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L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11

MasseyNews College receives million-dollar gift

Journalism Fellowship celebrates 50 years by Abraham Rotstein, Senior Journalism Fellow , 1981–08

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arlier this academic year, Massey College received a stunning $1-million gift from an Alumnus who wishes to remain anonymous. The donor requested that the fund serve two purposes: to add to the bursary endowment of the College and to assist, through interest gained, foreign graduate students at the University of Toronto elected as Junior Fellows of the College. In his thanks, Master John Fraser acknowledged both the generosity and keen insight of the Canadianborn donor, who had forged special friendships with foreign students while at Massey and the university, understanding very well their high tuition and transportation costs. Master Fraser added that the donor’s ultimate ambition is to make the bounty of this fund felt particularly for a few students of special merit. Nonetheless, the donor has accepted the Master’s wish to have the money more widely disbursed among foreign Junior Fellows until an equivalent sum can be raised for Canadian Three past Senior Journalism Fellows – Abraham Rotstein, students. As it stands now, this new Claude Bissell (1974–78), and Maurice Careless (1978–81) – in the fund automatically frees up more Quadrangle with a statue of Inkpik the owl, originally chosen as a bursary funds for Canadian students, so, as the Master told us, it’s a “win- symbol of the Fellowship because it is “an anxious, ungrammatical bird with a constant feeling that something astonishing has happened.” win” situation for everyone.

College loses two of its Founding Officers This past year, we lost two of our Founding Officers: Colin Friesen, Founding Bursar, and Douglas Lochhead, Founding Librarian. Obituaries for them appear on pages 36 and 39 respectively.

Colin Friesen

Douglas Lochhead

Over the hill I came into this strange place empty of danger, fear, deceit and death – only the talk of death which was not sad but ringing with unending changes, on and on. Discovering now, right here, that moment in celebration, in happiness of tears and revelation, a hanging out of the soul to dry.

From “Meditation at Wood Point” in the collection All Things Do Continue: Poems of Celebration by Douglas Lochhead (Toronto: The St. Thomas Poetry Series, 1997). Published with permission from The Estate of Douglas Lochhead. 44

Sapere Aude • Dare to know

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

M

y lunch with the two chief executives of the Southam Corporation some 30 years ago still stands out in my mind. That was when the late Gordon Fisher and the late St. Clair Balfour outlined what they had had in mind when they first started the Journalism Fellowship Program at the University of Toronto. I discerned that the program had little to do with their “bottom line” and everything to do with their genuine desire to contribute to the future of journalism in this country. I was struck by the sincerity and personal commitment of these founders, and when they asked if I would become the Senior Southam Fellow to look after it, I was pleased to accept. (My only credentials were those of a sometime editor of a small Canadian magazine). My predecessors in the program were no less than Vincent Bladen, the former Dean of Arts and Science, followed by Claude Bissell, the former President of the university, and Maurice Careless, the distinguished Canadian historian. See JOURNALISM – page 16

50 years ago… The Act to confirm an Agreement between The Massey Foundation and The Governors of the University of Toronto, and to incorporate the Master and Fellows of Massey College, had its first reading on March 14, 1961. It received Royal Assent on March 29, 1961. In the official records of the Government of Ontario, this statute is cited as “The Master and Fellows of Massey College Act, 1960–61.” Just a month before, on February 24, the appointment of Robertson Davies as the first Master had been announced. Almost a year later, in January 1962, construction of the College began.


Life at Massey College

From the Editor

Contact Us

ronically, we’ve never had more pages and I myself have never felt more squeezed for space, here, as usual, boxed within my spot on page 2. We’ve had to expand by four pages to accommodate the ever-increasing activity at the College, and you, our readers, are sending in more news than ever before. This is all terrific, of course, reflecting the dynamic place that Massey is as we build up to the 50th anniversary of our opening. I’ve been starting to think about that event and the MasseyNews issue for that year, just around the corner. I can hear Brian Dench, who so brilliantly designs and lays out this magazine, as he reminds me one more time about the harsh realities of “copy fitting.” I’m just about fitting in my own copy here right now. Who knows how much space I will have here in 2013? What I do know is that we’ll have all the space that’s needed to reflect what you and other members of our unique community are up to then. And that is as it should be. Do enjoy this issue. As always, my appreciation extends to the many Massey community members and College friends who contributed to this issue in one way or another – The Master, the Master Emerita, the Bursar, the Registrar, the Administrator, and the Librarian; Registrar Emerita Ann Brumell; Elizabeth MacCallum; College staff members Danylo Dzwonyk, Brian Maloney, Darlene Naranjo, and Tembeka Ndlovu; Matt Glandfield; Senior Fellows Judith Skelton Grant, Michael Laine, Vivian Rakoff, Abraham Rotstein, David Silcox, Jennifer Surridge, Carolyn Tuohy, and Michael Valpy; Senior Resident Dan White; Alumni Vinay Chaudry, John Court, Catherine Foote, Stephen Hume, Kari Maaren, Rosemary Marchant, Alexandra Sorin, Dale Taylor, Tracy Thompson (Tremaine), and the many others who sent in their news; Junior Fellows Daniel Goldbloom, Raili Lakanen, John MacCormick, Judith Seary, Ruediger Willenberg, Jessica Duffin Wolfe, and Christopher Young; Quadranglers Ramsay Derry and Ian Burgham; Barbara Moon Editorial Fellow Joshua Knelman; Sara Lochhead; Peter Kuitenbrouwer of the National Post; David Kent of the St. Thomas Poetry Series; and Chris Paul of Sybertooth Press. For photographs, thank you to Clara MacCallum Fraser, Simon Rakoff, and Junior Fellows Lucas Badenduck, Eric Leung, and Greg West. – Anthony Luengo, Editor

Massey College

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MasseyNews L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 1 1 • t o r o nt o • OC T O B E R 2 0 1 1

This is the 42nd annual about life at Massey College. The 2011–2012 edition is scheduled for publication in the fall of 2012. Submissions may be sent to the aluengo@sympatico.ca, or by mail to the College, no editor directly by e-mail later than July 31, 2012. We also welcome any comments. MasseyNews thanks the staff at Print3 Yonge & Eglinton for their support and expertise . Every reasonable effort has been made to find holders of any copyright material included. We would be pleased to have any oversights brought to our attention.

Running columns

2

Degrees Received 3 News of Alumni 3 Thank you, Donors! 5 News of Senior Fellows 15 Senior Fellows Elected 16 Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars 18 Spotlight on High Table 20 News of Quadranglers 27 Publications 29 Marriages 35 Births 35 In Memoriam 36

4 Devonshire Place Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2E1 <http://masseycollege.ca> The Master

college Assistant

Administrator

Anna Luengo Tel: 416-978-6606 Fax: 416-971-3032 h annaluengo@masseycollege.ca Bursar

Jill Clark Tel: 416-978-8447 h jclark@masseycollege.ca

We still need more help from our Alumni. The burden of this campaign has fallen largely on the shoulders of the Senior Fellowship and members of The Quadrangle Society. Many Alumni have been wonderfully generous, but their numbers remain small and if you have not yet donated, we strongly urge you to consider a generous gift to your College – Now!

Bursar’s Secretary

Tembeka Ndlovu Tel: 416-978-2892 Fax: 416-978-1759 h tndlovu@masseycollege.ca LibrarIAN

P.J. MacDougall Tel: 416-978-2893 h pmacdougall@masseycollege.ca Registrar

Mary Graham Tel: 416-978-2891 Fax: 416-971-3032 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

Please give or pledge as soon as possible. Charitable receipts are given for all donations. If you wish to discuss a proposed gift further, feel free to call the College Bursar, Jill Clark, at 416-978-8447, especially if you would like to donate by credit card. Cheques should be made out to “Massey College,” specifying “Visitors Challenge” in the memo field and sent to 4 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 2E1.

Catering Manager

Editor: Anthony Luengo • Contributing Editor: Amy Maish • Desktop & Design: Brian Dench

Tel: 416-978-2895 h porter@masseycollege.ca

members of DINE at We alwaysthewelcome Massey Community to dine in Hall MASSEY before any functions

SUMMER RESIDENCE CO-ORDINATOR

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Nevertheless, it doesn’t finish officially until December 31, 2011, and we are still short of the revised goal of $2-million. May we remind you that this campaign was designed to let Massey College renew both resident and non-resident Junior Fellow facilities, enhance our ability to support the Junior Fellows through bursary endowments, and maintain College traditions.

Danylo Dzwonyk Tel: 416-978-2549 Fax: 416-971-3032 h ddzwonyk@masseycollege.ca

Darlene Naranjo Tel: 416-978-2894 h dnaranjo@masseycollege.ca

On-line events calendar <http://masseycollege.ca/activities/events-calendar>

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign is now reaching its final stages and has already passed its official goal of $1.5-million.

John Fraser Tel: 416-978-8448 h jfraser@masseycollege.ca

h

All you need do is call the Porter at 416-978-2895 by 1.00 p.m. of the same day to make reservations

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign

Porter’s Lodge

Tel: 416-946-7843 Fax: 416-978-1759 h massey.summer@gmail.com

Thank you for carefully considering a gift to Massey College.

Alumni ASSOCIATION

Photography by Anthony Luengo

The Master's Report 3 College Quiz 4 From the Master Emerita 5 Walter Gordon Symposium 6 Massey Lectures 7 Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy Night 8 Massey Grand Rounds 8 Library Report 9 Book History and Print Culture 10 Massey Talks... Massey Talks... 11 From the Lodging 12 Massey WIDEN inaugurated 13 Journalism Fellows 15 Scholars- and Journalists-at-Risk 17 Elizabeth MacCallum speaks 18 Junior Fellows at Play 19 First Editorial Fellow named 20 Writer-in-Residence 20 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize 20 Clarkson Award 21 2010–2011 College Photo 22 Art at Massey: Harold Town 24 Quadrangle Society Book Club 26 Alumni Reports 26 Conversation: Ian Burgham 27 Reflections: Carolyn Hughes Tuohy 29 Senior Fellows at Lunch 30 Massey in the Media 31 Kitchen Creations 32 Connecting: Vivian Rakoff 33 Nooks & Crannies 34 From the Decades: 1960s 35 From the Decades: 1970s 36 From the Decades: 1980s 37 From the Decades: 1990s 38 From the Decades: 2000s 39 Don of Hall 41 From the Bursar’s Office 42 Postmark Buckingham Palace 42 The Visitors’ Challenge 43

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011 Photography by Brian Dench

what’s inside

Alexandra Sorin – President, Canada (outside Toronto) and International h alexandrasorin@gmail.com Kari Maaren – President, Toronto h kmaaren@gmail.com

Rose Wolfe and Hal Jackman To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

T

by

Jill Clark, Bursar

t has been a good year for the College as we settled down to learn the lessons of the economic crisis a couple of years ago. We have successfully dealt with the shortfall in bursary support to Junior Fellows by making sure we never again promise what we can’t deliver. We have turned around the timing, so we only spend funds received at the beginning of the year, and in 2011 we paid out a record of $250,000 in awards. The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign will soon reach a successful conclusion. In total, we raised $1,460,000 with only $230,300 receivable in current pledges. The Bursar’s Office now has excellent and continuous discussions with the Don of Hall and representatives of the House Committee to make sure there are no surprises in upcoming budgets, particularly as they relate to student fees. On the staffing front, Edith Lorayes retired last December after 20 years of loyal service as a member of our kitchen staff. We will miss her tasty salads, and wish her all the best in her retirement years. And a special thanks to two young Alumni who help us with the crucial summer rental program, Christopher MacDonald and Ankita Jauhari. They have established a system and service second to none on the campus. Their work was sustained during noisy construction at the looming Martin Prosperity Centre next door, and they even came up with a great scheme to provide “noise bursaries” to compensate loyal Junior Fellows who remained in residence during the very trying construction period. We remain grateful for the generous contributions from all members of the College community. As Senior Fellows know, our experiment with a dining/bar minimum did not work out and was something of an administrative nightmare. We have ended it and are returning this fall to a regular annual solicitation for support for the traditional Junior Fellow wine fund and other good causes. In that spirit, the Quadrangle Society of Massey College continues its wonderfully generous support, which each year now comes to more than $120,000 and allows the College to do so many things other institutions on the campus only dream of. Massey College is a very special place on the University of Toronto campus. It is a pleasure to be a part of the College in the Bursar’s Office, where we get tremendous service from the Bursar’s Assistant, Tembeka Ndlovu.

Keepsake from Christmas Gaudy 2010

Postmark

Buckingham Palace

Keepsake designed by Brian Maloney, College Printer

I

here was a nice conjunction in the Common Room last May. I had just got back from a trip to the United Kingdom, and I was trying to get through the deluge of mail and messages waiting for me when I realized I needed the fortitude of strong coffee. Out I went to the coffee trolley, only to be waylaid by Pippa, the two-year-old daughter of Junior Fellow James McKee and his wife, Alumna Amy Nugent. Pippa’s dad was in charge that day as her mom was dealing with her newborn sister at home. And there, over by the door to the front hall giving me a big “welcome home” smile was our venerable Senior Fellow, Professor Ursula Franklin, who turned 90 a few months ago. Ursula still has an office at Massey and is one of the most productive of our Senior Residents. Not for the first time, it struck me what an extraordinary place Massey College is, in this case because it is a kind of home for both two-year-olds and nonagenarians. Now brace yourself! We don’t just have one active member of our community in her nineties. We have at least eleven more, nine of whom will acknowledge their age and two of whom deny it emphatically, pointing out to me in no uncertain terms that their minds are still strong and their age is irrelevant and if I ever expose them by name I will be “court-martialled.” Let me celebrate those I am allowed to mention. In the Senior Fellowship, in addition to Professor Franklin, they are: Professors Francess Halpenny, Lou Siminovitch, and Ernest Sirluck; also, outside the professoriate, are benefactor David Campbell and Massey Foundation representative Vincent Tovell. In the Quadrangle Society, they are: Elunid MacMillan (mother of Senior Fellow Margaret MacMillan), Mary Godfrey, and Dorothy Dunlop. Among these “venerables,” we also celebrate Brenda Davies, widow of our Founding Master, who floats above all titles at Massey College. •

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ALUMNI

Ian Gentles has just published a

biography of Oliver Cromwell, Oliver Cromwell: God’s Warrior and the English Revolution, with Palgrave Macmillan.

Stan Loten is a Distinguished

Research Professor, Carleton University. He retired in 1999 and lives in Ottawa with his wife, Roberta Stopps. He was recently named a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada . h sloten@sympatico.ca

James Nohrnberg is an

Emeritus Professor, English, University of Virginia, and lives in

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

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All degrees awarded by the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified.

FALL 2010 Doctor of Philosophy

The Master’s Report

There’s going to be a sharp focus on nonagenarians in the months ahead thanks to our Honorary Senior Fellow and Chancellor of Cambridge University, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. We also hope he may be able to visit his Canadian graduate college some time during the Diamond Jubilee celebrations that will mark our 50th anniversary. My point here, though, is that Massey College’s unique role on the campus is to transcend the normal definitions of what constitutes an academic community. THE MASTER’S REPORT — page 4 ALUMNI

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News of Senior Fellows begins on page 15, News of Quadranglers on page 27, and Publications on page 29.

1963

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DEGREES RECEIVED

Charlottesville. He was a prize winner for his poem, “William Blake to William Herschel: Verses on the Universe, upon the Discovery of the Planet Uranus,” at a literary contest held to celebrate the exhibition “From Classic to Romantic: British Art in an Age of Transition” held at the University of Virginia Art Museum. As well, the spring 2011 issue of Arthuriana was dedicated to him. h jcn@virginia.edu

Nowhere. Once described by Time magazine as “Canada’s most consistently controversial newspaper columnist... a tangier critic of complacency has rarely appeared in a Canadian newspaper,” he has received two honorary degrees of D. Litt, from the University of New Brunswick and the University of Saskatchewan. h drfoth@sympatico.ca

Stanislav Kirschbaum was

1965 Boy from Nowhere ________________

Allan Fotheringham

(Southam Fellow) is just about to publish his memoir, Boy From

recently named Chairman of the Department of International Studies at York University, Glendon College.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Report from the Bursar’s Office

Daniel Bader Alexa Bramall Katherine Edwards Laura Esmail Kathleen Galloway Kenneth Lee Noam Miller Andrea Paras Master of Arts Susan Bilynskyj Sara Elcombe Tyler Flatt John MacCormick Master of Engineering Taylor Martin Master of Science Andrew Bresnahan Wesley George

SPRING 2011 Doctor, honoris causa (Sorbonne) Natalie Zemon Davis Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (University of Toronto) Craig Kielburger Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (University of Western Ontario) Craig Kielburger Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (Law Society of Upper Canada) John McCamus Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (Law Society of Upper Canada) Robert Sharpe Doctor of Medicine Matthew Lincoln

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Life at Massey College

The Master’s Report

DEGREES RECEIVED

from page 3

Ashleigh Androsoff Rochelle Côté Jordan Poppenk Nicholas Riegel Gregory West Juris Doctor Sabrina Bandali Arya Ghadimi Ilene Solomon Master of Arts Julie Wilson Master of Business Administration Shannon Robinson Master of Fine Arts (Washington University, St. Louis) John-Christian Bourque Master of Public Policy Dennis Lee Master of Science Matthew Strang Master of Science in Planning Raili Lakanen

College Quiz

We do it in many ways, but the juxtaposition between the very young and the very old is of major significance. The young children of married or partnered Junior Fellows, for example, are important to us because their well-being has a direct effect on their parents’ scholarship. We make a point of welcoming children to many events at the College and at any meals which they and their parents can manage with comfort and ease. For that purpose, we keep two high chairs handy just off the doorway leading directly to the High Table. These delightful children always bring a sense of joy and family community to the College when they visit us. As well, we are known for providing babysitting and short-term child-care. From time to time, as a community, we are referred to by addled scholar parents as a “godsend.” As for the venerable veterans in our community, they bring the extraordinary experience of their careers and experiences to our varied uses, and their generosity on all levels is deeply moving. No one who has been inspired by Ursula Franklin or Vincent Tovell will question this, and this was so when I myself first arrived at Massey and fell under the spell of Professor Robert Finch and, especially, Professor Douglas LePan of blessed memory. What I got from the “venerables,” what Junior Fellows get, what midcareer Senior Fellows get, what we all get is an extraordinary sense of the continuity of life and learning. We also sense their delight in still being considered important to the community. I had the great luck of growing up in a threegeneration household, and my Glaswegian granny – my mother’s mother ‒ had an enormous impact on how I came to view life around me and indeed the •

From the collection of Jennifer Surridge, Photography © Jill Krementz

When was smoking banned in all indoor spaces at Massey College? If you don't know, check for the answer on page 34. Be sure to check also for our Founding Master in his nowannual appearance in our College photo spread on pages 22–23.

by John MacCormick

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ALUMNI

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Photography by Anthony Luengo

Doctor of Philosophy

4

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

world itself. Every day at Massey, I have a strong sense that our Junior Fellows – uniquely on the campus – have something of the same privilege, and I rejoice in this as much as I rejoice in anything around this remarkable College. Finally, a short postscript on behalf of the Master Emeritus, Professor Patterson Hume. He sends his very best wishes to everyone and still enjoys coming to some College events. He is trying hard to master a life with limited eyesight and he continues to care for Mrs. Hume with great diligence, courage, and love. The Acting Master Emeritus, Professor Stefan Dupré, is also in mostly good spirits as he deals courageously with Alzheimer’s, and is being hugely and ably supported by his wonderful wife, Ann Dupré.

ALUMNI

1967

1971

DAVID DUPUY spent ten years

Vladimir Konečni is a Professor

on the faculty at St. Mary’s University, Halifax, in the Department of Astronomy, and served as Observatory Director and Department Head. In 1982, he moved to the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, where, in addition to teaching astronomy and electronics, he served as Director of the VMI Observatory. He is now retired and living just outside of Lexington. h dupuy41@gmail.com

Emeritus of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, and he recently published his autobiography. He lives in Solana Beach, California, with his wife, Miriam, and son, Dusan. h vkonecni@ucsd.edu and <http://www.vladimirkonecni.net>

Ian Story has been Professor of Ancient History & Classics, Trent University since 1974. h istorey@trentu.ca

1972 Terrill Theman retired from his

career as a cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon this past April. He lives in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. h ttheman@hotmail.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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a l u m n i

Graeme Wynn is a Professor of

Geography, University of British Columbia, where he holds the Brenda and David McLean Chair in Canadian Studies. He was awarded the Christenson Fellowship, St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, Trinity Term 2011. h wynn@geog.ubc.ca

1974 Fast Media_______________________

Tom Cooper is a Professor of

Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College in Boston, as well as head speechwriter for the CEO of Puma (sports gear), and is involved in projects at Harvard. He is also a black belt, union musician, poet, and playwright.

t is with gratitude for my great good fortune that I look back on the year I spent as Don of Hall. I am grateful, to begin with, for the tremendous privilege of being a part of this fellowship, and of coming to appreciate its beauty. As long as we belong to this community, we share our lives with one another, and I hope as Don to have been lucky enough to have helped to ensure that this communal life continues to be lived in a true spirit of fellowship. But if I have done so, I am hardly the one to be thanked: sheer luck has kept at bay the kinds of trouble that would have made my job much more difficult than it was – for that, my gratitude will know no bounds. And finally, my sincerest thanks are owed to the Junior Fellows themselves: you, my friends, are a wonderful group of people, whose support and whose company I have valued enormously. As you all know, the quality of communal life depends on the labours of many dedicated individuals, of whom I can now acknowledge but a few. Our thanks are due to the thoughtful and patient members of the House Committee, who have contributed to long and impassioned discussions during the past year: Lucas Badenduck, Claire Battershill, Dylan Gordon, Letitia Henville, Julia Lockhart, Massieh Moayedi, David Pereira, Rami Shoucri, and William To. These Junior Fellows have been a tremendous help to me during the time I have spent as Don. Their deliberations have been crucial to guiding our community through the challenges we faced. Though the year was peaceful, it was not without its share of issues. These included the community’s finances, the Rotman construction, and the maintenance of the College’s communal spaces. We also owe a great deal to a truly outstanding set of LMF Co-chairs – Jenn Amadio, Raili Lakenen, Ruediger Willenberg, and Albert Wu – who have been models of dedication and collegiality. Their hard work and their generous spirits – and those, too, of the LMF committee members, Bardia Bina, Ryan Doherty, Jine Jine Li, and Saba Mir – have been instrumental in forging the deep bond that has come to exist among the members of our fellowship. A number of other groups at the College have seen great success, and have helped to make this past year a very wonderful one.

From the Don of Hall The Junior Fellow Lecture Series, thanks to the leadership of Dan Goldbloom and to the labours of the other members of the committee – Stoney Baker, Yonsue Kim, Dylan Jervis, Arvid Agren, Utako Tanabe, William To, Robert Fraser – has become very popular this year, through its implementation of the WIDEN format that has been used by Junior Fellow Jessica Duffin Wolfe to exceptional effect in graduate workshops that have had an impact across the university. This replaces the single-lecture format with a moderated panel, and has been enthusiastically promoted as a podcast by members of the Fellowship, both on the College website and in the iTunes store, where it was even featured in the “New and Notable” category. Our Winterball Committee – made up of Francisca (Desh) Fernando, Saba Mir, Roxane Bejjany, Ryan Doherty, Andrea Holmes, Cameron Laird, Erik Leung, Lluís Vena, and William To – worked tremendously hard to hold an event on the theme of “Classic Hollywood”, an evening of beautiful food and music (the latter having been provided by Junior Fellow Jonathan Bright) that displayed the committee’s creativity, organizational talent, and terrifically good taste. The members of the non-resident committee, Chris Young, Jemy Joseph, and Gillian Reis, have been particularly active over the past year, organizing such initiatives

as the bi-weekly Non-ResidentsDine-in-Hall evenings. The Masseywear Committees of both this year and last were successful in bringing out a line of stylish College clothing that I think we’re very proud to wear. Finally, I should be remiss were I not to observe that this spring saw the foundation, by Ashish Deshwar, Brys Stafford, Mark McConaghy, Ryan Stoner, and Victoria Arrandale, of a lively new Committee for the Appreciation of Televised Sports, known to the Junior Fellows as CATS. There are many more Junior Fellows who deserve to be thanked: were it not for a want of space and for my own forgetfulness, all would have the mention they deserve. I should also like to recognize the Senior Fellows, Alumni, Quadrangle Society members, the Journalism Fellows, College Officers and employees, our beloved Master, and all the other community members who have made such an important contribution to every Junior Fellow’s experience of the College. It has been both a privilege and a pleasure to serve this community I love. I am grateful for the good fortune we have all enjoyed during this year of peace and comfort at Massey, and to the good friends who make this community what it is. With all my heart, I wish the best to Stoney Baker, the new Don of Hall, who has already shown herself to be a patient and dedicated servant of our community. May she have all the support and the good fortune that I have enjoyed! John MacCormick, a native of Bible Hill, Nova Scotia, studied Philosophy and Classics at the University of Ottawa before enrolling as a graduate student in the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the University of Toronto. John’s interests lie mainly in the field of ancient moral philosophy, and his doctoral work deals with the topic of agency and determinism in Aristotle and the Aristotelian tradition, with a focus on questions relating to character development and moral responsibility. His other interests include ancient hedonism as an ethical system, as well as Latin poetry.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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Life at Massey College

After some time in the government and at Cornell, Dalhousie, and York, he was asked in 1963 by Robertson Davies to open a library at Massey, where he then served as librarian, archivist, curator, and printer until 1975, when he left us to become the second Davidson Professor of Canadian Studies at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. The excellence of our collections testify to his expertise and devotion. In addition to his administrative duties, he taught, in his role as Professor of English, bibliography to graduate students. At Massey he established, along with friends in publishing, the graphic arts, and the printing trades, the Massey College Press as an extensive museum and archive for nineteenth-century printing and as a specialized facility for teaching printing and bibliography. Throughout his career at Massey and at Mount Allison, Douglas continued to publish distinguished poetry. He was nominated in 1980 for the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry for High Marsh Road, and received the Carlo Betocchi International Poetry Prize in 2005 (the first non-Italian to do so) for the same work. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1976 and subsequently received honorary degrees from Saint Mary’s, Dalhousie, and the University of New Brunswick. In 1983, he spent a year as Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at the University of Edinburgh, where his inaugural lecture was called “Something Still to Find,” a title that can stand as a sign for the way he led his life as a scholar and as a poet. It would, however, fail to emphasize his warmth and his kindness as a teacher, a colleague, and a friend. Despite his fugitive heart, he was devoted to Massey College, and we will remember him through a scholarship established in his name. We are very fortunate to have had him here. 40

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

From the Master Emerita

From the 60s from page 35

Where else could you have been collared coming in late to lunch (with Dave Trott) by Lionel Massey and taken over to join Vincent Massey, the Visitor himself, former Premier Leslie Frost, then U of T President Claude Bissell, and then Education Minister Bill Davis discussing how Ontario had been overwhelmed by student numbers after the War and should have planned better for it. And then there were the tennis games. The entire Davies family delighted many a Junior Fellow with them. I recall a morning doubles tennis match with Brenda, Miranda, and Jennifer. I showed up in Alpine attire, including a pair of tattered black hiking pants. I thought I played nicely with them, and so it seemed did they. Only half way through was it necessary for them to discretely let me know that my fly was wide open! Perhaps the best memory is of the older Junior Fellows of the time. They so kindly shared their experience of graduate work and life. Eric Rump, Derek Breach, and Ken Windsor provided most gentle, wise counsel and great wit. And Tom Surridge was my closest friend through Massey. I will never forget his incisiveness about life and his passion for it. The Upper Library sums up my Massey experience. There I encountered in 1963 the first issue of the The New York Review of Books, which has nourished me through the years ever since. And there, in 1964, I first saw my future and, alas, now late wife, the wondrous Janet Slone, at a meeting of the Graduate History Club. (I am forever grateful to you, Mike Horn, for introducing us.) Dale Taylor did his B.A. at York University, his M.A. in Political Science at U of T, and doctoral work at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He was a Junior Fellow from 1963 to 1965. A retired civil servant, he was an economist with both the Federal and Ontario governments. He is now an economic development consultant, and is completing two works of historical fiction. Dale lives in Richmond Hill, Ontario. He has one son and two grandsons. h daletaylor@rogers.com

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fter reporting to us last year that she had completed her edition of the correspondence of W. B. Yeats and his wife, George, for Oxford University Press, Professor Saddlemyer is very pleased to announce that the 624-page work is now published. She travelled to Dublin last March for its European launch and, while there, gave a lecture at the National Library of Ireland. This was followed by the volume’s North American launch in May in New York, where she delivered two lectures on the subject. (Full bibliographical information on this and her other publications this past year appear on page 32.) Professor Saddlemyer continues her long-time connection with the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagaraon-the-Lake, where she is a Corresponding Scholar, Academy of the Shaw Festival Theatre Board. In addition, she wrote a program essay for Lennox Robinson’s Drama at Inish, which was performed at this world-renowned festival, and she is on the Board and the Advisory Committee of the Council of the International Shaw Society. She also serves on various committees of the Royal Society. Professor Saddlemyer continues her involvement as one of the General Editors of the Cornell Yeats and of the Selected Irish Plays series. This series is published by Colin Smythe, where the Master Emerita serves as a member of the Publishing Board, as she still does with Hedgerow Press, in British Columbia. As well, she remains an Editorial Board member of The Correspondence of Bernard Shaw, Irish Studies Review, and the Shaw Annual; and a member of the Advisory Boards of the Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, the Irish University Review, and Studi irlandesi.

New non-resident Junior Fellow Saeed Selvam signs up to tutor in the Massey College Student Tutoring and Mentoring Program. Now enrolled as a Masters in Public Policy student at the U of T School of Public Policy and Governance, Saeed was himself part of College program in its earliest days, and was tutored and mentored by Alumni Patrick Byrne and Olivier Sorin. Now approaching its tenth anniversary, the tutoring program pairs Junior Fellows with high school students who show promise despite poor academic showing because of language and other problems.

From the 80s

from page 37

Connie showing me that the original of my favourite A.Y. Jackson painting was hanging at St. Hilda’s next door, in view from the street, so I could walk by and have a peek every time I felt homesick for southern Alberta. Mark bringing me into his unique circumstance and warm home life as the Master’s son, plus pronouncing it “chee-hoo-a-hoo-a” dog in one of our marathon Trivial Pursuit games. Charlie having contests with me at supper over who would get stuck with the little brown buns or whose tapioca pudding could stay upside-down in its dish the longest. My fellow night owl Sheldon competing with me to see who could make breakfast the least number of times in the year, and insisting that I do the ordering at very late brunch at The Bagel just so he could start his day laughing. All those Massey conversations late into the night. Thank you, my friends. Cathie Foote was a resident Junior Fellow between 1983 and 1985 while pursuing her Ph.D. in Social Work at the University of Toronto. She then returned home to Calgary, working for the next 13 years as a therapist, researcher, and university teacher in the field of death and grief, in particular with families who have lost a child. For the past 13 years, Cathie has served the Calgary Waldorf School in many roles, currently as the School Administrator. Her husband Arthur Frank is about to retire as a Professor of Sociology (University of Calgary); her daughter, Kate Foote Frank, just graduated from the Toronto Waldorf School,has just headed off on a gap year before moving to Halifax to attend the University of King’s College.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

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He has just published Fast Media, Media Fast, described by one reviewer as “a stimulating, provocative, and compelling account of the consequences, both personal and cultural, of freeing ourselves from, or at least controlling, the mediated world in which we live.” He would love to hear from any colleagues passing through or near Boston. h twcooper@comcast.net

1975 Donald Baronowski is

a retired Faculty Lecturer, Department of History and Classical Studies, McGill University. He lives in Châteauguay, Québec. h donald.baronowski@mcgill.ca

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1976

1977

Paul Bolton is Deputy-Director-

Carolyn Roberts Finlay is a

General, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, in Kyoto, Japan. He specializes in intense-laser-plasma physics and laser-driven accelerators. He lives in Melo Park, California, but also spends considerable time in Kyoto. The legacy of his name continues with the birth of his grandson, Paul R. Bolton III, in Chicago this past year. h boltonpr@gmail.com

Inducted into Engineering Hall of Distinction–––––––––––––––––––– Lloyd McCoomb is one of six new inductees into the University of Toronto Engineering Alumni Hall of Distinction. He is President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority.

self-employed musician, teacher, and actress. She lives in North Vancouver. Following her performance in Don Mowatt’s play Weeping Muse, Broken Lyre, commissioned by the Vancouver Chopin Society to commemorate the bicentennial of the birth of composer-pianist Frédéric Chopin, she and Don Mowatt took the work to Poland, where they represented Canada at the Symposium of International Chopin Societies held in Warsaw. They were also invited to attend the 16th International Chopin Piano Competition in that city. h carolyn_r_finlay@hotmail.com

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Thank you, donors! Donations made between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. In our last issue, Marilyn FieldMarsham was not included as a donor and Cornelia Schuh’s name was misspelled. Our sincerest apologies to the community members concerned. Nora Adamson Alice Adelkind Howard Adelman Toshiko Adilman Susan Ainley Bruce Alexander Ian Alexander Derek Allen Jocelyn Allen Richard Alway Cristina Amon R. Jamie Anderson Sally Armstrong James Arthur Philip Arthur Katherine Ashenburg Roger Bagnall Andrew Baines Cornelia Baines Mary Balfour Sarah Band Curtis Barlow Despina Barnard Donald Baronowski Joan Barr Isabel Bassett Belinda Beaton Helaine Becker Douglas Bell Jalynn Bennett Robert Bennett Alan Bernstein Suresh Bhalla Andrew Binkley Harriet Binkley Sonja Bird Robert Birgeneau Gloria Bishop John Bishop Shannon Black Robert Boeckner

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Life at Massey College

Walter Gordon Massey Symposium addresses democracy, expertise, and politics

Thank you, donors! Henry Borden Elaine Borins Alan Borovoy Marian Botsford Fraser Robert Bowden Walter Bowen Alan & Carolyn Bowker Diana Bradshaw Suzanne Bradshaw Donald Brean Robin Breon Peter Brigg Alan Broadbent Stephen Brooke Robert Brown Russell Brown Sandra Brown Francis Brunelle Michael Bryan Catherine Buck Ian Burgham Ben Burston Peter Calamai Brendan Calder David Cameron Teddy Cameron David Campbell Dona Campbell Joanna Campion CanadaHelps Edmund Cape James Carley Tim Casgrain Rosann Cashin Wendy Cecil Edward Chamberlin Adam Chapnick Barbara Charles Michael Charles Janet Charlton Emmanuel Chomski Kathy Chung Catherine Clark Ian Clark Thomas Clark John Clarry Michael Clarry

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• 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s •

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he 2011 Walter Gordon Massey Symposium, entitled “Democracy, Expertise – and Politics” took place at the Isabel Bader Theatre, University of Toronto, on March 22. Featured on the panel were Mel Cappe, then President and CEO of the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP); Antonia Maioni, Director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada; and Munir Sheikh, former Chief Statistician of Canada. Misha Glouberman, a professional facilitator, moderated. The symposium panel addressed the growing tension between unelected experts, elected politicians, and the unmediated voice of the public, looking at questions such as: Was the Canadian government bound by some virtuous responsibility in the case of the mandatory long-form census? How can the public arrive at informed decisions on building more prisons when crime rates are declining? How can a responsible sex-education curriculum be instituted in public schools when the government withdraws proposals from its expert officials the moment a minority religious leader speaks up? There were also two invitation-only follow-up sessions in the Upper Library on the morning of March 23, attended by several government officials, academics, and others who play important roles in policy-making. Panellists for the session on “Talking to the Public” were Don Lenihan, Vice-President of Public Engagement at the Public Policy Forum, pollster Frank Graves, Ryan Merkley of Mozilla Foundation, and Karim Bardeesy of The Globe and Mail. The second panel addressed the topic “Serving the Public.” This panel featured Anthony Doob, Professor at the University of Toronto’s Centre of •

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Joan Colquhoun McGorman was a consultant for the estate of renowned music critic Jacob Siskind. She helped make the arrangements for his collection of over 30,000 sound recordings, books, scores, and archival material to be donated to Carleton University in this past January. She also participated in the conference of the International Association of Music Libraries in Moscow. She is a retired library scientist living in Ottawa. h joan_mcgorman@yahoo.ca

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Criminology, and Paul Thomas, Ph.D. candidate in Canadian Politics. Neil Seeman, Director of Health Strategy Innovation Cell, moderated the morning’s proceedings. Inaugurated in 1990 in honour of the distinguished Canadian statesman and public servant, the late Honourable Walter Gordon, a Senior Fellow of Massey College from 1973 until his death in 1987. Through his example and encouragement, he endorsed the mandate of the College to nourish learning and serve the public good. The annual two-day conference on public policy, open to the public at no charge, is made possible by generously granted seed monies from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation. In 2009, the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) at the University of Toronto became a partner in the Symposium. Each year, distinguished speakers are invited to discuss a topic of immediate significance to Canada before an interested audience drawn from the public, academic, corporate, and government worlds. The main organizers of the 2011 event were Junior Fellows Grant Bishop, Jessica Duffin Wolfe, Daniel Goldbloom, James McKee, and Margaret Olszewski; SPPG students Tiffany Blair, Hillary Connolly, Bridget Nardi, and Melissa Wheeler; Senior Fellow Michael Valpy; and Anna Luengo, College Administrator. The next Walter Gordon Symposium will focus on “Struggling Toward Global Governance in Finance, Security, and Sustainability,” and it will take place at the Isabel Bader Theatre on March 20, 2012. Details will be announced on the Symposium’s website: <http://www.waltergordonsymposium.com> ALUMNI

and currently publishes in the area of Gender Studies in Medieval and Early Modern England. h mc.bodden@mu.edu

Andrew Johnson is a Senior

Producer, Independent Documentaries, at the CBC News Network. He has been with this unit of the CBC since 2001 and has won three Gemini Awards, for which he has been nominated 13 times. He currently helps program The Passionate Eye on the CBC News Network.

