcane disciplines – some might call them complementary black arts – law and astrology. Vince went on to a distinguished career, in Canada and abroad, in the fields of criminal justice, human rights, and the rule of law. Among numerous highlights, he was the Founding President of two international institutions for criminal law reform, served as Deputy Secretary-General of Amnesty International in London, and led the British Council’s Access to Justice program in Nigeria, for which he was honoured by investiture into the Order of the Federal Republic of Nigeria. (He was equally proud of his traditional Nigerian titles: The King’s Law Maker and The Emir’s Chief Mediator.) At the time of his death, he was CEO of the Niagara 1812 Bicentennial Legacy Council. Over the years, Vince held academic appointments at, among other institutions, York, McGill, UBC, the University of Ottawa, and the State University of New York at Buffalo. In spite of his busy and peripatetic life, Vince retained close ties to Massey. In 2004, he was especially proud to be one of four inaugural recipients of the College’s Clarkson Laureateship for Public Service. In honour of his many achievements – and his larger-than-life personality – friends and colleagues are organizing the Vincent M. Del Buono Visiting Fellowship in International Justice and Human Rights, to be based at Massey College.

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And to posthumously rectify his omission from the official list of past Dons, we will also endow in Vince’s name an annual prize to be awarded to a member of the College community, at the discretion of the current Don of Hall.

ENA FRANCIS

(1933-2010)

by Anna Luengo Many Masseyites will fondly remember our dear server Ena Francis, who spent almost as many years at the College (1972-06) as Pat Kennedy had. When I joined the staff in 1995, Ena was very much in charge of serving breakfast and lunch, and she was known both for giving a hapless new Junior Fellow a shout for taking a glass of juice and a bowl of soup (definitely verboten in those days), as well as for turning a blind eye to the odd team-rower who needed extra calories. Originally from the Caribbean island of Grenada, Ena had immigrated to Canada several years before coming to Massey, and she and I regularly exchanged lyrics from various old calypsos that we had both grown up with. If she had been quarrelling about something right before I turned up for my morning coffee, some lines from the Mighty Sparrow, the Grenadian-born “Calypso King of the World,” would get her laughing, a wonderful resonating laugh that filled Ondaatje Hall. But it wasn’t only the rhythm of the Caribbean that endeared Ena to everyone around her. She was a warm presence, providing a listening ear to many, and never forgetting a face when one of our Alum turned up for a meal. When David Landaverde joined her, there was even more respect for “La Ena,” and he added some extra softness to complete the marvellous choreography of the servery. We carry on without Ena, but she will be deeply missed by those she touched during her many years of loyal service to our College.

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MasseyNews • 2009-2010

Kitchen Creations Kitchen Creations

From the Master Emerita

GRILLED BEEF TENDERLOIN STEAKS WITH A LIME-GORGONZOLA BUTTER ¾ cup soft unsalted butter ½ tbsp. Gorgonzola cheese 2 limes Pinch of fresh thyme Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

6 beef tenderloin steaks, cut 2 inches thick 3 tbsps. olive oil 1 tsp. sherry vinegar ½ tsp. roasted garlic

Place the softened butter in a bowl. Finely grate the zest of both limes and then juice them. Break up the gorgonzola cheese. Add all the zest, half the juice, and cheese to the butter. Using a spoon, blend the ingredients well, then mix in a pinch of thyme and season to taste with salt and pepper. Place the lime butter on a piece of parchment paper and roll into a thick log 6 inches long. Twist the ends of the parchment and refrigerate until firm. Approximately half an hour before cooking, take the steaks out of the fridge and marinate them in a dish with the remaining lime juice and sherry vinegar garlic and olive oil. Season with salt and pepper just before grilling. Grill on a medium-high barbecue until done as desired.

Chef Silvana Valdes

Serve with desired side dishes and top each steak with a slice of the lime butter.

Continued from page 1

The Master tackles a “complicated” evening How do you organize an evening that includes space-shuttle astronauts, government and academic VIPs, an assortment of Massey Fellows and other community members, a film and question period in an over-crowded Common Room, and the return of a College spoon? And all this with maximum security on Devonshire Place as the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall are reviewing troops just up the street at Varsity Stadium, not to speak of displaced Junior Fellows to feed and a Corporation High Table to follow 24 hours later. We thought this detailed and enthusiastic pre-event notice from the Master would give our readers a taste of what’s involved in organizing all this. It’s all, as he says, quite “complicated.” It just takes, we might add, a bit of panache. TO ALL JUNIOR FELLOWS FROM THE MASTER Next Thursday, our distinguished Alumna, astronaut Julie Payette, will be returning to Massey College with the entire crew of the Space Shuttle Endeavour STS 127: Mark Polansky, Chris Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, and Dave Wolf, along with their wives and senior officials from the Canadian Space Agency. The College has invited them all to join us for dinner in Ondaatje Hall and I have been landed with the task of organizing a complicated evening. But what’s a challenge if it’s not worth meeting! I am going to have to accommodate some Senior Fellows, the President of the university, our Visitor, members of the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, distinguished outside guests (like the LieutenantGovernor), and some Senior Fellows, so the following plan seems to be the fairest way I can come up with. (1) There will be seating for 40 resident Junior Fellows and 40 non-resident Junior Fellows. The remaining 44 seats will go the astronauts and all the others I have to accommodate. This will leave some residents without a meal here and we will organize one for them at Trinity College. Stay posted! (2) We will gather in the Common Room (gowns, please) at 6 p.m. for drinks and go up as usual at 6:30. I propose to put an astronaut at each table, along with other guests. The High Table will be divided in three and will feature officials of the space agencies at each of them. (3) After a two-course dinner, we will all go back to the Common Room to see a short film, narrated live by the