Christine Koch has returned to

1981 Mary Bodden is Associate

Professor at Marquette University specializing in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Literature and Language,

St. Johns from Woody Point to install a new exhibition for October at Devon House, “BLACK and WHITE: Twenty Years of Linocut Prints.” Some of them can be

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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viewed on her website: <www. christinekoch.com>.

Jonathan Rose was elected as

Foreign Associate, United States National Academy of Engineering. He is a Professor at the University of Toronto, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. h jayar@eecg.utoronto.ca

1982 Peter Calamai (Southam Fellow) was inducted as a Distinguished Alumnus at Brantford Collegiate Institute and Vocational School on occasion of its 100th anniversary celebration. He is freelance writer, editor, and communications consultant living in Ottawa. h pcalamai@magma.ca

Brick of discomfiting orange, it’s for the strong of knee

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by Tracey Thompson (Tremaine)

y first awareness of Massey College came when I abruptly realized, as I laboured in Saskatoon to finish my master’s thesis, that I had nowhere to stay if I were going to start doctoral studies at the University of Toronto. My Internet search revealed that the established residence available for graduate students was a place called Massey College. So I applied and found myself, eagerly thrusting my head from side to side, riding in a taxi on a bright sunny day along Queen’s Park and onto Harbord Street, past Trinity College, to the iron gates of Massey. Barely had I arrived, struggled with my luggage up to my second-floor room, and settled myself blithely on a bench in the southeast quadrant of the courtyard, when I fell into conversation with another new Junior Fellow: Sharon Bouhnick. We talked. We talked some more. He found out, I am sure, that I was from The Bahamas. I found out that he was from Israel, but really from Europe, and I discovered some of the personal struggles that could mark the souls of sensitive persons born into societies which emphasized social distinctions. There began for me what was so characteristic of living at Massey: meeting people from hither and yon who shared with me gifts drawn from their insight and experience. The Senior Fellowship, my peers in the Junior Fellowship, and the ladies and gentlemen who prepared our meals and cleaned our rooms all provided me with blessed things of value. Ursula Franklin, for example, helped me to forgive myself my innocence and naiveté as a young woman, and lent me courage to organize my intellectual life around my own questions rather than around others’ answers. Rahim Hirji, adept at combining professional study with addressing the needs of persons pushed to the margins of society, explained to me, when I asked him how he managed it all, “I take a minimalist approach,” meaning that he did only what was essential, and in that way covered more ground. From Dana Luccock I gained something even more valuable than good advice: I gained confidence and a whole new world of aspiration, for she explained to me that what I thought was my “hopeless ear”’ was in truth my trying to sing above my vocal range. So to set me straight Dana took the time to encourage me on from the land of the alto and into the land of the tenor. Then there was Sheila Ball, my best friend, who taught me that friendship is something fragile and sensitive, in need of protection, a precious gift to be reflected on and not taken for granted. John Neary reminded me that arresting looks and capable intellect could indeed walk hand in hand with humility and sheer niceness, while Craig

2000s Tracey Thompson (Tremaine) Handy, gentleman that he was, showed me that decency, though often innate, must also be actively cultivated. He spoke of how pleased his family was with the kindness and maturity displayed by his younger sister in handling certain challenges during her first year of college. And one particular janitor who confided her personal trials to me reaffirmed for me why I had come to the university: to make a difference for those persons rendered most vulnerable in society. And I could go on. But let me summarize. Massey, with its freezing water in the courtyard ponds, its brick of discomfiting orange, its stairs built for the strong of knee, and its Junior Fellowship, black-caped, congregating like crows, gave me a home and enriched my vision. It taught me not to underestimate the imagination and ambition of young people. It showed me how a wealthy society might celebrate talent, cultivate fellowship, and foster confidence among its young. The College was a rich dessert that I would have liked to have had more time to properly digest. Would that I could have brought my completed doctoral coursework and comprehensive examination notes with me when I first arrived. Then I could have spent three years of learning simply through participating in projects that mobilized the gifts and resources of the Junior Fellowship and through supping at table in the Massey milieu. Tracey Thompson (Tremaine) is an Assistant Professor of History at The College of The Bahamas. She was a resident Junior Fellow from 2001–2004.

His last work, recently completed, was a comprehensive database of Romantic poetry in English. An expert once introduced him to an audience as “a scholar’s scholar” and a “human being’s human being.” In his obituary in The Globe and Mail, he was described as “learned, funny, gentle, and stubborn as a mule.” His several strong connections to Massey College include time as a Senior Resident when he was a young academic. Master John Fraser fondly remembers warm and amusing anecdotes of the early days of the College, especially of Professor Jackson having occasional breakfasts with Vincent Massey in what used to be known as the Senior Fellows Common Room (now the Private Dining Room). His loyal and loving wife, Professor Heather Jackson, a fine scholar in her own right, is a Continuing Senior Fellow, and was for many years Chair of the Library Committee of the College. Master Fraser added that Robin Jackson was as close as he ever met to Chaucer’s “very gentil parfait knight.”

Douglas Grant Lochhead (1922–2011)

by Michael Laine Douglas Lochhead, our Founding Librarian who died on March 15, 2011, was born in Guelph, but he often claimed that his heart was in the Maritimes, the subject and inspiration for most of his poetry. Destined by virtue of his undergraduate training for a career in medicine, following service in World War II, he had somewhat of an epiphany and began an M.A. in English at the University of Toronto.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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• 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s •

Kathleen (Kitty) Griffin (1912–2011)

Kitty Griffin died on July 13th, 2011 in her 100th year. An enthusiastic Quadrangler, particularly keen on the Society’s Book Club, she was the wife of Tony Griffin, to whom she was married for 74 years; mother of Quadrangler and College benefactor Scott Griffin; and sister of Walter Gordon, a Senior Fellow of Massey College, after whom the annual Walter Gordon Symposium is named, and an event that Mrs. Griffin always attended. During her lifetime she was an enthusiastic golfer, skier, and sailor, the last of these activities resulting in the publication of her book, The Sea Has Many Voices. She was also an avid supporter of the arts and a long-time volunteer at the Art Gallery of Ontario. In addition to her husband and her son Scott, she leaves behind her daughter, Ann, sons Ian, Peter, and Tim, 15 grandchildren, and 26 great-grandchildren.

James Robert (Robin) de Jager Jackson (1935–2011)

Robin Jackson, a great Coleridge scholar and a Senior Fellow of Massey College since 2004, died in Toronto on April 29, 2011. He was born in St. Andrews, Scotland in 1935, and his death came after a long illness borne without bitterness. He taught English at Victoria College from 1964 until his retirement in 2001, and worked on research projects at the British Library in London every summer for even longer. Starting as a specialist on Samuel Taylor Coleridge but steadily broadening his range, he was the author of many books on the literature of the Romantic period, from theory and criticism to editions and biographies, including a study of poetry by women that was dedicated to his two daughters.

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Douglas Coupland delivers 2010 Massey Lectures

Culture Vultures at Massey by Vinay K. Chaudhri

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nce again, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), Massey College, and House of Anansi co-sponsored Canada’s most important lecture series, the five-part Massey Lectures. In October 2010, the lectures, entitled PlayerOne: What Is To Become of Us, were delivered by Douglas Coupland, the international bestselling author of Generation X and 11 other novels. In fact, the lectures, for the first time in the history of the series, were presented as the five chapters of “A Novel in Five Hours.” The first of the public presentations, “Cue the Flaming Zeppelin,” took place at the University of British Columbia. The subsequent

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fter being the Hart House Music Committee secretary, I was looking for a new way to broaden my perspectives, so I applied to be a non-resident Junior Fellow at Massey College. As an international student, I had thought that the College was too expensive for me, so I might as well just enjoy it from outside. But then I got a call from Janice Du Mont, the Don of Hall at the time, inviting me for a tour of Massey. I was taken around the College by Glenn Moulaison, a graduate student in French. I was quite mystified by Glenn’s almost expressionless demeanour and the seriousness with which he walked me to the College chapel through the dark halls of the basement. I thought that the common areas and the resident Junior Fellows’ accommodations were simply lovely, and decided to change my application to be a resident. Since the love of music was still thriving in my heart, I suggested to Sean DiGiovanna, the chair of the Lionel Massey Fund, that we organize a group called Culture Vultures. Sean totally loved the idea, which evolved into a focal point for cultural excursions. The Vultures devoured numerous cultural delicacies, whether it was grabbing lastminute inexpensive tickets to the symphony or carefully pre-planning trips to see Tosca. There was also a thought-provoking tour of a showing of the Group of Seven at the Art Gallery of Ontario led by Senior Fellow David Silcox. The year ended with a live performance in the Quad by a folk band called Shadow Puppets. With their eclectic mixture of instruments and sounds (especially the fine bassoon playing of Jeff Burke), the Puppets mesmerized their Massey audience. To top it all, the Puppets played for us for us free of charge, doing so simply for their love of sharing music. The Elizabethan night at the College gave me a perfect opportunity to connect with a friend who was active with the Society for Creative Anachronism. He set me up with a period costume for a prince, an aspiring suitor of the queen, which I decided to wear at the ball. This plan was a bit at odds with the expectations of some fellow residents, who thought that I would dress up in Indian clothes and be an ambassador to the English court. I, however, found the period costume much more adventurous and out of the ordinary. With little historical and cultural context for my character, it was difficult for me to find a place in the ball, but I nonetheless had a lot of fun posing for pictures. All the activities I’ve been describing are not characteristic of a computer scientist, which is my profession. Once in a while I got asked by fellow residents to help solve their problems with Microsoft Word, but I was ill-equipped to help them, as my expertise was with an esoteric typesetting program called LaTeX that was of little use to most other residents at the College. Sapere Aude • Dare to know

1990s Vinay K. Chaudhri And let me not forget the opportunity I had to lunch with the Nobel Laureate John Polyani, at the time when, through the College, I got tickets to hear seven laureates make presentations on campus. I may never reach the same heights as these scholars, but I feel confident that my time at Massey gave me an opportunity to rub shoulders with the best and the brightest from all fields of study. All this set a course for my life and inspires me still. Vinay K. Chaudhri lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a program director at SRI International, where he leads a project building an intelligent textbook that answers questions. For the last two years, he has taught a graduate-level course on knowledge representation and reasoning at Stanford University. He also recently completed an Olympic distance triathlon. He was a resident Junior Fellow from 1992 to 1994. h vinay_chaudhri@yahoo.co

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1983 Angela Colantonio is a

Senior Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and a Professor at the University of Toronto. She received the 2010 Brain Injury Association of Canada Research Award and the University of Toronto Physical and Occupational Therapy Alumni Achievement Award. h angela.colantonio@utoronto.ca

1985 Michael Baur is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Fordham University. He lives in New York City. h mbaur@fordham.edu

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four readings – “The Best of the Rest of Your Life,” “God’s Little Dumpsters,” “Hello, My Name is: Monster,” and “The View from Inside Daffy Duck’s Hole” – were delivered respectively at the University Regina, the University of Prince Edward Island, the University of Ottawa, and the University of Toronto. The last lecture took place in Convocation Hall on October 29, and all five readings were broadcast in their entirety on the CBC Radio One program Ideas. Set in an airport cocktail lounge during a global disaster, Coupland’s five readings explored modern crises of time, human identity, society, religion, and the afterlife. The Master hosted a reception in the Common Room of the College at the end of the last public lecture in Toronto. Similar receptions were hosted across Canada after each of the other lectures. A five-CD set or podcast of the 2010 Massey Lectures can be ordered from the CBC at <http://goo. gl/QwVeS>, and the book version from House of Anansi at <http://goo.gl/tLO2J>. ALUMNI

Stanley Oziewicz is the

home-page news editor for globeandmail.com. He lives in Toronto. h soziewicz@sympatico.ca h soziewicz@globeandmail.com

1987 Robert Thompson is a

senior member of the Alpha Collaboration, which attracted considerable media coverage as they are the first to trap atomic antimatter. He was named Chair of the Department of Physics and a Member of the Board of Governors at the University of Calgary. In addition to all of this, he has welcomed his second child, Owen. h rthompso@ucalgary.ca

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1988 Nicholas Halmi is a University

Lecturer in Romantic Literature, Oxford University, and a Fellow of University College, Oxford. During this past winter, he was at Stanford University as a Visiting Professor in the Department of English. h nicholas.halmi@ell.ox.ac.uk

1989 Eve Egoyan has an upcoming CD

release concert on November 3 at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto. Her previous release, Simple Lines of Enquiry, was designated one of ten top classical discs of 2009 by Alex Ross of the New Yorker. h emu@interlog.com

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! Christine Clement Andrew Cohen Elizabeth Cohen Judith Loeb Cohen Elizabeth Comper Martin Connell Eleanor Cook William Corcoran Brian Corman Jack Costello John Court James Coutts Elizabeth Cowper Margaret Anne Craik Patrick Crean Maxine Crook John Cruickshank Abdallah Daar Mary Daniher Gary Davis William Davis Natalie Zemon Davis Ruth Davis Dianne De Fenoyl Honor de Pencier Marni de Pencier Martha Deacon Philip Deck Jon Dellandrea Thomas Delworth Ramsay Derry Donald Dicks Brenda Dinnick John Dirks Wendy Dobson Kevin Doyle Jane Drake Rupert Duchesne Anne Dunlop Dorothy Dunlop J. Stefan Dupré Fredrik Eaton Noel Edison Elizabeth Edmison Peter Edwards Gordon Elliot Robin Elliott Sheila Embleton

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Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors!

Arthur English Diana Ericson Gay Evans George Fallis Curtis Faught Catherine Fauquier Federal Elevator Systems Inc. Brian Felske George Fetherling Marilyn Field-Marsham Alice Finlay Terence Finlay Patricia Fischer Alison Fisher Derek Fisher James Fleck Catherine Foote Charles Foran Sally Forrest Ursula Franklin Danielle Fraser Josephine Frayne Kathleen Freeman Martin Friedland Colin Friesen Murray Frum Heather Gardiner Jane Gaskell Meric Gertler Pamela Gibson Gary Goldberg David Goldbloom Edward Goldfarb Joan Goldfarb Cynthia Good Mary Goodwin Peter Goring Allan Gotlieb Katherine Govier Bryan Graham Catherine Graham

ast year, numerous prizes were presented to Junior Fellows at the Fellows’ Gaudy night (the last High Table for the academic year). Of long standing, the Moira Whalon Prize honours a Junior Fellow who – in the opinion of the Master and Officers, Don of Hall, and Junior Fellow members of the House Committee – has contributed most to the College spirit and its values. It is named in honour of Massey’s first Secretary of Corporation (and Robertson Davies’ long-time assistant). The prize consists of a first edition copy of a Davies work (presented by Pendragon Ink) and a cheque for $500. Last year, the prize was awarded to Jessica Duffin Wolfe. The second longstanding award is the Morris Wayman Prize, given to the Junior Fellow who did the most to explain his or her work to the community, or fostered interdisciplinary understanding. The prize, awarded last year to Ruediger Willenberg, consists of a reference book, a plaque, and a cheque for $500, and is named after the late Professor Morris Wayman from the University of Toronto. His son, the poet Tom Wayman, was Writer-in-Residence •

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1993 Duncan MacLellan was

promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University. He lives in Toronto. h dkmaclellan@bell.net

Katherine (Kate) Bell

(Journalism Fellow) is a doctoral candidate in media studies at the University of Washington in Seattle. h katbell@gmail.com

Ronald Graham

1994

William Graham

Shannon Robinson is the

Jack Granatstein Judith Skelton Grant

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Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy night

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Howard Engel

• 1980s • From the Decades • 1980s • From the Decades • 1980s • • From the Decades • 1980s •

Writer-In-Residence at the Interlochen Center for the Arts. This past May, she completed her

in 1996, and he and his family set up the prize in Professor Wayman’s honour. In addition, the Vincent Del Buono Prize (a book and $300) for outstanding contribution by a Junior Fellow to the Junior Fellowship, was presented to Pierre Lairez. The late Mr. Del Buono was a former Don of Hall and one of the first Adrienne Clarkson Laureates in Public Service. In addition on this Fellows’ Gaudy night, funds provided by an anonymous Senior Fellow donor are used to give a reference book prize, along with a

plaque printed on our presses, to every Junior Fellow who “has completed the work to become a doctor of the university.” Last year’s recipients were Daniel Bader (Philosophy), Tim Barrett (Juris Doctor), Rochelle Côté (Sociology), Josh Elcombe (Juris Doctor), Kate Galloway (Musicology), Noam Miller (Psychology), Andrea Paras (Political Science), Jordan Poppenk (Psychology), Jeff Ryback (Juris Doctor), and Kim Stanton, (Doctor of Juridical Science).

Massey Grand Rounds hosts fifth annual symposium by Judith Seary Due to meteorological difficulties, Dr. David Secko joined us remotely for his keynote address on “Health Journalism: What Would Make It Matter?”. The afternoon concluded with lively discussions moderated by Kevin Finnerty and Michael Valpy. Thank you to everyone who planned, participated in, and supported the symposium.

Massey Grand Rounds had another fantastic year and hosted its fifth annual symposium on April 27th, 2011 titled “Medicine and the Media: Exploring the Issues.” Members of the Massey and University of Toronto communities came out to hear inspiring talks by Carolyn Abraham, Dr. Michael Evans, and Dr. Molly Shoichet.

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MA in Fine Arts at Washington University in Saint Louis. She also had her first child, Henry, and is married to James Arthur. h shannonlkarobinson@yahoo.ca

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Vincent Gaudet is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo. h vgaudet@uwaterloo.ca

1995

Inducted into Hall of Honour_ ______

Martin Chang is a Staff

Burton MacDonald is a Senior

Pathologist at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pathobiology at the University of Toronto. His main research interest is in the molecular pathology of breast and ovarian cancers. He is married to Alexandria Jong and they have a daughter, Saffron Leela, born in 2009. h mchang2@mtsinai.on.ca

Research Professor, Department of Religious Studies, St. Francis Xavier University. He is Director of “The Shammakh to Ayl Archaeological Survey, Southern Jordan” project, a second infield season for which was carried out last April–June. He was also inducted into the St. Francis Xavier University “Hall of Honour” last October. h bmacdona@stfx.ca

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

’80s Echoes of Massey from the West

He never regretted his decision to accept Davies’ offer. Indeed, when the CIBC tried to entice him back, seven or eight years after the College opened, he turned the offer down. He felt honoured to have been part of the tightly knit cadre who helped make the dream of Massey a reality. When I interviewed him in the early 1980s, he said that working at the College had been “a fulfillment.” He would “never trade what I have had, the experience I have had, the love for the College that I’ve had, for anything else I might have done.”

by Cathie Foote

T

he Calgary school where I now work has a quotation from Schiller hand-painted in calligraphy above the door of our assembly hall: “Only through the gates of beauty canst thou pass into the realms of knowledge.” Massey College taught me the truth of that idea, and Massey reveals that Schiller’s claim can be a reality. Even before anything was said or done, Massey’s beautiful physical space had a profound effect on how I regarded myself as a student within a communal tradition of learning and scholarship. Although I was working on my doctorate in Social Work during the two years that I lived at Massey as a Junior Fellow, a series of circumstances and decisions have brought me to be Administrator of the Calgary Waldorf School (CWS). When my daughter, Kate, graduated from CWS in grade 9 (when our school ends), she chose to finish high school within Waldorf education, and so she attended grades 10, 11, and 12 at the Toronto Waldorf School, graduating from there this June. Visiting Kate in Toronto these past three years gave me a chance to see Massey again, on occasion with her in tow for a walk-by. As I write this reminiscence, I think of what I would like to tell Kate about living in the College and the particular gifts that experience gave to me – things I hope she, too, will find in her own university studies to come. As a graduate student, you can easily find yourself working in an academic silo, with little opportunity to meet students outside your own discipline. Massey changes that. I was surrounded by students from every corner of the University of Toronto, hearing their academic enthusiasms and suddenly realizing what could be fascinating about some other field of study. It’s a terrific place for piquing your curiosity. Massey can even leave you with the illusion that you yourself had actually studied a bit in all those different fields! We could also compare the procedures of different departments and the foibles of different supervisors, including those who took the longest to comment on papers or dissertation proposals. But it was my friends’ fascination and struggles with what they were studying that I remember most. Because I arrived at Massey somewhat older than the other Junior Fellows, and as a married graduate student who had been maintaining my own household for several years, one very pleasant shock of arrival was suddenly being so well and so completely taken care of. From the Porter at the gate to the kitchen and maintenance staff, all these people were dedicated to giving me time to work and, yes, have fun. Most memorable was Tina, the staff member whom I got to know best and who kept my room spick and span. If Massey was rich in its staff, it also offered unique material resources. In those pre-Internet days, a real library had a greater importance. And however completely libraries are digitized, reading on a screen can never match the discovery of actual manuscripts.

1980s Cathie Foote For me, Massey’s collection of original reports from the Great Exhibition of 1851 was a surprise treasure. I discovered them accidentally, and they allowed me to write one of my major seminar papers on the origins of statistical records and social-class experiments, a couple of the innovations of Prince Albert’s Great Exhibition. What Massey added was the thrill of having these records housed downstairs, literally, and I could work at the quiet tables there, poring over the wonderfully huge, heavy Victorian texts. Massey provided so many unusual opportunities, each quaint and curious sounding in itself, and even a bit surreal looking back now from more than 25 years away – but together they created the experience of being the bearer of a tradition. Recitation of Latin graces in gowns at supper; being invited to sit at High Table (and trying the snuff afterwards); evening drinks and board games; croquet in the Quad (often having to hit balls out of the fountains); and the wonderful festivals that punctuated the year and gave us rhythm and ritual. All these practices came alive in the presence of the truly remarkable people who came and went for longer or shorter periods of time. I felt especially fortunate that the Founding Master, Robertson Davies, was still in the College when I was there. His characters were constantly being interpreted for clues as to who had provided the real-life model, and his sculptured nose gave me good luck whenever I stopped by for a respectful polishing. Most lasting to me have been the College friendships. Beauty and knowledge in Massey, yes, but what moves me the most as I remember and write this from Calgary in 2011 and look back on my two years in Toronto is the following. see FROM THE 80s – page 40

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Although he was something of a fussbudget, Colin was always scrupulously fair and generous. His many acts of kindness – loaning money, sticking up for the rights of a Junior Fellow against the demands of a more senior individual, helping Fellows in difficulty – were noticed and appreciated. Two stories give the measure of the man. During World War II, when he served in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Colin participated in missions over Europe. One involved dropping bombs on a railway station in Frankfurt. He made the pilot circle the area three times, even though fuel was running low, until he was certain that he had the right target in his sights. As he later said, it would have been most unfortunate to drop bombs on any of the many Friesens below. Proposals to admit women to the College caused him serious anguish. Since the Act that brought the College into being in 1961 stated that it was for men only, he was acutely “conscious of a trust,” and felt that “come hell or high water, there should be no changes made.” However, when the Masseys themselves accepted the admission of women, he gave in gracefully, and later found himself pleased at the impact that the women had on College life. Young men who had been wont to throw buns from one table to another, he remarked, suddenly turned into wellmannered gentlemen. The College is very fortunate to have had a person of Colin’s dedication as its Founding Bursar. 37


MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

• 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s •

IN MEMORIAM We regret to announce the passing of the following members of our community. Colin Erdman Friesen Founding Bursar on May 7, 2011 Kathleen (Kitty) Griffin Quadrangler on July 13, 2011 James Robert (Robin) de Jager Jackson Senior Fellow on April 29, 2011 Doug Lavers Junior Fellow, ’63–’66 on July 11, 2011 Douglas Grant Lochhead Founding Librarian on March 15, 2011 Doug (John) McConachie Southam Journalism Fellow, ’80–’81, on April 27, 2011 Fr. Kurt Pritzl Junior Fellow, ’74–’77 on February 21, 2011 Michael Sutton Junior Fellow, ’72–’74 on April 17, 2011

COLIN ERDMAN FRIESEN (1922–2011)

by Judith Skelton Grant Colin Friesen served as Massey’s Bursar from January 1, 1963 until his retirement in 1988. Leaving behind a more lucrative career in banking, he came to the College at the invitation of Robertson Davies, who knew him to be a man of strong principles. As Davies anticipated, he managed the College’s financial resources scrupulously and well. Colin was intensely loyal to Davies and to the Founders’ conception of Massey as a diverse community learning from one other, from encounters with the larger community, and from the beauty of the building.

36

Library Report

Where Was Massey, Anyway? by Stephen Hume

I

first encountered Massey College during a freshman engineering scavenger hunt. A bottle of water from the Massey College fountain with a description of how you were able to obtain it was one of the items. Rumour had it that it was too hard to obtain and no one knew where Massey College was anyway. My father, Patterson Hume, became a Massey Senior Fellow, and when I was nearing graduation he encouraged me to apply to increase the representation of science students. I was now able to experience the mystery of High Table that my father had attended for many years (I would pass on the offering of cigars and snuff with no regrets). I remember that Karen Kain was a guest of honour at one High Table evening. She was at the peak of her dancing career and was receiving many accolades. All eyes followed her as she made the walk up to the High Table, as graceful as in any performance of Swan Lake. At one meet-and-greet sherry party, I received a stunned look and no response as a new Southam Fellow tried to figure out what sort of practical joke I was performing. It turns out that she had come across the country to Massey only to find out that someone was introducing themselves as Stephen Hume, her boss at the Edmonton Journal. A unique experience for both of us, I suspect. The Massey College community offered some memorable opportunities other than its being a quiet place for study. Everyone needs to add some fun to their schedules. A small gang of Junior Fellows enrolled in the popular evening ballroom dancing lessons at U of T. Every week we would learn the basics of many dance steps. Saturday Night Fever had been a recent blockbuster, and the Maple Leaf Ballroom (if I remember the name correctly) had disco nights that we would attend to practise our new-found dancing steps. There was also a graduate softball league, and our American Junior Fellows signed us up and did their best to recruit and coach a Massey College squad. I had last played in grade six and during one of our practices I remember playing 3rd base. I stopped a low line drive using my foot like a road-hockey goalie; then I picked up the ball for the throw to first base. I was subsequently coached into the correct cross-body dive with my baseball glove to make such a stop. Also, Jonathan Ostroff from South Africa would use his cricket skills to catch bouncing drives with one bare hand and half a baseball glove. I don’t remember our league results, so they were probably not stellar. After joining BellNorthern Research, this coaching was obviously good as I was asked to start up an expansion softball team. We stayed in the top division in the largest league in Canada. Massey College, it seems, was the start of becoming a recreational shortstop. Other memories come back. The Common Room as a great break from studies, a place where I could often find a game of bridge with others and the opportunity for casual chat. The walk through the basement corridors to my room passed by the hand printing press,

Thank you, donors!

by P.J. MacDougall, College Librarian

W

hat does not change is the will to change, ” said Charles Olsen, and there was a great will for change in the Robertson Davies Library this past year. First of all, Professor Patricia Fleming was appointed to succeed Professor Heather Jackson as Chair of the Library Committee. Thank you to Heather for her steadfast guidance and commitment to the Library since 2004, most notably during the past year of transition. And welcome to Pat, who brings with her a wealth of experience and deep knowledge of our collections. With the return of our printer, Brian Maloney, the press room has become a beehive of activity. In addition to holding an open shop for visitors two days a week during the academic year, Brian gave several printing demonstrations and lectures for graduate classes, took on three printing apprentices in partnership with the Book History and Print Culture Program (BHPC), and held weekend Letterpress Printing classes in the shop through the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild (CBBAG). He is also putting his skill and talent to use once again for Massey in printing keepsakes on the presses for College events. Our three Massey printing apprentices ‒ Junior Fellows Claire Battershill, Lindsey Eckert, and Heather Jessup ‒ had a busy year developing their skills on the presses. Working with our large collection of wood type, they designed and printed a Christmas card that was quickly sold out in support of the shop, Hollywoodinspired tickets for the Winter Ball, and a multi-coloured onomatopoeia Batman poster. In April, they hosted a successful Printing Night for Massey Fellows to try their hand at printing and learn more about the presses. Junior Fellow Joe Culpepper also worked with Brian to learn about the Library’s unique collection of early twentieth-

1970s Stephen Hume technology which, as a computer scientist, seemed pretty obsolete to me. And, not much fun, having the flu at the Christmas break (I subsequently got my flu shots regularly after learning that it was likely A/Texas/1/77 (H3N2) and had killed healthy people my age). And I can now picture us playing croquet in the Quad. Placing hoops on the sloped sections beside the steps required accurate shooting, and there was nothing more pleasing than executing a croquet stroke to send an opponent’s ball into the bike racks. It was also satisfying to launch them into the fountain, but we did allow drops out of the water so as not to waterlog the balls. Then there was Dan Utrecht, who introduced me to some new music from his vinyl collection (we were, of course, pre-Walkman, pre-CD in 1978). I still listen to Taj Mahal’s The Real Thing album with its four tuba players. And because of Dan also, I remain a fan of Mississippi Blues. One final memory to share: a sherry-party conversation about how glad a new Junior Fellow was to escape Ottawa and continue her studies in the big city of Toronto. I remember this because I am now happy here in the national capital after having grown up in TO. It does makes you think: maybe Massey College is a waypoint for such changes in life. Stephen Hume was a Junior Fellow from 1977 to 1978, after which he accepted his dream job at Bell-Northern Research in Ottawa, where he had the opportunity to introduce many modern telephony services that we all use today, such as seeing the name of the person calling you. Following 27 years with Nortel, he now is an independent consultant. He is married to Lisa Fast, and they enjoy two sons, Tristan, 15, and Elliot, 13.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

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ALUMNI

1996 Lisa Talbot is a Partner,

Litigation and Dispute Resolution, Torys LLP. She now has a two-year -old son, Benjamin. h ltalbot@torys.com

1998 Andrea Russell became

Executive Director, Office of the Dean, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, last September. She also teaches a course in International Criminal Law. h andrea.russell@utoronto.ca

1999 Nicos Fassler, after briefly

operating his own criminal law practice, has returned to his

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Charlotte Gray John Gray James Greene Edward Greenspan Kathleen Griffin Scott Griffin Franklyn Griffiths Phyllis Grosskurth Rhonda Grunier Marc Grynpas Richard Gwyn Elizabeth Haddon Cecil Hahn Anthony Hall

1848 Imperial Press in the Massey College Printing Room century zinc stereotype blocks originally used to illustrate the catalogue of a Toronto magic shop. Space in the Library was at a premium this year as studious fellows shared tables with researchers from both within and outside the university consulting our collection. There’s more to see in the Library these days as students in the BHPC program are now mounting small exhibits connected to their coursework and showcasing our holdings in the display cases. Items are continually being added to the Library’s collection and are now being listed on the Massey website at See LIBRARY – page 10 ALUMNI

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former position at the Ministry of the Attorney General as an Assistant Crown Attorney. He lives in Toronto with his wife, Nadia, son, Theo, and daughter, Isabel. h nicos.fassler@gmail.com

2000

Jane Gardiner is a Clinical

Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, at the University of British Columbia. She specializes in pediatric ophthalmology. h jagkm@mail.ubc.ca

David Pantalony is Curator,

Physical Sciences and Medicine, Canada Science and Technology Museum. He lives in Ottawa and has a second child on the way, a sibling for Dominic. h dpantalony@technomuses.ca

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a l u m n i

Benjamin Alarie is Associate

Dean, First Year Program, and Associate Professor, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. His research can be viewed on-line at <http://ssrn.com/author=384494>. He is also involved with the Canadian Tax Wiki Project, <http:// www.taxwiki.ca>.

Prize for Excellence in Research_ ____ Adam Chapnick is Deputy Director, Education, Canadian Forces College, and an Associate Professor, Defence Studies, Royal Military College of Canada. He was given the John Scott Cowan Prize for Excellence in Research, a RMC Faculty Research Award. h achapnick@hotmail.com

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Roger Hall Rick Halpern James Hansen David Harris William Harris Joan Harrison Elizabeth Harvey Lynn Hasher Margaret Hayes Sandra Hazan Nona Heaslip Chantal Hébert Colette Hegarty John Heintz Ralph Heintzman Stephen Herbert Peter Herrndorf Anna Hilderman David Hilton Judith Hinchman Mimi Hollenberg Patricia Holtz Thomas Homer-Dixon Michiel Horn Chaviva Hošek Janette Housego Margret Hovanec Robert Hulse Martin Hunter Philippa Hunter Adam Hurley Linda Hutcheon Michael Hutcheon

9


Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! George Hutchison The Janet E. Hutchison Foundation Catherine Hyland Robert Hyland Frank Iacobucci Eva Innes Institute of International Studies Ellen Jaaku Henry Jackman Trinity Jackman Heather Jackson Karl Jaffary Ray Jayawardhana Prabhat Jha Andrew Johnson Robert Johnson Robert Johnstone George Jonas The Kahanoff Foundation Christine Karcza Martin Katz Alison Keith Merrijoy Kelner Bruce Kidd Thomas Kierans Thomas King Chown Kirby Stanislav Kirschbaum David Klausner Pia Kleber Stephen Klimczuk Terrence Knight Jeffrey Kofman Judy Korthals Clare Kosnik Eva Kushner Alexander Kuskis Andy Kwong Sonia Labatt Michael Laine Anne Lancashire Peter Large John Lawson Leila Lax Mary Jo Leddy Eugene Lee Malcolm Lester

10

Program in Book History and Print Culture (BHPC)

Was I worthy of all this?

by Dan White, Director, BHPC Program

by Dale Taylor

BHPC

turned ten years old this year! Housed at Massey since its inception in 2000–2001, the program has firmly established the University of Toronto as one of the premier institutions in the world for the study of book history. As a collaborative graduate program, we draw all of our students from other departments, centres, and faculties around the university, and in 2011 our number of participating units expanded to 15. The majority of our faculty and students come from the iSchool and the Department of English, along with Art, Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, French, German, History, History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Italian Studies, Medieval Studies, Music, Spanish and Portuguese, and Religion. What brings our diverse community together is a shared interest in the physical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the book, with respect to its past and present as well as its future. With Massey’s working printing room, where the Printer, Brian Maloney, keeps his doors open, the College is a wonderful home for BHPC, so we’d like to take this opportunity to tell the readers of MasseyNews a little bit about the past year in the life of the program. (If you’re unfamiliar with BHPC, please take a look at our website at <http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca>.) The regular activities of the program at Massey included two courses in the Colin Friesen Room, Professor Jon Bath’s “Book History in Practice” and Professor Adam Cohen’s “The Medieval and Renaissance Book”; our annual “Librorum,” at which four of our doctoral students presented their research; and our Graduate Student Colloquium, “Illustrating Illustration: Towards a Graphic Criticism,” which featured papers by students from U of T, Windsor, Queen’s, UBC, Ottawa, •

• 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s •

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ALUMNI

Brenda Didyk is an Associate at

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and Western, and an exciting keynote by Professor Jytte Klausen (Brandeis). The program’s “Toronto Centre for the Book” public lecture series is going strong, and next year’s schedule looks great (see <http://bookhistory. ischool.utoronto.ca/TCB_program.html>). The past three years have seen record numbers of applicants to BHPC. We received 49 applications for 24 spaces, so entry into the program is competitive. And our incoming class of 2011–2012 is our most diverse yet, with eight students from the iSchool, eight from English, and eight from our other participating units. Keep an eye out for us around the halls of the College! And needless to say, we’d love to see you at “Librorum” on December 7, 2011 in the Upper Library from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Library

from page 9

<http://www.masseycollege.ca/library/recent_acquisitions> and <http://www.masseycollege.ca/library/gift-of-janemillgate>. Highlights this year include a donation of important bibliographical titles by Senior Fellow Jane Millgate and a pen-and-ink book illustration by Wyndam Lewis for the press room by Senior Fellow James Carley. Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer donated a complete set of the Vale Press Shakespeare. Our most exciting donation comes from Will Reuter and the Aliquando Press, an important and highly regarded Canadian private press. This includes the press’s archives and an extensive collection of reference books on printing and typography. Above all, the Library welcomes all Massey Fellows who are in need of a quiet and comfortable place for reading, writing, or Wi-Fi connecting. Do visit us soon! ALUMNI

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Giles Pinto is an administrator

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appointed Trudeau Foundation Mentor last January and holds the and teacher living in Mississauga. Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies, In May, he was appointed as the Mount Saint Vincent University. International Baccalaureate Middle h ritadeverell@ca.inter.net Years Program Coordinator at Branksome Hall School in Toronto. Matthew Peros lives in Jonathan Gouveia was h giles_pinto@yahoo.ca Sherbrooke and is the Canada promoted last March to Senior ViceResearch Chair in Climate and President, Strategic Investments 2001 Environmental Change and Group, at the New York City Assistant Professor at Bishop’s Economic Development Corporation. Rachel Berger got married. She lives in Montreal and is an University. h mperos@ubishops.ca He lives in New York. Assistant Professor in History at h jgouveia@nycedc.com or 2003 Concordia University. h jonathan.gouveia@utoronto.ca h rberger@alcor.concordia.ca Sylvie Lamoureux is an Nick Lo lives in Toronto with his wife, Assistant Professor, Institut des _ ______________ Irene Kwan. He is Staff Anesthesiologist, One-Woman Show langues officielles et du bilinguisme St. Michael’s Hospital, and in January Rita Shelton Deverell (Senior (ILOB), University of Ottawa. She was appointed Assistant Professor, was a finalist for the 2011 Capital Resident) wrote a one-woman Department of Anesthesia, Faculty Educators’ Awards. show, Smoked Glass Ceiling, which of Medicine, University of Toronto. h slamoureux@uottawa.ca or she performed at the Rock, Paper, h lon@smh.ca h sylvie.lamoureux@gmail.com Sistahz Festival in Toronto. She was Couzin Taylor LLP. She lives in Toronto and welcomed her second child, Alexander, this year. h brenda.didyk@gmail.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

MARRIAGES

T

he late Douglas Lochhead, Librarian of York University in its founding years, met me in a hallway at the new York Hall in the spring of 1963 and suggested that, for my make-up year and Master’s degree, I should accompany him to the new Massey College that September. I went downtown, saw Ron Thom’s marvellous architecture, and fell in love with the place, right down to its ashtrays, knives, forks, and spoons. And, of course, I soon realized I had been made an offer by a very good man (a very good poet and librarian, too). Thank heavens I accepted it. I first boldly attempted to enter the College in August, 1963, only to be intercepted by the h-bar mustachioed Sergeant Major McCracken, who made it abruptly clear that, without credentials, I should please go away. “Ah,” I said, “I was a lieutenant in my school’s artillery regiment. This place seems well run already.” He dissolved in front of me (but for the last time). I then went to the Bursar’s Office. Colin Friesen was seated at his desk hidden behind a cloud of smoke. As a fellow pipe smoker, I could not help but admire the foot or so of plumbing ending up in his mouth. Though I was impecunious, he welcomed me warmly. I then chatted with Moira Whalon and later with Pat Kennedy, both always most understanding. Indeed, that first week (and throughout my two years at Massey), I wondered many times: was I worthy of all this? I settled in. Next door to my first floor room was Martie Birkhans, now emeritus at the University of Edinburgh, and Stan Loten, now emeritus at Carleton University, two of several non-resident Junior Fellows I befriended. Others included Stuart Goodings, John Barker, and Dave Hobbes, all architects, and they taught me design. There, too, was Doug Lavers, who told me about the Maritimes and geophysics. That winter, as I walked into Massey, I whiffed the sweet smoke in the air of wood fires from the College fireplaces and heard the clanking chains of Dinsmore’s Ghost in the Quadrangle on Christmas Eve (I kid you not). Later, the following summer, I could hear James Ayers (my international relations prof) in the next room clattering away non-stop, 12 hours a day on his typewriter. Academics, I thought, must have to work hard. In those two years I enjoyed a splendid camaraderie with a politically incorrect (not heard of then) and still canon-dedicated crew of Masters’ students (including Bob Dinsmore, Mike Horn, Dave Trott, Stuart Niermeyer, Mike Daschtschuck, and the wonderfully witted Mark Levene). Some of us did a skit at the second Gaudy, once again directed by Bob, based on his metamedieval thesis on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. It was followed by the Master’s vividly told ghost story. And talk about kultur. During a typical afternoon in the Quadrangle you could hear, delightfully intermingled from one end, Brahms’ Fourth and, from the other, “Daddy took my T-Bird away!” We then had at Massey intellectual fellow-toilers from the Caribbean, Africa (a good nod to you, Felix Douma), India (Ravi Gupta

Rachel Berger (’01) and Nitika Dosaj – July 2, 2011 John Court (’73) and Elizabeth Julia Hodgins – September 12, 2010

BIRTHS Max Bina – July 15, 2011, to Bardia Bina (’10) and Sarah Bina Paul Bolton III – July 16, 2011, a grandson for Paul Bolton (’76)

1960s Dale Taylor was an unforgettable friend), and, most bizarre of places, Australia! As well, there were some very good-humoured Russians. The interdisciplinary experience deepened. James Nornberg (emeritus University of Virginia) vividly explained and added to Frye’s ideas on the archetypal themes in English literature. The geophysics guys loved talking about “doing science” in the summer. Tuzo Wilson regaled me with tales of the Mohole Project, and showed me the unlimited-expense plastic credit card he had as a consulting geophysicist. There were, nonetheless, some touchy moments. My turn at High Table, for example, saw the wickedly humorous Professor William Dobson goad me into talking about the possibility of a Republic in Canada. Had RD heard this, I would have been out in the street the next day (he was fortunately busy at that moment in a tête-à-tête with the Canadian Editor of Time magazine). Speaking of RD, I always thought he was a perfect Master: formidable, scary, intriguing, the soft persuasive whoosh of his voice so easily remembered. He was most kind to me – advising me in his office about good writing, and giving me an energizing talk when I was faint-hearted. Thank you, late Master. In my second year, I was beside two wonderful Junior Fellows: Winston Collins, English poet and scholar, and law student Lorie Waisberg. I vividly remember Lorie coming down the hall in a towel shouting: “I just got a call. There’s a Free Speech Movement at Berkeley. We gotta support them!” And where else could you have sat down beside Duncan Macpherson and watched him doing a hilarious editorial cartoon?

Dylan Matthew Cook – adopted October 15, 2010 by Trevor Cook (’07) and Sarah Cook Alexander – February 20, 2011, to Brenda Didyk (’01), a brother for Caroline Iker Koshal – July 7, 2011, to Anu Koshal (’10) and Erin Post Jeremy Carson Nohrnberg – April 10, 2010, a fourth grandchild for James Carson Nohrnberg (’63) Mairead Louise Nugent-McKee – May 5, 2011, to James McKee (’07) and Amy Nugent (’05), a sister for Pippa Lewis Joseph Ozon-Wells – January 18, 2011, to Marc Ozon (’96) and Sarah Wells (02) Owen Victor Ramraj Thompson – December 1, 2010, to Robert Thompson (’90) and Sharon Ramraj, a brother for Ian Jasper Robertson-Ronn – July 12, 2011 to David Robertson (’95 ) and Peter Ronn Henry Nolan Arthur – May 5, 2011, to Shannon Robinson (’97) and James Arthur

see FROM THE 60s – page 40

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

35


Nooks & Crannies

The Heritage CUpboard

Like Ontario, Massey College offers “more to discover” for those adventurous enough to strike out beyond the well-trodden paths of familiar spaces such as the Common Room, the Upper Library, Ondaatje Hall, and the Quadrangle – or, for that matter, for those curious enough to look more closely at what’s within such familiar spaces. Who knows what worlds of wonder await in our choice this year of “The Heritage Cupboard,” located in the northeast area of the Common Room? Originally purchased by Master John Fraser and Elizabeth MacCallum, this eighteenth-century English walnut apothecary’s chest found a home here in 1995 because there was simply no room for it in the Lodging. It awaits your close attention. The first College “Register,” containing the signatures of High Table guests and distinguished visitors, as well as records of every wedding, baptism, and funeral held in the College Chapel. Many of the entries are in Robertson Davies’ own hand, along with those of Moira Whalon (Davies’ secretary) and Master Ann Saddlemyer. The first signature is that of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1962 (the Most Rev. and Rt. Hon Dr. Michael Ramsay). The last signature was that of Brenda Davies, who signed it on the Feast for the Founding Master in November 1999, the last entry before the year 2000, when the first signature in the new register was that of Julie Payette, astronaut and former Junior Fellow. A copy of Robertson Davies’ High Spirits, a collection of 19 ghost stories, all but one set in Massey College (that one is set in Trinity College next door). This copy is used every year by a famous actor who reads one of the ghost stories at the annual Feast for the Founding Master. A DVD of Porterhouse Blue, the satirical BBC drama set in a mythical Cambridge College that mocks its Master and Senior Fellows. The College’s world-famous snuff collection, well known at Harvard, according to Alumnus Robert McGill, and at the Oxford colleges of Balliol, Exeter, and Christchurch, thanks to Chancellor Lord Patten of Barnes, an Honorary Senior Fellow of Massey College. The snuff has been donated over the years mainly by Richard Winter, the longest sitting member of Corporation, a founding Junior Fellow, and the College’s solicitor. Other donors have been the author Graeme Gibson and Junior Fellow Dylan Gordon. Odd Balls is a black-and-white film shot in the style of Jacques Tati’s M. Hulot films and featuring the Founding Master and Junior Fellows (all male) playing croquet in the Quad. A sterling silver tea/coffee urn/samovar with ivory spigot, goats’ hooves for feet, and an inscription stating “Presented to H.A. Hart Massey with tray, Sep. 22 1871.” 34

Massey Talks…MasseyTalks…Massey Talks…Massey Talks…Massey Talks Under the very able guidance of Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Wesley George, Tina Park, and Julie Wilson, a new series of monthly presentations was inaugurated at the College this past year: Massey Talks. Described as “a forum for Junior Fellows to learn about the life and work of Senior Fellows and other distinguished community members,” the series involved informal after-dinner presentations by speakers, along with lots of opportunity for questions and general discussion. All but one of the following five were held in the Upper Library. That one (the third, in January) was held in the Round Room.

October

A nineteenth-century oil Chanukah candelabrum, presented by Vincent Massey to the College and brought out at each Chanukah celebration.

Sally Armstrong (Quadrangle Society), Amnesty International award-winning human rights activist, journalist, film maker, and author John Fraser, Master and longtime journalist Mark Smith (Quadrangle Society), Partner at KPMG Canada’s Advisory Services

A jigsaw puzzle in a cylindrical tin presented to the non-resident Junior Fellows who won the pumpkin-carving competition of 2006, a gift of Queen Silvia of Sweden, who judged the competition. A postcard to Master John Fraser and Elizabeth MacCallum from Madam Ingrid Iremark, Swedish ambassador to Canada, who was very instrumental in arranging the October 2006 visit to Massey College of King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden. The postcard thanks the Master and Ms. MacCallum for lunch at the Lodging and, referring to an upcoming visit of that year’s Journalism Fellows, states that she is “looking forward to seeing these talented journalists scrutinize old Sweden.” A leather-bound book with the initials MH and a dagger. This is a presentation volume issued by Massey-Harris Co. farm implements to take note of its war effort in building munitions, airplanes, and tanks for Canadian troops. It is now used to record the winners of the annual pumpkin-carving competition. Among the judges who have signed are: a Queen of Sweden, a Governor General of Canada, a Chief Justice of Ontario, a High Commissioner of the United Kingdom, and an ambassador of Finland. The College’s snuff horn, a gift of late Senior Fellow William Elgin Swinton, with the College crest engraved on its sterling silver lid surmounting a ram’s horn. A Ron Thom designed clay ashtray containing the stub of the last cigar Mordecai Richler smoked in the Common Room when he was a Senior Resident in 1999. Also the last cigarette smoked in the CR by LMF co-chair Brenda Didyk before smoking was banned beginning in the summer of 2002. Photography by Anthony Luengo

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

January

November

Dr. Aubie Angel (Senior Fellow), President of Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FCIHR)

Mayo Moran (Senior Fellow), Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto David Hilton (Quadrangle Society), Senior Vice President at Scotia Bank and senior official in the Department of Finance Canada

Dr. John Dirks (Senior Fellow), President and Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation Dr. John Polanyi (Senior Fellow), Nobel Laureate University Professor of Chemistry, University of

Michael Valpy (Senior Fellow), journalist

Toronto

February Dr. David Goldbloom (Senior Fellow), Senior Medical Advisor, Education and Public Affairs, at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and Professor of Psychiatry, University of Toronto Edward L. Greenspan (Quadrangle Society), Senior Partner, Greenspan Partners, and VicePresident, Canadian Civil Liberties Association Mark Starowicz (Senior Fellow), Executive Director of Documentary Programming, CBC Television

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2004 Shelley Beal is happy to be

living close to her parents and brother in Brantford. She is teaching at Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) in both official languages, including a core English course in rhetoric, argument and effective writing, and French grammar and culture courses. WLU and the Bibliographical Society of Canada supported her attendance at Congress 2011 in Fredericton to give a paper on the increased presence of French contributors to the North American Review in the 1890s. h shelley.beal@utoronto.ca

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March Dr. David Naylor (Senior Fellow), President of the University of Toronto Very Rev. Lois Wilson (Senior Fellow), former Moderator of the United Church of Canada Hon. Patrick J. LeSage (Senior Fellow), former Chief Justice, Superior Court of Justice for Ontario

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Jeremy Bergen is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Theology at Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo. h jbergen@uwaterloo.ca

Winner of Triple-S Salud Prize _ _______

Jan Eperjesi received the 2010

Triple-S Salud (Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association) Prize for Best Overall Clinical Performance During Medical School, Escuela de Medicina San Juan Bautista, Puerto Rico. His M.D. degree was conferred summa cum laude and he was appointed as OBGYN house officer (PGY-1), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. h jan.eperjesi@duke.edu

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Jackie Feke is a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. h jackie.feke@gmail.com

Jean-François Lozier was appointed last February as Curator of Canadian History Before 1800 at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. h jflozier@rogers.com

Joshua Nichols is the

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria, and he recently celebrated his fourth wedding anniversary. He will be starting the JD Program at UBC Law this fall. He is organizing a SSHRC Workshop entitled “The Ends of History?:

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Thank you, donors! Jill Levenson Brian Levine Michael Levine Joyce Lewis Peter Lewis Eve Leyerle Phyllis Lill Christopher Lind Alison Loat Katharine Lochnan George Logan Keith Lowe John Lownsbrough Anthony Luengo Shirley Ma Joan MacCallum Catherine Macdonald Jocelyn MacDonald John MacFarlane Joseph MacInnis Eluned MacMillan Akaash Maharaj Athar Malik David Malone Susan Maltby Dow Marmur Lorna Marsden Hildegard Martens Peter Martin Roger Martin Sandra Martin Richard Martin-Nielsen The Massey Foundation Judith Matthews Jill Matus Kathryn McCain John McCamus Ken McCarter Marcia McClung Lynn McDonald Barbara McDougall Harriett McFarlane Ivan McFarlane Anita McGahan Mary McGeer Robert McGill Mark McGowan Roderick McInnes Stuart McLean Juliana McMeekin

11


Connecting

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors!

David Napier John Neale Sioban Nelson New Routes to The Future Ecological Foundation Anne Osler Sylvia Ostry Gilles Ouellette Mary Ann Parker Roger Parkinson James Parrish Louis Pauly Peter Pauly James Paupst Anthony Pawson Joseph Peckham Richard Peltier Derek Penslar Douglas Perovic Susan Perren Paul Perron David Peterson Heather Peterson Gaylanne Phelan Tony Pigott Peter Pokrupa

12

From the Lodging

Photography by Brian Dench

Robert McMullan Roy McMurtry Joseph Medeiros Rosemary Meier Kelly Meighen Patricia Merivale Sarianna Metso David Miller Jane Millgate Arthur Millward David Mirvish John Monahan Peter Moon Carole Moore John Moore Joshua Morhart Brian Morrison Sue Mortimer Javad Mostaghimi David Mowbray Linda Munk Heather Munroe-Blum Jacqueline Murray

by Vivian Rakoff

by Elizabeth M ac Callum

T

he big change in the Master’s Lodging this year was the return of Clara Fraser, No. 3 daughter, who discovered that the cheapest digs happen to be with her parents while she does a two-year M.A. at Ryerson in Urban Planning. Being her father’s clone, only prettier and more organized, she livened up the place no end. It was a joy to the mother to hear the words, firmly articulated, “Focus, Dad. Just focus!” And sometimes, believe it or not, he actually did. Clara also was a huge help with the vast spreadsheet that is Life in the Lodging – the guest list. Together, she and Norma Briones, Clara’s second mother and the sine qua non of civilization in the place, kept things running. As one who does not joyfully greet the dawn, I am eternally grateful for Clara’s friendly cheer to the benighted Lodging guests trying to find their way around the house in the morning. In the fall term, Quadrangler and old friend Charlotte Gray spent several days with us while •

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Questioning the Stakes of Historical Reason,” which has just been held at Concordia University. Also, he will be editing the proceedings of the workshop, which will be published in a forthcoming anthology from Routledge Press and a special issue of the Journal of Historical Sociology. h joshua.nichols@utoronto.ca

Olivier Sorin was appointed

Liaison Adviser to the Master’s Office with the Governing Council of the University of Toronto. In this new position, he speaks directly with members of the Governing Council, of which he is an elected member, on

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researching her new book on the Klondike, and distinguished broadcaster David Halton stayed while he prepared for his Quadrangle Book Club presentation on David Remnick’s The Bridge about Barack Obama. Quadrangler and friend from Saturday Night days, Ernest Hillen, stayed over to enjoy a Massey event as well. With the fall also came the usual collection of dispossessed, injured, and between-stages Junior Fellows. Non-resident Jordan Guthrie stayed with us while he prepared to leave on his research/work year in Tanzania. Dylan Gordon used our ambulatory care services when he bunged his ankle and was having trouble commuting home. Alum and friend Andrea Paras camped out at the Lodging while her parents and grandparents took over her apartment on their trip to honour her convocation. And a notable reunion of Alum took place here with the visits of Myles Leslie and his wife, Sofie Pepermans – See FROM THE LODGING – page 14 ALUMNI

subjects of importance to the College, such as new special bursaries for foreign humanities students enrolled at the School of Graduate Studies, the construction project at the Martin Prosperity Centre, and the upcoming arrangements for the College’s 50th anniversary celebrations during 2012 and 2013.

2005 Ian Caines spent the last year

as a Visiting Fellow at the University of Toronto Law School after practising at Sullivan and Cromwell LLP in New York. h iancaines@me.com

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Amy Nugent welcomed her second daughter, Mairead, and is Senior Manager at the Ontario Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs. h amy.nugent@gmail.com

Ruth Panofsky (Visiting Scholar) specializes in the history of the Macmillan Company of Canada. She is a Professor, English, Ryerson University and lives in Toronto. h panofsky@ryerson.ca

Scott Young is a biomedical

engineer and Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles. h scottjasonyoung@gmail.com

It hardly bears repeating that Massey College is a place – a state of mind, even – where connections are made, ones that bridge disciplines, town and gown, cultures of various kinds. As our 50th anniversary approaches, we thought it would be fitting to introduce a regular column devoted to exploring the various meanings of such connections. In this column, members of our community will share their thoughts with us about interdisciplinarity, links between the academy and the wider world, and about the very purpose of academic institutions. Massey College may not be specifically mentioned in these pieces, but its presence as a facilitating environment can always be assumed. Long-standing Senior Fellow Vivian Rakoff has kindly agreed to inaugurate our new column with his thoughts on “The University” in colonial and post-colonial times.

M

y first idea of a university – “The University” – was formed by the University of Cape Town. That idea was not of a specific academic place or anything so quotidian, but of a mythical domain “up there.” And that particular university was, and is, indeed physically up there: hovering like an acropolis above Cape Town, cascading down from its apex, a Palladian temple flanked by symmetrical columned wings past a series of neo-classical parapets to a high ivy-covered wall just above heavily trafficked De Waal Drive, a very busy road crammed with speeding cars. When we drove by that university, my parents would gesture upward and say (I guess in awe), “There’s the university.” Leading up from the road is a flight of granite steps piercing the wall. At the top of the steps a larger-than-life-sized bronze monument to Cecil Rhodes used to sit (he’s been moved since), enthroned, staring across the deep valley below, a scroll of paper in his right hand. (Later, I would come to know the juvenile jokes. The last time a virgin walked by Rhodes stood up; he’ll do so again the next time one does. And see that paper in his hand? He’s run out of toilet paper. Ha! Ha! Ha!) When I was 16 going on 17, I was let in, and I duly climbed the endless steps ascending to the library and the student union again and again and again. Inevitably with each climb, the place became more ordinary. Before long, too, my new-found Marxist friends gave me a powerful and readymade set of intellectual instruments which would undermine my idealized notion of “The University.” As a consequence, Rhodes, on whose land grant the university was built, changed from being the presiding bronze demi-god reminiscent of Rodin’s thinker. In spite of his acquired patina of respectability – as the generator of the Rhodes scholarships, his patronage of the arts that resulted in the National Gallery in Cape Town – in spite of all that, he became in my circle the quintessential figure of the rot of colonial power and oppression.

The physical structure of the university, which had seemed a remote temple of learning, became, as I was alerted to the cultural semiotics of post-colonial theory, a concrete expression of cultural hegemony (though, I hasten to add, these labels were not yet attached to such ideas 60 years ago). It’s worth noting that Herbert Baker, who put his stamp on the final plans of the University of Cape Town, was Rhodes’s favourite architect. A creature of empire, the sun never set on Baker’s buildings. Their monumental symmetries became – in imperial buildings in New Delhi, Oxford, Cambridge, and the Union Buildings in Pretoria – the triumphal markers of British power. How redolent of empire as well was Jameson Hall, which sits at the very apex of the architectural symmetries of the University of Cape Town. This dominant Parthenon-like convocation hall is named for Rhodes’s sidekick, Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, whose provocative and disastrous raid into the independent Transvaal Republic was one of the sparks which set off the Boer War. He, too, like Rhodes, would be laundered into a statesman, and also like Rhodes he would become prime minister of the Cape Colony. But the very criticism of the university of my generation of undergraduates meant that the true function of a university ‒ engagement with ideas ‒ was nonetheless being fulfilled in the debates we had inside this colonial cocoon. Later I would read Newman’s The Idea of a University, and I was pleased to recognize in its lofty expectations my first modest university. Without realizing it at the time, I had found my “republic,” the place of my enduring belonging: first in South Africa, later in England, and eventually in Canada. In the late sixties, more powerful and sophisticated criticism of “The University” disrupted campuses throughout the West. But most universities emerged from the crisis of the times by accommodating themselves to the message of the student occupations of administrative offices, with their charges of irrelevancy and elitism. To me, these were echoes of the arguments I had heard long ago

Vivian Rakoff in Cape Town: that the university was a cover for the continuing authority of dead white males, Eurocentrism, and hegemonic capitalism. Curricula changed, as did governance to include students. In short, “The University” endured. Once again, though, I am troubled by threats to the idea of the university as the preserver, imparter, and maker of knowledge. The structure has become more bureaucratic, fundraisers seem to be more valued than scholars, and the “non-productive” disciplines of philosophy, language, and literature are constantly under threat of being closed down, their role as bearers of the civilization and guardians of complex histories dismissed. Of course, I recognize that no institution exists on the energy of its own myth making. It does need money, but when the money threatens to overtake the soul of the institution, a reconsideration of priorities is called for. Our own Massey College has some lessons to teach us here ‒ in the almost-always-perfect equilibrium it achieves among the magic of its myths, the vigour of the ideas that fill its welcoming spaces, and, yes, the impressive sums raised to keep it all afloat. Vivian Rakoff was born in Cape Town, South Africa. He attended the University of Cape Town and University College London, and taught at McGill and the University of Toronto, where he was Chair of the Department of Psychiatry. His other posts included those of Director and Psychiatrist-inChief at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry (now the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Sunnybrook Medical Centre. He is now Professor Emeritus and, since 1997, has been a Senior Fellow at Massey College.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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Massey WIDEN inaugurated

Life at Massey College

unior Fellow Jessica Duffin Wolfe started UofT JWIDEN (Workshops for Interdiscipline Exchange and

Kitchen Creations MASCARPONE CHEESECAKE WITH HONEY-CARAMEL RHUBARB AND ALMOND PRALINE Almond praline

Mascarpone cheesecake

1 cup whole natural almonds 3/4 cup granulated sugar

8 oz. mascarpone cheese at room temperature 11 1/4 oz. cream cheese at room temperature 5/8 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean pod, split and seeds scraped, pod discarded 5 large eggs 3 egg yolks 1/3 cup whipping cream

Preheat the oven to 350˚ F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the almonds on the baking sheet and toast until very lightly browned, 8–10 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow the nuts to cool on the baking sheet. In a small pot, combine the sugar with just enough water (about 1/4 cup) to moisten it evenly. Heat the sugar on medium heat without stirring until it is caramelized and light amber, approximately 10 minutes.

Honey-caramel rhubarb

Preheat the oven to 300˚ F. Tightly wrap the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with parchment. Place inside a large roasting pan. Place the roasting pan on a baking sheet. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, combine the mascarpone and cream cheese with the sugar and vanilla. Mix on medium speed until the cheese is well blended and the sugar is dissolved, about 5 minutes.

Pour this syrup over the almonds and stir gently until the nuts are evenly coated. Allow the praline to cool completely, then grind it in batches in a food processor until you have a fine powder.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, and cream. With the motor running at low speed, add the egg mixture to the cheese mixture. Scraping down the sides of the bowl 2 or 3 times, mix until the batter is just combined and smooth, about 3 minutes total. Strain the batter through a fine-mesh sieve into the prepared springform pan. Fill the roasting pan with enough hot water to reach halfway up the side of the pan. Bake for 15 minutes, then turn the pan around and turn down the oven to 285˚ F. Bake for another 15 minutes. Insert a tester stick in the centre of the cake. When the stick comes out clean, remove from the oven and cool down and chill for at least 2 hours.

p u b l i c at i o n s

p u b l i c at i o n s

DAVID PANTALONY, “Coincidence Mixing in Inuvik,” ArcPoetry, Quarc issue, 66, 2011.

____, “The Cost of Living: Tracing the Supply Chain for Superconductors in MRI Machines,” Canadian Medical Association Journal, 183 (11), 2011.

SHANNON ROBINSON, “Miscarriages,” in New Stories from the Midwest 2011. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2011.

JONATHAN ROSE (with J. Luu and J. Anderson), “Architecture Description and Packing for Logic Blocks with Hierarchy, Modes and Complex Interconnect,” FPGA ’11: ACM Symposium on FPGAs, 2011: 227–236.

____ (with H. Wong and V. Betz), “Comparing FPGA vs. Custom CMOS and the Impact on Processor Microarchitecture,” in FPGA '11: ACM Symposium on FPGAs, 2011: 5–14.

ANN SADDLEMYER, “Bernard Shaw’s Domestic Play,” in A Garland of Words: For Maureen O’Rourke Murphy, Munira H. Mutran, Laura P.Z. de Izarra, and Beatriz Kopschitz X. Bastos (eds). São Paulo: Humanitas, 2010.

____, W. B. Yeats & George Yeats: The Letters. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

4 cups cubed fresh rhubarb 1 /2 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean pod, split and seeds scraped ¾ cup cranberry juice ¼ cup liquid honey Put rhubarb and some lemon juice in bowl.

In a large pan over medium heat, cook the sugar until it turns a golden brown, about 4 minutes. Add the rhubarb to the pan, then stir in the vanilla seeds and pod.

Deglaze the pan with cranberry juice and honey, and cook until the rhubarb is tender and the juice has reduced to a glaze. Remove and place in a stainless steel bowl to cool. Unmould the cheesecake into a cake plate, spoon the rhubarb over the top, and garnish with the almond praline.

Bon Appetit!

p u b l i c at i o n s

____, “John Millington Synge – Playwright and Poet,” in A Companion to Irish

Literature, Volume Two, Julia M. Wright, ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell 2010: 83–97.

IVOR SHAPIRO, “Evaluating Journalism: Towards an Assessment Framework for the Practice of Journalism.” Journalism Practice, 4 (2) 2010.

____ “What’s a Good story? Recognizing Quality in Journalists’ Work,” in The

New Journalist: Roles, Skills, and Critical Thinking, Paul Benedetti, Tim Currie, and Kim Kierans, eds. Toronto: Emond Montgomery, 2010.

RONALD E. STEWART (with J. Theriault), “A Parameterization of the

Microphysical Processes Forming Many Types of Winter Precipitation.” Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 67, 2010: 1492–1508.

IAN C. STORY, Fragments of Old Comedy (3 volumes). Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2011.

ROBERT THOMPSON The ALPHA Collaboration, “Confinement of

Antihydrogen for 1,000 seconds,” Nature Physics, 7, 2011: 568–564.

____, “Trapped Antihydrogen,” Nature, 468, 2010: 673–676.

WILLIAM TOYE (ed.), The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, 2nd ed. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010.

32

Pastry Sous-Chef Darren Diabo

Sapere aude • Dare to know

with the assistance of Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Stoney Baker, Arvid Agren, Utako Tanebe, and Yonsue Kim. It Novelty) in January 2009 with a workshop on Pleasure and replaced the long-established Junior Fellows Lecture speakers from Neuroscience, Classics, and Anthropology. Series, which featured a single presentation at each event. Since then the series has represented dozens of disciplinary The popularity of the WIDEN concept has now spread perspectives. According to Jessica, “Throughout, it’s been to Ryerson University (thanks to Clara MacCallum important to me to maintain that this is an ‘inter-discipline’ Fraser), and to Winters College at York University series, as opposed to being broadly interdisciplinary (thanks to York Fellow John Mayberry). Jessica is also WIDEN likes and values disciplines, as much as it tries to working on some possible start-ups at other universities. break down barriers between them.” The first offshoot of the Below are the Massey WIDEN events last year, in original series, Massey WIDEN, was inaugurated last year the order in which they were presented by the Junior under the leadership of Junior Fellow Daniel Goldbloom, Fellows listed, one a month beginning in September. What the Eyes See

Greed

(Anti) Valentine’s

• “How Our Eyes Read,” Heather Sheridan (Psychology)

• “The Salamander’s Selfish Genes,” Arvid Agren (Evolutionary Biology)

• “The Influence of Photography and the Cinema on ‘Ways of Seeing’ in the Modernist Novel,” Sean Starke (English)

• “What Do We Mean by Greed?” Leonel Abaroa (Theology)

• “Pigs, Sex, and Unclean Reading Practices,” Peter Buchanan (Medieval Studies)

• “How Our Emotions Guide Our Visual System,” Greg West (Psychology)

Systems

• “Breeding Heartless Fish,” Ashish Deshwar (Medicine and Molecular Genetics)

• “Black Canadians in the Criminal Justice System,” Akwasi Owusu- Bempah (Criminology)

• “Immigration, Marriage, and Federal Investigation,” Beth Elder (Public Policy)

• “Financial Regulation in a Greed- Is-Good World,” Grant Bishop (Law)

____ and the City • Raili Lakanen (Urban Planning)

• “No Status, No Healthcare?” Michaela Beder (Psychiatry)

• Shelley Liebembuk (Drama) • Utako Tanebe (Architecture)

Reactions • “Little Picasso Meets the Newspaper,” Sara Angel (Art)

• “Peasant Resistance in Tanzania,” Jordan Guthrie (Political Science)

Remembrance

• “How Critics Decide if They Like Books,” Phillipa Chong (Literature)

Relationships

• “Renegotiating the Terms of Belonging in Europe,” Cliff Vanderlinden (Political Science)

• “Lobbyists in Da House,” J.C. Bourque (Business)

• “A Model of Social Blame,” Lior Sheffer (Political Psychology)

• “Stravinsky Gets Neo-Classical,” Erik Leung (Music)

• “Post-Operative and Post-Anaesthetic Memory Loss,” William To (Physiology)

• “Robertson Davies and Ploughright College,” Jonathan Tam (Law)

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2007 Ivor Shapiro (Senior Resident)

was recently appointed Chair, School of Journalism, Ryerson University. He lives in Toronto and was given the Ryerson University Award for Scholarly Research and Creative Activity, 2010. h ishapiro@ryerson.ca

2008 Winner of Youth Award ____________

Jemy Joseph received the 2011

Youth Award at the 19th Annual New Pioneers Awards ceremony held in March at the Fairmount Royal York Hotel in Toronto. Presented by Skills for Change since 1993, these awards celebrate

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diversity by showcasing the achievements of immigrants and refugees. Jemy is currently doing a Master’s degree in Cardiovascular Sciences, studying heart transplantation immunology, at the University of Toronto. h jemyjoseph@gmail.com

Robert Mukasa (Journalism

Fellow) is now Managing Editor of The Razor, one of three English daily newspapers in Kampala, Uganda.

2010 Hugo Rodrigues (Journalism

Fellow) returned to the SentinelReview in Woodstock, Ontario, after completing his Fellowship at

• “Atomic Order Near Absolute Zero,” Dylan Jervis (Physics)

See MASSEY WIDEN – page 16

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Massey in April. This summer he began a new job as a multimedia journalist at the Expositor in Brantford, Ontario, with reporting duties covering Brantford City Council and Brant County Council. h hrodrigues@sympatico.ca Tourists of Consciousness __________

Jeff Warren (Journalism Fellow)

received the Gold Award for Personal Journalism at the 34th annual National Magazine Awards in June for his piece “Tourists of Consciousness,” published in the Winter 2010 issue of Maisonneuve (<maisonneuve.org/pressroom/ article/2011/apr/29/touristsconsciousness>).