astronauts. There will be seats for the infirm (like me), but most of us will be crowding in and squatting on the floor. There will be time for questions. At the end of that exercise, the College’s silver teaspoon will be formally presented back to us having taken its historic trip to outer space, and I am proposing that David Landaverde, Pat Kennedy, and the Don of Hall will be there to accept it on behalf of the College. (4) Following all this, dessert and coffee will be served in the Upper Library, and the astronauts have promised to linger for informal discussions. (5) The same night during our event, and just up the street, the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall will be reviewing troops in Varsity Stadium. There will be massive security on the street, so please take notice of that. All in all, it should all make for a memorable and amusing night at Massey College and Devonshire Place. (6) The following night is Corporation High Table, and life is going to get confusing if we don’t separate the sign-ups. So, dear colleagues, please sign-up for the Payette evening by e-mail on a first-come, firstserved basis. If you don’t make it into Ondaatje Hall for dinner, Trinity College will feed you and just get back here in time for the film and post-prandials in the Upper Library. (7) Sgt. Hope in the Porter’s Lodge will take the sign-up for the Corporation High Table in the usual way starting next Monday. Thank you all for your co-operation. It promises to be a great evening.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause,

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s our current Master notes in his report, he hosted a lunch last spring for Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer, an occasion that delighted her. In her own words: “I was honoured to have the Master arrange a lunch party for me. It was good to see old friends and to hear of others. And, of course, it was good to see the College in such good hands!” She added that she was also in Toronto at Professor Saddlemyer that time to host the Canadian launch of the multi-volume Dictionary of Irish Biography for the Royal Irish Academy. This event took place at St. Michael’s College at the University of Toronto. Professor Saddlemyer’s main project this past year was the completion of her edition of the correspondence of W. B. Yeats and his wife, George, for Oxford University Press. Much of this past summer was spent on the production details of this large volume, and we look forward to its publication in March 2011. While this work took up most of her time, the Master Emerita still managed to fit in teaching a course on the poetry of Yeats for the University of Victoria extension department in the winter, as well as a talk last January in Victoria to the Canadian Federation of University Women on writing a woman’s biography and a lecture this past April on the art of Edmund Dulac at the National Library of Ireland, in Dublin. •

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Professor Saddlemyer continues her connection with the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagara-on-the-Lake: in the past year she wrote program essays for two of Shaw’s plays – The Devil’s Disciple and John Bull’s Other Island – that were performed at this world-renowned festival. She also remained actively involved as one of the general editors of the Cornell Yeats, one more volume of which came out last year (just four volumes are left to complete this 32-volume series). Also published this past year was another volume in the Selected Irish Plays series, of which she is one of the General Editors. This series is published by Colin Smythe, where the Master Emerita also serves as a member of the editorial board, as she still is with a number of Canadian and international journals such as the Canadian Journal of Irish Studies and the Irish University Review.

STAFF NEWS After the retirement of College Librarian Marie Korey last December, P.J. MacDougall assumed the new position of Library Administrator. We also welcomed a new Porter, Dan Speirs. Brian Maloney returned to the Print Room on a part-time basis to instruct students on the use of the presses, and to provide us with the unique and creative keepsakes enhancing special events. For private catered functions, if time permits, Brian is pleased to work with our members to create printed notices, for a fee, which contributes to library and printroom funding. Our new one-person IT department consists of Matt Glandfield, of Log-On Solutions, who joins us one day per week. He’s had a challenging task in updating our systems over the summer, which he accomplished with great patience and good humour.

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1974

1975

1977

MICHAEL BRODIE lives in

DONALD BARONOWSKI is a

Playing George Sand_ _____________

Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is Chief Scientist, Verizon Communications (VSO). He was appointed to a second term to the Advisory Committee of The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics. He delivered the keynote address, on “Understanding Our Digital Universe: Unleashing Natural Forces,” at the June 2009 IEEE International Conference on Cyber Engineering and Creating Value by Making Connections in Istanbul. h michael.brodie@verizon.com or www.michaelbrodie.com

Faculty Lecturer, Department of History, McGill University. He lives in Chateauguay, Quebec. h donald.baronowski@mcgill.ca

1976 BARRY MONSON is a Professor of

Mathematics, University of New Brunswick. He longs for an end to the busy work that more and more pollutes the intellectual environment. He and his wife, Milda, just celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary. Their younger daughter, Eva, is a graduate student at McGill and their older daughter, Rita, is a post-doctoral fellow at Cambridge. h bmonson@unb.ca

CAROLYN ROBERTS FINLAY,

Canada Music Week Coordinator for the British Columbia Registered Music Association, North Vancouver, commissioned and organized the premier performances of three pieces for piano by Dr. Stephen Chatman, Professor of Composition at UBC. She also performed in three biographical plays by former Ideas producer Don Mowatt as Clara Schumann, Olivia Clemens, and George Sand. The last was for a feature evening on Frederic Chopin and George Sand at the Bicentennial Chopin Festival held in Vancouver this past May.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Thank you, donors! Deryck Brown Robert Brown Russell Brown Francis Brunelle Robert Buchan Catherine Buck Ian Burgham Donald Burwash Brendan Calder David Cameron Teddy Cameron David Campbell Dona Campbell Joanna Campion CanadaHelps CBC Edmund Cape James Carley Rosann Cashin Wendy Cecil John Chamberlin David Chapman-Smith Barbara Charles Michael Charles Janet Charlton Mark Cheetham Emmanuel Chomski Marilyn Chotem Tara Chotem Ian Clark George Clarke Howard Clarke Stephen Clarkson Christine Clement Edward Coderre Andrew Cohen Judith Cohen George Connell Martin Connell Russell Connolly Eleanor Cook Anthony Coombes Brian Corman Jack Costello James Coutts Elizabeth Cowper Christopher Cowperthwaite David Cox Marcelle Cox Margaret Craik Phillip Crawley Patrick Crean Wilma Cromwell Crosbie Limited

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• From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades • From the Decades •

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Donations made between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Nora Adamson Howard Adelman Toshiko Adilman Bruce Alexander Ian Alexander Derek Allen Jocelyn Allen Richard Always Cristina Amon Carl Amrhein R. Jamie Anderson Aubie Angel David Angell James Appleyard Sally Armstrong James Arthur Philip Arthur Katherine Ashenburg Roger Bagnall Andrew Baines Cornelia Baines Helen Balfour Ian Bandeen Carolyn Barnes Donald Baronowski Isabel Bassett R. Beardsley Belinda Beaton Avie Bennett Daryl Bennett Jalynn Bennett Robert Bennett Alan Bernstein Suresh Bhalla Andrew Binkley Robert Birgeneau Sonja Bird Gloria Bishop John Bishop Michael Bliss Robert Boeckner Henry Borden Alan Borovoy Marian Botsford Fraser Walter Bowen Alan Bowker Diana Bradshaw Donald Brean Robin Breon Peter Brigg Alan Broadbent Stephen Brooke Aaron Brotman Carol Brough

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The Master’s Report from page 3

Whenever a Junior Fellow makes a real contact with him, either in informal chat in the Common Room, or sitting beside him at High Table, an animated connection is made. Earlier this year, Master Hume and I went to visit Professor Boris Stoicheff at his palliative care hospice shortly before the great physicist died (his obituary appears on page 38). Both men deployed courage and black humour at what General de Gaulle once called “the shipwreck of old age,” but this particular rendezvous was one of the most moving I had ever encountered. I have thought about it often after I drove Pat back to his home, where he cares for and protects Patricia Hume, his loyal and loving wife. I think it is because of an innate understanding of the unpredictable trajectory of life that the Master Emeritus’ approach to old age is so moving. That charming offbeat sense of humour (which delighted so many at High Table and occasionally discomforted others) has turned out to be his battle shield against the vicissitudes and challenges of the unrelenting process we all must face. It’s also why the Junior Fellows enjoy his company and why I rejoice whenever he comes to College events, or just drops by for lunch. I need hardly say that the Masters of our College have been a remarkably diverse lot. When Stefan Dupré, one of the University of Toronto’s most distinguished political scientists, became Acting Master in 1993 to give Master Ann Saddlemyer a much-needed sabbatical to deal with health issues, he set about educating Corporation on the necessities of fundraising. Thanks to him, a somewhat hidebound but proudly independent graduate college learned to grow up without the benefit of U of T’s development office raising its funds. •

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Master Dupré also deployed good humour to get across some of his more difficult points and decisions to the community. Consequently, by the time Master Saddlemyer returned in good health to resume her mastership, he had managed to aid her immeasurably in getting the College to accept the reality of its special situation with greater equanimity and effectiveness. It was a simple enough equation and message that Master Dupré left the Corporation, the Senior Fellowship, and its Alumni to ponder: “Take fundraising seriously or wither on the vine.” Master Dupré comes fairly often to College events, although not as much as we would like. He also handles the vicissitudes of age with courage and grace, and his Christian faith has been a source of great comfort to him. With great integrity and honesty, he has this past year let people know that he is now coping with the onset of Alzheimer’s. Not that anyone would notice; his unfailing courtesy and tact seem as untouched as his curiosity about the young and his presiding affection for the Junior Fellowship. Once again, courage is the hallmark, and my respect for Master Dupré, which was always high, is now even higher. When the Master Emerita, Ann Saddlemyer, came to town last spring to help with the Canadian launch of the Dictionary of Irish Biography (to which she was a crucial contributor), I hosted a lunch for her that included Masters Hume and Dupré, as well as many of the Senior Fellows and Alumni who were associated with her seven years as Master. She is, as all who know her appreciate, a warm and welcoming figure in the College’s history. During her years, the whole notion of community became her watchword and presiding ethos, and much of the joyous and communal atmosphere at Massey today can be traced back to her influence, especially the quantum leap made by women at Massey. Continued on page 6 ALUMNI

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1972

1973

JACK MacQUARRIE continues to

Lane Bishop, now retired from his

Ronald Stewart is Head of the

play in a variety of musical organizations and write a monthly column for a music magazine. He was made a member of the Chancellor’s Circle (U of T) this past year. He lives in Goodwood, Ontario, with his wife, Joan Andrews. h jmac@infinity.net

JOHN TSANG is a Clinical Professor, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, UBC. He lives in Vancouver with his wife, Eileen, and has two daughters, Katherine and Laura. h jtsang@interchange.ubc.ca

position at Honeywell International, relocated this past June to Kars, New Brunswick, with his wife, Diane. h Lane@LBishop.net