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! Julian Porter Frank Potter Vivienne Poy Dorothy Pringle Nest Pritchard Brenda Proulx Alanna Quinn Robert Rabinovitch Vivian Rakoff Stephen Ralls Lola Rasminsky Peter Raymont Chesley Rees Douglas Reeve John Reibetanz Gilbert Reid Jonathon Reid Donald Rickerd Catherine Riggall Jean Riley Morton Ritts Gordon Rixon Anne Roberts David Robertson Judith Robertson Robin Roger Janet Rossant Sandra Rotman The Rotman Family Foundation William Rueter Aubrey Russell Ann Saddlemyer Richard Sadleir Edward Safarian Mark Sarner John Ralston Saul Beth Savan Bruno Scherzinger Lionel Schipper Cornelia Schuh Clayton Scott David Scott Iain Scott Robin Sears Philip Seeman John Sewell Saad Shah Jack Shapiro Robert Sharpe Gerald Sheff 13


Masse� in the Media

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Geraldine Sherman Sara Shettleworth David Silcox Donald Simpson Pekka Sinervo Cathy Singer Peter Singer David Sisam Philip Slayton Mark Smith Harley Smyth Greg Sorbara Martine Sorin Linda Spalding Rosemary Speirs James Spence Katherine Spence Mark Stabile Don Stevenson Andrew Stewart Nalini Stewart The St. George’s Society of Toronto Brian Stock Judith Stoffman Roy Stuart Alan Sullivan Rosemary Sullivan Jennifer Surridge Sylvia Sutherland Mary Symons Andrew Szende Ethel Teitelbaum Gordon Teskey Terrill Theman Jordan Thompson Paul Thompson Wendy Thompson Craig Thorburn Cynthia Thorburn William Thorsell Marta Tomins Toronto Community Foundation Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts Peter Tovell William Toye Liz Trotter John Tsang TV Ontario Christopher Twigge-Molecey

14

From the Lodging from page 12

Myles being in town to defend his thesis in Criminology – and Marie-Pierre Kruk, here to defend hers in classical medical literature (she was accompanied by her five-week old son, Paul, and the baby-minder father, Frédéric Charbonneau). Other Alum visitors included former Don John Neary and Sylvia Nickerson, Janna Rosales (the quietest guest ever), and Anna Shamaeva (bridging a gap in living places). Lisa Henderson, Professor of Communication at the University of Massachusetts (and the Master’s cousin) passed through a few times, and Senior Fellow Ralph Heintzman overnighted while he was in in town to deliver the lecture on French-language newspapers in the course on Canadian Journalism given by Senior Fellow Michael Valpy. Friend of Massey and Founder of Trent University, Tom Symons, stayed over to attend a British North American Committee meeting, where Kevin Lynch, former Chief Clerk of the Privy Council and now Senior Vice-President of RBC, spoke in the Upper Library. Ralph returned with his wife, Jane, in June, for a three-day marathon of seminars and dinners to honour Tom Symons. Ralph was the moving force behind this tribute with the help of event organizer Jessie Fraser, No. 1 daughter, who was taking a break from theatre directing. Tom and his wife, Christine, stayed in the Lodging as well, so it was a full house during that time. Also in June, Joan Harrison, Georgian Bay friend and Quadrangler and now in Ottawa, camped out with us in John’s upstairs study while celebrating her 60th anniversary of graduating in Medicine. At that time also, Alum Katie Edwards, just finished a year of teaching at Amherst, holidayed with us. It seems a very long time ago when we were taking trays to Katie in House III during her bout of pneumonia. One of the unforgettable domestic scenes of the College year occurred on the second floor of the Lodging prior to the Robbie Burns’ High Table, when the Master – natty in his Fraser (hunting) trous and jacket resplendent with silver buttons – competed for Gaelic glory with Christopher McCreary, Personal Secretary to the Lt. Gov. of Nova Scotia; and Kevin MacLeod, Black Rod of the Senate, Personal Secretary to Queen Elizabeth, and planner of the visit of Prince William and Catherine, both in their appropriately tartanned kilts. I myself wore dignified navy with an ancient (and understated) MacCallum scarf. I was not even in the running for sartorial splendour. Speaking of royals, while John was in England covering the royal wedding and I was in France visiting friends, Clara hosted Baroness Sharp of Guildford and her husband, Tom, who were in Toronto to launch Just a Larger Family: Letters of Marie Williamson from the Canadian Home Front, 1940–1944, edited by Tom Sharp and Mary P. Williamson, about Tom and his brother being war guests in Toronto. (Thanks to Clara, we all now have a standing invitation to lunch at the House of Lords.)

Music, of course, remained an integral part of life at the Lodging. The Talisker Players, Massey’s Musicians-inResidence, continued to practise in our basement, both for College events and for their tenth anniversary Words and Music Series at Trinity-St. Paul’s. Dewi Minden’s resurrected Devonshire Cats with old regulars like Alum Kevin Blagrave and Dave DeDourek also reconvened in their favourite basement. And when the long-lasting Massey Belles rehearsed downstairs, we got a chance to hear Clara sing as one of that group’s new members. At ground level, an old friend, Quebec pianist David Jalbert, took over the living room’s old Steinway to rehearse with cellist Yegor Dyachkov and violinist Jasper Wood before a piano trio tour in southern Ontario. As well this year, Shakespeare joined the musicians and the mice in the basement, where rehearsals took place for The Breath of Kings, originated by actor Graham Abbey, which he directed with Jessie Fraser. Their fundraising evening performance in the Upper Library, further enlivened by a specially adapted piece by Vivaldi from the Talisker Players, was a moment of sheer theatrical bliss. And let me not forget the extraordinary film evening featuring a six-minute work by young East African women talking about life in the generational gap in Canada. That was wonderfully hosted by middle daughter Kate Fraser. The regular schedule of receptions for non-resident Junior Fellows started the year as usual, and buffets occurred every other week, continuing the near halfcentury tradition of providing Junior Fellows and other College members and friends a chance to meet and relax around two big dinner tables in the Lodging. Norma cooks meals they wouldn’t find in Hall, and I get a chance to meet people I might not otherwise. There were other dinners as well, including two auctioned off at the Junior Fellows’ annual fundraiser and a unique evening hosted by Michael Cooke, editor of the Toronto Star. A notable change for the permanent Lodging residents is our Sunday family dinners, which now often include John’s nephews and their wives and children. As a result, we have rediscovered the joys of the basement corridors for push-toys and races, and the delights of hurling Ping-Pong balls up into the air in the Puffy Couch Room. As I mentioned last year, I caught the Camino pilgrimage bug (see the picture with this report). This year I was back at work training for it, and had a glorious time walking 250 km in two weeks with Alum Andrea Paras, my old College room-mate Molly Blyth, and the intrepid Quadrangler Joan York, who also walked with me last year. I returned triumphant, without blisters, elated and exhausted, just a tad smug, and ready to set out again. Unfortunately, I must end on a sad note. Mollie Bloom, College terrier and ever tolerant of all on two legs, died quickly of cancer in late June. Only a day before, she had been harassing Georgian Bay chipmunks. She was a good friend to many at Massey, and we are hoping to find another terrier with just as much attitude this fall. We still make sure no food is left near the edge of a table.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

When the College pops up in the mass media, we’d like members of our community to hear about it. Please let us know if you spot something of significance on Massey in a newspaper or magazine, or on television or the Web. “Sanctuary at Massey” appeared in the National Post on May 14, 2011. For permission to reprint it in this abridged version, we are grateful to Peter Kuitenbrouwer, who wrote the piece, and to the National Post.

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ichael Ignatieff’s new office at Massey College is a cozy nook, featuring a fireplace, a wrought-iron poker for the fire, and what John Fraser, the college’s Master, describes as a “monk’s cell,” with a bathroom and a bed wide enough for one person. “It’s not haute luxury,” Mr. Fraser allows. Still, he notes the room’s best feature: the window, which looks out over the grand main entrance to the college. “I like this because you can see the enemy coming,” Mr. Fraser says. Canada may not want Mr. Ignatieff, but Mr. Fraser and Massey College most certainly do; the Master fairly crowed this week as he talked about the coup of landing the former Liberal leader, who, whatever else you say about him, has proved his mettle at some of the world’s top schools. It seems fitting that, when Mr. Ignatieff found himself all alone in the political wilderness on May 3, he received an offer to find shelter at Massey. This is, after all, the same fortress to which Bob Rae, the former premier of Ontario, Preston Manning, founder of the Canadian Alliance, Glen Murray, former mayor of Winnipeg, Ken Whyte, former editor of the National Post, and others retreated after being unceremoniously booted from their jobs. Those who come through Massey generally emerge on more firm ground; some then return to political life. Glen Murray, who came to Massey after losing as a federal candidate for the Liberals in Winnipeg, is now Ontario’s minister of research and innovation; Bob Rae, who came here after serving as NDP premier of Ontario, is now a

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Liberal MP for downtown Toronto. Pierre Trudeau, for his part, used Massey College in the 1990s not so much to sharpen his wits but rather for sleepovers when he visited Toronto to be near his daughter, Sarah Coyne. Michael Ignatieff is not the first member of the family to come to Massey College. His great aunt, Alice Parkin Massey, was the wife of Vincent Massey, one of the founders of the College, and his younger brother, Andrew, has been a member of the college’s Quadrangle Society for some time. “I think it’s a great idea,” says Andrew Ignatieff of his brother’s arrival at Massey. “He’s an excellent teacher, he has lots of experience, and he likes nothing better than to discuss ideas with engaged, curious, and opinionated students. He will be well received and extremely happy there. It’s a very welcoming community.” When Michael Ignatieff gets to Massey and visits the chapel, a small, subterranean spot of worship that Mr. Fraser has reimagined with Byzantine archways in blonde wood, he will appreciate a Russian icon that hangs on a wall there. The Russian Orthodox image of John the Baptist is a relic that Vincent and Alice Massey rescued from a church in Russia being sacked and burned by Communists in 1920. The couple gave it to Mr. Ignatieff’s parents on their wedding; the couple then passed it on to their daughter-in-law, Melody. She, in turn, gave it to Andrew Ignatieff, who donated it to the college, where it now hangs proudly, having survived great adversity on the way to sanctuary. Mr. Ignatieff may well find safety here, too.

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SYLVIE A. LAMOUREUX (co-ed with N. Labrie), “Language, Identity and

JAMES CARSON NOHRNBERG, “‘The Mythical Method’ in Song and Saga,

____ (co-ed with F. Giampapa), “Voices from the Field: Identity, Language, and

____, “‘The Mythical Method’ in Song and Saga, Verse and Prose: Part II,” Forum

Educational Policy,” Canadian Journal of Education, 33(2) and 33(3), 2010.

Power in Multilingual Research Settings,” Journal of Language, Identity and Education, 10(3), 2011.

CHRISTOPHER LIND, Rumours of a Moral Economy. Halifax & Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing, 2010.

BURTON MacDONALD, Pilgrimage in Early Christian Jordan: A Literary and Archaeological Guide. Oxford, UK and Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2010.

DAVID M. MALONE, Does the Elephant Dance? Contemporary Indian Foreign Policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

RODERICK R. McINNES, “Culture: The Silent Language Geneticists Must

Learn – Genetic Research with Indigenous Populations,” American Journal of Human Genetics, 88, 2011: 254–261.

____, (with A. Bramall, A. Wright, and S. Jacobson, “The Genomic, Biochemical and Cellular Responses of the Retina in Inherited Photoreceptor Degenerations and Prospects for the Treatment of These Disorders,” Annual Review of Neuroscience, 33, 2010: 441–472.

Prose and Verse: Part One,” Arthuriana, 21 (1), 2011: 20–38. for World Literature Studies, 2 (2), 2010: 270–30.

____, “’This Disfigured People’: The Representation of Sin as Pathological Bodily and Mental Affliction in Inferno XXIX–XXX,” in Rhetorics of Bodily Disease and Health in Medieval and Early Modern England, Jennifer C. Vaught, ed. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2010: 43–64.

RUTH PANOFSKY, “One Series after Another: The Macmillan Company of

Canada,” in The Culture of the Publisher’s Series. Vol. 2: Nationalisms and the National Canon, John Spiers, ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011: 184–198.

____, “‘This Was Her Punishment’: Jew, Whore, Mother in the Fiction of Adele

Wiseman and Lilian Nattel,” in Textual Mothers/Maternal Texts: Motherhood in Contemporary Women’s Literatures, Elizabeth Podnieks and Andrea O'Reilly, eds. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2010: 95–107.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Life at Massey College

Reflections by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy from page 29

I think of two magic touches among many. The stardust-sprinkled 1999 visit of Mikhail Baryshnikov to High Table, 25 years after our intrepid Master Fraser had been instrumental in his defection to the West, was commemorated by a card brilliantly portraying a dancing figure using typeface from the Massey press. And, more recently, Jane Freeman’s utterly engaging exposition of the validity of the Sanders portrait allegedly of Shakespeare at a Senior Fellows luncheon in February was topped by her disclosure of a rib-splitting response in doggerel from David Goldbloom. (Full disclosure: the doggerel was offered in an email exchange, so I must allow for that mode of conversation in this tribute.) Only at Massey!

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Carolyn Hughes Tuohy is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto. She holds a B.A. from the University of Toronto, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. Her area of research and teaching interest is comparative public policy, with an emphasis on social policy. Her publications include Accidental Logics: the Dynamics of Change in the Health Care Arena in the United States, Britain and Canada (Oxford University Press, 1999) and Policy and Politics in Canada: Institutionalized Ambivalence (Temple University Press, 1992), a treatment of Canadian public policy in comparative perspective. From 1992 – 2005 she served in a number of roles in the senior administration of the University of Toronto, including Deputy Provost and Vice-President, Government and Institutional Relations. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She has been a Senior Fellow at Massey College since 2001. h c.tuohy@utoronto.ca

Senior Fellows at lunch The speakers this past year at the well-attended monthly lunches were: • Mr. Mark Starowicz, “How the News Was Born” • Ursula Franklin, “Fakes I Have Known: On the Use of Scientific Techniques in the Authentication of Archaeological Finds and Works of Art” • Andy Orchard, “The Penis Mightier than the Sword: The Riddle of Anglo-Saxon Lewdness and Learning” • Allan Peterkin, “Why Healthcare Needs the Humanities” • Jane Freeman, “CSI Shakespeare: Investigating the Portraits of ‘William Shakespeare‘ ” • Ian Clark, “Academic Reform: Policy Options for Improving the Quality and Cost-Effectiveness of Undergraduate Education in Ontario”

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NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS, “Decentering History: Local Stories and Cultural Crossings in a Global World,” History and Theory, 50, 2011: 188–202.

RITA SHELTON DEVERELL, “Slavery Endangers the Masters’ Health, But

Please Don‘t Shoot the Messenger.” In Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the Lens of Cultural Diversity, Ashok Mathur, Jonathan Dewar, and Mike DeGagné, eds. Ottawa: Aboriginal Healing Foundation, 2011: 383–395.

JACKIE FEKE, “Ptolemy,” in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late

Antiquity, Vol. 1, Lloyd Gerson, ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010: 197–209.

J. CAITLIN FINLAYSON, “John Squire: The Unknown Author of The Tryumphs of Peace, the London Lord Mayor’s Show for 1620,” Neophilologus, 94 (3), 2010: 531–539.

____, “Mercantilism and the Path to Spiritual Salvation in Thomas Heywood’s Londini Emporia (1633),” English Studies, 91 (8), 2010: 838–860.

ALLAN FOTHERINGHAM, Boy From Nowhere: A Life in Ninety-One Countries. Toronto: Dundurn Press, 2011.

DOUGLAS GIBSON, Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro,

Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and Others. Toronto: ECW Press, 2011.

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Journalism Fellows 2010–2011

Conversation with Ian Burgham

Thank you, donors!

from page 28

What the place offers me is a place for thinking and meditation, an almost religious atmosphere. And by that I don’t mean going to the Chapel! The College is appropriately far away from the traffic of the world, yet somehow it offers a space where you can come face to face with everything that means anything. So I’m not talking about self-indulgent escapism here. And, finally, Alexander McCall Smith. You connected him to Massey after connecting with him yourself in Scotland. Tell us a bit about that. Yes, we became very good friends in Scotland, beginning in 1977, when I was at Canongate Publishing, and he remains a great supporter of my work. We have lots of back and forth as I develop my poems. He’s very supportive of me personally, for sure, but he also pushes me very hard in my writing. And he’s now a great supporter of Massey, most publicly at the fundraising whisky-nosing events. Thank you, Ian, for giving us some of your time today. And thank you for our wonderful hour and a half of talk.

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NICHOLAS HALMI (co-ed. with Richard T. Gray and Gary J. Handwerk),

Inventions of the Imagination: Romanticism and Beyond. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2011.

____, “The Very Model of a Modern Epic Poem,” European Romantic Review, 21, 2010: 589–600.

BRIAN HODGES (with M. Albert, D. Arweiler, S. Akseer, et al.), “The Future of

Medical Education: A Canadian Environmental Scan,” Medical Education, 45(1), 2011: 95–106.

____, “A Tea-Steeping or i-Doc Model for Medical Education?,” Academic Medicine, 85, 2010: 34–44.

RAY JAYAWARDHANA, Strange New Worlds: The Search for Alien Planets and Life Beyond Our Solar System. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Vladimir J. Konečni, “Aesthetic Trinity Theory and the Sublime,” Philosophy Today, 55, 2011: 64–73.

____ Literary and Visual Experiments 1986–2011. Belgrade, Serbia: Licej/ Publikum, 2011.

George Kovacs (co-ed with C.W. Marshall), Classics and Comics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

United Way Daniel Utrecht Henry Van Driel George Vanderburgh Joan Vanduzer Rudolph Vezer Robert Vipond Tara Vongpaisal

(Left-to-right) Kierans Janigan Fellow Elizabeth Church (The Globe and Mail, Toronto), Webster/ McConnell Fellow Jeff Warren (Freelancer), Gordon N. Fisher Fellow Hugo Rodrigues (Sentinel-Review, Woodstock, Ontario), and CBC/Radio-Canada Fellow Susan Mahoney (CBC/Radio-Canada). Yongho Kim, who does not appear in this photograph, also joined the group last year as an Associate Fellow. He is with Kookje Daily News in Busan, South Korea. During the year, the Journalism Fellows hosted a series of distinguished invited guests for lunch and conversation in the Private Dining Room. Among these guests were Charles Pascal from OISE; Nathalie Des Rosiers of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association; Hubert Lacroix, President and CEO of the CBC; Catherine Zahn, CEO of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto; James Orbinski, founder of Dignitas International; and author Margaret Atwood. The Fellows also paid working visits to Berlin, Helsinki, and Copenhagen. A full report on the activities of the 2010–2011 Journalism Fellows can be found in Owl, available in hard copy from the College Administrator, Anna Luengo, or online at <http://www.masseycollege.ca/journalism-fellows/the-owl>. •

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THOMAS AXWORTHY was appointed Secretary-

General of the InterAction Council. The Council regularly brings together more than 30 former heads of state or government. Its aim is to foster international co-operation and action in peace and security, world economic revitalization, and universal ethical standards.

ANDREW BAINES received the University of Toronto

Northrup Frye Award for excellence in teaching. h andrew.baines@utoronto.ca

DAVID BEACH is engaged in numerous activities in his

retirement. He taught a course at the Royal Conservatory of Music and a doctoral seminar at the Don Wright Faculty of Music, University of Western Ontario. He is also in the final stages of completing two books, one written with Ryan McClellan at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music and the other a textbook on Advanced Schenkerian Analysis. In his spare time, he is President, Toronto Summer Music Foundation.

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DONNA BENNETT and RUSSELL BROWN have

just published The Collected Poems of Patrick Lane. h bennett@chass.utoronto.ca h rbrown@chass.utoronto.ca

ALAN BERNSTEIN stepped down, effective July,

after three and a half years as the inaugural executive director of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise. Being part of the global collaborative efforts of Enterprise stakeholders working toward the development of a safe and effective vaccine against HIV has been immensely rewarding for him, personally and professionally. He especially values the friendships he made around the world in the global community of funders, researchers, advocates and policy makers who are working so tirelessly together to speed up the day when AIDS is history.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Diane Walker Ken Walker Ian Wallace Michael Walsh Patrick Walshe Germaine Warkentin Judith Watt-Watson Alex Waugh Cynthia Webb Ian Webb Norman Webster Harriet (Sis) Bunting Weld Richard Wernham Grace Westcott Bruce Westwood Pamela Wheaton Rodney White William Whitehead Catherine Whiteside Blossom Wigdor Ian and Ailsa Wiggins Mary Williamson Elizabeth Wilson Lois Wilson Martin Wine Warren Winkler Richard Winter Eleanor Wittlin Judith Wolfson Janet Wright Morden Yolles Joan York Marion York Eric Young Ernst Young James Young Jacob Ziegel Moses Znaimer

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Reflections by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy

Life at Massey College

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED 2010–2011 All academic affiliations are with the University of Toronto unless stated otherwise. Emanuel Adler Chair of Israeli Studies, Department of Political Science Thomas S. Axworthy President and Chief Executive Officer, Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation Leonard W. Conolly Professor of English and former President, Trent University Ronald Deibert Associate Professor, Department of Political Science Don Drummond Economic Advisor and former Senior Vice-President and Chief Economist, TD Bank Tony Easty Senior Scientist, University Health Network, and Associate Professor, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Brendan Frey Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering James R. Graham Director, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics Richard Greene Professor, Department of English Ralph Halbert Philanthropist Edith Hillan Vice-Provost, Faculty and Academic Life Rafi Hofstein President and Chief Executive Officer, MaRS Innovation Margret Hovanec Co-Founder and Chair, Lupina Foundation Thomas Hurka Professor of Philosophy William Johnston Psychiatrist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Outreach Psychiatry Program Trevor Levere Professor Emeritus, History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics

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Journalism

from page 1

I felt intimidated by the prospect of stepping into such large shoes. As with so many other things in Canada, the Journalism Fellowship Program had been initiated in 1962 to provide a Canadian counterpart to an American one, the Nieman Program for American Journalists at Harvard. My colleague at the time was Ross Munro, a distinguished journalist who had reported from the battlefields of World War II. Together, we designed the new program based to a degree on the Harvard curriculum. Besides the individual program of courses, the plan was for special guests to join the journalists for off-the-record lunches. We planned as well for travel to Washington at the invitation of the US State Department and to other points in the United States. And, of course, we added the Canadian counterpart with an annual trip to Ottawa. Over the years, the program has had many eminent visitors (almost no one refused our invitation) as political leaders, scientists, writers, and historians joined us for off-therecord sessions twice every week. Travel expanded gradually over the years to include at various times Finland, Sweden, Denmark Germany, the Arctic, England, Mexico, and Trinidad, to name just •

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some of the countries that the journalists visited to meet with prominent local figures in politics and other areas. Massey College has been the ever-welcoming host for the past 50 years. One could not have imagined a more congenial and stimulating home for the program. I watched annually as the incoming group of seasoned journalists started the year as dazed freshmen in this world without deadlines. And I watched as they ended the year as self-assured and articulate participants in their graduate seminars. Those who passed through the program now form a roster of some of the leading journalists and media executives in this country. As I look back on the last three decades of the program, I flip through my intangible Rolodex of memories of Canadian journalists from across the country, and I remember as well our international journalists from Africa, India, Korea, and elsewhere. And I have a sense that once in a while someone from a newspaper somewhere on the globe or from somewhere in Canada dials back to retrieve a special moment during the year they spent with us. (Editor’s note: a list of all Journalism Fellows may be found at <www.masseycollege.ca/ journalism-fellows/past-journalismfellows>.) f e l l o w s

BRENDAN CALDER conducted the GettingItDone®

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Massey WIDEN Continued from page 13 Growth • “Angiogenesis – How to Promote the Growth of New Blood Vessels,” Sarah Figley (Biology/Bio-Medicine) • “What Hoaxes in Literature and Visual Art Can Tell Us,” Heather Jessup (English) • “How Eighteenth-Century Korean Intellectual Culture Got Sexy,” Yonsue Kim (History)

Song • “Song and Sacrifice in Ancient Greece and Rome,” Susan Bilynskyj (Classics) • “When Harp Notation Goes Wrong,” with live demonstration, Angela Schwarzkopf (Music) • “God of War, God of Song – The Dead Sea Scrolls Come Alive,” Chad Stauber (Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations) For videos of Massey Widen presentations, you may check <http://www.masseycollege.ca/ events/junior-fellow-lectureseries>. For more on the WIDEN concept, see <http://www.widentoronto. com>.

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SHEILA EMBLETON was inducted to the Royal Society

of Canada last November. She is also helping her course for the new Centre for Social CRM and for the daughter settle in to being a Junior Fellow at Massey. new Next 36 program at the Rotman School of h embleton@yorku.ca Management. This year he also celebrated his fortieth wedding anniversary! JOHN GEIGER was elected the thirteenth President of h brendan.calder@rotman.utoronto.ca the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. He previously served as Governor and Vice-President of the Society. MICHAEL CHARLES completed his term as President As well, he has established the James Geiger Fund in of the Canadian Academy of Engineering last June. memory of his son James, who passed away in 2007. STEPHEN CLARKSON has just published, with This fund helps underwrite expeditions by young co-author Matto Mildenberger, the third of his trilogy people. on North America, Dependent America?: How Canada and Mexico Construct US Power. LINDA HUTCHEON was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada. She retired last year from her position h stephen.clarkson@utoronto.ca as University Professor, Department of English and JACK COSTELLO, S.J., was appointed President of Centre for Comparative Literature, at the University of Regis College, University of Toronto, for a three-year Toronto. term, beginning July 1. He also served in this capacity at Regis from 1988–1998.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

“Reflections” is a regular feature of MasseyNews. In this brief piece, a longstanding, prominent member of our community reflects on her association with the College. The content and approach are entirely at the discretion of the writer.

T

hink – what word comes to mind when you reflect on Massey College? For me, that word is conversation. Alongside inquiry, conversation is one of the two animating values of the university. Why come to a real flesh-andblood, bricks-and-mortar institution of higher education if not for the rhythm and inspiration of human face-to-face sharing of ideas and musings? Twitter may offer immediacy, Google a global cornucopia of information, and each has its value. And as I write this I’ve just switched windows from a lively email exchange in my own area of scholarship. But none of these media creates the intellectual intimacy of in-person conversations, with their nuance of gesture and tone and their moments of presence-insilence. Conversations like this occur in classrooms, faculty and student lounges, and other campus venues. But it is at Massey that the university is at its best. The College affords both the physical and intellectual space and the occasions for conversations that could occur only here. The subdued elegance of Ron Thom’s masterpiece signals that this is a place for deep breaths as well as deep thoughts. There are scheduled occasions too numerous to list exhaustively: High Tables, Junior Fellow Lectures, Senior Fellow Luncheons, and many others. But equally important are the serendipitous occasions for conversation that occur in the Common Room, over lunch, in the Quad, and elsewhere on the precincts. Masseyites converse across disciplines. The value of interdisciplinary exchange is one that the University of Toronto has increasingly sought to promote, even as it respects the strength of its disciplinary pillars. While the university has wrestled with striking this balance (thus speaks the former denizen of Simcoe Hall), Massey has simply lived it. •

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I treasure the conversations I have with Senior and Junior Fellows, ones I do not think I could have anywhere else. Among many such interchanges stand out ones that explore questions on the power of narrative, not to speak of those that explore important questions that have long engaged scholars of literature, rhetoric, political science, law, and medicine. Especially important to me, in my other university home at the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG), are the conversations the College makes possible between the university and the broader community. I am thrilled that the prestigious Walter Gordon Symposium in Public Policy is now co-hosted by Massey and SPPG. The passion, insight, and sheer organizational chops of Junior Fellows in orchestrating this annual event never cease to astound me, and it has been an inspiration to work with the organizing committee for each of the past three years. Junior Fellows don’t shrink from big topics and high ambitions, as attested by the topics of these occasions: “Rising Inequality in Canada,” “Private Emotions, Public Policy,” and “Democracy, Expertise ‒ and Politics.” Every year is a cliff-hanger as speakers are confirmed or events (like federal election calls!) conspire to prevent their coming to pass, but the organizers inevitably surf these roiling waves with aplomb. Conversation, then, lies at the heart of Massey College. But any reflection on this remarkable place would be incomplete without conjuring another key word – magic. Every institution needs a touch of magic – something that elevates us beyond the everyday and delights the soul. Maybe the Massey magic has something to do with the fact that it embraces Oxonian traditions just seriously enough to honour them, but puckishly enough to give them freshness. See REFLECTIONS – page 30

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MICHAEL BAUR, “From Kant’s Highest Good to Hegel’s Absolute Knowing,” in

____ “ ‘Take All My Wealth and Let My Body Go,‘ ” in Women and Wealth in Late

SHELLEY S. BEAL, “Translation and Re-translation: The Memoirs of Eugénie

MARTA BRAUN, Eadweard Muybridge. London: Reaktion Books, 2010. PETER CALAMAI, The Real World of Sherlock Holmes. Toronto: The Friends of

A Companion to Hegel, Michael Baur and Stephen Houlgate, eds. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011: 452–473. de Montijo, Ex-Empress of France,” Mémoires du livre, 2, (1), 2010.

KATE BELL, “’A Delicious Way to Help Save Lives’: Race, Commodification and Celebrity in Product (RED),” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 4(3), 2011: 163–180.

____, “Weinergate: Sexting, Lies and the Mediascape,” Centre for Journalism Ethics, 2011. <http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/2011/07/09/weinergatesexting-lies-and-the-mediascape>

DONNA BENNETT and RUSSELL MORTON BROWN (eds.), The Collected Poems of Patrick Lane. Madeira Park, BC: Harbour Publishing, 2011.

JEREMY M. BERGEN, Ecclesial Repentance: The Churches Confront Their Sinful Pasts. London: T & T Clark International, 2011.

M. C. BODDEN, Language as the Site of Revolt in Medieval and Early Modern England: Speaking as a Woman. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Medieval Europe, Theresa Earenfight, ed. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Toronto Public Library, 2011.

ADAM CHAPNICK, “Virtually Learning: Confessions of a New Online

Instructor.” Blog series for University Affairs. <http://www.universityaffairs.ca>

STEPHEN CLARKSON (with Stepan Wood), A Perilous Imbalance: The

Globalization of Canadian Law and Governance. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2010.

____ (with Stepan Wood), “Multi-modal Governance in North America,” in

Handbook on Multi-Level Governance, Henrik Enderlein, Sonja Wälti, and Michael Zürn (eds.). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011.

THOMAS W. COOPER, Fast Media, Media Fast. Boulder, CO: Gaeta Press, 2011.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Conversation with from page 27 Ian Burgham And what exactly does that involve? It means pulling together different interests – the medical profession, universities, government, foundations, private companies – to help establish education programs and events of different kinds related to the clinical application of science and drugs, the impact of new drugs or new devices on protocol and best practice, and so on. We now have continuing medical education programs accredited by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. I’m also involved with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in this work and as an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Studies in Primary Care, an independent research group at Queen’s University. So that’s your world of everyday work. What about your other world – creating poems? How long has poetry been a part of your life? A long, long time. It was very much part of our family. There were books around our house that my grandmother would point out as written by my grandfather, my greatgrandfather, my great-great grandfather – all poetry. And she and others would read them to me. From very young – I’d say from around two and half or three years old – I was taken by the physical, tactile sense of those books, not to speak of the rhythms I was hearing in those poems, as well as rhythms elsewhere… in music…in the streets…. So rhythm is central in poetry? Definitely. Rhythm is the underpinning of all literature but is especially intense or distilled in poetry. Poems operate rhythmically, playing musically to the ear before they affect us in other ways. So there’s no point to trying to get the point of a poem before absorbing its rhythm. Is that what you’re saying? I’d even go a bit further with that. “The point” is a very dangerous thing to look for in a poem. Listen to a poem. Forget about “learning” anything from it and let it wash over you. Let me use the analogy of finding a rock on a beach. You come across a beautiful one, you pick it up, and you gaze in wonder at its beauty. You may eventually consider why it’s affecting you in this way, but that’s not your first reaction. You’re not “dissecting” it at this point, trying to figure out what geological era it’s from and the like. You’re taking in the whole immediate object, absorbing its beauty.

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Would you explain for our readers the poetic process as you experience it? Give me a second or two to answer that….It’s a very complicated being, a poem, and it’s a very complicated business to write one. I usually start with an image, something physical but charged with emotion – glancing light across a landscape, something felt on the skin, a casual encounter with someone. And that image is lodged deep in my memory, not memory in the sense of remembering an exact moment but of a kind that’s deeply infused in my DNA. Then what? I often don’t know at first what the image means, with few words if any to go with it, so I just sit there quite uncomfortable, damned uncomfortable, in fact, wondering “What the hell is going on? What do I want to write about?” But then I surrender and tunnel down to find out what this image means, where it’s taking me. At this stage, I have sometimes spent 300 or 400 hours on a poem working it over. Does that reflect the “grim compulsion” you mention in your poem “Sometimes”? It absolutely does. The process can be very tough going. But, again, I have to go to where it’s taking me, looking for what it all means. I simply have to do that. What do you mean? Poetry to me is an exploration of meaning, not just how the poem has meaning in itself, but where it takes me beyond itself and way beyond the mundane to face fundamental questions about human relationships, what makes life worth living in the face of mortality, and the like. Can poetry be an assertion of being, an affirmation of life? Certainly, yes, especially as it explores the question of what binds us to life and makes life joyful. I’ve only come up with one answer to that. Love. And I mean love in any form, not only romantic love. There’s always a distance between us, and yet we’re pulled to the comfort of each other. That’s the central theme, if you will, of my work. Would you care to identify influences on your work? If by that you mean other poets and writers in general, there are many: Coleridge, Rilke, Joyce, Neruda, Irving Layton (before 1974), Leonard Cohen, Ted Hughes…. I mine, borrow, steal from all of them – and others – for my own work.

Let me add, too, that Coleridge’s understanding of poetic process is the best I’ve ever come across outside of Aristotle. And I trace my appreciation of Coleridge to someone who was a major source of encouragement for me, back to George Whalley at Queen’s. He had been in the Navy with my father, who showed him some of my early poetry when I was in high school in Kingston. So at 16 I found myself spending a couple of hours every Saturday morning with George discussing my own poetry and poetry in general. I thought I had died and gone to heaven. He was my first mentor. In an earlier conversation we had some months ago in the Common Room you mentioned your work with the remarkable painter Uno Hoffmann. Please tell our readers a bit about that. In his dazzling work War Music, a largeformat book, Uno combines his art with the words of Christopher Logue’s poem of the same name. It’s a large-format book, a sequence of spreads, some with foldout pages, all based on the Iliad. You can check it out online at <http://unohoffmann.com/ warmusic.pdf>. Now we’re working on something similar with the working title Ten Paintings, Ten Poems, based on my work. And what’s the focus or theme of this collaborative work with Hoffmann? Stone. The elemental nature of it, the universe of stone, if you like. What it reveals. What it hides. How it’s used. How as humans we interact with it. How do you find the process of creative collaboration? I’ve never done it before and it’s very intense and absolutely fascinating, an ongoing dialogue in which we create – and destroy. My work with Uno – which, I should add, also involves a public art project in downtown Toronto – has given me a whole new orientation to my work. I’d say working with him has altered my poetic sensibility. And I see in a note to your poem “The Snow Garden at Massey College” that this place “has been a refuge for me; many of the poems [in the collection The Grammar of Distance] have been written within its walls.” In what ways has Massey been a part of your process of writing? It’s the cloistered aspect of Massey that helps me write. Not the chit-chat, not the fine minds, not the scholarship.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

CONVERSATION – page 30

News of our Scholars- and Journalists-at-Risk by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

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aron Berhane (Journalist-at-Risk, 2003–04) was finally joined by his wife and three children after eight years of separation. When we called Aaron in for an interview for a fellowship, he had just fled Eritrea and was about to start training in palliative care in Toronto. Colleagues who worked with him at his newspaper in Asmara had been jailed and his office destroyed. He had to leave the country immediately or put himself and his family (then including a young baby boy) in danger. It was an arduous and sometimes seemingly hopeless period for him, but we knew that all would be well when he called last spring to say that his family had finally been able to flee Eritrea and were waiting for their final papers to get to Canada. They are all now in Toronto as he continues to work hard on his newspaper, Meftih (<www.meftih.org>). In Tigrigna and English, Meftih has twice been awarded for “Best Editorial and Visual Presentation” by the National Ethnic Press & Media Council of Canada. After four years of hard work interspersed with some good years at Massey, Clement Jumbe taught at Centennial College last year and defended his thesis in HIV/AIDS Education at the end of May. Congratulations, Clement! François Ndayizigiye and his wife, Adolphine Kambayire, arrived at Massey College in early December after a long journey from Cameroon, where they lived after fleeing Rwanda. Once in Toronto, they moved into an apartment at Trinity and were welcomed by all of us across the road at Massey. Messages went out on the listserv asking for help with English tutoring and very positive responses from Junior Fellows and Alum immediately came flooding in. François and Adolphine were soon seen in the Common Room on a regular basis in deep English •

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FREDERIC JACKMAN was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

RAY JAYAWARDHANA was given the University of

Toronto McLean Award, a $100,000 prize intended to help emerging research leaders attract promising graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to their labs. This year, he is a Radcliffe Institute Fellow at Harvard.