MARTIN O’MALLEY is a writer

living in Toronto. He is preparing a memoir based on diaries, and enjoys time with his grandchildren, Rhiannon, Noah, and Jamison. h martin.omalley@live.com

TERRILL THEMAN is a surgeon at

St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery, Temple University, in Philadelphia. h ttheman@hotmail.com

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Department of Environment and Geography at the University of Manitoba. He is one of the scientists developing the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) on climate extremes, and has been funded to do a cross-Canada speaking tour on this issue. As well, to better understand mountain precipitation, he carried out measurements on the distribution of snow and rain on Whistler Mountain just before and just after the last Winter Olympics. He continues to publish extensively in his field. h ronald_stewart@umanitoba.ca

JANE GLASSCO

Don in slippers

(1939-2010)

by SIMON DEVEREAUX

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ast night I dreamt I was at Massey College again. The place was vastly bigger than I remember. My legs seemed to be sunk in molasses, and I realized with despair that I was going to be hopelessly late for High Table, since simply getting across the quad was taking me an hour. Even so, I first stopped by the Porter’s Lodge to check my mail, which was piled high with mysteriously neglected items. Why did “Devereaux” share a box with someone named “Oppenheim”? Such are the eccentricities of dreams, and Massey – like all the best human institutions – is at its best when allowing space for dreams and eccentricity. For me, an early sign of belonging to the place was a communal TV set surrounded by people who, like my younger self, could name the title of a Star Trek episode before the main credit sequence. Not the more recent crop of shows – STNG, STDSN, etc. – but the original Kirk-Spock crew (or, as we must now call them, STOS). Those were innocent days: before Shatner further embarrassed himself and his country by plugging the nether-region benefits of wholegrain cereals on bus-stop posters. Not to mention wife #3 turning up drowned in the swimming pool. But I digress. For me, as I hope for everyone I shared it with, Massey was a place of both retreat and community, and of affirmation. The greatest affirmation for me was to be elected Don of Hall during my final year. To be sure, some of my affectations were no longer welcome. Daffy Duck in place of the rosette on my gown had to go. But another eccentricity was wonderfully endorsed. Timothy Findley, the guest of honour at High Table the night I assumed office, was sitting on a quad bench, contentedly puffing on a cigarette, when a passing Senior Fellow insisted that I could not assume the dignities of my position while wearing slippers instead of shoes. Findley responded, his cigarette punctuating the statement: “Wear the slippers!” End of debate. Of course, the main job of any Don of Hall is the daily recitation of grace before and after dinner. Of the three Dons I saw in action, I alone had the dubious distinction of once going completely blank. (Thanks, Steve, wherever you are, for saving my hide that night!) I also remember one Senior Fellow, on the eve of returning to his native Ireland, telling me how much he enjoyed my “ironic delivery of the grace”. Whatever could he have meant? And, come to think of it, weren’t these also the years we stopped thanking a Christian God for our daily bread and replaced Him/Her with the Massey Foundation (domus Massiensus)? Inevitably though, as a historian, one of the things I remember most vividly about my Massey years is what remarkable events were transpiring beyond its halls – the fall of the Berlin Wall, the failed coup in Moscow, the First Gulf War (the one with the other Bush; the one that ended, or at least stopped). My own feeble attempt to share in the flow of events involved the novelist Josef Škvorecký, who attended a High Table on the same day that Alexander Dubček reappeared in public to set the

1990s Simon Devereaux seal on the end of Communism in Czechoslovakia. “This must be a proud day for you,” I said very earnestly. Škvorecký smiled mischievously. “Not really,” he said. “Dubček was always a boring speaker.” With such bricks should all the windows of historical cliché be broken. Sometimes history arrived at our door. I remember vividly the late John Kenneth Galbraith coming to speak, as well as to set his generational seal of approval on then-premier Bob Rae’s ill-fated effort to revive deficit spending in an era of fiscal restraint. In the end, the image of Massey that most often comes to my mind – the one that arises unbidden and without obvious association – is the one which surely all of us saw most often without even thinking about it. It is the enormous picture in the Common Room: Icarus plunging from the sky, while the chariot of Helios roars on un-noticing through the heavens. Which of the two might we budding scholars have been meant to emulate? The answer, of course, was neither. Our intended model was the third, markedly less ostentatious figure in the picture – Daedalus, in whom ambition is balanced by modesty, and accomplishment is devoid of a prideful defiance of human limitations. I hope that all of you are as content in the life to which Massey helped lead you as am I. Simon Devereaux was a Junior Fellow from 1989 to 1992 and Don of Hall 1991-92. He was four-and-halfyears at the University of Queensland in Australia, and is now Associate Professor of History at the University of Victoria. His colleague and partner Andrea McKenzie was much amused to read some years ago in the Massey Newsletter that she was her husband’s first child! They are, in fact, the proud parents of five cats and a 2005 Toyota Echo. h devereau@uvic.ca