BERNIE LUCHT was appointed the Irving Chair in

Journalism for 2011–2012 at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick.

DAVID MALONE continues to find The International

Development Research Centre (IDRC) in Ottawa, one of Canada’s little-known centres of excellence, a tremendous place to work and to learn. His new monograph, Does the Elephant Dance? Contemporary Canadian Foreign Policy, started during his days as

conversation, several times at our lunchtime French Tables, and for many events at the College. A geographer with expertise in erosion control in the highlands of East Africa, François became associated with the Department of Geography at UTM, where he attended several seminars and was also invited to do some guest lecturing. Adolphine is an agronomist. We hope to have them with us for another year. Former Director General of Antiquities of Gaza, Moain Sadeq, made a brief visit to Toronto in the spring. He reported that he and his family have settled well into life in Doha, Qatar. His position as Associate Professor in the History Program at Qatar University is a three-year term, and he has invited us to be in touch at m.sadeq@utoronto.ca, should any Masseyites plan to be in Qatar in the near future. The Massey College Scholars-at-Risk program started in 1998 and has since funded some 15 scholars. Thanks to an endowment from the Donner Canadian Foundation, and in association with the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies, the College each year chooses two or three scholars who are at-risk in their home countries for political or similar reasons. They receive assistance to complete a graduate degree or support as they return to academia, including, in some cases, accommodation at the College. All the scholars take an active part in College life and a number have since settled permanently in Canada. Many of the scholars are invited to teach part-time or to give individual lectures in their associated departments at the University of Toronto. The program here is part of New York University’s Scholarat-Risk network (<http://scholarsatrisk.nyu.edu>), with which Massey College works closely to identify potential scholars in need of assistance. •

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Canadian High Commissioner in Delhi, was published last May. It lingers still on the Indian topten bestseller list. Giving him more pleasure than anything else professionally is a fresh batch of students at the NYU Law School this fall, keen to tackle the law and practice of the United Nations. Massey College remains his home in Toronto. h dmalone@idrc.ca

RODERICK McINNES was the Alon/ARVO Keynote

Speaker for the opening session of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He was also named a “Champion of Genetics” by the Canadian Gene Cure Foundation. He is the Alva Chair in Human Genetics and Director, Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University. He lives in Montreal with his wife, Daniele. h rod.mcinnes@mcgill.ca

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED, 2010–2011 Gillian Mackay Associate Dean of Graduate Education and Associate Professor of Music David Malkin Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Biophysics; Director, Cancer Genetics Program; Senior Scientist, Genetics and Genomic Biology Program and Associate Chief of Research, HSC Research Institute Ivan McFarlane Co-Founder, The Quadrangle Society Anita McGahan Associate Dean, Research and Director of PhD programs, Rotman School of Management; Professor of Strategic Management, Munk School of Public Affairs Don McLean Dean, Faculty of Music Michael McMillan Co-Founder and Chair, Samara Kenneth Mills Professor and Chair, Department of History Cheryl Misak Vice-President and Provost Mary Kay O’Neil Director, Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis Clifford Orwin Professor, Department of Political Science Julia O’Sullivan Dean, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Charles Pachter Artist, historian, and lecturer David Palmer Vice-President, Advancement William B.P. Robson President and Chief Executive Officer, C.D. Howe Institute Seamus Ross Dean, Faculty of Information Karin Ruerdanz Curator, Islamic Art, Royal Ontario Museum, and Associate Professor of Islamic Art Stephen J. Rupp Chair, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

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Conversation with Ian Burgham

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED, 2010–2011 Stephen Scharper Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology

A Quadrangler since 1998, Ian Burgham is an associate of the League of Canadian Poets. Born in New Zealand, he grew up in Kingston, Ontario, and studied literature at Queen’s University and at the University of Edinburgh, where he did an M. Litt. on Blake. After working at Canongate Publishing and Macdonald Publishing in Edinburgh, he returned to Canada and established himself in the field of medical education. He has published three collections of poetry: A Confession of Birds, The Stone Skippers, and, most recently, in 2010, The Grammar of Distance. His poems have appeared in many Canadian literary journals, including Prairie Fire, The New Quarterly, The Literary Review of Canada, and Queen’s Quarterly. Ian is also an Adjunct Professor at the Queen’s University Centre for Studies in Primary Care (<www.queensu.ca/cspc/index.html>), Senior Vice-President for the International Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, President of Garrison Creek Educational Services, and a Director of the Rowers’ Pub Reading Series based at Harbord House, a few blocks west of Massey College. Ian spoke with us this August in the Master’s Office.

Anna Skorzewska Head, Acute Care Unit, University Health Network, and Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry Elizabeth Smyth Professor and Associate Chair of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, and Vice-Dean (Programs), School of Graduate Studies Robert Jan van Pelt Professor, School of Architecture, University of Waterloo Janet Walker Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University Sandy Welsh Professor, Department of Sociology R. Paul Young Keck Chair of Seismology and Rock Mechanics, Department of Civil Engineering, and Vice-President, Research David W. Zingg Director, University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars In 2010–2011, Massey was home to the following Senior Residents. Warmly welcomed, they were active members of our community during the year. Dr. Aubie Angel Medicine Professor Stephen Clarkson Political Science Dr. John Dirks Medicine Mr. Michael Enright Journalism Professor Ursula Franklin Physics/Metallurgy The Hon. Justice Arthur Gans Law Professor Donald Goellnicht English Mr. Rudyard Griffiths Dominion Institute

Massey College was honoured with a visit on February 12 by the then recently elected mayor of Calgary, Naheed Nenshi. He is shown here in the Round Room with (left to right) Calgarian Junior Fellows Lucas Badenduck, Beth Elder, and Mark McConaghy, and Journalism Fellows Susan Mahoney, Hugo Rodrigues, Jeff Warren, and Elizabeth Church.

Elizabeth MacCallum speaks at gala dinner on pain management

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Oxycontin and morphine. She remarked that “pain control remains one of the great failures of modern medicine, hugely understudied even though it is the main reason people see a doctor.” She also noted that twice as many people commit suicide among those with chronic pain as among the healthy population and that, in spite of the seriousness of the problem, there is isn’t a single public multi-disciplinary pain clinic in Ontario. Ms. MacCallum has written on pain management in the national media and is currently working on a book that, in part, examines the recent demonization of pain killers.

lizabeth MacCallum was the guest speaker on March 5, 2011 at the annual gala dinner hosted by the Alumni Association, the Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program, and the Quadrangle Society. Introduced by Alumni David Robertson and Michael McGillion, Ms. MacCallum, an award-winning documentary maker, author, and journalist, spoke on “Pain Management Today,” based on her many years of experience with chronic pain and trying to deal with it through surgery and drugs. In the course of her presentation, she spoke of her conflicted feelings about the use of pain killers like •

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HELEN (ROSEMARY) MEIER was given the Amina

Malko award by the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture. She is a Staff Psychiatrist St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto; Consulting Psychiatrist, and Member of the Consent and Capacity Board. She also became the Consulting Psychiatrist for COPA (Community Outreach Program in Addition) last January. h hmr.meier@utoronto.ca

ROBERT PAUL was appointed last October as Vice-

President, Education at the University Health Network. He was also recently awarded the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) President’s Award for Exemplary Leadership in Academic Medicine.

LOUIS PAULY was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. h louis.pauly@utoronto.ca

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JIM PAUPST is researching the history of pain and how pain was perceived and treated in various cultures, especially by magic and shamanistic practitioners.

ALLAN PETERKIN was named Associate Editor of

Medical Humanities, published by the British Medical Journal.

PETER RUSSELL gave the keynote speech at events

celebrating the seventieth anniversary of the historic meeting of Churchill and Roosevelt in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland, August 9–12, 1941. It was at this time that they wrote the Atlantic Charter. He has written a new book on that event, The First Summit and the Atlantic Charter.

PETER SINGER was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Dr. Franklin Harkins Theology

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To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Before we talk about your poetry, would you tell us a bit about your day job and how you fell into it. I got to it eventually through publishing. I started in that world in the 1970s, in Edinburgh, working in different jobs: as a book salesman, editor, and publisher, not to speak of time spent sweeping the floors at Canongate Publishing wearing gloves to keep warm in the winter because we had no heat! With little pay, no doubt? [laughs] Very little! Initially I got £15 a week, along with a dozen free-range eggs.

But now – outside of your poetic work, of course – you’re involved, if I understand it correctly, in medical education in some form. Yes, but let me explain how I got where I am now. While in Scotland, I tried to figure out a way to make money out of books. So I approached private corporations such as the manufacturers of Drambuie and asked them if they were interested in having their names associated with special editions of books: for example, a leather-bound book on favourite recipes

of the Clan Chiefs of Scotland. The idea was for the corporation to purchase 10,000 or so specially bound copies to give as gifts to corporate friends and associates. Then you returned to Canada in 1982 with the express purpose of doing the same thing. Is that correct? Exactly! But that didn’t quite work out as planned, so I shifted into medical publishing, then more broadly into medical education, which is now the focus of my work outside of poetry. CONVERSATION – page 28

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Robin Breon is back working in the theatre since retiring from the Museum Studies Program at the University of Toronto. He is working with a great creative team on an adaptation of the Ain’t Lookin’ by George Luscombe and John Craig. The team was awarded a Toronto Arts Council theatre project grant for a one-night workshop presentation of the musical. The story has to do with a barnstorming black baseball team in the summer of 1939 led by Chappie Johnson (a real figure in Negro League baseball), and how a young white kid from the fictional town of Trentville, Ontario, was able to link up with the team for several months and gain experience and insights that would last a lifetime.

Charles Foran won the 2011 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

for his widely acclaimed work, Mordecai: The Life & Times. On the night of the award ceremony, David Macfarlane, one of three judges for the prize, commented: “We felt that this book had a very clear voice. From beginning to end, it seemed in command of its subject and of the story it was telling.”

Douglas Gibson published Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice

Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and Others. Many of the stories (including those dealing with W.O. Mitchell , Mavis Gallant, Charles Ritchie, and Val Ross) have a Massey College connection. He is promoting the ECW Press book with an eponymous stage show at venues across the country.

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D.B. Scott received the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement at the thirty-fourth annual National Magazine Awards in June. He is President of Impresa Communications, a consulting firm specializing in Canadian magazine and publishing companies, and a part-time instructor and associate coordinator with the Magazine and Web Publishing Program at Ryerson University. The citation for Scott’s National Magazine Award noted that “the results of his studies and research have contributed to strengthening public policy at the provincial and federal levels.”

David Sisam is an architect and Founding Principal, Montgomery Sisam

Architects. His firm was recently honored with two prestigious awards: in 2010, the June Callwood Outstanding Achievement Award for Voluntarism in Ontario in recognition of work to establish a corporate volunteer program with one of their clients, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; in spring 2011, the Architectural Firm Award from the Royal Architecture Institute of Canada. In choosing Montgomery Sisam, the jury noted: “The folio put forward by Montgomery Sisam Architects described a practice that demonstrated cumulative decades of depth, breadth, and richness in an architectural practice... a practice with a vision, purpose, and ethic.” h dsisam@montgomerysisam.com

Bill Toye edited The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, Second Edition. It was published last December.

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Quadrangle Society Book Club Report The Quadrangle Society Book Club at Massey College is open to the whole Massey community – current and emeriti Senior Fellows, Journalism and Junior Fellows, and Alumni, as well as Quadranglers ‒ and our meetings have become a popular forum for all the different categories of Massey people to meet and exchange ideas. Meetings are held in the Upper Library at 7:45 p.m. once a month from October to May (usually, the first Monday), preceded by coffee and desert. Many members dine beforehand in Hall. Two or three times a year we send out an e-mail (and snailmail) newsletter with updated schedules and additional information about the books and presenters to all members of the Quadrangle Society and to all other members of the College community who would like it. Please let the Master’s office know if you wish to be on this mailing list. We opened the 2010 – 2011 season with Quadrangle member Charlotte Gray describing some of her adventures in researching her new book Gold Diggers: Striking It Rich in the Klondike. Our November title, Ian McEwan’s surprisingly comic novel Solar, about a disreputable Nobel prize-winning scientist, was given a genially ironic presentation by Nobel prizewinning Senior Fellow John Polanyi. Hilary Mantel’s popular novel Wolf Hall, based on the

QUADRANGLE SOCIETY • BOOK CLUB • 2011– 2012 At press time, the following titles are confirmed for the 2011–2012 season. As their names become available, the presenters will be announced in communication updates from the College.

• Mordecai: The Life & Times by Charles Foran

• The Big Short (Inside the Doomsday Machine) by Michael Lewis

• The Hare with the Amber Eyes by Edmund de Waal

• Dreams of My Russian Summers by Alexei Makine

• Defiant Spirits: The Modernist Revolution and the Group of Seven by Ross King

life of the Tudor politician Thomas Cromwell, was presented by Tudor scholar and Senior Fellow James Carley, who did not allow his expertise to inhibit his response to the book. Our January title was The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama by David Remnick, presented by our guest, David Halton, formerly CBC Washington correspondent, who gave us a masterful insight into the American political scene. The contemporary Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany, suggested and presented by Quadrangler Judy Stoffman, was an exceptionally timely choice as our discussion of it coincided with the Egyptian spring revolution. In

March, Jean Riley drew us into Hugh MacLennan’s 1959 novel The Watch that Ends the Night. We began our final meeting of the year with a hymn, led by our choir mistress, Elizabeth MacCallum, in an effort to get into the subtly satiric spirit of Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood, which was given a splendidly illuminating presentation by the book club’s founder, Sandra Martin. To our regret, however, our traditional concluding gala dinner had to be cancelled because of scheduling problems. We are extremely grateful to all the presenters and to the Master and his staff for helping to make all our meetings such successful events.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION REPORTS

Toronto chapter by Kari Maaren

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his past year, the Massey College Alumni Association has continued along the lines laid out by its restructuring last year. The International branch of the Executive has expanded, with Alexandra Sorin in charge of this initiative, while the Toronto Alumni are focusing on learning more about what Alumni want from the committee. The Toronto chapter of the Alumni Association held its annual barbecue in August 2010; due to some scheduling difficulties, it happened only a week or so before the Orientation Week barbecue, but there was still a good turnout. In the winter of 2011, Toronto Alumni Executive member Katherine Verhagen launched a detailed survey meant to ascertain what Alumni want from the Toronto chapter in the future. We are meeting this fall to discuss how to implement some of the suggestions that have arisen from the survey. In March 2011, the annual Alumni/ Journalism Fellows/Quadrangle Society Gala 26

was held. Elizabeth MacCallum, the guest of honour, offered up a moving, intriguing talk about the physical and psychological effects of pain (see page 18). The Alumni listserv is now keeping Alumni informed about Massey news and events. The website at <http://www. masseycollege.ca/alumni> is also going strong. If you wish to sign up for the listserv, you will find instructions on this site, which also offers news, a list of upcoming events, a comic about the College, and various other interesting little features. Any questions about the website or the Toronto chapter in general can be directed to me at kmaaren@gmail. com. In the upcoming year, the Toronto chapter plans to be more active. Committee members last year were Michael McGillion, Katherine Verhagen, Smadar Peretz, Jacqueline To, Alexandra Sorin, Rosemary Marchant, and Natalie Papoutsis. Yours truly continued as president. Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

Canadian and International chapters

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by Alexandra Sorin

his past year has been an exciting one for the Alumni Association. Recently created, the International Alumni Committee, of which I am president, oversees all chapters outside of Toronto and around the world, and helps to organize events that get Alumni to mingle and connect. Whether you are in Ottawa, Montreal, Vancouver, St. John’s, or New York, or overseas in Australia, Europe, Africa, or Asia, there are many former Masseyites waiting to reconnect and share stories. Last January 24, we hosted our very first low-key dinner and drinks soirée at Massey, which was very successful. We are working on expanding these fun evenings around the globe in the year to come. In order to keep in touch, put you in contact with the nearest Alumni chapter, and help us keep our files up to date, please send us your current address, phone number, and preferred email address to masseycollegealumni@gmail.com.

Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars

Each year, our Junior Fellows elect a Lionel Massey Fund Committee, locally and fondly known as the LMF. The goal of the committee is to foster a collegial atmosphere with a calendar of social activities. 2010–2011 co-chairs Jennifer Amadio, Raili Lakanen, Ruediger Willenberg, and Albert Wu report on the year’s proceedings.

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Mr. Stephen Herbert Healthcare Services Dr. Margret Hovanec Lupina Foundation

Junior Fellows at play

e are looking back on a rewarding year of fellowship at Massey, one in which it was an honour and a treat to make sure that Junior Fellows had regular opportunities to lay aside their books, pens, and laptops in order to have some fun. After three barbecues to rally those fellows stuck in town for the summer, our term went into high gear with a trip to Niagara-on-the-Lake, featuring a tasting of local wines and viewing a Shaw Festival performance. Only two weeks later, Junior Fellows poured back in for Orientation Week, returning to us many missed veterans, along with an engaged and cheerful crowd of new Masseyites. They enthusiastically entered their first House contest, the Scavenger Hunt, presenting their peers with Master-Fraser-ThemeSongs, renditions of 80s dance parties, and creative bribes for their LMF judges. American exceptionalism, at least in Thanksgiving cooking, was undeniable when Albert Wu’s superior talents delivered to us three scrumptiously juicy turkeys. Augmented by a wide range of Junior Fellow side dishes and desserts, and consumed with a large, joyful crowd, we truly had much to be thankful for. Halloween week brought the return of the pumpkin-carving contest. This year’s celebrity judge, Massey Lecturer Douglas Coupland, was thoroughly impressed by House IV’s rendition of a howling wolf in front of a full moon, crowning them this year’s squash champions. For the first time, fellows got the chance to proclaim their friendship, gratitude, or undying love by sending a Halloween candygram delivered by the LMF. And Taylor Martin took best costume honours as the City of Toronto gravy train at the traditional Halloween party. In February, St. Valentine got his due with Junior Fellow-decorated cupcakes, a screening of “While You Were Sleeping,” and the return of candygrams. The feast of the flower and chocolate industry was spiced up with the beginning of the annual Murder Game, again bringing out the creepy, diabolical side in some of us. Perennial runner-up Dave Cape (a.k.a. “Cape Fear”) was literally one snatch away from glory when his prey Lucas “Quack Quack” Badenduck narrowly escaped on legal nitpicking – yes, all the stairway steps belong to one room – and went on to claim the assassin’s crown.

Ms. Ann Dowsett Johnston Journalism Mr. Patrick Luciani Salonspeakers Dr. John Marenbon Philosophy

This year’s major events again included the Coffee House and Tea Hut talent shows, and, wow, is there talent in this place! Among the memorable performances this year was a bona fide drag queen (identity withheld) and a traditional Chinese dance by Tian Tian. The LMF followed the trend toward reality TV, focusing its obligatory videos on Junior Fellow interviews and a mock College promotional video. Luckily for us, our engaged fellowship again did not solely rely on the LMF for a rich College life. Wholesome Sunday nutrition was guaranteed by the newly founded Sunday Supper Club, which alternated dinner outings with in-house cuisine prepared by our talented fellows. The Winter Ball committee transported us into a more glamorous era with their “Classic Hollywood” theme. Couch potatoes among us found acceptance in the newly formed Committee for the Appreciation of Televised Sports (CATS), which served us both the Grey Cup and the Super Bowl. Outshining most Low Tables, a raucous goodbye party for our highly popular and engaged Journalism-Fellow-in-Residence Hugo Rodrigues was thrown. And, among many other gracious offerings, no fewer than four dates with eligible bachelors and bachelorettes were bid on during a very fruitful charity auction organized by the Community Service Committee. Our farewell during this year’s Fellows Gaudy gave us the chance to say thank you to some of the numerous Junior Fellows who made our jobs easier and more successful, among them a reliable and supportive LMF committee, namely Jine Jine Li, Saba Mir, Bardia Bina, and Ryan Doherty, and our ever-helpful Don of Hall, John MacCormick. It is a testament to this year’s fellowship and College spirit that there is not nearly enough space here for all the deserved credit. Thank you all for a great year. Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Professor Michael Marrus History Dr. Rosemary Meier Psychiatry Dr. Travis Murdoch Aurea Fellow, Writing Ms. Marina Nemat Aurea Fellow, Writing Dr. Andrea Paras Political Science Mr. Tim Plumptre Public Policy Dr. Andrea Geddes Poole History Ms. Anna Porter Publishing Mr. Dennis Reid Art Ms. Sheila Robinson Gairdner Foundation Professor Abraham Rotstein Economics Mr. Neil Seeman Health System Policy Dr. Ulrica Skagert English Ms. Rolie Srivastava Environmental Studies Dr. David Staines Canadian Studies Mrs. Jennifer Surridge Pendragon Ink Dr. Gordon Teskey English Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalfe Foundation Fellow Mr. Michael Valpy Journalism Dr. Peter Warrian Lupina Foundation Mr. Ian Webb Finance Professor Dan White Book History and Print Culture Dr. Albert Wu Medicine Dr. Peer Zumbansen Law 19


Life at Massey College

SPOTLIGHT ON HIGH TABLE 2010–2011

First Editorial Fellow named

Massey hosts fortnightly High Table Dinners where distinguished invited guests rub shoulders with Junior Fellows and Alumni. Mrs. Lisa Balfour Bowen Philanthropist Ms. Elizabeth Church St. Clair Balfour Journalism Fellow The Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson Former Governor General of Canada Mr. Michael Cooke, Editor-in-Chief, The Toronto Star The Hon. William G. Davis Former Premier of Ontario Mr. Justice Arthur Gans Visiting Scholar, Law Dr. Franklin Harkins, Senior Resident, Theology and Medieval Studies The Hon. Jason Kenney Federal Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Mr. Derek Lloyd, Secretary, The Massey Foundation His Excellency Mr. Erik Vilstrup Lorenzen, Ambassador of Denmark to Canada Mr. Kevin MacLeod Senate Usher of the Black Rod

Knelman has been named the first Joshua Barbara Moon Editorial Fellow. This fellowship has

related to editing and outreach to the broader editing community. Joshua is the former head of research and been funded by the late Barbara Moon’s husband, Wynne fiction editor of The Walrus, and co-editor of Four Letter Word, a collection of fictional love letters by Thomas, the former editor of the Imperial Oil Review, and the fellowship has an experimental life of five years, authors from around the world. His new book, Hot Art: Chasing Thieves and Detectives Through the Secret when it will be assessed. As Editing Fellow, Joshua will World of Stolen Art, has just been published. His work with the Massey community on various projects writing has appeared in Queen’s Quarterly, The Walrus, Toronto Life, Quill & Quire, National Post, and The Globe and Mail. Joshua will be working with, among others, Senior Fellow Dr. Allan Peterkin (a psychologist at U of T and founding editor of Ars Medica), and on developing a writing and editing seminar for interested medical students. Joshua will also be available to assist Junior Fellows who want to explore writing for generalinterest media outlets rather than academic journals. The Barbara Moon Fellowship was recently introduced on the same night as the 2011–2012 Journalism Fellows, with Wynne Thomas attending. A celebrated lifelong journalist and editor, Barbara Moon won a Maclean-Hunter Prize for Editorial Achievement, the University of Western Ontario’s President’s Medal, and the National Magazine Foundation’s Award for Outstanding Achievement. She died in 2009.

Barbara Gowdy: 2010–2011 Writer-in-Residence

Ms. Susan Mahoney CBC/Radio-Canada Journalism Fellow Dr. John Marenbon Senior Resident, Philosophy Mr. Raymond Massey Chair, The Massey Foundation Dr. Christopher McCreery Private Secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia The Hon. R. Roy McMurtry Former Chief Justice of Ontario His Excellency Mr. Risto Piipponen Ambassador of Finland to Canada Mr. John Ralston Saul, Author Mr. Dennis Reid Visiting Scholar, Fine Art Mr. Hugo Rodrigues Gordon N. Fisher Journalism Fellow Mrs. Dianna Symonds, Managing Editor, Maclean’s Mr. Jeff Warren, Webster/ McConnell Journalism Fellow His Excellency Dr. Georg Witschel Ambassador of Germany to Canada Dr. Peer Zumbansen York Fellow, Law

Upper Library east wall right: Under Memory

In the Master’s office: Sky Hearth

Upper Library west wall right: Buckle of the Desert King

In the Administrator’s office: Cave of Logos

The Winner of the 2010 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize

Mr. Michael MacMillan Founder, Samara

20

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

L

ast year, Barbara Gowdy was named the Jack McClelland Writer-inResidence, taking up that position during the second term. Gowdy has published short stories and several successful novels, including Mister Sandman, The White Bone, and Helpless, all of which were nominated for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. The White Bone was also nominated for the Giller Prize, and The Romantic, another of her novels was nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Man Booker Prize. She has also received the Marion Engel Award for her body of work. The Writer-in-Residence Program is jointly sponsored by Massey College and the Department of English at the University of Toronto. In addition to presenting seminars on creative writing through the Department of English (offered last year by Gowdy in the Round Room), the writers make themselves available to members of the Massey community for consultations on writing. Past writers in the program include Austin Clark, Kildare Dobbs, Marilyn Dumont, David Gilmour, Steven Heighton, Don McKay, Michael Redhill, Jane Urquhart, and Tom Wayman.

Last year, community members were asked to submit a piece of suspense fiction (or nonfiction) set at the College – in the past, present, or future – that featured a homicide or a suspected homicide of a College community member. There was a restriction of 100 words. Junior Fellow Ruediger Willenberg won with the following entry. His inspiration came from the weekly status updates sent by the builders of the Martin Prosperity Centre being constructed next door to the College. “So what do we do with the body ?,” she asked. It hadn’t really been a homicide. Nor did they have a choice. The Master had had laryngitis for days, and he still hadn’t stopped chatting extensively with anybody crossing his way. So as good future doctors, they had acted in the patient’s interest and gagged him. Who could have predicted he would choke on it? “Seriously, what about the body ?,” she insisted. He stared at his laptop screen as if it could provide an answer, or at least absolution. An e-mail popped up,“8th floor concrete pour scheduled tomorrow.”

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause,

Harold Town

television personality. He received admiring notices and won prestigious international prizes for his paintings, collages, drawings, and prints, which were shown in Brussels, London, Cologne, Utrecht, São Paulo, New York, Lugano, Mexico City, Milan, Venice, and Chicago. He was the brightest star of Painters Eleven, a short-lived but energetic group of Toronto painters who banded together to proclaim the validity of abstract painting.

These eight works are marked by their uniformity of size, vibrancy of colour, and originality of composition, although Town painted both smaller and much, much larger works, including, in 1958, a mammoth 10' × 37' mural for the St. Lawrence Seaway at Cornwall. The paintings here are intimate poetic statements, which have a family resemblance like a suite of related images, each unique but each similar. Their titles, like so many of Town’s titles, are enchanting and enigmatic.

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

25


Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Clarkson Award Citations

Upper Library east wall left: Interior, Interior

Upper Library east wall middle: Untitled

Madam Clarkson and Victoria Arrandale

V

Upper Library west wall left: Untitled

by

T

David Silcox

he six two-foot square oil paintings in the Upper Library and two more in the Master’s office and the Administrator’s office are by the great Canadian artist Harold Town (1924–1990). They were given to Massey College by the artist’s estate, among whose trustees are Robert Fulford and myself, both Senior Fellows. 24

Upper Library west wall middle: Sky Furnace

�rt at �asse�: The paintings date from 1957 to 1960, when Ron Thom was conceiving, designing, and building Massey College. They complement Massey’s quiet elegance and reflect a time when Canadian art was in a turbulent, innovative, and ebullient state. Thom himself graduated from art school, not architecture, and much admired Town’s work. In the late 1950s, Town was just emerging as Canada’s enfant terrible – a caustic wit, a brilliant writer, and a formidable radio and

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

ICTORIA ARRANDALE is one of Massey College’s academic stars. In the midst of her doctoral work at the Institute of Medical Sciences at the University of Toronto, she has focused on occupational exposure prevention and the co-occurrence of work-related skin and respiratory symptoms and disease. The motivation here is to solve problems and improve conditions, a kind of Arrandale trademark. Because she is hard-working and intuitively brilliant, her research has won her outstanding awards, but that’s not why she is standing before Madam Clarkson tonight. Instead, it is because she is such a clear and shining example of an engaged person who sees no disconnect between her professional ambition and her duty as a human being. For over five years, Victoria has been a Big Sister through the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program in Toronto. Her prowess at soccer and Frisbee and swimming don’t just lead to awards (although she is a national swimming champ). It leads especially to mentoring as a volunteer coach for the smaller Varsity teams and especially for the Toronto Eagles Club Girls House League. From 2008 to 2010, Victoria chaired the Massey Grand Rounds at this College, and she provided excellent organizational skills to this increasingly successful program. And – of course – she has been an active member of the Massey College high school student mentoring program for which this College is justly renowned. A teacher, a brilliant researcher, an advocate, a Big Sister, a mentor, a volunteer coach. Madam Clarkson, may I present to you Victoria Arrandale, Junior Fellow, someone who exemplifies your own notion of service, someone for whom service is second nature, and someone for whom all this fuss will be a profound embarrassment but who, in the end, simply can’t help herself.

W

ILLIAM GRENVILLE DAVIS stands before us already so heavily laden with honours and recognition we cannot be accused of gilding the lily: in his case, all the gold has already been deployed! The eighteenth premier of Ontario, he has for some years been accounted one of the best in our history. The record of his achievement and sense of civic service has been etched into the fabric of the province he has always loved and the country for which his fierce pride has always been on guard. If we are riding on his coattails tonight, it is nevertheless for a specific and hugely important reason. The truth is that despite all the attacks and budget cuts of the past few decades, Ontario still has one of the greatest public school systems in the world, one that is based on egalitarian access and the recognition of both fairness and excellence. This achievement can be attributed jointly to the people of Ontario, who demanded it, and the Premier of Ontario and former Minister of Education who fulfilled the people’s wishes with a tenacity and creativity that simply have not been matched since. For William Davis, good public education was not a duty, but a right; not a privilege, but an obligation; not a perk for a lucky person living in Ontario, but the very path that leads to becoming an engaged citizen. Anything or anyone who supports this almost holy cause, he also supports; anyone who undermines it, he opposes, even if the attacks come from within his own party. His credo is clearly that public education transcends ideology, and you chip away at its edifice in this province at your own peril while William Granville Davis breathes on this earth. Or afterwards, too, and don’t doubt it!

The 2011–2012 Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service Call for Nominations ❖ Named in honour of the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, former Governor General of Canada, the Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service seeks to honour each year a member of the Massey College community whose conspicuous commitment to public service is worthy of emulation and appreciation. Nominations may be made by any member of the College community. This includes the Senior and Junior Fellowship, members of the Alumni Association and the Quadrangle Society, and College staff. Nominations should be in the form of a letter or e-mail to the College Registrar, Mary Graham, and arrive no later than January 31, 2012. Nominators should explain succinctly why they think someone is worthy of the Clarkson Laureateship and, where appropriate, supply any supporting evidence and/or names of supporting nominators. Please send nominations to:

Madam Clarkson and William Davis Madam Clarkson, here before you is the self-same William Granville Davis, a Senior Fellow of our College who needs no more honours in this life, but who has left an indelible contribution to public education in Ontario and honours us and these laureateships by recognizing what we are trying to do with them. a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Ms. Mary Graham Registrar’s Office Massey College 4 Devonshire Place Toronto Ontario M5S 2E1 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

21


�asse� College

MasseyNews MasseyNews• •2005 2010––2011 2006 • Massey College, Toronto

Photography by Richard Bell & Associates Inc

The Annual Newsletter Life of at Massey College

2010–2011

BACK ROW (left–right) Jonathan Tam, William To, Lior Sheffer, Greg West, Lucas Badenduck, Brys Stafford, Adam Welch, Jordan Guthrie, Hugo Rodrigues, Dylan Gordon, Sherif Kinawy, Cillian O’Hogan, Bardia Bina, Danylo Dzwonyk, Arya Ghadimi, Jonathan Bright, Grant Bishop, J.C. Bourque, Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, Christopher Young, David Matthews, Tom McLaughlin, James Martens, Anu Koshal, Arvid Agren, Sean Starke, Lewis Reis, Manveen Puri, Graham Chamberlain, Wesley George THIRD ROW (left–right) Peter Buchanan, Linda van Waes, Kiera Amy Gabriel, Saba Mir, Susan Bilynskyj, Heather Sheridan, Sarah Yun, Jine Jine Li, Stoney Baker, Julie Wilson, Avery Guthrie, Janet Li, Talia Zajac, Anna Shamaeva, Elizabeth Klaiber, Yonsue Kim, Claire Battershill, Lindsey Eckert, Candice Lys, Ilene Solomon, Francisca Fernando, Akosua Matthews, Minako Uchino, Tina Park, Ruediger Willenberg, Lluis Vena, Albert Wu, John Mayberry, Andrea Holmes, Olivier Sorin, Albert Wu, Kate Galloway, José David Arango, Mary Graham, Jonathan Rose, Dan Spiers SECOND ROW (left–right) Neil Seeman, Cliff Vanderlinden, Mary McGeer, Heather Andres, Peter Hitchcock, Elizabeth Harper-Clark, Pat Kennedy, Cornelia Baines, Isobel Harry, Linda Hutcheon, Michael Hutcheon, Pat Thompson, Andrew Baines, George Logan, David Silcox, Rose Wolfe, John Fraser, Elizabeth MacCallum, Ursula Franklin, David Goldbloom, Michael Marrus, Brian Stock, David James, Don Rickerd, Brian Corman, Linda Corman, Robert Johnson, George Georgopolos, Brendan Calder FRONT ROW (left–right) John MacCormick, Daniel Goldbloom, Clarissa Binkley, Eric Leung, Ryan Stoner, Cameron Laird, Ashish Deshwar, Jennifer Amadio, Beth Elder, Ryan Doherty, Jemy Joseph, Phillipa Chong, Molly Bloom, Clara Fraser, Sarah Cappeliez, Utako Tanebe, Raili Lakanen, Judith Seary, Mark McConaghy, Shah Ansari, Ulrica Skagert, Pia Kleber, Pierre Lairez, John Anderson, Tina Tian

22

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed. You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion, and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

23


�asse� College

MasseyNews MasseyNews• •2005 2010––2011 2006 • Massey College, Toronto

Photography by Richard Bell & Associates Inc

The Annual Newsletter Life of at Massey College

2010–2011

BACK ROW (left–right) Jonathan Tam, William To, Lior Sheffer, Greg West, Lucas Badenduck, Brys Stafford, Adam Welch, Jordan Guthrie, Hugo Rodrigues, Dylan Gordon, Sherif Kinawy, Cillian O’Hogan, Bardia Bina, Danylo Dzwonyk, Arya Ghadimi, Jonathan Bright, Grant Bishop, J.C. Bourque, Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, Christopher Young, David Matthews, Tom McLaughlin, James Martens, Anu Koshal, Arvid Agren, Sean Starke, Lewis Reis, Manveen Puri, Graham Chamberlain, Wesley George THIRD ROW (left–right) Peter Buchanan, Linda van Waes, Kiera Amy Gabriel, Saba Mir, Susan Bilynskyj, Heather Sheridan, Sarah Yun, Jine Jine Li, Stoney Baker, Julie Wilson, Avery Guthrie, Janet Li, Talia Zajac, Anna Shamaeva, Elizabeth Klaiber, Yonsue Kim, Claire Battershill, Lindsey Eckert, Candice Lys, Ilene Solomon, Francisca Fernando, Akosua Matthews, Minako Uchino, Tina Park, Ruediger Willenberg, Lluis Vena, Albert Wu, John Mayberry, Andrea Holmes, Olivier Sorin, Albert Wu, Kate Galloway, José David Arango, Mary Graham, Jonathan Rose, Dan Spiers SECOND ROW (left–right) Neil Seeman, Cliff Vanderlinden, Mary McGeer, Heather Andres, Peter Hitchcock, Elizabeth Harper-Clark, Pat Kennedy, Cornelia Baines, Isobel Harry, Linda Hutcheon, Michael Hutcheon, Pat Thompson, Andrew Baines, George Logan, David Silcox, Rose Wolfe, John Fraser, Elizabeth MacCallum, Ursula Franklin, David Goldbloom, Michael Marrus, Brian Stock, David James, Don Rickerd, Brian Corman, Linda Corman, Robert Johnson, George Georgopolos, Brendan Calder FRONT ROW (left–right) John MacCormick, Daniel Goldbloom, Clarissa Binkley, Eric Leung, Ryan Stoner, Cameron Laird, Ashish Deshwar, Jennifer Amadio, Beth Elder, Ryan Doherty, Jemy Joseph, Phillipa Chong, Molly Bloom, Clara Fraser, Sarah Cappeliez, Utako Tanebe, Raili Lakanen, Judith Seary, Mark McConaghy, Shah Ansari, Ulrica Skagert, Pia Kleber, Pierre Lairez, John Anderson, Tina Tian

22

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed. You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion, and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

23


Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Clarkson Award Citations

Upper Library east wall left: Interior, Interior

Upper Library east wall middle: Untitled

Madam Clarkson and Victoria Arrandale

V

Upper Library west wall left: Untitled

by

T

David Silcox

he six two-foot square oil paintings in the Upper Library and two more in the Master’s office and the Administrator’s office are by the great Canadian artist Harold Town (1924–1990). They were given to Massey College by the artist’s estate, among whose trustees are Robert Fulford and myself, both Senior Fellows. 24

Upper Library west wall middle: Sky Furnace

�rt at �asse�: The paintings date from 1957 to 1960, when Ron Thom was conceiving, designing, and building Massey College. They complement Massey’s quiet elegance and reflect a time when Canadian art was in a turbulent, innovative, and ebullient state. Thom himself graduated from art school, not architecture, and much admired Town’s work. In the late 1950s, Town was just emerging as Canada’s enfant terrible – a caustic wit, a brilliant writer, and a formidable radio and

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

ICTORIA ARRANDALE is one of Massey College’s academic stars. In the midst of her doctoral work at the Institute of Medical Sciences at the University of Toronto, she has focused on occupational exposure prevention and the co-occurrence of work-related skin and respiratory symptoms and disease. The motivation here is to solve problems and improve conditions, a kind of Arrandale trademark. Because she is hard-working and intuitively brilliant, her research has won her outstanding awards, but that’s not why she is standing before Madam Clarkson tonight. Instead, it is because she is such a clear and shining example of an engaged person who sees no disconnect between her professional ambition and her duty as a human being. For over five years, Victoria has been a Big Sister through the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program in Toronto. Her prowess at soccer and Frisbee and swimming don’t just lead to awards (although she is a national swimming champ). It leads especially to mentoring as a volunteer coach for the smaller Varsity teams and especially for the Toronto Eagles Club Girls House League. From 2008 to 2010, Victoria chaired the Massey Grand Rounds at this College, and she provided excellent organizational skills to this increasingly successful program. And – of course – she has been an active member of the Massey College high school student mentoring program for which this College is justly renowned. A teacher, a brilliant researcher, an advocate, a Big Sister, a mentor, a volunteer coach. Madam Clarkson, may I present to you Victoria Arrandale, Junior Fellow, someone who exemplifies your own notion of service, someone for whom service is second nature, and someone for whom all this fuss will be a profound embarrassment but who, in the end, simply can’t help herself.

W

ILLIAM GRENVILLE DAVIS stands before us already so heavily laden with honours and recognition we cannot be accused of gilding the lily: in his case, all the gold has already been deployed! The eighteenth premier of Ontario, he has for some years been accounted one of the best in our history. The record of his achievement and sense of civic service has been etched into the fabric of the province he has always loved and the country for which his fierce pride has always been on guard. If we are riding on his coattails tonight, it is nevertheless for a specific and hugely important reason. The truth is that despite all the attacks and budget cuts of the past few decades, Ontario still has one of the greatest public school systems in the world, one that is based on egalitarian access and the recognition of both fairness and excellence. This achievement can be attributed jointly to the people of Ontario, who demanded it, and the Premier of Ontario and former Minister of Education who fulfilled the people’s wishes with a tenacity and creativity that simply have not been matched since. For William Davis, good public education was not a duty, but a right; not a privilege, but an obligation; not a perk for a lucky person living in Ontario, but the very path that leads to becoming an engaged citizen. Anything or anyone who supports this almost holy cause, he also supports; anyone who undermines it, he opposes, even if the attacks come from within his own party. His credo is clearly that public education transcends ideology, and you chip away at its edifice in this province at your own peril while William Granville Davis breathes on this earth. Or afterwards, too, and don’t doubt it!

The 2011–2012 Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service Call for Nominations ❖ Named in honour of the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson, former Governor General of Canada, the Clarkson Laureateship in Public Service seeks to honour each year a member of the Massey College community whose conspicuous commitment to public service is worthy of emulation and appreciation. Nominations may be made by any member of the College community. This includes the Senior and Junior Fellowship, members of the Alumni Association and the Quadrangle Society, and College staff. Nominations should be in the form of a letter or e-mail to the College Registrar, Mary Graham, and arrive no later than January 31, 2012. Nominators should explain succinctly why they think someone is worthy of the Clarkson Laureateship and, where appropriate, supply any supporting evidence and/or names of supporting nominators. Please send nominations to:

Madam Clarkson and William Davis Madam Clarkson, here before you is the self-same William Granville Davis, a Senior Fellow of our College who needs no more honours in this life, but who has left an indelible contribution to public education in Ontario and honours us and these laureateships by recognizing what we are trying to do with them. a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Ms. Mary Graham Registrar’s Office Massey College 4 Devonshire Place Toronto Ontario M5S 2E1 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

21


Life at Massey College

SPOTLIGHT ON HIGH TABLE 2010–2011

First Editorial Fellow named

Massey hosts fortnightly High Table Dinners where distinguished invited guests rub shoulders with Junior Fellows and Alumni. Mrs. Lisa Balfour Bowen Philanthropist Ms. Elizabeth Church St. Clair Balfour Journalism Fellow The Rt. Hon. Adrienne Clarkson Former Governor General of Canada Mr. Michael Cooke, Editor-in-Chief, The Toronto Star The Hon. William G. Davis Former Premier of Ontario Mr. Justice Arthur Gans Visiting Scholar, Law Dr. Franklin Harkins, Senior Resident, Theology and Medieval Studies The Hon. Jason Kenney Federal Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Mr. Derek Lloyd, Secretary, The Massey Foundation His Excellency Mr. Erik Vilstrup Lorenzen, Ambassador of Denmark to Canada Mr. Kevin MacLeod Senate Usher of the Black Rod

Knelman has been named the first Joshua Barbara Moon Editorial Fellow. This fellowship has

related to editing and outreach to the broader editing community. Joshua is the former head of research and been funded by the late Barbara Moon’s husband, Wynne fiction editor of The Walrus, and co-editor of Four Letter Word, a collection of fictional love letters by Thomas, the former editor of the Imperial Oil Review, and the fellowship has an experimental life of five years, authors from around the world. His new book, Hot Art: Chasing Thieves and Detectives Through the Secret when it will be assessed. As Editing Fellow, Joshua will World of Stolen Art, has just been published. His work with the Massey community on various projects writing has appeared in Queen’s Quarterly, The Walrus, Toronto Life, Quill & Quire, National Post, and The Globe and Mail. Joshua will be working with, among others, Senior Fellow Dr. Allan Peterkin (a psychologist at U of T and founding editor of Ars Medica), and on developing a writing and editing seminar for interested medical students. Joshua will also be available to assist Junior Fellows who want to explore writing for generalinterest media outlets rather than academic journals. The Barbara Moon Fellowship was recently introduced on the same night as the 2011–2012 Journalism Fellows, with Wynne Thomas attending. A celebrated lifelong journalist and editor, Barbara Moon won a Maclean-Hunter Prize for Editorial Achievement, the University of Western Ontario’s President’s Medal, and the National Magazine Foundation’s Award for Outstanding Achievement. She died in 2009.

Barbara Gowdy: 2010–2011 Writer-in-Residence

Ms. Susan Mahoney CBC/Radio-Canada Journalism Fellow Dr. John Marenbon Senior Resident, Philosophy Mr. Raymond Massey Chair, The Massey Foundation Dr. Christopher McCreery Private Secretary to the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia The Hon. R. Roy McMurtry Former Chief Justice of Ontario His Excellency Mr. Risto Piipponen Ambassador of Finland to Canada Mr. John Ralston Saul, Author Mr. Dennis Reid Visiting Scholar, Fine Art Mr. Hugo Rodrigues Gordon N. Fisher Journalism Fellow Mrs. Dianna Symonds, Managing Editor, Maclean’s Mr. Jeff Warren, Webster/ McConnell Journalism Fellow His Excellency Dr. Georg Witschel Ambassador of Germany to Canada Dr. Peer Zumbansen York Fellow, Law

Upper Library east wall right: Under Memory

In the Master’s office: Sky Hearth

Upper Library west wall right: Buckle of the Desert King

In the Administrator’s office: Cave of Logos

The Winner of the 2010 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize

Mr. Michael MacMillan Founder, Samara

20

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

L

ast year, Barbara Gowdy was named the Jack McClelland Writer-inResidence, taking up that position during the second term. Gowdy has published short stories and several successful novels, including Mister Sandman, The White Bone, and Helpless, all of which were nominated for the Governor General’s Award for Fiction. The White Bone was also nominated for the Giller Prize, and The Romantic, another of her novels was nominated for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Man Booker Prize. She has also received the Marion Engel Award for her body of work. The Writer-in-Residence Program is jointly sponsored by Massey College and the Department of English at the University of Toronto. In addition to presenting seminars on creative writing through the Department of English (offered last year by Gowdy in the Round Room), the writers make themselves available to members of the Massey community for consultations on writing. Past writers in the program include Austin Clark, Kildare Dobbs, Marilyn Dumont, David Gilmour, Steven Heighton, Don McKay, Michael Redhill, Jane Urquhart, and Tom Wayman.

Last year, community members were asked to submit a piece of suspense fiction (or nonfiction) set at the College – in the past, present, or future – that featured a homicide or a suspected homicide of a College community member. There was a restriction of 100 words. Junior Fellow Ruediger Willenberg won with the following entry. His inspiration came from the weekly status updates sent by the builders of the Martin Prosperity Centre being constructed next door to the College. “So what do we do with the body ?,” she asked. It hadn’t really been a homicide. Nor did they have a choice. The Master had had laryngitis for days, and he still hadn’t stopped chatting extensively with anybody crossing his way. So as good future doctors, they had acted in the patient’s interest and gagged him. Who could have predicted he would choke on it? “Seriously, what about the body ?,” she insisted. He stared at his laptop screen as if it could provide an answer, or at least absolution. An e-mail popped up,“8th floor concrete pour scheduled tomorrow.”

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause,

Harold Town

television personality. He received admiring notices and won prestigious international prizes for his paintings, collages, drawings, and prints, which were shown in Brussels, London, Cologne, Utrecht, São Paulo, New York, Lugano, Mexico City, Milan, Venice, and Chicago. He was the brightest star of Painters Eleven, a short-lived but energetic group of Toronto painters who banded together to proclaim the validity of abstract painting.

These eight works are marked by their uniformity of size, vibrancy of colour, and originality of composition, although Town painted both smaller and much, much larger works, including, in 1958, a mammoth 10' × 37' mural for the St. Lawrence Seaway at Cornwall. The paintings here are intimate poetic statements, which have a family resemblance like a suite of related images, each unique but each similar. Their titles, like so many of Town’s titles, are enchanting and enigmatic.

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

25


Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Quadrangle Society Book Club Report The Quadrangle Society Book Club at Massey College is open to the whole Massey community – current and emeriti Senior Fellows, Journalism and Junior Fellows, and Alumni, as well as Quadranglers ‒ and our meetings have become a popular forum for all the different categories of Massey people to meet and exchange ideas. Meetings are held in the Upper Library at 7:45 p.m. once a month from October to May (usually, the first Monday), preceded by coffee and desert. Many members dine beforehand in Hall. Two or three times a year we send out an e-mail (and snailmail) newsletter with updated schedules and additional information about the books and presenters to all members of the Quadrangle Society and to all other members of the College community who would like it. Please let the Master’s office know if you wish to be on this mailing list. We opened the 2010 – 2011 season with Quadrangle member Charlotte Gray describing some of her adventures in researching her new book Gold Diggers: Striking It Rich in the Klondike. Our November title, Ian McEwan’s surprisingly comic novel Solar, about a disreputable Nobel prize-winning scientist, was given a genially ironic presentation by Nobel prizewinning Senior Fellow John Polanyi. Hilary Mantel’s popular novel Wolf Hall, based on the

QUADRANGLE SOCIETY • BOOK CLUB • 2011– 2012 At press time, the following titles are confirmed for the 2011–2012 season. As their names become available, the presenters will be announced in communication updates from the College.

• Mordecai: The Life & Times by Charles Foran

• The Big Short (Inside the Doomsday Machine) by Michael Lewis

• The Hare with the Amber Eyes by Edmund de Waal

• Dreams of My Russian Summers by Alexei Makine

• Defiant Spirits: The Modernist Revolution and the Group of Seven by Ross King

life of the Tudor politician Thomas Cromwell, was presented by Tudor scholar and Senior Fellow James Carley, who did not allow his expertise to inhibit his response to the book. Our January title was The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama by David Remnick, presented by our guest, David Halton, formerly CBC Washington correspondent, who gave us a masterful insight into the American political scene. The contemporary Egyptian novel The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany, suggested and presented by Quadrangler Judy Stoffman, was an exceptionally timely choice as our discussion of it coincided with the Egyptian spring revolution. In

March, Jean Riley drew us into Hugh MacLennan’s 1959 novel The Watch that Ends the Night. We began our final meeting of the year with a hymn, led by our choir mistress, Elizabeth MacCallum, in an effort to get into the subtly satiric spirit of Margaret Atwood’s The Year of the Flood, which was given a splendidly illuminating presentation by the book club’s founder, Sandra Martin. To our regret, however, our traditional concluding gala dinner had to be cancelled because of scheduling problems. We are extremely grateful to all the presenters and to the Master and his staff for helping to make all our meetings such successful events.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION REPORTS

Toronto chapter by Kari Maaren

T

his past year, the Massey College Alumni Association has continued along the lines laid out by its restructuring last year. The International branch of the Executive has expanded, with Alexandra Sorin in charge of this initiative, while the Toronto Alumni are focusing on learning more about what Alumni want from the committee. The Toronto chapter of the Alumni Association held its annual barbecue in August 2010; due to some scheduling difficulties, it happened only a week or so before the Orientation Week barbecue, but there was still a good turnout. In the winter of 2011, Toronto Alumni Executive member Katherine Verhagen launched a detailed survey meant to ascertain what Alumni want from the Toronto chapter in the future. We are meeting this fall to discuss how to implement some of the suggestions that have arisen from the survey. In March 2011, the annual Alumni/ Journalism Fellows/Quadrangle Society Gala 26

was held. Elizabeth MacCallum, the guest of honour, offered up a moving, intriguing talk about the physical and psychological effects of pain (see page 18). The Alumni listserv is now keeping Alumni informed about Massey news and events. The website at <http://www. masseycollege.ca/alumni> is also going strong. If you wish to sign up for the listserv, you will find instructions on this site, which also offers news, a list of upcoming events, a comic about the College, and various other interesting little features. Any questions about the website or the Toronto chapter in general can be directed to me at kmaaren@gmail. com. In the upcoming year, the Toronto chapter plans to be more active. Committee members last year were Michael McGillion, Katherine Verhagen, Smadar Peretz, Jacqueline To, Alexandra Sorin, Rosemary Marchant, and Natalie Papoutsis. Yours truly continued as president. Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

Canadian and International chapters

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by Alexandra Sorin

his past year has been an exciting one for the Alumni Association. Recently created, the International Alumni Committee, of which I am president, oversees all chapters outside of Toronto and around the world, and helps to organize events that get Alumni to mingle and connect. Whether you are in Ottawa, Montreal, Vancouver, St. John’s, or New York, or overseas in Australia, Europe, Africa, or Asia, there are many former Masseyites waiting to reconnect and share stories. Last January 24, we hosted our very first low-key dinner and drinks soirée at Massey, which was very successful. We are working on expanding these fun evenings around the globe in the year to come. In order to keep in touch, put you in contact with the nearest Alumni chapter, and help us keep our files up to date, please send us your current address, phone number, and preferred email address to masseycollegealumni@gmail.com.

Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars

Each year, our Junior Fellows elect a Lionel Massey Fund Committee, locally and fondly known as the LMF. The goal of the committee is to foster a collegial atmosphere with a calendar of social activities. 2010–2011 co-chairs Jennifer Amadio, Raili Lakanen, Ruediger Willenberg, and Albert Wu report on the year’s proceedings.

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Mr. Stephen Herbert Healthcare Services Dr. Margret Hovanec Lupina Foundation

Junior Fellows at play

e are looking back on a rewarding year of fellowship at Massey, one in which it was an honour and a treat to make sure that Junior Fellows had regular opportunities to lay aside their books, pens, and laptops in order to have some fun. After three barbecues to rally those fellows stuck in town for the summer, our term went into high gear with a trip to Niagara-on-the-Lake, featuring a tasting of local wines and viewing a Shaw Festival performance. Only two weeks later, Junior Fellows poured back in for Orientation Week, returning to us many missed veterans, along with an engaged and cheerful crowd of new Masseyites. They enthusiastically entered their first House contest, the Scavenger Hunt, presenting their peers with Master-Fraser-ThemeSongs, renditions of 80s dance parties, and creative bribes for their LMF judges. American exceptionalism, at least in Thanksgiving cooking, was undeniable when Albert Wu’s superior talents delivered to us three scrumptiously juicy turkeys. Augmented by a wide range of Junior Fellow side dishes and desserts, and consumed with a large, joyful crowd, we truly had much to be thankful for. Halloween week brought the return of the pumpkin-carving contest. This year’s celebrity judge, Massey Lecturer Douglas Coupland, was thoroughly impressed by House IV’s rendition of a howling wolf in front of a full moon, crowning them this year’s squash champions. For the first time, fellows got the chance to proclaim their friendship, gratitude, or undying love by sending a Halloween candygram delivered by the LMF. And Taylor Martin took best costume honours as the City of Toronto gravy train at the traditional Halloween party. In February, St. Valentine got his due with Junior Fellow-decorated cupcakes, a screening of “While You Were Sleeping,” and the return of candygrams. The feast of the flower and chocolate industry was spiced up with the beginning of the annual Murder Game, again bringing out the creepy, diabolical side in some of us. Perennial runner-up Dave Cape (a.k.a. “Cape Fear”) was literally one snatch away from glory when his prey Lucas “Quack Quack” Badenduck narrowly escaped on legal nitpicking – yes, all the stairway steps belong to one room – and went on to claim the assassin’s crown.

Ms. Ann Dowsett Johnston Journalism Mr. Patrick Luciani Salonspeakers Dr. John Marenbon Philosophy

This year’s major events again included the Coffee House and Tea Hut talent shows, and, wow, is there talent in this place! Among the memorable performances this year was a bona fide drag queen (identity withheld) and a traditional Chinese dance by Tian Tian. The LMF followed the trend toward reality TV, focusing its obligatory videos on Junior Fellow interviews and a mock College promotional video. Luckily for us, our engaged fellowship again did not solely rely on the LMF for a rich College life. Wholesome Sunday nutrition was guaranteed by the newly founded Sunday Supper Club, which alternated dinner outings with in-house cuisine prepared by our talented fellows. The Winter Ball committee transported us into a more glamorous era with their “Classic Hollywood” theme. Couch potatoes among us found acceptance in the newly formed Committee for the Appreciation of Televised Sports (CATS), which served us both the Grey Cup and the Super Bowl. Outshining most Low Tables, a raucous goodbye party for our highly popular and engaged Journalism-Fellow-in-Residence Hugo Rodrigues was thrown. And, among many other gracious offerings, no fewer than four dates with eligible bachelors and bachelorettes were bid on during a very fruitful charity auction organized by the Community Service Committee. Our farewell during this year’s Fellows Gaudy gave us the chance to say thank you to some of the numerous Junior Fellows who made our jobs easier and more successful, among them a reliable and supportive LMF committee, namely Jine Jine Li, Saba Mir, Bardia Bina, and Ryan Doherty, and our ever-helpful Don of Hall, John MacCormick. It is a testament to this year’s fellowship and College spirit that there is not nearly enough space here for all the deserved credit. Thank you all for a great year. Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Professor Michael Marrus History Dr. Rosemary Meier Psychiatry Dr. Travis Murdoch Aurea Fellow, Writing Ms. Marina Nemat Aurea Fellow, Writing Dr. Andrea Paras Political Science Mr. Tim Plumptre Public Policy Dr. Andrea Geddes Poole History Ms. Anna Porter Publishing Mr. Dennis Reid Art Ms. Sheila Robinson Gairdner Foundation Professor Abraham Rotstein Economics Mr. Neil Seeman Health System Policy Dr. Ulrica Skagert English Ms. Rolie Srivastava Environmental Studies Dr. David Staines Canadian Studies Mrs. Jennifer Surridge Pendragon Ink Dr. Gordon Teskey English Ms. Pat Thompson Metcalfe Foundation Fellow Mr. Michael Valpy Journalism Dr. Peter Warrian Lupina Foundation Mr. Ian Webb Finance Professor Dan White Book History and Print Culture Dr. Albert Wu Medicine Dr. Peer Zumbansen Law 19


Conversation with Ian Burgham

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED, 2010–2011 Stephen Scharper Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology

A Quadrangler since 1998, Ian Burgham is an associate of the League of Canadian Poets. Born in New Zealand, he grew up in Kingston, Ontario, and studied literature at Queen’s University and at the University of Edinburgh, where he did an M. Litt. on Blake. After working at Canongate Publishing and Macdonald Publishing in Edinburgh, he returned to Canada and established himself in the field of medical education. He has published three collections of poetry: A Confession of Birds, The Stone Skippers, and, most recently, in 2010, The Grammar of Distance. His poems have appeared in many Canadian literary journals, including Prairie Fire, The New Quarterly, The Literary Review of Canada, and Queen’s Quarterly. Ian is also an Adjunct Professor at the Queen’s University Centre for Studies in Primary Care (<www.queensu.ca/cspc/index.html>), Senior Vice-President for the International Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, President of Garrison Creek Educational Services, and a Director of the Rowers’ Pub Reading Series based at Harbord House, a few blocks west of Massey College. Ian spoke with us this August in the Master’s Office.

Anna Skorzewska Head, Acute Care Unit, University Health Network, and Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry Elizabeth Smyth Professor and Associate Chair of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, and Vice-Dean (Programs), School of Graduate Studies Robert Jan van Pelt Professor, School of Architecture, University of Waterloo Janet Walker Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University Sandy Welsh Professor, Department of Sociology R. Paul Young Keck Chair of Seismology and Rock Mechanics, Department of Civil Engineering, and Vice-President, Research David W. Zingg Director, University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies

Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars In 2010–2011, Massey was home to the following Senior Residents. Warmly welcomed, they were active members of our community during the year. Dr. Aubie Angel Medicine Professor Stephen Clarkson Political Science Dr. John Dirks Medicine Mr. Michael Enright Journalism Professor Ursula Franklin Physics/Metallurgy The Hon. Justice Arthur Gans Law Professor Donald Goellnicht English Mr. Rudyard Griffiths Dominion Institute

Massey College was honoured with a visit on February 12 by the then recently elected mayor of Calgary, Naheed Nenshi. He is shown here in the Round Room with (left to right) Calgarian Junior Fellows Lucas Badenduck, Beth Elder, and Mark McConaghy, and Journalism Fellows Susan Mahoney, Hugo Rodrigues, Jeff Warren, and Elizabeth Church.

Elizabeth MacCallum speaks at gala dinner on pain management

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Oxycontin and morphine. She remarked that “pain control remains one of the great failures of modern medicine, hugely understudied even though it is the main reason people see a doctor.” She also noted that twice as many people commit suicide among those with chronic pain as among the healthy population and that, in spite of the seriousness of the problem, there is isn’t a single public multi-disciplinary pain clinic in Ontario. Ms. MacCallum has written on pain management in the national media and is currently working on a book that, in part, examines the recent demonization of pain killers.

lizabeth MacCallum was the guest speaker on March 5, 2011 at the annual gala dinner hosted by the Alumni Association, the Canadian Journalism Fellowship Program, and the Quadrangle Society. Introduced by Alumni David Robertson and Michael McGillion, Ms. MacCallum, an award-winning documentary maker, author, and journalist, spoke on “Pain Management Today,” based on her many years of experience with chronic pain and trying to deal with it through surgery and drugs. In the course of her presentation, she spoke of her conflicted feelings about the use of pain killers like •

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HELEN (ROSEMARY) MEIER was given the Amina

Malko award by the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture. She is a Staff Psychiatrist St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto; Consulting Psychiatrist, and Member of the Consent and Capacity Board. She also became the Consulting Psychiatrist for COPA (Community Outreach Program in Addition) last January. h hmr.meier@utoronto.ca

ROBERT PAUL was appointed last October as Vice-

President, Education at the University Health Network. He was also recently awarded the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) President’s Award for Exemplary Leadership in Academic Medicine.

LOUIS PAULY was made a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. h louis.pauly@utoronto.ca

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JIM PAUPST is researching the history of pain and how pain was perceived and treated in various cultures, especially by magic and shamanistic practitioners.

ALLAN PETERKIN was named Associate Editor of

Medical Humanities, published by the British Medical Journal.

PETER RUSSELL gave the keynote speech at events

celebrating the seventieth anniversary of the historic meeting of Churchill and Roosevelt in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland, August 9–12, 1941. It was at this time that they wrote the Atlantic Charter. He has written a new book on that event, The First Summit and the Atlantic Charter.

PETER SINGER was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Dr. Franklin Harkins Theology

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To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Before we talk about your poetry, would you tell us a bit about your day job and how you fell into it. I got to it eventually through publishing. I started in that world in the 1970s, in Edinburgh, working in different jobs: as a book salesman, editor, and publisher, not to speak of time spent sweeping the floors at Canongate Publishing wearing gloves to keep warm in the winter because we had no heat! With little pay, no doubt? [laughs] Very little! Initially I got £15 a week, along with a dozen free-range eggs.

But now – outside of your poetic work, of course – you’re involved, if I understand it correctly, in medical education in some form. Yes, but let me explain how I got where I am now. While in Scotland, I tried to figure out a way to make money out of books. So I approached private corporations such as the manufacturers of Drambuie and asked them if they were interested in having their names associated with special editions of books: for example, a leather-bound book on favourite recipes

of the Clan Chiefs of Scotland. The idea was for the corporation to purchase 10,000 or so specially bound copies to give as gifts to corporate friends and associates. Then you returned to Canada in 1982 with the express purpose of doing the same thing. Is that correct? Exactly! But that didn’t quite work out as planned, so I shifted into medical publishing, then more broadly into medical education, which is now the focus of my work outside of poetry. CONVERSATION – page 28

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Robin Breon is back working in the theatre since retiring from the Museum Studies Program at the University of Toronto. He is working with a great creative team on an adaptation of the Ain’t Lookin’ by George Luscombe and John Craig. The team was awarded a Toronto Arts Council theatre project grant for a one-night workshop presentation of the musical. The story has to do with a barnstorming black baseball team in the summer of 1939 led by Chappie Johnson (a real figure in Negro League baseball), and how a young white kid from the fictional town of Trentville, Ontario, was able to link up with the team for several months and gain experience and insights that would last a lifetime.

Charles Foran won the 2011 Charles Taylor Prize for Literary Non-Fiction

for his widely acclaimed work, Mordecai: The Life & Times. On the night of the award ceremony, David Macfarlane, one of three judges for the prize, commented: “We felt that this book had a very clear voice. From beginning to end, it seemed in command of its subject and of the story it was telling.”

Douglas Gibson published Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice

Munro, Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and Others. Many of the stories (including those dealing with W.O. Mitchell , Mavis Gallant, Charles Ritchie, and Val Ross) have a Massey College connection. He is promoting the ECW Press book with an eponymous stage show at venues across the country.

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D.B. Scott received the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement at the thirty-fourth annual National Magazine Awards in June. He is President of Impresa Communications, a consulting firm specializing in Canadian magazine and publishing companies, and a part-time instructor and associate coordinator with the Magazine and Web Publishing Program at Ryerson University. The citation for Scott’s National Magazine Award noted that “the results of his studies and research have contributed to strengthening public policy at the provincial and federal levels.”

David Sisam is an architect and Founding Principal, Montgomery Sisam

Architects. His firm was recently honored with two prestigious awards: in 2010, the June Callwood Outstanding Achievement Award for Voluntarism in Ontario in recognition of work to establish a corporate volunteer program with one of their clients, the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; in spring 2011, the Architectural Firm Award from the Royal Architecture Institute of Canada. In choosing Montgomery Sisam, the jury noted: “The folio put forward by Montgomery Sisam Architects described a practice that demonstrated cumulative decades of depth, breadth, and richness in an architectural practice... a practice with a vision, purpose, and ethic.” h dsisam@montgomerysisam.com

Bill Toye edited The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, Second Edition. It was published last December.

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Conversation with from page 27 Ian Burgham And what exactly does that involve? It means pulling together different interests – the medical profession, universities, government, foundations, private companies – to help establish education programs and events of different kinds related to the clinical application of science and drugs, the impact of new drugs or new devices on protocol and best practice, and so on. We now have continuing medical education programs accredited by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. I’m also involved with the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in this work and as an Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Studies in Primary Care, an independent research group at Queen’s University. So that’s your world of everyday work. What about your other world – creating poems? How long has poetry been a part of your life? A long, long time. It was very much part of our family. There were books around our house that my grandmother would point out as written by my grandfather, my greatgrandfather, my great-great grandfather – all poetry. And she and others would read them to me. From very young – I’d say from around two and half or three years old – I was taken by the physical, tactile sense of those books, not to speak of the rhythms I was hearing in those poems, as well as rhythms elsewhere… in music…in the streets…. So rhythm is central in poetry? Definitely. Rhythm is the underpinning of all literature but is especially intense or distilled in poetry. Poems operate rhythmically, playing musically to the ear before they affect us in other ways. So there’s no point to trying to get the point of a poem before absorbing its rhythm. Is that what you’re saying? I’d even go a bit further with that. “The point” is a very dangerous thing to look for in a poem. Listen to a poem. Forget about “learning” anything from it and let it wash over you. Let me use the analogy of finding a rock on a beach. You come across a beautiful one, you pick it up, and you gaze in wonder at its beauty. You may eventually consider why it’s affecting you in this way, but that’s not your first reaction. You’re not “dissecting” it at this point, trying to figure out what geological era it’s from and the like. You’re taking in the whole immediate object, absorbing its beauty.

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Would you explain for our readers the poetic process as you experience it? Give me a second or two to answer that….It’s a very complicated being, a poem, and it’s a very complicated business to write one. I usually start with an image, something physical but charged with emotion – glancing light across a landscape, something felt on the skin, a casual encounter with someone. And that image is lodged deep in my memory, not memory in the sense of remembering an exact moment but of a kind that’s deeply infused in my DNA. Then what? I often don’t know at first what the image means, with few words if any to go with it, so I just sit there quite uncomfortable, damned uncomfortable, in fact, wondering “What the hell is going on? What do I want to write about?” But then I surrender and tunnel down to find out what this image means, where it’s taking me. At this stage, I have sometimes spent 300 or 400 hours on a poem working it over. Does that reflect the “grim compulsion” you mention in your poem “Sometimes”? It absolutely does. The process can be very tough going. But, again, I have to go to where it’s taking me, looking for what it all means. I simply have to do that. What do you mean? Poetry to me is an exploration of meaning, not just how the poem has meaning in itself, but where it takes me beyond itself and way beyond the mundane to face fundamental questions about human relationships, what makes life worth living in the face of mortality, and the like. Can poetry be an assertion of being, an affirmation of life? Certainly, yes, especially as it explores the question of what binds us to life and makes life joyful. I’ve only come up with one answer to that. Love. And I mean love in any form, not only romantic love. There’s always a distance between us, and yet we’re pulled to the comfort of each other. That’s the central theme, if you will, of my work. Would you care to identify influences on your work? If by that you mean other poets and writers in general, there are many: Coleridge, Rilke, Joyce, Neruda, Irving Layton (before 1974), Leonard Cohen, Ted Hughes…. I mine, borrow, steal from all of them – and others – for my own work.

Let me add, too, that Coleridge’s understanding of poetic process is the best I’ve ever come across outside of Aristotle. And I trace my appreciation of Coleridge to someone who was a major source of encouragement for me, back to George Whalley at Queen’s. He had been in the Navy with my father, who showed him some of my early poetry when I was in high school in Kingston. So at 16 I found myself spending a couple of hours every Saturday morning with George discussing my own poetry and poetry in general. I thought I had died and gone to heaven. He was my first mentor. In an earlier conversation we had some months ago in the Common Room you mentioned your work with the remarkable painter Uno Hoffmann. Please tell our readers a bit about that. In his dazzling work War Music, a largeformat book, Uno combines his art with the words of Christopher Logue’s poem of the same name. It’s a large-format book, a sequence of spreads, some with foldout pages, all based on the Iliad. You can check it out online at <http://unohoffmann.com/ warmusic.pdf>. Now we’re working on something similar with the working title Ten Paintings, Ten Poems, based on my work. And what’s the focus or theme of this collaborative work with Hoffmann? Stone. The elemental nature of it, the universe of stone, if you like. What it reveals. What it hides. How it’s used. How as humans we interact with it. How do you find the process of creative collaboration? I’ve never done it before and it’s very intense and absolutely fascinating, an ongoing dialogue in which we create – and destroy. My work with Uno – which, I should add, also involves a public art project in downtown Toronto – has given me a whole new orientation to my work. I’d say working with him has altered my poetic sensibility. And I see in a note to your poem “The Snow Garden at Massey College” that this place “has been a refuge for me; many of the poems [in the collection The Grammar of Distance] have been written within its walls.” In what ways has Massey been a part of your process of writing? It’s the cloistered aspect of Massey that helps me write. Not the chit-chat, not the fine minds, not the scholarship.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

CONVERSATION – page 30

News of our Scholars- and Journalists-at-Risk by Anna Luengo, College Administrator

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aron Berhane (Journalist-at-Risk, 2003–04) was finally joined by his wife and three children after eight years of separation. When we called Aaron in for an interview for a fellowship, he had just fled Eritrea and was about to start training in palliative care in Toronto. Colleagues who worked with him at his newspaper in Asmara had been jailed and his office destroyed. He had to leave the country immediately or put himself and his family (then including a young baby boy) in danger. It was an arduous and sometimes seemingly hopeless period for him, but we knew that all would be well when he called last spring to say that his family had finally been able to flee Eritrea and were waiting for their final papers to get to Canada. They are all now in Toronto as he continues to work hard on his newspaper, Meftih (<www.meftih.org>). In Tigrigna and English, Meftih has twice been awarded for “Best Editorial and Visual Presentation” by the National Ethnic Press & Media Council of Canada. After four years of hard work interspersed with some good years at Massey, Clement Jumbe taught at Centennial College last year and defended his thesis in HIV/AIDS Education at the end of May. Congratulations, Clement! François Ndayizigiye and his wife, Adolphine Kambayire, arrived at Massey College in early December after a long journey from Cameroon, where they lived after fleeing Rwanda. Once in Toronto, they moved into an apartment at Trinity and were welcomed by all of us across the road at Massey. Messages went out on the listserv asking for help with English tutoring and very positive responses from Junior Fellows and Alum immediately came flooding in. François and Adolphine were soon seen in the Common Room on a regular basis in deep English •

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FREDERIC JACKMAN was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada.