Jane Glassco, who died on April 28, 2010 after a courageous battle with Lou Gehrig’s Disease, was a founding member of The Quadrangle Society. Like her father, the late Hon. Walter Gordon, who was a founding Senior Fellow of the College, she was a challenger and didn’t hesitate to state her mind. Once, during a question period following the formal presentation of a Walter Gordon Symposium on Public Policy, she told a participant that not only was she wrong, but that she, Jane, was prepared to stomach her distaste of what was argued and explain the depth of the participant’s ignorance in private in order to avoid further embarrassment. To the Master, who was a good friend, she simply said: “Better luck next year, old boy. This one was a bummer!” If she could be gruff, she also had an expansive and generous heart. A great benefactor, she loved the give and take at Massey encounters, and was a particularly wonderful friend and adviser to whichever Junior Fellow was assigned to her in the mentorship program, even after she was afflicted with the debilitating effects of the disease that took her life. “She was the soul of commitment,” said Andrew Ignatieff, a fellow Quadrangler and her dear friend right to the end. “I know of very few people who gave over so much of their lives to their family, friends, and causes.” Those causes were legion: she was co-founder of the famous Tarragon Theatre with her late husband, Bill Glassco. An edgy journalist and filmmaker, her work was always allied to causes or people she believed in. Her philanthropy was widely dispersed, but had a presiding focus on Aboriginal causes. The only flaw Andrew Ignatieff would ascribe to her was an intolerance toward the Canada geese that taunted her regularly at her beautiful farm an hour north of her Toronto home. Master Fraser commented: “Jane Glassco’s wit, questioning spirit, and supportive affection will be sorely missed by the College she always supported. I have lost a wonderful friend and ally of five decades. When the Quadrangle Society was first conceived, she caught the idea in a flash and stayed the course with us to her very end. On behalf of the College, I extended our profound sympathies to all her family.”

a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear. To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

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Life at Massey College

(1924-2010)

by Ursula Franklin With the death of Boris Stoicheff, the world of learning lost one of its most distinguished citizens. Yet, over and above this loss, the Massey community felt an even deeper void: an influential elder and committed friend no longer with us. Officer of the Order of Canada, Fellow of many distinguished learned societies, recipient of numerous honorary degrees and medals, University Professor Emeritus, teacher and researcher extraordinaire, Boris Stoicheff was respected for his insights and scholarship, as well as loved for his integrity and unfailing helpfulness. Born in Macedonia in 1924, he grew up in Toronto, earning his Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Toronto. Spectroscopy and all aspects of the interaction of matter and light remained the soil from which his rich original contributions grew. Science was the milieu in which Boris lived. To him it was part of our culture: advances were contributions to the common good, not sources of private gain. In his own words, “Each discovery is not merely an advance for science, but a contribution to all dimensions of our humanity.” Also deeply interested in the arts, Boris studied how certain painters explored light in their works. His cherished conversations with colleagues from the Humanities often took place here at Massey, where he founded and chaired monthly Senior Fellows’ luncheons that were designed to encourage informed interdisciplinary discourse. In 2002, Boris’s biography of Canadian Nobel laureate Gerhard Herzberg was published. Herzberg was his friend and mentor. There is much of Boris in this major contribution to the intellectual history of modern Canadian science: the philosophy of research that informed his conduct, the views on Canadian science policy he held, and the standards of international co-operation to which he adhered. Boris will be greatly missed – maybe nowhere more than at his beloved Massey College.

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From the Don of Hall by JANE HILDERMAN, 2009-10

O

n more occasions than I dare count over the past year, I was faced with a surprisingly difficult question – perhaps the wording varied, but in its essence, it was always the same – “How is it being Don?” For those who know of my rural Western roots, you may not be surprised by my conclusion. Being the Don of Hall is much like a racing a chuckwagon: the horn sounds, you may be the “driver” in name, but in fact you are hanging on to the reins for dear life as you make your way around the track. You pray for no major accidents; you are completely dependent on your team of outriders to cross the finish line with you in order to succeed; and, of course, it’s all over in the blink of an eye. Perhaps this is a clever way of evading the question. But the truth is, it is difficult to put into words how enriching the Massey community has been, and the sense of fulfillment I’ve had while doing my best to serve it. I doubt I am the only one that has struggled to articulate the uniqueness of this community. Of course, when using “unique” and “Massey” together, the surface trappings immediately come to mind. Before I arrived, I had never been a connoisseur of port or snuff; it was always Johnny Appleseed at my dinner table – certainly not a Latin grace! And gowns were something I associated with ballrooms. Then there are the pinch-me moments at Massey, such as when you spend an evening with five (FIVE!) astronauts, or you witness dozens of new Canadians from as many different countries receive their citizenship right in your living room (that is, the Common Room). That, too, is unique.

But what is truly special about this place is that, despite the number of new people who flow in each year and the number who continue downstream, there remains an unshakeable sense of a tight-knit community that genuinely cares for each other. We celebrate each others’ successes and milestones. We also help each other through tougher times. This year, there was no shortage of hurdles, from the threat of a flu pandemic to ongoing Rotman construction. It was not easy dealing with all this, but we did so extremely well. I had the good fortune to travel to Israel in December with the Tanenbaum Fellows (see page 11). We saw and heard a great deal while we there. However, what I still find myself thinking about is how rare an opportunity it is for our own peers – young Israelis and Palestinians – to have a chance to sit down, preferably over a meal (as we so often do at Massey) and talk, confident that there will be mutual respect, no matter how heated the debate. Without this opportunity to establish common ground, without the vessel of a shared community, the opposite happens between the sides: disengagement, a key block in the building of mental barriers that cannot be so easily dismantled. I returned to Massey College from Israel appreciating this place, this community, more than ever. But it is not somewhere you stay forever. Thus, I have recognized that the only way I can move on without feeling more than a little heartbroken and forlorn, is to carry with me the values I have learned and lived here: of dialogue and exchange, of respect for diversity, and of fellowship. My hope is that whenever you depart, you will work to build a little Massey wherever you are, with whoever is there, through whatever you do. This way the world will be a little better off for our experiences here. I could not speak so highly of Massey without acknowledging the dedication of all the community members who made this year a success! From the Junior Fellowship: the LMF Co-Chairs and Committee members, House Committee, Junior Fellow Lecture Series Coordinators, Winter Ball Committee, Special Events Coordinators, Tutoring Committee, Community Service Community, NonResidents’ Committee, Wine Grazing Coordinators, Clothing Committee, Environmental Committee, Library Committee, Sports Committee, Choir, and all enthusiastic participants and volunteers. And Massey wouldn’t be what is was without the involvement of Senior Fellows, Alumni, Quadranglers, Journalism Fellows, the College Officers, the Master and his family, and our fantastic staff. Thank you many times over for your contributions! Finally, I extend my best wishes to John MacCormick, whom I am confident will be a chuckwagon driver/Don of Hall extraordinaire.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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orty-six does not seem like a particularly memorable number. Nevertheless, the academic year just past was Massey’s 46th and – apart from the remarkably irritating construction site right next door to accommodate the massive expansion of the Rotman School of Management – it was a wonderful, even memorable, year. That will be very apparent as you read this year’s MasseyNews. For the purposes of my annual report, I want to focus mostly on the past and a little bit on the future. During the year, for one reason or another, all of my predecessors in the office of Master appeared to come to the forefront. The Founding Master has a special High Table held in his honour each year, which is fitting and appropriate considering the contributions he made to our College. He presided over Massey’s affairs for its first 19 years with wit, gravitas, a dash of mischief, and great distinction, bringing honour and fame to this place well beyond our small geographic territory. Master Davies was also the focus of the first of a series of historic plaques initiated by the City of Toronto to honour its greatest citizens. There was a small but impressive ceremony outside the Master’s Lodgings when the plaque was unveiled by the mayor of Toronto, David Miller, and our wonderful Visitor, the Hon. H.N.R. Jackman (see page 24 for a photo of this occasion). Less celebrated on a regular basis, his successors have nonetheless also made indelible contributions, and I was so pleased that the College was able, one way or another, to celebrate them. When Master Davies stepped down as Master in 1981, there was a tough act to follow, but the second Master, Professor Patterson Hume, never faltered, even when he saw the parlous state of the finances and the narrowing scope of the Senior Fellowship. He set about to fix these two major blockages to our future with considerable resolution, tact, and personal sacrifice. It is not generally known, but for many years Master Hume gave up much of his salary to help the College’s bottom •

1963

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Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

BORIS STOICHEFF

MasseyNews • 2009-2010

International Spenser Society’s Colin Clout Award for Lifetime Achievement in Spenser and Renaissance Studies at the Society’s annual gathering held in conjunction with the Modern Language Association meeting in Philadelphia. In November, Purdue University held a Renaissance literature conference in his honour and that of Professor Michael Murrin’s of Chicago. Nohrnberg gave two of three plenary addresses at Purdue, his under the title “The ‘Mythical Method’ in Simile, Saga, Verse, and Prose.”

All degrees awarded by the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified.

FALL 2009 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Shelley Beal Sarah Copland Jacob Etches Dan Giang Toby Malone Joshua Nichols Tara Vongpaisal

The Master’s Report

MASTER OF ARTS Daniel Alati Charles Belanger Caitlin Burton Sarah Fornace Gordon Hawkins

line. He was not at all a rich man and his act should never have been countenanced by the Corporation, but he contributed financially nonetheless, and it got the College through a really rough spell. It is a matter of real satisfaction that Master Hume, despite the agues of age – his sight is much diminished and he has consented somewhat grudgingly to use a walking stick now – continues to come to the College, wearing the title of Master Emeritus with pride. THE MASTER’S — page 4 ALUMNI

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News of Senior Fellows begins on page 15, News of Quadranglers on page 22, and Publications on page 25.

JAMES NOHRNBERG received the

DEGREES RECEIVED

Fifteen other papers were presented by the honoree’s former students. Nohrnberg is a Professor at the Department of English, University of Virginia. h jcn@virginia.edu

1966

He also collaborated with his son Trevor on a paper and back-to-back lectures at the Canadian Mathematical Society in Fredericton, New Brunswick. He is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Calgary, and Emeritus Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Western Ontario. h bruen@ucalgary.ca

43 years of marriage ______________

1970

AIDEN BRUEN celebrated 43 years

DEREK OPPEN recently retired.

RAVI RAVINDRA is Professor

Emeritus (Physics), Dalhousie University, Halifax. He lives in Ferguson’s Cover, Nova Scotia. h ravindra@eastlink.ca

of marriage to his wife, Katri, this year.