RAY JAYAWARDHANA was given the University of

Toronto McLean Award, a $100,000 prize intended to help emerging research leaders attract promising graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to their labs. This year, he is a Radcliffe Institute Fellow at Harvard.

BERNIE LUCHT was appointed the Irving Chair in

Journalism for 2011–2012 at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick.

DAVID MALONE continues to find The International

Development Research Centre (IDRC) in Ottawa, one of Canada’s little-known centres of excellence, a tremendous place to work and to learn. His new monograph, Does the Elephant Dance? Contemporary Canadian Foreign Policy, started during his days as

conversation, several times at our lunchtime French Tables, and for many events at the College. A geographer with expertise in erosion control in the highlands of East Africa, François became associated with the Department of Geography at UTM, where he attended several seminars and was also invited to do some guest lecturing. Adolphine is an agronomist. We hope to have them with us for another year. Former Director General of Antiquities of Gaza, Moain Sadeq, made a brief visit to Toronto in the spring. He reported that he and his family have settled well into life in Doha, Qatar. His position as Associate Professor in the History Program at Qatar University is a three-year term, and he has invited us to be in touch at m.sadeq@utoronto.ca, should any Masseyites plan to be in Qatar in the near future. The Massey College Scholars-at-Risk program started in 1998 and has since funded some 15 scholars. Thanks to an endowment from the Donner Canadian Foundation, and in association with the University of Toronto’s School of Graduate Studies, the College each year chooses two or three scholars who are at-risk in their home countries for political or similar reasons. They receive assistance to complete a graduate degree or support as they return to academia, including, in some cases, accommodation at the College. All the scholars take an active part in College life and a number have since settled permanently in Canada. Many of the scholars are invited to teach part-time or to give individual lectures in their associated departments at the University of Toronto. The program here is part of New York University’s Scholarat-Risk network (<http://scholarsatrisk.nyu.edu>), with which Massey College works closely to identify potential scholars in need of assistance. •

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Canadian High Commissioner in Delhi, was published last May. It lingers still on the Indian topten bestseller list. Giving him more pleasure than anything else professionally is a fresh batch of students at the NYU Law School this fall, keen to tackle the law and practice of the United Nations. Massey College remains his home in Toronto. h dmalone@idrc.ca

RODERICK McINNES was the Alon/ARVO Keynote

Speaker for the opening session of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. He was also named a “Champion of Genetics” by the Canadian Gene Cure Foundation. He is the Alva Chair in Human Genetics and Director, Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University. He lives in Montreal with his wife, Daniele. h rod.mcinnes@mcgill.ca

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED, 2010–2011 Gillian Mackay Associate Dean of Graduate Education and Associate Professor of Music David Malkin Professor of Pediatrics and Medical Biophysics; Director, Cancer Genetics Program; Senior Scientist, Genetics and Genomic Biology Program and Associate Chief of Research, HSC Research Institute Ivan McFarlane Co-Founder, The Quadrangle Society Anita McGahan Associate Dean, Research and Director of PhD programs, Rotman School of Management; Professor of Strategic Management, Munk School of Public Affairs Don McLean Dean, Faculty of Music Michael McMillan Co-Founder and Chair, Samara Kenneth Mills Professor and Chair, Department of History Cheryl Misak Vice-President and Provost Mary Kay O’Neil Director, Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis Clifford Orwin Professor, Department of Political Science Julia O’Sullivan Dean, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education Charles Pachter Artist, historian, and lecturer David Palmer Vice-President, Advancement William B.P. Robson President and Chief Executive Officer, C.D. Howe Institute Seamus Ross Dean, Faculty of Information Karin Ruerdanz Curator, Islamic Art, Royal Ontario Museum, and Associate Professor of Islamic Art Stephen J. Rupp Chair, Department of Spanish and Portuguese

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Reflections by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy

Life at Massey College

SENIOR FELLOWS ELECTED 2010–2011 All academic affiliations are with the University of Toronto unless stated otherwise. Emanuel Adler Chair of Israeli Studies, Department of Political Science Thomas S. Axworthy President and Chief Executive Officer, Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation Leonard W. Conolly Professor of English and former President, Trent University Ronald Deibert Associate Professor, Department of Political Science Don Drummond Economic Advisor and former Senior Vice-President and Chief Economist, TD Bank Tony Easty Senior Scientist, University Health Network, and Associate Professor, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Brendan Frey Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering James R. Graham Director, Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics Richard Greene Professor, Department of English Ralph Halbert Philanthropist Edith Hillan Vice-Provost, Faculty and Academic Life Rafi Hofstein President and Chief Executive Officer, MaRS Innovation Margret Hovanec Co-Founder and Chair, Lupina Foundation Thomas Hurka Professor of Philosophy William Johnston Psychiatrist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Outreach Psychiatry Program Trevor Levere Professor Emeritus, History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics

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Journalism

from page 1

I felt intimidated by the prospect of stepping into such large shoes. As with so many other things in Canada, the Journalism Fellowship Program had been initiated in 1962 to provide a Canadian counterpart to an American one, the Nieman Program for American Journalists at Harvard. My colleague at the time was Ross Munro, a distinguished journalist who had reported from the battlefields of World War II. Together, we designed the new program based to a degree on the Harvard curriculum. Besides the individual program of courses, the plan was for special guests to join the journalists for off-the-record lunches. We planned as well for travel to Washington at the invitation of the US State Department and to other points in the United States. And, of course, we added the Canadian counterpart with an annual trip to Ottawa. Over the years, the program has had many eminent visitors (almost no one refused our invitation) as political leaders, scientists, writers, and historians joined us for off-therecord sessions twice every week. Travel expanded gradually over the years to include at various times Finland, Sweden, Denmark Germany, the Arctic, England, Mexico, and Trinidad, to name just •

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some of the countries that the journalists visited to meet with prominent local figures in politics and other areas. Massey College has been the ever-welcoming host for the past 50 years. One could not have imagined a more congenial and stimulating home for the program. I watched annually as the incoming group of seasoned journalists started the year as dazed freshmen in this world without deadlines. And I watched as they ended the year as self-assured and articulate participants in their graduate seminars. Those who passed through the program now form a roster of some of the leading journalists and media executives in this country. As I look back on the last three decades of the program, I flip through my intangible Rolodex of memories of Canadian journalists from across the country, and I remember as well our international journalists from Africa, India, Korea, and elsewhere. And I have a sense that once in a while someone from a newspaper somewhere on the globe or from somewhere in Canada dials back to retrieve a special moment during the year they spent with us. (Editor’s note: a list of all Journalism Fellows may be found at <www.masseycollege.ca/ journalism-fellows/past-journalismfellows>.) f e l l o w s

BRENDAN CALDER conducted the GettingItDone®

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Massey WIDEN Continued from page 13 Growth • “Angiogenesis – How to Promote the Growth of New Blood Vessels,” Sarah Figley (Biology/Bio-Medicine) • “What Hoaxes in Literature and Visual Art Can Tell Us,” Heather Jessup (English) • “How Eighteenth-Century Korean Intellectual Culture Got Sexy,” Yonsue Kim (History)

Song • “Song and Sacrifice in Ancient Greece and Rome,” Susan Bilynskyj (Classics) • “When Harp Notation Goes Wrong,” with live demonstration, Angela Schwarzkopf (Music) • “God of War, God of Song – The Dead Sea Scrolls Come Alive,” Chad Stauber (Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations) For videos of Massey Widen presentations, you may check <http://www.masseycollege.ca/ events/junior-fellow-lectureseries>. For more on the WIDEN concept, see <http://www.widentoronto. com>.

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SHEILA EMBLETON was inducted to the Royal Society

of Canada last November. She is also helping her course for the new Centre for Social CRM and for the daughter settle in to being a Junior Fellow at Massey. new Next 36 program at the Rotman School of h embleton@yorku.ca Management. This year he also celebrated his fortieth wedding anniversary! JOHN GEIGER was elected the thirteenth President of h brendan.calder@rotman.utoronto.ca the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. He previously served as Governor and Vice-President of the Society. MICHAEL CHARLES completed his term as President As well, he has established the James Geiger Fund in of the Canadian Academy of Engineering last June. memory of his son James, who passed away in 2007. STEPHEN CLARKSON has just published, with This fund helps underwrite expeditions by young co-author Matto Mildenberger, the third of his trilogy people. on North America, Dependent America?: How Canada and Mexico Construct US Power. LINDA HUTCHEON was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada. She retired last year from her position h stephen.clarkson@utoronto.ca as University Professor, Department of English and JACK COSTELLO, S.J., was appointed President of Centre for Comparative Literature, at the University of Regis College, University of Toronto, for a three-year Toronto. term, beginning July 1. He also served in this capacity at Regis from 1988–1998.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

“Reflections” is a regular feature of MasseyNews. In this brief piece, a longstanding, prominent member of our community reflects on her association with the College. The content and approach are entirely at the discretion of the writer.

T

hink – what word comes to mind when you reflect on Massey College? For me, that word is conversation. Alongside inquiry, conversation is one of the two animating values of the university. Why come to a real flesh-andblood, bricks-and-mortar institution of higher education if not for the rhythm and inspiration of human face-to-face sharing of ideas and musings? Twitter may offer immediacy, Google a global cornucopia of information, and each has its value. And as I write this I’ve just switched windows from a lively email exchange in my own area of scholarship. But none of these media creates the intellectual intimacy of in-person conversations, with their nuance of gesture and tone and their moments of presence-insilence. Conversations like this occur in classrooms, faculty and student lounges, and other campus venues. But it is at Massey that the university is at its best. The College affords both the physical and intellectual space and the occasions for conversations that could occur only here. The subdued elegance of Ron Thom’s masterpiece signals that this is a place for deep breaths as well as deep thoughts. There are scheduled occasions too numerous to list exhaustively: High Tables, Junior Fellow Lectures, Senior Fellow Luncheons, and many others. But equally important are the serendipitous occasions for conversation that occur in the Common Room, over lunch, in the Quad, and elsewhere on the precincts. Masseyites converse across disciplines. The value of interdisciplinary exchange is one that the University of Toronto has increasingly sought to promote, even as it respects the strength of its disciplinary pillars. While the university has wrestled with striking this balance (thus speaks the former denizen of Simcoe Hall), Massey has simply lived it. •

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I treasure the conversations I have with Senior and Junior Fellows, ones I do not think I could have anywhere else. Among many such interchanges stand out ones that explore questions on the power of narrative, not to speak of those that explore important questions that have long engaged scholars of literature, rhetoric, political science, law, and medicine. Especially important to me, in my other university home at the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG), are the conversations the College makes possible between the university and the broader community. I am thrilled that the prestigious Walter Gordon Symposium in Public Policy is now co-hosted by Massey and SPPG. The passion, insight, and sheer organizational chops of Junior Fellows in orchestrating this annual event never cease to astound me, and it has been an inspiration to work with the organizing committee for each of the past three years. Junior Fellows don’t shrink from big topics and high ambitions, as attested by the topics of these occasions: “Rising Inequality in Canada,” “Private Emotions, Public Policy,” and “Democracy, Expertise ‒ and Politics.” Every year is a cliff-hanger as speakers are confirmed or events (like federal election calls!) conspire to prevent their coming to pass, but the organizers inevitably surf these roiling waves with aplomb. Conversation, then, lies at the heart of Massey College. But any reflection on this remarkable place would be incomplete without conjuring another key word – magic. Every institution needs a touch of magic – something that elevates us beyond the everyday and delights the soul. Maybe the Massey magic has something to do with the fact that it embraces Oxonian traditions just seriously enough to honour them, but puckishly enough to give them freshness. See REFLECTIONS – page 30

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MICHAEL BAUR, “From Kant’s Highest Good to Hegel’s Absolute Knowing,” in

____ “ ‘Take All My Wealth and Let My Body Go,‘ ” in Women and Wealth in Late

SHELLEY S. BEAL, “Translation and Re-translation: The Memoirs of Eugénie

MARTA BRAUN, Eadweard Muybridge. London: Reaktion Books, 2010. PETER CALAMAI, The Real World of Sherlock Holmes. Toronto: The Friends of

A Companion to Hegel, Michael Baur and Stephen Houlgate, eds. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011: 452–473. de Montijo, Ex-Empress of France,” Mémoires du livre, 2, (1), 2010.

KATE BELL, “’A Delicious Way to Help Save Lives’: Race, Commodification and Celebrity in Product (RED),” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication, 4(3), 2011: 163–180.

____, “Weinergate: Sexting, Lies and the Mediascape,” Centre for Journalism Ethics, 2011. <http://ethics.journalism.wisc.edu/2011/07/09/weinergatesexting-lies-and-the-mediascape>

DONNA BENNETT and RUSSELL MORTON BROWN (eds.), The Collected Poems of Patrick Lane. Madeira Park, BC: Harbour Publishing, 2011.

JEREMY M. BERGEN, Ecclesial Repentance: The Churches Confront Their Sinful Pasts. London: T & T Clark International, 2011.

M. C. BODDEN, Language as the Site of Revolt in Medieval and Early Modern England: Speaking as a Woman. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

Medieval Europe, Theresa Earenfight, ed. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection, Toronto Public Library, 2011.

ADAM CHAPNICK, “Virtually Learning: Confessions of a New Online

Instructor.” Blog series for University Affairs. <http://www.universityaffairs.ca>

STEPHEN CLARKSON (with Stepan Wood), A Perilous Imbalance: The

Globalization of Canadian Law and Governance. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2010.

____ (with Stepan Wood), “Multi-modal Governance in North America,” in

Handbook on Multi-Level Governance, Henrik Enderlein, Sonja Wälti, and Michael Zürn (eds.). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011.

THOMAS W. COOPER, Fast Media, Media Fast. Boulder, CO: Gaeta Press, 2011.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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Life at Massey College

Reflections by Carolyn Hughes Tuohy from page 29

I think of two magic touches among many. The stardust-sprinkled 1999 visit of Mikhail Baryshnikov to High Table, 25 years after our intrepid Master Fraser had been instrumental in his defection to the West, was commemorated by a card brilliantly portraying a dancing figure using typeface from the Massey press. And, more recently, Jane Freeman’s utterly engaging exposition of the validity of the Sanders portrait allegedly of Shakespeare at a Senior Fellows luncheon in February was topped by her disclosure of a rib-splitting response in doggerel from David Goldbloom. (Full disclosure: the doggerel was offered in an email exchange, so I must allow for that mode of conversation in this tribute.) Only at Massey!

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

Carolyn Hughes Tuohy is a Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto. She holds a B.A. from the University of Toronto, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale University. Her area of research and teaching interest is comparative public policy, with an emphasis on social policy. Her publications include Accidental Logics: the Dynamics of Change in the Health Care Arena in the United States, Britain and Canada (Oxford University Press, 1999) and Policy and Politics in Canada: Institutionalized Ambivalence (Temple University Press, 1992), a treatment of Canadian public policy in comparative perspective. From 1992 – 2005 she served in a number of roles in the senior administration of the University of Toronto, including Deputy Provost and Vice-President, Government and Institutional Relations. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. She has been a Senior Fellow at Massey College since 2001. h c.tuohy@utoronto.ca

Senior Fellows at lunch The speakers this past year at the well-attended monthly lunches were: • Mr. Mark Starowicz, “How the News Was Born” • Ursula Franklin, “Fakes I Have Known: On the Use of Scientific Techniques in the Authentication of Archaeological Finds and Works of Art” • Andy Orchard, “The Penis Mightier than the Sword: The Riddle of Anglo-Saxon Lewdness and Learning” • Allan Peterkin, “Why Healthcare Needs the Humanities” • Jane Freeman, “CSI Shakespeare: Investigating the Portraits of ‘William Shakespeare‘ ” • Ian Clark, “Academic Reform: Policy Options for Improving the Quality and Cost-Effectiveness of Undergraduate Education in Ontario”

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NATALIE ZEMON DAVIS, “Decentering History: Local Stories and Cultural Crossings in a Global World,” History and Theory, 50, 2011: 188–202.

RITA SHELTON DEVERELL, “Slavery Endangers the Masters’ Health, But

Please Don‘t Shoot the Messenger.” In Cultivating Canada: Reconciliation through the Lens of Cultural Diversity, Ashok Mathur, Jonathan Dewar, and Mike DeGagné, eds. Ottawa: Aboriginal Healing Foundation, 2011: 383–395.

JACKIE FEKE, “Ptolemy,” in The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late

Antiquity, Vol. 1, Lloyd Gerson, ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010: 197–209.

J. CAITLIN FINLAYSON, “John Squire: The Unknown Author of The Tryumphs of Peace, the London Lord Mayor’s Show for 1620,” Neophilologus, 94 (3), 2010: 531–539.

____, “Mercantilism and the Path to Spiritual Salvation in Thomas Heywood’s Londini Emporia (1633),” English Studies, 91 (8), 2010: 838–860.

ALLAN FOTHERINGHAM, Boy From Nowhere: A Life in Ninety-One Countries. Toronto: Dundurn Press, 2011.

DOUGLAS GIBSON, Stories About Storytellers: Publishing Alice Munro,

Robertson Davies, Alistair MacLeod, Pierre Trudeau, and Others. Toronto: ECW Press, 2011.

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Journalism Fellows 2010–2011

Conversation with Ian Burgham

Thank you, donors!

from page 28

What the place offers me is a place for thinking and meditation, an almost religious atmosphere. And by that I don’t mean going to the Chapel! The College is appropriately far away from the traffic of the world, yet somehow it offers a space where you can come face to face with everything that means anything. So I’m not talking about self-indulgent escapism here. And, finally, Alexander McCall Smith. You connected him to Massey after connecting with him yourself in Scotland. Tell us a bit about that. Yes, we became very good friends in Scotland, beginning in 1977, when I was at Canongate Publishing, and he remains a great supporter of my work. We have lots of back and forth as I develop my poems. He’s very supportive of me personally, for sure, but he also pushes me very hard in my writing. And he’s now a great supporter of Massey, most publicly at the fundraising whisky-nosing events. Thank you, Ian, for giving us some of your time today. And thank you for our wonderful hour and a half of talk.

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NICHOLAS HALMI (co-ed. with Richard T. Gray and Gary J. Handwerk),

Inventions of the Imagination: Romanticism and Beyond. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2011.

____, “The Very Model of a Modern Epic Poem,” European Romantic Review, 21, 2010: 589–600.

BRIAN HODGES (with M. Albert, D. Arweiler, S. Akseer, et al.), “The Future of

Medical Education: A Canadian Environmental Scan,” Medical Education, 45(1), 2011: 95–106.

____, “A Tea-Steeping or i-Doc Model for Medical Education?,” Academic Medicine, 85, 2010: 34–44.

RAY JAYAWARDHANA, Strange New Worlds: The Search for Alien Planets and Life Beyond Our Solar System. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Vladimir J. Konečni, “Aesthetic Trinity Theory and the Sublime,” Philosophy Today, 55, 2011: 64–73.

____ Literary and Visual Experiments 1986–2011. Belgrade, Serbia: Licej/ Publikum, 2011.

George Kovacs (co-ed with C.W. Marshall), Classics and Comics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

United Way Daniel Utrecht Henry Van Driel George Vanderburgh Joan Vanduzer Rudolph Vezer Robert Vipond Tara Vongpaisal

(Left-to-right) Kierans Janigan Fellow Elizabeth Church (The Globe and Mail, Toronto), Webster/ McConnell Fellow Jeff Warren (Freelancer), Gordon N. Fisher Fellow Hugo Rodrigues (Sentinel-Review, Woodstock, Ontario), and CBC/Radio-Canada Fellow Susan Mahoney (CBC/Radio-Canada). Yongho Kim, who does not appear in this photograph, also joined the group last year as an Associate Fellow. He is with Kookje Daily News in Busan, South Korea. During the year, the Journalism Fellows hosted a series of distinguished invited guests for lunch and conversation in the Private Dining Room. Among these guests were Charles Pascal from OISE; Nathalie Des Rosiers of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association; Hubert Lacroix, President and CEO of the CBC; Catherine Zahn, CEO of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto; James Orbinski, founder of Dignitas International; and author Margaret Atwood. The Fellows also paid working visits to Berlin, Helsinki, and Copenhagen. A full report on the activities of the 2010–2011 Journalism Fellows can be found in Owl, available in hard copy from the College Administrator, Anna Luengo, or online at <http://www.masseycollege.ca/journalism-fellows/the-owl>. •

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THOMAS AXWORTHY was appointed Secretary-

General of the InterAction Council. The Council regularly brings together more than 30 former heads of state or government. Its aim is to foster international co-operation and action in peace and security, world economic revitalization, and universal ethical standards.

ANDREW BAINES received the University of Toronto

Northrup Frye Award for excellence in teaching. h andrew.baines@utoronto.ca

DAVID BEACH is engaged in numerous activities in his

retirement. He taught a course at the Royal Conservatory of Music and a doctoral seminar at the Don Wright Faculty of Music, University of Western Ontario. He is also in the final stages of completing two books, one written with Ryan McClellan at the University of Toronto Faculty of Music and the other a textbook on Advanced Schenkerian Analysis. In his spare time, he is President, Toronto Summer Music Foundation.

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DONNA BENNETT and RUSSELL BROWN have

just published The Collected Poems of Patrick Lane. h bennett@chass.utoronto.ca h rbrown@chass.utoronto.ca

ALAN BERNSTEIN stepped down, effective July,

after three and a half years as the inaugural executive director of the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise. Being part of the global collaborative efforts of Enterprise stakeholders working toward the development of a safe and effective vaccine against HIV has been immensely rewarding for him, personally and professionally. He especially values the friendships he made around the world in the global community of funders, researchers, advocates and policy makers who are working so tirelessly together to speed up the day when AIDS is history.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Diane Walker Ken Walker Ian Wallace Michael Walsh Patrick Walshe Germaine Warkentin Judith Watt-Watson Alex Waugh Cynthia Webb Ian Webb Norman Webster Harriet (Sis) Bunting Weld Richard Wernham Grace Westcott Bruce Westwood Pamela Wheaton Rodney White William Whitehead Catherine Whiteside Blossom Wigdor Ian and Ailsa Wiggins Mary Williamson Elizabeth Wilson Lois Wilson Martin Wine Warren Winkler Richard Winter Eleanor Wittlin Judith Wolfson Janet Wright Morden Yolles Joan York Marion York Eric Young Ernst Young James Young Jacob Ziegel Moses Znaimer

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Masse� in the Media

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! Geraldine Sherman Sara Shettleworth David Silcox Donald Simpson Pekka Sinervo Cathy Singer Peter Singer David Sisam Philip Slayton Mark Smith Harley Smyth Greg Sorbara Martine Sorin Linda Spalding Rosemary Speirs James Spence Katherine Spence Mark Stabile Don Stevenson Andrew Stewart Nalini Stewart The St. George’s Society of Toronto Brian Stock Judith Stoffman Roy Stuart Alan Sullivan Rosemary Sullivan Jennifer Surridge Sylvia Sutherland Mary Symons Andrew Szende Ethel Teitelbaum Gordon Teskey Terrill Theman Jordan Thompson Paul Thompson Wendy Thompson Craig Thorburn Cynthia Thorburn William Thorsell Marta Tomins Toronto Community Foundation Toronto Friends of the Visual Arts Peter Tovell William Toye Liz Trotter John Tsang TV Ontario Christopher Twigge-Molecey

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From the Lodging from page 12

Myles being in town to defend his thesis in Criminology – and Marie-Pierre Kruk, here to defend hers in classical medical literature (she was accompanied by her five-week old son, Paul, and the baby-minder father, Frédéric Charbonneau). Other Alum visitors included former Don John Neary and Sylvia Nickerson, Janna Rosales (the quietest guest ever), and Anna Shamaeva (bridging a gap in living places). Lisa Henderson, Professor of Communication at the University of Massachusetts (and the Master’s cousin) passed through a few times, and Senior Fellow Ralph Heintzman overnighted while he was in in town to deliver the lecture on French-language newspapers in the course on Canadian Journalism given by Senior Fellow Michael Valpy. Friend of Massey and Founder of Trent University, Tom Symons, stayed over to attend a British North American Committee meeting, where Kevin Lynch, former Chief Clerk of the Privy Council and now Senior Vice-President of RBC, spoke in the Upper Library. Ralph returned with his wife, Jane, in June, for a three-day marathon of seminars and dinners to honour Tom Symons. Ralph was the moving force behind this tribute with the help of event organizer Jessie Fraser, No. 1 daughter, who was taking a break from theatre directing. Tom and his wife, Christine, stayed in the Lodging as well, so it was a full house during that time. Also in June, Joan Harrison, Georgian Bay friend and Quadrangler and now in Ottawa, camped out with us in John’s upstairs study while celebrating her 60th anniversary of graduating in Medicine. At that time also, Alum Katie Edwards, just finished a year of teaching at Amherst, holidayed with us. It seems a very long time ago when we were taking trays to Katie in House III during her bout of pneumonia. One of the unforgettable domestic scenes of the College year occurred on the second floor of the Lodging prior to the Robbie Burns’ High Table, when the Master – natty in his Fraser (hunting) trous and jacket resplendent with silver buttons – competed for Gaelic glory with Christopher McCreary, Personal Secretary to the Lt. Gov. of Nova Scotia; and Kevin MacLeod, Black Rod of the Senate, Personal Secretary to Queen Elizabeth, and planner of the visit of Prince William and Catherine, both in their appropriately tartanned kilts. I myself wore dignified navy with an ancient (and understated) MacCallum scarf. I was not even in the running for sartorial splendour. Speaking of royals, while John was in England covering the royal wedding and I was in France visiting friends, Clara hosted Baroness Sharp of Guildford and her husband, Tom, who were in Toronto to launch Just a Larger Family: Letters of Marie Williamson from the Canadian Home Front, 1940–1944, edited by Tom Sharp and Mary P. Williamson, about Tom and his brother being war guests in Toronto. (Thanks to Clara, we all now have a standing invitation to lunch at the House of Lords.)

Music, of course, remained an integral part of life at the Lodging. The Talisker Players, Massey’s Musicians-inResidence, continued to practise in our basement, both for College events and for their tenth anniversary Words and Music Series at Trinity-St. Paul’s. Dewi Minden’s resurrected Devonshire Cats with old regulars like Alum Kevin Blagrave and Dave DeDourek also reconvened in their favourite basement. And when the long-lasting Massey Belles rehearsed downstairs, we got a chance to hear Clara sing as one of that group’s new members. At ground level, an old friend, Quebec pianist David Jalbert, took over the living room’s old Steinway to rehearse with cellist Yegor Dyachkov and violinist Jasper Wood before a piano trio tour in southern Ontario. As well this year, Shakespeare joined the musicians and the mice in the basement, where rehearsals took place for The Breath of Kings, originated by actor Graham Abbey, which he directed with Jessie Fraser. Their fundraising evening performance in the Upper Library, further enlivened by a specially adapted piece by Vivaldi from the Talisker Players, was a moment of sheer theatrical bliss. And let me not forget the extraordinary film evening featuring a six-minute work by young East African women talking about life in the generational gap in Canada. That was wonderfully hosted by middle daughter Kate Fraser. The regular schedule of receptions for non-resident Junior Fellows started the year as usual, and buffets occurred every other week, continuing the near halfcentury tradition of providing Junior Fellows and other College members and friends a chance to meet and relax around two big dinner tables in the Lodging. Norma cooks meals they wouldn’t find in Hall, and I get a chance to meet people I might not otherwise. There were other dinners as well, including two auctioned off at the Junior Fellows’ annual fundraiser and a unique evening hosted by Michael Cooke, editor of the Toronto Star. A notable change for the permanent Lodging residents is our Sunday family dinners, which now often include John’s nephews and their wives and children. As a result, we have rediscovered the joys of the basement corridors for push-toys and races, and the delights of hurling Ping-Pong balls up into the air in the Puffy Couch Room. As I mentioned last year, I caught the Camino pilgrimage bug (see the picture with this report). This year I was back at work training for it, and had a glorious time walking 250 km in two weeks with Alum Andrea Paras, my old College room-mate Molly Blyth, and the intrepid Quadrangler Joan York, who also walked with me last year. I returned triumphant, without blisters, elated and exhausted, just a tad smug, and ready to set out again. Unfortunately, I must end on a sad note. Mollie Bloom, College terrier and ever tolerant of all on two legs, died quickly of cancer in late June. Only a day before, she had been harassing Georgian Bay chipmunks. She was a good friend to many at Massey, and we are hoping to find another terrier with just as much attitude this fall. We still make sure no food is left near the edge of a table.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

When the College pops up in the mass media, we’d like members of our community to hear about it. Please let us know if you spot something of significance on Massey in a newspaper or magazine, or on television or the Web. “Sanctuary at Massey” appeared in the National Post on May 14, 2011. For permission to reprint it in this abridged version, we are grateful to Peter Kuitenbrouwer, who wrote the piece, and to the National Post.

M

ichael Ignatieff’s new office at Massey College is a cozy nook, featuring a fireplace, a wrought-iron poker for the fire, and what John Fraser, the college’s Master, describes as a “monk’s cell,” with a bathroom and a bed wide enough for one person. “It’s not haute luxury,” Mr. Fraser allows. Still, he notes the room’s best feature: the window, which looks out over the grand main entrance to the college. “I like this because you can see the enemy coming,” Mr. Fraser says. Canada may not want Mr. Ignatieff, but Mr. Fraser and Massey College most certainly do; the Master fairly crowed this week as he talked about the coup of landing the former Liberal leader, who, whatever else you say about him, has proved his mettle at some of the world’s top schools. It seems fitting that, when Mr. Ignatieff found himself all alone in the political wilderness on May 3, he received an offer to find shelter at Massey. This is, after all, the same fortress to which Bob Rae, the former premier of Ontario, Preston Manning, founder of the Canadian Alliance, Glen Murray, former mayor of Winnipeg, Ken Whyte, former editor of the National Post, and others retreated after being unceremoniously booted from their jobs. Those who come through Massey generally emerge on more firm ground; some then return to political life. Glen Murray, who came to Massey after losing as a federal candidate for the Liberals in Winnipeg, is now Ontario’s minister of research and innovation; Bob Rae, who came here after serving as NDP premier of Ontario, is now a

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Liberal MP for downtown Toronto. Pierre Trudeau, for his part, used Massey College in the 1990s not so much to sharpen his wits but rather for sleepovers when he visited Toronto to be near his daughter, Sarah Coyne. Michael Ignatieff is not the first member of the family to come to Massey College. His great aunt, Alice Parkin Massey, was the wife of Vincent Massey, one of the founders of the College, and his younger brother, Andrew, has been a member of the college’s Quadrangle Society for some time. “I think it’s a great idea,” says Andrew Ignatieff of his brother’s arrival at Massey. “He’s an excellent teacher, he has lots of experience, and he likes nothing better than to discuss ideas with engaged, curious, and opinionated students. He will be well received and extremely happy there. It’s a very welcoming community.” When Michael Ignatieff gets to Massey and visits the chapel, a small, subterranean spot of worship that Mr. Fraser has reimagined with Byzantine archways in blonde wood, he will appreciate a Russian icon that hangs on a wall there. The Russian Orthodox image of John the Baptist is a relic that Vincent and Alice Massey rescued from a church in Russia being sacked and burned by Communists in 1920. The couple gave it to Mr. Ignatieff’s parents on their wedding; the couple then passed it on to their daughter-in-law, Melody. She, in turn, gave it to Andrew Ignatieff, who donated it to the college, where it now hangs proudly, having survived great adversity on the way to sanctuary. Mr. Ignatieff may well find safety here, too.

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SYLVIE A. LAMOUREUX (co-ed with N. Labrie), “Language, Identity and

JAMES CARSON NOHRNBERG, “‘The Mythical Method’ in Song and Saga,

____ (co-ed with F. Giampapa), “Voices from the Field: Identity, Language, and

____, “‘The Mythical Method’ in Song and Saga, Verse and Prose: Part II,” Forum

Educational Policy,” Canadian Journal of Education, 33(2) and 33(3), 2010.

Power in Multilingual Research Settings,” Journal of Language, Identity and Education, 10(3), 2011.

CHRISTOPHER LIND, Rumours of a Moral Economy. Halifax & Winnipeg: Fernwood Publishing, 2010.

BURTON MacDONALD, Pilgrimage in Early Christian Jordan: A Literary and Archaeological Guide. Oxford, UK and Oakville, CT: Oxbow Books, 2010.

DAVID M. MALONE, Does the Elephant Dance? Contemporary Indian Foreign Policy. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

RODERICK R. McINNES, “Culture: The Silent Language Geneticists Must

Learn – Genetic Research with Indigenous Populations,” American Journal of Human Genetics, 88, 2011: 254–261.

____, (with A. Bramall, A. Wright, and S. Jacobson, “The Genomic, Biochemical and Cellular Responses of the Retina in Inherited Photoreceptor Degenerations and Prospects for the Treatment of These Disorders,” Annual Review of Neuroscience, 33, 2010: 441–472.

Prose and Verse: Part One,” Arthuriana, 21 (1), 2011: 20–38. for World Literature Studies, 2 (2), 2010: 270–30.

____, “’This Disfigured People’: The Representation of Sin as Pathological Bodily and Mental Affliction in Inferno XXIX–XXX,” in Rhetorics of Bodily Disease and Health in Medieval and Early Modern England, Jennifer C. Vaught, ed. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2010: 43–64.

RUTH PANOFSKY, “One Series after Another: The Macmillan Company of

Canada,” in The Culture of the Publisher’s Series. Vol. 2: Nationalisms and the National Canon, John Spiers, ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011: 184–198.

____, “‘This Was Her Punishment’: Jew, Whore, Mother in the Fiction of Adele

Wiseman and Lilian Nattel,” in Textual Mothers/Maternal Texts: Motherhood in Contemporary Women’s Literatures, Elizabeth Podnieks and Andrea O'Reilly, eds. Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2010: 95–107.

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Massey WIDEN inaugurated

Life at Massey College

unior Fellow Jessica Duffin Wolfe started UofT JWIDEN (Workshops for Interdiscipline Exchange and

Kitchen Creations MASCARPONE CHEESECAKE WITH HONEY-CARAMEL RHUBARB AND ALMOND PRALINE Almond praline

Mascarpone cheesecake

1 cup whole natural almonds 3/4 cup granulated sugar

8 oz. mascarpone cheese at room temperature 11 1/4 oz. cream cheese at room temperature 5/8 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean pod, split and seeds scraped, pod discarded 5 large eggs 3 egg yolks 1/3 cup whipping cream

Preheat the oven to 350˚ F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the almonds on the baking sheet and toast until very lightly browned, 8–10 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow the nuts to cool on the baking sheet. In a small pot, combine the sugar with just enough water (about 1/4 cup) to moisten it evenly. Heat the sugar on medium heat without stirring until it is caramelized and light amber, approximately 10 minutes.