SPRING 2010 DOCTOR OF ENGINEERING AND COMPUTER SCIENCE Honoris Causa (Concordia University) Julie Payette JURIS DOCTOR Tim Barrett Joshua Elcombe JURIS DOCTOR/MASTER OF ARTS Amara Gossin Jeff Rybak MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE Salim Bamakhrama MASTER OF MATHEMATICAL FINANCE Riyaad Dinath MASTER OF PUBLIC POLICY Jodie Bakker Please note that the following two names were missed from the listing in our last issue of Spring 2009 degrees received. Our sincerest apologies. DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Caitlin Finlayson MASTER OF ARTS Christopher MacDonald

h mail@derekoppen.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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The Master's Report 3 From the Master Emerita 5 Staff News 5 Journalism Fellowships 8 Journalism Fellows 9 Fellows’ Gaudy Prizes 10 Friendship with Finland 10 Junior Fellows in Israel 11 From the Lodging 12 Junior Fellows at Play 13 Walter Gordon Symposium 14 Junior Fellows Lecture Series 14 Quarter Century Fund 14 Massey Lectures: Wade Davis 15 Massey in the Media 16 Senior Fellows at Lunch 16 Alumni Association goes global 17 Toronto Alumni 17 News from the Library 18 Book History and Print Culture 18 Art: The Wisdom Windows 19 2009-2010 College Photo 20 Quadrangle Society Book Club 22 Writer-in-Residence 22 Clarkson Laureateships 23 Robertson Davies Plaque 24 Pendragon Ink Reports 24 Conversation with John Dirks 25 Reflections by Sara Shettleworth 27 Exposé: Mordecai Richler 28 Talisker Players 28 Scholars-at-Risk at Massey 29 Massey Grand Rounds 29 College Quiz 29 Nooks & Crannies 30 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize 30 Massey’s Associate Partners 31 Financial News 31 From the Decades: 1960s 33 From the Decades: 1970s 34 From the Decades: 1980s 35 Kitchen Creations 36 From the Decades: 1990s 37 Don of Hall 38 The Visitors’ Challenge 39

Running columns

Degrees Received 3 News of Alumni 3 Thank you, Donors! 4 News of Senior Fellows 15 Senior Residents 15 Senior Fellows Elected 15 News of Quadranglers 22 Publications 25 Spotlight on High Table 31 Marriages 34 Births 34 In Memoriam 34

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From the Editor

MasseyNews • 2009-2010 Photography by antHony luengo

Life at Massey College

what’s inside

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign

Contact Us

THE $2-million Visitors’ Challenge Campaign is now in the last of its three years. The response to date has been magnificent. Gifts have been given, with pledges totalling just under $1.8 million made or promised. This campaign is going to let us renew both resident and non-resident Junior Fellow facilities at the College, enhance our ability to support needy Junior Fellows through bursary enhancement, and maintain College traditions.

t seemed, just a few months ago, that there might be a big Rideau Hall Massey College 4 Devonshire Place story to report, but that was not to be. Master John Fraser remains with us, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2E1 no doubt with his own tales to tell about the experience, some to be http://masseycollege.ca recounted, we hope, in a future issue. In the meantime, we’ve reprinted an online piece on the topic from The Globe and Mail that you might have The Master missed. Do check it out on page 16. And, of course, there’s lots more – more John Fraser than ever, in fact – to inform, entertain, and enlighten you in this issue. For Tel: 416-978-8448 one thing, you’ll discover what Massey might have looked like if Ron Thom’s h jfraser@masseycollege.ca original proposal, submitted 50 years ago, in June 1960, had been accepted. Had it been, you could now be playing billiards in a room just about where college Assistant the pond is located. You won’t want to miss the wonderful illustrations on Danylo Dzwonyk pages 6 and 7 from Thom’s first pass. And be sure to look for the ghost of Tel: 416-978-2549 Fax: 416-971-3032 h ddzwonyk@masseycollege.ca Robertson Davies in our centre-spread community photo. He also appeared there in last year’s issue. He haunts us still, and we’d like to think that he’s right Administrator now in a nook or cranny somewhere in his beloved College – at the top of the Anna Luengo bell tower, perhaps? – reading about all that transpired this past year. Tel: 416-978-6606 Fax: 416-971-3032 As always, my appreciation extends to the many Massey community h annaluengo@masseycollege.ca members and College friends who contributed to this issue in one way or another – The Master, the Master Emerita, the Bursar, the Registrar, the Bursar Administrator, the Library Administrator, and Pat Kennedy, Secretary Emerita; Jill Clark Elizabeth MacCallum; College staff members Danylo Dzwonyk, Darlene Tel: 416-978-8447 Naranjo, and Tembeka Ndlovu; Senior Fellows Ian Alexander, Russell Brown, h jclark@masseycollege.ca John Dirks, Ursula Franklin, Judith Grant, Sara Shettleworth, and Jennifer Bursar’s Secretary Surridge; Senior Resident Dan White; Alumni Andrew Cunningham, Simon Tembeka Ndlovu Devereaux, Michiel Horn, Kari Maaren, Jacqueline Murray, and the many Tel: 416-978-2892 Fax: 416-978-1759 others who sent in their news; Junior Fellows Dylan Gordon, Jane Hilderman, h tndlovu@masseycollege.ca Heather Sheridan, and Matthew Strang; Quadranglers Douglas Bell, Ramsay Derry, and Charles Foran; Misha Shaal of the Gairdner Foundation; Sarah Hall LibrarY ADMINISTRATOR from Sarah Hall Glass Studio; and Mary McTeer of the Talisker Players. For P.J. MacDougall the photographs, thank you to Junior Fellows Salim Bamakhrama and Jemy Tel: 416-978-2893 Joseph, as well as to André Beneteau and Fernando Morales. h pjmacdougall@masseycollege.ca – Anthony Luengo, Editor Registrar

MasseyNews L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0 t o r o nt o • OC T O B E R 2 0 1 0

This is the 41st annual about life at Massey College. The 2010-2011 edition is scheduled for publication in the fall of 2011. Submissions may be sent to the aluengo@sympatico.ca, or by mail to the College, editor directly by e-mail no later than July 31, 2011. We also welcome any comments. MasseyNews thanks the staff at Print3 Yonge & Eglinton for their support and expertise. Editor: Anthony Luengo • Contributing Editor: Amy Maish • Desktop & Designer: Brian Dench

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HERE’S why the last $200,000 is almost exclusively dependent on Alumni support: • Nearly 80 per cent of the 204 Senior Fellows have given or pledged (to a total of $1,235,000 – this figure includes the $750,000 opening Challenge gifts). • Although the 213 members of the Quadrangle Society, who have already donated over $100,000 every year, were exempted from a direct appeal, they nevertheless were offered an opportunity to donate, and over 50 per cent did so (to a total of $350,000). • Our far-flung Alumni now number several thousand, and although there were some very generous gifts sent or pledged, less than two per cent have so far responded to the appeal (for a total of $145,000).

Mary Graham Tel: 416-978-2891 Fax: 416-971-3032 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

NOW is the chance for the Alumni of Massey College to make all the difference in this campaign begun so generously by Visitor Hal Jackman and Visitor Emerita Rose Wolfe. The gap in the final stage of any financial campaign is always the hardest to bridge. The Alumni of Massey College now have a chance to make good on all the positive feelings they have about their graduate college.

Catering Manager

Darlene Naranjo Tel: 416-978-2894 h dnaranjo@masseycollege.ca Porter’s Lodge

members of DINE at We alwaysthewelcome Massey Community to dine in Hall MASSEY before any functions All you need do is call the Porter at 416-978-2895 by 1.00 p.m. of the same day to make reservations On-line events calendar <http://masseycollege.ca/activities/events-calendar> To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Tel: 416-978-2895 h massey.porter@gmail.com

PLEASE give or pledge now! Use the form that comes with this issue of MasseyNews to consider your various options for giving, and then make your decision.

SUMMER RESIDENCE CO-ORDINATOR

Tel: 416-946-7843 Fax: 416-978-1759 h massey.summer@gmail.com Alumni

Kari Maaren Alumni Association President h kmaaren@gmail.com

Rose Wolfe and Hal Jackman and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

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L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0

MasseyNews Photography by Anna Luengo

Julie Payette returns to Massey

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This huge crane appeared beside – sometimes even above – the College this year as the nine-storey Martin Prosperity Institute of the Rotman School of Management, scheduled to open in 2012, took shape next door. The construction caused complaints, especially from those living on the western side of the Quadrangle. In the words of one resident, “Not even ear plugs help, and sometimes even the ground shakes!”

here are many memorable evenings at Massey College, but few more memorable than the one on November 5, 2009, when astronaut Julie Payette, distinguished and loyal Alumna (’88), visited with four of her co-pilots from Space Shuttle Endeavour, whom she introduced to the College community. The eagerly anticipated evening was described by Master John Fraser in his pre-event notice as a “complicated” one (see page 36), and it included pre-dinner drinks and a film in the Common Room narrated live by the astronauts, as well as dinner in Ondaatje Hall. Also that evening, the College’s silver teaspoon – which, as we had reported in our last issue, had travelled with Ms. Payette into outer space in the summer of 2008 – was formally returned to us. Fittingly, kitchen staff member David Landaverde accepted the spoon back on behalf of the College. He had originally proposed the spoon as a suitable companion for the Endeavour trip and had gone, along with then retiring Pat Kennedy, to Cape Canaveral for the launch. The spoon, beautifully framed by the Canadian Space Agency, now holds a special place of honour in the Common Room. At one point in the evening, Ms. Payette spoke for her astronaut companions when she said: “I told my friends that this is the place where my dreams started to come to fruition and where I felt many of the possibilities that are now realized. How could anyone not love Massey

Julie Payette and Master John Fraser in the Common Room College? It is the most special place I know and we are all lucky to be associated with it.” Another special moment came when Senior Fellow Ursula Franklin stood up after the film and talk. Evoking the title of the 2009 Massey Lectures by Wade Davis, she told Julie and her colleagues that they had become the inspirational “wayfinders” for many people. See THE MASTER TACKLES – page 36

Fiftieth anniversary of first round of submissions of architectural plans for College This building should be capable of being seen in many ways, and of unfolding itself by degrees – probably never completely. It represents to the student within a condensed piece of the world that must accommodate all his changing moods and attitudes. It should be as many things as possible to as many people as possible.

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o read the opening words of the rationale accompanying the original drawings and plans for Massey College submitted by Ron Thom. His was one of four submissions presented on June 30, 1960 to the Trustees of the Massey Foundation: Vincent Massey; his sons Lionel and Hart; his brother Raymond; Raymond’s son Geoffrey; and Wilmot Broughall, an officer of the National Trust Company, which managed the finances of the Foundation.

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To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana • Sapere Aude • Dare to know

The three other submissions in this first round were from Carmen Corneil, Arthur Erickson, and John Parkin. A second round of submissions took place on October 15, 1960, at which time the decision to go with Thom’s revised plans was made. Douglas Shadbolt in his book Ron Thom, The Shaping of an Architect, wrote of this submission: “The plan form and massing are reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo.” Images of Thom’s round 1 submission appear on pages 6 and 7.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Massey News 2009-2010  
Massey News 2009-2010  

A summary of the Massey College year 2009-2010, at the Unversity of Toronto.