Honey-caramel rhubarb

Preheat the oven to 300˚ F. Tightly wrap the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with parchment. Place inside a large roasting pan. Place the roasting pan on a baking sheet. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, combine the mascarpone and cream cheese with the sugar and vanilla. Mix on medium speed until the cheese is well blended and the sugar is dissolved, about 5 minutes.

Pour this syrup over the almonds and stir gently until the nuts are evenly coated. Allow the praline to cool completely, then grind it in batches in a food processor until you have a fine powder.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, egg yolks, and cream. With the motor running at low speed, add the egg mixture to the cheese mixture. Scraping down the sides of the bowl 2 or 3 times, mix until the batter is just combined and smooth, about 3 minutes total. Strain the batter through a fine-mesh sieve into the prepared springform pan. Fill the roasting pan with enough hot water to reach halfway up the side of the pan. Bake for 15 minutes, then turn the pan around and turn down the oven to 285˚ F. Bake for another 15 minutes. Insert a tester stick in the centre of the cake. When the stick comes out clean, remove from the oven and cool down and chill for at least 2 hours.

p u b l i c at i o n s

p u b l i c at i o n s

DAVID PANTALONY, “Coincidence Mixing in Inuvik,” ArcPoetry, Quarc issue, 66, 2011.

____, “The Cost of Living: Tracing the Supply Chain for Superconductors in MRI Machines,” Canadian Medical Association Journal, 183 (11), 2011.

SHANNON ROBINSON, “Miscarriages,” in New Stories from the Midwest 2011. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2011.

JONATHAN ROSE (with J. Luu and J. Anderson), “Architecture Description and Packing for Logic Blocks with Hierarchy, Modes and Complex Interconnect,” FPGA ’11: ACM Symposium on FPGAs, 2011: 227–236.

____ (with H. Wong and V. Betz), “Comparing FPGA vs. Custom CMOS and the Impact on Processor Microarchitecture,” in FPGA '11: ACM Symposium on FPGAs, 2011: 5–14.

ANN SADDLEMYER, “Bernard Shaw’s Domestic Play,” in A Garland of Words: For Maureen O’Rourke Murphy, Munira H. Mutran, Laura P.Z. de Izarra, and Beatriz Kopschitz X. Bastos (eds). São Paulo: Humanitas, 2010.

____, W. B. Yeats & George Yeats: The Letters. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

4 cups cubed fresh rhubarb 1 /2 cup granulated sugar 1 vanilla bean pod, split and seeds scraped ¾ cup cranberry juice ¼ cup liquid honey Put rhubarb and some lemon juice in bowl.

In a large pan over medium heat, cook the sugar until it turns a golden brown, about 4 minutes. Add the rhubarb to the pan, then stir in the vanilla seeds and pod.

Deglaze the pan with cranberry juice and honey, and cook until the rhubarb is tender and the juice has reduced to a glaze. Remove and place in a stainless steel bowl to cool. Unmould the cheesecake into a cake plate, spoon the rhubarb over the top, and garnish with the almond praline.

Bon Appetit!

p u b l i c at i o n s

____, “John Millington Synge – Playwright and Poet,” in A Companion to Irish

Literature, Volume Two, Julia M. Wright, ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell 2010: 83–97.

IVOR SHAPIRO, “Evaluating Journalism: Towards an Assessment Framework for the Practice of Journalism.” Journalism Practice, 4 (2) 2010.

____ “What’s a Good story? Recognizing Quality in Journalists’ Work,” in The

New Journalist: Roles, Skills, and Critical Thinking, Paul Benedetti, Tim Currie, and Kim Kierans, eds. Toronto: Emond Montgomery, 2010.

RONALD E. STEWART (with J. Theriault), “A Parameterization of the

Microphysical Processes Forming Many Types of Winter Precipitation.” Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 67, 2010: 1492–1508.

IAN C. STORY, Fragments of Old Comedy (3 volumes). Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2011.

ROBERT THOMPSON The ALPHA Collaboration, “Confinement of

Antihydrogen for 1,000 seconds,” Nature Physics, 7, 2011: 568–564.

____, “Trapped Antihydrogen,” Nature, 468, 2010: 673–676.

WILLIAM TOYE (ed.), The Concise Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, 2nd ed. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2010.

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Pastry Sous-Chef Darren Diabo

Sapere aude • Dare to know

with the assistance of Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Stoney Baker, Arvid Agren, Utako Tanebe, and Yonsue Kim. It Novelty) in January 2009 with a workshop on Pleasure and replaced the long-established Junior Fellows Lecture speakers from Neuroscience, Classics, and Anthropology. Series, which featured a single presentation at each event. Since then the series has represented dozens of disciplinary The popularity of the WIDEN concept has now spread perspectives. According to Jessica, “Throughout, it’s been to Ryerson University (thanks to Clara MacCallum important to me to maintain that this is an ‘inter-discipline’ Fraser), and to Winters College at York University series, as opposed to being broadly interdisciplinary (thanks to York Fellow John Mayberry). Jessica is also WIDEN likes and values disciplines, as much as it tries to working on some possible start-ups at other universities. break down barriers between them.” The first offshoot of the Below are the Massey WIDEN events last year, in original series, Massey WIDEN, was inaugurated last year the order in which they were presented by the Junior under the leadership of Junior Fellow Daniel Goldbloom, Fellows listed, one a month beginning in September. What the Eyes See

Greed

(Anti) Valentine’s

• “How Our Eyes Read,” Heather Sheridan (Psychology)

• “The Salamander’s Selfish Genes,” Arvid Agren (Evolutionary Biology)

• “The Influence of Photography and the Cinema on ‘Ways of Seeing’ in the Modernist Novel,” Sean Starke (English)

• “What Do We Mean by Greed?” Leonel Abaroa (Theology)

• “Pigs, Sex, and Unclean Reading Practices,” Peter Buchanan (Medieval Studies)

• “How Our Emotions Guide Our Visual System,” Greg West (Psychology)

Systems

• “Breeding Heartless Fish,” Ashish Deshwar (Medicine and Molecular Genetics)

• “Black Canadians in the Criminal Justice System,” Akwasi Owusu- Bempah (Criminology)

• “Immigration, Marriage, and Federal Investigation,” Beth Elder (Public Policy)

• “Financial Regulation in a Greed- Is-Good World,” Grant Bishop (Law)

____ and the City • Raili Lakanen (Urban Planning)

• “No Status, No Healthcare?” Michaela Beder (Psychiatry)

• Shelley Liebembuk (Drama) • Utako Tanebe (Architecture)

Reactions • “Little Picasso Meets the Newspaper,” Sara Angel (Art)

• “Peasant Resistance in Tanzania,” Jordan Guthrie (Political Science)

Remembrance

• “How Critics Decide if They Like Books,” Phillipa Chong (Literature)

Relationships

• “Renegotiating the Terms of Belonging in Europe,” Cliff Vanderlinden (Political Science)

• “Lobbyists in Da House,” J.C. Bourque (Business)

• “A Model of Social Blame,” Lior Sheffer (Political Psychology)

• “Stravinsky Gets Neo-Classical,” Erik Leung (Music)

• “Post-Operative and Post-Anaesthetic Memory Loss,” William To (Physiology)

• “Robertson Davies and Ploughright College,” Jonathan Tam (Law)

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2007 Ivor Shapiro (Senior Resident)

was recently appointed Chair, School of Journalism, Ryerson University. He lives in Toronto and was given the Ryerson University Award for Scholarly Research and Creative Activity, 2010. h ishapiro@ryerson.ca

2008 Winner of Youth Award ____________

Jemy Joseph received the 2011

Youth Award at the 19th Annual New Pioneers Awards ceremony held in March at the Fairmount Royal York Hotel in Toronto. Presented by Skills for Change since 1993, these awards celebrate

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diversity by showcasing the achievements of immigrants and refugees. Jemy is currently doing a Master’s degree in Cardiovascular Sciences, studying heart transplantation immunology, at the University of Toronto. h jemyjoseph@gmail.com

Robert Mukasa (Journalism

Fellow) is now Managing Editor of The Razor, one of three English daily newspapers in Kampala, Uganda.

2010 Hugo Rodrigues (Journalism

Fellow) returned to the SentinelReview in Woodstock, Ontario, after completing his Fellowship at

• “Atomic Order Near Absolute Zero,” Dylan Jervis (Physics)

See MASSEY WIDEN – page 16

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Massey in April. This summer he began a new job as a multimedia journalist at the Expositor in Brantford, Ontario, with reporting duties covering Brantford City Council and Brant County Council. h hrodrigues@sympatico.ca Tourists of Consciousness __________

Jeff Warren (Journalism Fellow)

received the Gold Award for Personal Journalism at the 34th annual National Magazine Awards in June for his piece “Tourists of Consciousness,” published in the Winter 2010 issue of Maisonneuve (<maisonneuve.org/pressroom/ article/2011/apr/29/touristsconsciousness>).

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! Julian Porter Frank Potter Vivienne Poy Dorothy Pringle Nest Pritchard Brenda Proulx Alanna Quinn Robert Rabinovitch Vivian Rakoff Stephen Ralls Lola Rasminsky Peter Raymont Chesley Rees Douglas Reeve John Reibetanz Gilbert Reid Jonathon Reid Donald Rickerd Catherine Riggall Jean Riley Morton Ritts Gordon Rixon Anne Roberts David Robertson Judith Robertson Robin Roger Janet Rossant Sandra Rotman The Rotman Family Foundation William Rueter Aubrey Russell Ann Saddlemyer Richard Sadleir Edward Safarian Mark Sarner John Ralston Saul Beth Savan Bruno Scherzinger Lionel Schipper Cornelia Schuh Clayton Scott David Scott Iain Scott Robin Sears Philip Seeman John Sewell Saad Shah Jack Shapiro Robert Sharpe Gerald Sheff 13


Connecting

Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors!

David Napier John Neale Sioban Nelson New Routes to The Future Ecological Foundation Anne Osler Sylvia Ostry Gilles Ouellette Mary Ann Parker Roger Parkinson James Parrish Louis Pauly Peter Pauly James Paupst Anthony Pawson Joseph Peckham Richard Peltier Derek Penslar Douglas Perovic Susan Perren Paul Perron David Peterson Heather Peterson Gaylanne Phelan Tony Pigott Peter Pokrupa

12

From the Lodging

Photography by Brian Dench

Robert McMullan Roy McMurtry Joseph Medeiros Rosemary Meier Kelly Meighen Patricia Merivale Sarianna Metso David Miller Jane Millgate Arthur Millward David Mirvish John Monahan Peter Moon Carole Moore John Moore Joshua Morhart Brian Morrison Sue Mortimer Javad Mostaghimi David Mowbray Linda Munk Heather Munroe-Blum Jacqueline Murray

by Vivian Rakoff

by Elizabeth M ac Callum

T

he big change in the Master’s Lodging this year was the return of Clara Fraser, No. 3 daughter, who discovered that the cheapest digs happen to be with her parents while she does a two-year M.A. at Ryerson in Urban Planning. Being her father’s clone, only prettier and more organized, she livened up the place no end. It was a joy to the mother to hear the words, firmly articulated, “Focus, Dad. Just focus!” And sometimes, believe it or not, he actually did. Clara also was a huge help with the vast spreadsheet that is Life in the Lodging – the guest list. Together, she and Norma Briones, Clara’s second mother and the sine qua non of civilization in the place, kept things running. As one who does not joyfully greet the dawn, I am eternally grateful for Clara’s friendly cheer to the benighted Lodging guests trying to find their way around the house in the morning. In the fall term, Quadrangler and old friend Charlotte Gray spent several days with us while •

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Questioning the Stakes of Historical Reason,” which has just been held at Concordia University. Also, he will be editing the proceedings of the workshop, which will be published in a forthcoming anthology from Routledge Press and a special issue of the Journal of Historical Sociology. h joshua.nichols@utoronto.ca

Olivier Sorin was appointed

Liaison Adviser to the Master’s Office with the Governing Council of the University of Toronto. In this new position, he speaks directly with members of the Governing Council, of which he is an elected member, on

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researching her new book on the Klondike, and distinguished broadcaster David Halton stayed while he prepared for his Quadrangle Book Club presentation on David Remnick’s The Bridge about Barack Obama. Quadrangler and friend from Saturday Night days, Ernest Hillen, stayed over to enjoy a Massey event as well. With the fall also came the usual collection of dispossessed, injured, and between-stages Junior Fellows. Non-resident Jordan Guthrie stayed with us while he prepared to leave on his research/work year in Tanzania. Dylan Gordon used our ambulatory care services when he bunged his ankle and was having trouble commuting home. Alum and friend Andrea Paras camped out at the Lodging while her parents and grandparents took over her apartment on their trip to honour her convocation. And a notable reunion of Alum took place here with the visits of Myles Leslie and his wife, Sofie Pepermans – See FROM THE LODGING – page 14 ALUMNI

subjects of importance to the College, such as new special bursaries for foreign humanities students enrolled at the School of Graduate Studies, the construction project at the Martin Prosperity Centre, and the upcoming arrangements for the College’s 50th anniversary celebrations during 2012 and 2013.

2005 Ian Caines spent the last year

as a Visiting Fellow at the University of Toronto Law School after practising at Sullivan and Cromwell LLP in New York. h iancaines@me.com

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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Amy Nugent welcomed her second daughter, Mairead, and is Senior Manager at the Ontario Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs. h amy.nugent@gmail.com

Ruth Panofsky (Visiting Scholar) specializes in the history of the Macmillan Company of Canada. She is a Professor, English, Ryerson University and lives in Toronto. h panofsky@ryerson.ca

Scott Young is a biomedical

engineer and Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Southern California. He lives in Los Angeles. h scottjasonyoung@gmail.com

It hardly bears repeating that Massey College is a place – a state of mind, even – where connections are made, ones that bridge disciplines, town and gown, cultures of various kinds. As our 50th anniversary approaches, we thought it would be fitting to introduce a regular column devoted to exploring the various meanings of such connections. In this column, members of our community will share their thoughts with us about interdisciplinarity, links between the academy and the wider world, and about the very purpose of academic institutions. Massey College may not be specifically mentioned in these pieces, but its presence as a facilitating environment can always be assumed. Long-standing Senior Fellow Vivian Rakoff has kindly agreed to inaugurate our new column with his thoughts on “The University” in colonial and post-colonial times.

M

y first idea of a university – “The University” – was formed by the University of Cape Town. That idea was not of a specific academic place or anything so quotidian, but of a mythical domain “up there.” And that particular university was, and is, indeed physically up there: hovering like an acropolis above Cape Town, cascading down from its apex, a Palladian temple flanked by symmetrical columned wings past a series of neo-classical parapets to a high ivy-covered wall just above heavily trafficked De Waal Drive, a very busy road crammed with speeding cars. When we drove by that university, my parents would gesture upward and say (I guess in awe), “There’s the university.” Leading up from the road is a flight of granite steps piercing the wall. At the top of the steps a larger-than-life-sized bronze monument to Cecil Rhodes used to sit (he’s been moved since), enthroned, staring across the deep valley below, a scroll of paper in his right hand. (Later, I would come to know the juvenile jokes. The last time a virgin walked by Rhodes stood up; he’ll do so again the next time one does. And see that paper in his hand? He’s run out of toilet paper. Ha! Ha! Ha!) When I was 16 going on 17, I was let in, and I duly climbed the endless steps ascending to the library and the student union again and again and again. Inevitably with each climb, the place became more ordinary. Before long, too, my new-found Marxist friends gave me a powerful and readymade set of intellectual instruments which would undermine my idealized notion of “The University.” As a consequence, Rhodes, on whose land grant the university was built, changed from being the presiding bronze demi-god reminiscent of Rodin’s thinker. In spite of his acquired patina of respectability – as the generator of the Rhodes scholarships, his patronage of the arts that resulted in the National Gallery in Cape Town – in spite of all that, he became in my circle the quintessential figure of the rot of colonial power and oppression.

The physical structure of the university, which had seemed a remote temple of learning, became, as I was alerted to the cultural semiotics of post-colonial theory, a concrete expression of cultural hegemony (though, I hasten to add, these labels were not yet attached to such ideas 60 years ago). It’s worth noting that Herbert Baker, who put his stamp on the final plans of the University of Cape Town, was Rhodes’s favourite architect. A creature of empire, the sun never set on Baker’s buildings. Their monumental symmetries became – in imperial buildings in New Delhi, Oxford, Cambridge, and the Union Buildings in Pretoria – the triumphal markers of British power. How redolent of empire as well was Jameson Hall, which sits at the very apex of the architectural symmetries of the University of Cape Town. This dominant Parthenon-like convocation hall is named for Rhodes’s sidekick, Dr. Leander Starr Jameson, whose provocative and disastrous raid into the independent Transvaal Republic was one of the sparks which set off the Boer War. He, too, like Rhodes, would be laundered into a statesman, and also like Rhodes he would become prime minister of the Cape Colony. But the very criticism of the university of my generation of undergraduates meant that the true function of a university ‒ engagement with ideas ‒ was nonetheless being fulfilled in the debates we had inside this colonial cocoon. Later I would read Newman’s The Idea of a University, and I was pleased to recognize in its lofty expectations my first modest university. Without realizing it at the time, I had found my “republic,” the place of my enduring belonging: first in South Africa, later in England, and eventually in Canada. In the late sixties, more powerful and sophisticated criticism of “The University” disrupted campuses throughout the West. But most universities emerged from the crisis of the times by accommodating themselves to the message of the student occupations of administrative offices, with their charges of irrelevancy and elitism. To me, these were echoes of the arguments I had heard long ago

Vivian Rakoff in Cape Town: that the university was a cover for the continuing authority of dead white males, Eurocentrism, and hegemonic capitalism. Curricula changed, as did governance to include students. In short, “The University” endured. Once again, though, I am troubled by threats to the idea of the university as the preserver, imparter, and maker of knowledge. The structure has become more bureaucratic, fundraisers seem to be more valued than scholars, and the “non-productive” disciplines of philosophy, language, and literature are constantly under threat of being closed down, their role as bearers of the civilization and guardians of complex histories dismissed. Of course, I recognize that no institution exists on the energy of its own myth making. It does need money, but when the money threatens to overtake the soul of the institution, a reconsideration of priorities is called for. Our own Massey College has some lessons to teach us here ‒ in the almost-always-perfect equilibrium it achieves among the magic of its myths, the vigour of the ideas that fill its welcoming spaces, and, yes, the impressive sums raised to keep it all afloat. Vivian Rakoff was born in Cape Town, South Africa. He attended the University of Cape Town and University College London, and taught at McGill and the University of Toronto, where he was Chair of the Department of Psychiatry. His other posts included those of Director and Psychiatrist-inChief at the Clarke Institute of Psychiatry (now the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Sunnybrook Medical Centre. He is now Professor Emeritus and, since 1997, has been a Senior Fellow at Massey College.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

33


Nooks & Crannies

The Heritage CUpboard

Like Ontario, Massey College offers “more to discover” for those adventurous enough to strike out beyond the well-trodden paths of familiar spaces such as the Common Room, the Upper Library, Ondaatje Hall, and the Quadrangle – or, for that matter, for those curious enough to look more closely at what’s within such familiar spaces. Who knows what worlds of wonder await in our choice this year of “The Heritage Cupboard,” located in the northeast area of the Common Room? Originally purchased by Master John Fraser and Elizabeth MacCallum, this eighteenth-century English walnut apothecary’s chest found a home here in 1995 because there was simply no room for it in the Lodging. It awaits your close attention. The first College “Register,” containing the signatures of High Table guests and distinguished visitors, as well as records of every wedding, baptism, and funeral held in the College Chapel. Many of the entries are in Robertson Davies’ own hand, along with those of Moira Whalon (Davies’ secretary) and Master Ann Saddlemyer. The first signature is that of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1962 (the Most Rev. and Rt. Hon Dr. Michael Ramsay). The last signature was that of Brenda Davies, who signed it on the Feast for the Founding Master in November 1999, the last entry before the year 2000, when the first signature in the new register was that of Julie Payette, astronaut and former Junior Fellow. A copy of Robertson Davies’ High Spirits, a collection of 19 ghost stories, all but one set in Massey College (that one is set in Trinity College next door). This copy is used every year by a famous actor who reads one of the ghost stories at the annual Feast for the Founding Master. A DVD of Porterhouse Blue, the satirical BBC drama set in a mythical Cambridge College that mocks its Master and Senior Fellows. The College’s world-famous snuff collection, well known at Harvard, according to Alumnus Robert McGill, and at the Oxford colleges of Balliol, Exeter, and Christchurch, thanks to Chancellor Lord Patten of Barnes, an Honorary Senior Fellow of Massey College. The snuff has been donated over the years mainly by Richard Winter, the longest sitting member of Corporation, a founding Junior Fellow, and the College’s solicitor. Other donors have been the author Graeme Gibson and Junior Fellow Dylan Gordon. Odd Balls is a black-and-white film shot in the style of Jacques Tati’s M. Hulot films and featuring the Founding Master and Junior Fellows (all male) playing croquet in the Quad. A sterling silver tea/coffee urn/samovar with ivory spigot, goats’ hooves for feet, and an inscription stating “Presented to H.A. Hart Massey with tray, Sep. 22 1871.” 34

Massey Talks…MasseyTalks…Massey Talks…Massey Talks…Massey Talks Under the very able guidance of Junior Fellows Rob Fraser, Wesley George, Tina Park, and Julie Wilson, a new series of monthly presentations was inaugurated at the College this past year: Massey Talks. Described as “a forum for Junior Fellows to learn about the life and work of Senior Fellows and other distinguished community members,” the series involved informal after-dinner presentations by speakers, along with lots of opportunity for questions and general discussion. All but one of the following five were held in the Upper Library. That one (the third, in January) was held in the Round Room.

October

A nineteenth-century oil Chanukah candelabrum, presented by Vincent Massey to the College and brought out at each Chanukah celebration.

Sally Armstrong (Quadrangle Society), Amnesty International award-winning human rights activist, journalist, film maker, and author John Fraser, Master and longtime journalist Mark Smith (Quadrangle Society), Partner at KPMG Canada’s Advisory Services

A jigsaw puzzle in a cylindrical tin presented to the non-resident Junior Fellows who won the pumpkin-carving competition of 2006, a gift of Queen Silvia of Sweden, who judged the competition. A postcard to Master John Fraser and Elizabeth MacCallum from Madam Ingrid Iremark, Swedish ambassador to Canada, who was very instrumental in arranging the October 2006 visit to Massey College of King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden. The postcard thanks the Master and Ms. MacCallum for lunch at the Lodging and, referring to an upcoming visit of that year’s Journalism Fellows, states that she is “looking forward to seeing these talented journalists scrutinize old Sweden.” A leather-bound book with the initials MH and a dagger. This is a presentation volume issued by Massey-Harris Co. farm implements to take note of its war effort in building munitions, airplanes, and tanks for Canadian troops. It is now used to record the winners of the annual pumpkin-carving competition. Among the judges who have signed are: a Queen of Sweden, a Governor General of Canada, a Chief Justice of Ontario, a High Commissioner of the United Kingdom, and an ambassador of Finland. The College’s snuff horn, a gift of late Senior Fellow William Elgin Swinton, with the College crest engraved on its sterling silver lid surmounting a ram’s horn. A Ron Thom designed clay ashtray containing the stub of the last cigar Mordecai Richler smoked in the Common Room when he was a Senior Resident in 1999. Also the last cigarette smoked in the CR by LMF co-chair Brenda Didyk before smoking was banned beginning in the summer of 2002. Photography by Anthony Luengo

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

January

November

Dr. Aubie Angel (Senior Fellow), President of Friends of Canadian Institutes of Health Research (FCIHR)

Mayo Moran (Senior Fellow), Dean of the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto David Hilton (Quadrangle Society), Senior Vice President at Scotia Bank and senior official in the Department of Finance Canada

Dr. John Dirks (Senior Fellow), President and Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation Dr. John Polanyi (Senior Fellow), Nobel Laureate University Professor of Chemistry, University of

Michael Valpy (Senior Fellow), journalist

Toronto

February Dr. David Goldbloom (Senior Fellow), Senior Medical Advisor, Education and Public Affairs, at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and Professor of Psychiatry, University of Toronto Edward L. Greenspan (Quadrangle Society), Senior Partner, Greenspan Partners, and VicePresident, Canadian Civil Liberties Association Mark Starowicz (Senior Fellow), Executive Director of Documentary Programming, CBC Television

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2004 Shelley Beal is happy to be

living close to her parents and brother in Brantford. She is teaching at Wilfrid Laurier University (WLU) in both official languages, including a core English course in rhetoric, argument and effective writing, and French grammar and culture courses. WLU and the Bibliographical Society of Canada supported her attendance at Congress 2011 in Fredericton to give a paper on the increased presence of French contributors to the North American Review in the 1890s. h shelley.beal@utoronto.ca

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March Dr. David Naylor (Senior Fellow), President of the University of Toronto Very Rev. Lois Wilson (Senior Fellow), former Moderator of the United Church of Canada Hon. Patrick J. LeSage (Senior Fellow), former Chief Justice, Superior Court of Justice for Ontario

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Jeremy Bergen is an Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and Theology at Conrad Grebel University College, University of Waterloo. h jbergen@uwaterloo.ca

Winner of Triple-S Salud Prize _ _______

Jan Eperjesi received the 2010

Triple-S Salud (Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association) Prize for Best Overall Clinical Performance During Medical School, Escuela de Medicina San Juan Bautista, Puerto Rico. His M.D. degree was conferred summa cum laude and he was appointed as OBGYN house officer (PGY-1), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University. He lives in Durham, North Carolina. h jan.eperjesi@duke.edu

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Jackie Feke is a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. h jackie.feke@gmail.com

Jean-François Lozier was appointed last February as Curator of Canadian History Before 1800 at the Canadian Museum of Civilization. h jflozier@rogers.com

Joshua Nichols is the

SSHRC Post-Doctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria, and he recently celebrated his fourth wedding anniversary. He will be starting the JD Program at UBC Law this fall. He is organizing a SSHRC Workshop entitled “The Ends of History?:

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Thank you, donors! Jill Levenson Brian Levine Michael Levine Joyce Lewis Peter Lewis Eve Leyerle Phyllis Lill Christopher Lind Alison Loat Katharine Lochnan George Logan Keith Lowe John Lownsbrough Anthony Luengo Shirley Ma Joan MacCallum Catherine Macdonald Jocelyn MacDonald John MacFarlane Joseph MacInnis Eluned MacMillan Akaash Maharaj Athar Malik David Malone Susan Maltby Dow Marmur Lorna Marsden Hildegard Martens Peter Martin Roger Martin Sandra Martin Richard Martin-Nielsen The Massey Foundation Judith Matthews Jill Matus Kathryn McCain John McCamus Ken McCarter Marcia McClung Lynn McDonald Barbara McDougall Harriett McFarlane Ivan McFarlane Anita McGahan Mary McGeer Robert McGill Mark McGowan Roderick McInnes Stuart McLean Juliana McMeekin

11


Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors! George Hutchison The Janet E. Hutchison Foundation Catherine Hyland Robert Hyland Frank Iacobucci Eva Innes Institute of International Studies Ellen Jaaku Henry Jackman Trinity Jackman Heather Jackson Karl Jaffary Ray Jayawardhana Prabhat Jha Andrew Johnson Robert Johnson Robert Johnstone George Jonas The Kahanoff Foundation Christine Karcza Martin Katz Alison Keith Merrijoy Kelner Bruce Kidd Thomas Kierans Thomas King Chown Kirby Stanislav Kirschbaum David Klausner Pia Kleber Stephen Klimczuk Terrence Knight Jeffrey Kofman Judy Korthals Clare Kosnik Eva Kushner Alexander Kuskis Andy Kwong Sonia Labatt Michael Laine Anne Lancashire Peter Large John Lawson Leila Lax Mary Jo Leddy Eugene Lee Malcolm Lester

10

Program in Book History and Print Culture (BHPC)

Was I worthy of all this?

by Dan White, Director, BHPC Program

by Dale Taylor

BHPC

turned ten years old this year! Housed at Massey since its inception in 2000–2001, the program has firmly established the University of Toronto as one of the premier institutions in the world for the study of book history. As a collaborative graduate program, we draw all of our students from other departments, centres, and faculties around the university, and in 2011 our number of participating units expanded to 15. The majority of our faculty and students come from the iSchool and the Department of English, along with Art, Classics, Comparative Literature, East Asian Studies, French, German, History, History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Italian Studies, Medieval Studies, Music, Spanish and Portuguese, and Religion. What brings our diverse community together is a shared interest in the physical, cultural, and theoretical aspects of the book, with respect to its past and present as well as its future. With Massey’s working printing room, where the Printer, Brian Maloney, keeps his doors open, the College is a wonderful home for BHPC, so we’d like to take this opportunity to tell the readers of MasseyNews a little bit about the past year in the life of the program. (If you’re unfamiliar with BHPC, please take a look at our website at <http://bookhistory.fis.utoronto.ca>.) The regular activities of the program at Massey included two courses in the Colin Friesen Room, Professor Jon Bath’s “Book History in Practice” and Professor Adam Cohen’s “The Medieval and Renaissance Book”; our annual “Librorum,” at which four of our doctoral students presented their research; and our Graduate Student Colloquium, “Illustrating Illustration: Towards a Graphic Criticism,” which featured papers by students from U of T, Windsor, Queen’s, UBC, Ottawa, •

• 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s • From the Decades • 1960s •

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Brenda Didyk is an Associate at

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and Western, and an exciting keynote by Professor Jytte Klausen (Brandeis). The program’s “Toronto Centre for the Book” public lecture series is going strong, and next year’s schedule looks great (see <http://bookhistory. ischool.utoronto.ca/TCB_program.html>). The past three years have seen record numbers of applicants to BHPC. We received 49 applications for 24 spaces, so entry into the program is competitive. And our incoming class of 2011–2012 is our most diverse yet, with eight students from the iSchool, eight from English, and eight from our other participating units. Keep an eye out for us around the halls of the College! And needless to say, we’d love to see you at “Librorum” on December 7, 2011 in the Upper Library from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Library

from page 9

<http://www.masseycollege.ca/library/recent_acquisitions> and <http://www.masseycollege.ca/library/gift-of-janemillgate>. Highlights this year include a donation of important bibliographical titles by Senior Fellow Jane Millgate and a pen-and-ink book illustration by Wyndam Lewis for the press room by Senior Fellow James Carley. Master Emerita Ann Saddlemyer donated a complete set of the Vale Press Shakespeare. Our most exciting donation comes from Will Reuter and the Aliquando Press, an important and highly regarded Canadian private press. This includes the press’s archives and an extensive collection of reference books on printing and typography. Above all, the Library welcomes all Massey Fellows who are in need of a quiet and comfortable place for reading, writing, or Wi-Fi connecting. Do visit us soon! ALUMNI

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Giles Pinto is an administrator

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appointed Trudeau Foundation Mentor last January and holds the and teacher living in Mississauga. Nancy’s Chair in Women’s Studies, In May, he was appointed as the Mount Saint Vincent University. International Baccalaureate Middle h ritadeverell@ca.inter.net Years Program Coordinator at Branksome Hall School in Toronto. Matthew Peros lives in Jonathan Gouveia was h giles_pinto@yahoo.ca Sherbrooke and is the Canada promoted last March to Senior ViceResearch Chair in Climate and President, Strategic Investments 2001 Environmental Change and Group, at the New York City Assistant Professor at Bishop’s Economic Development Corporation. Rachel Berger got married. She lives in Montreal and is an University. h mperos@ubishops.ca He lives in New York. Assistant Professor in History at h jgouveia@nycedc.com or 2003 Concordia University. h jonathan.gouveia@utoronto.ca h rberger@alcor.concordia.ca Sylvie Lamoureux is an Nick Lo lives in Toronto with his wife, Assistant Professor, Institut des _ ______________ Irene Kwan. He is Staff Anesthesiologist, One-Woman Show langues officielles et du bilinguisme St. Michael’s Hospital, and in January Rita Shelton Deverell (Senior (ILOB), University of Ottawa. She was appointed Assistant Professor, was a finalist for the 2011 Capital Resident) wrote a one-woman Department of Anesthesia, Faculty Educators’ Awards. show, Smoked Glass Ceiling, which of Medicine, University of Toronto. h slamoureux@uottawa.ca or she performed at the Rock, Paper, h lon@smh.ca h sylvie.lamoureux@gmail.com Sistahz Festival in Toronto. She was Couzin Taylor LLP. She lives in Toronto and welcomed her second child, Alexander, this year. h brenda.didyk@gmail.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

MARRIAGES

T

he late Douglas Lochhead, Librarian of York University in its founding years, met me in a hallway at the new York Hall in the spring of 1963 and suggested that, for my make-up year and Master’s degree, I should accompany him to the new Massey College that September. I went downtown, saw Ron Thom’s marvellous architecture, and fell in love with the place, right down to its ashtrays, knives, forks, and spoons. And, of course, I soon realized I had been made an offer by a very good man (a very good poet and librarian, too). Thank heavens I accepted it. I first boldly attempted to enter the College in August, 1963, only to be intercepted by the h-bar mustachioed Sergeant Major McCracken, who made it abruptly clear that, without credentials, I should please go away. “Ah,” I said, “I was a lieutenant in my school’s artillery regiment. This place seems well run already.” He dissolved in front of me (but for the last time). I then went to the Bursar’s Office. Colin Friesen was seated at his desk hidden behind a cloud of smoke. As a fellow pipe smoker, I could not help but admire the foot or so of plumbing ending up in his mouth. Though I was impecunious, he welcomed me warmly. I then chatted with Moira Whalon and later with Pat Kennedy, both always most understanding. Indeed, that first week (and throughout my two years at Massey), I wondered many times: was I worthy of all this? I settled in. Next door to my first floor room was Martie Birkhans, now emeritus at the University of Edinburgh, and Stan Loten, now emeritus at Carleton University, two of several non-resident Junior Fellows I befriended. Others included Stuart Goodings, John Barker, and Dave Hobbes, all architects, and they taught me design. There, too, was Doug Lavers, who told me about the Maritimes and geophysics. That winter, as I walked into Massey, I whiffed the sweet smoke in the air of wood fires from the College fireplaces and heard the clanking chains of Dinsmore’s Ghost in the Quadrangle on Christmas Eve (I kid you not). Later, the following summer, I could hear James Ayers (my international relations prof) in the next room clattering away non-stop, 12 hours a day on his typewriter. Academics, I thought, must have to work hard. In those two years I enjoyed a splendid camaraderie with a politically incorrect (not heard of then) and still canon-dedicated crew of Masters’ students (including Bob Dinsmore, Mike Horn, Dave Trott, Stuart Niermeyer, Mike Daschtschuck, and the wonderfully witted Mark Levene). Some of us did a skit at the second Gaudy, once again directed by Bob, based on his metamedieval thesis on Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. It was followed by the Master’s vividly told ghost story. And talk about kultur. During a typical afternoon in the Quadrangle you could hear, delightfully intermingled from one end, Brahms’ Fourth and, from the other, “Daddy took my T-Bird away!” We then had at Massey intellectual fellow-toilers from the Caribbean, Africa (a good nod to you, Felix Douma), India (Ravi Gupta

Rachel Berger (’01) and Nitika Dosaj – July 2, 2011 John Court (’73) and Elizabeth Julia Hodgins – September 12, 2010

BIRTHS Max Bina – July 15, 2011, to Bardia Bina (’10) and Sarah Bina Paul Bolton III – July 16, 2011, a grandson for Paul Bolton (’76)

1960s Dale Taylor was an unforgettable friend), and, most bizarre of places, Australia! As well, there were some very good-humoured Russians. The interdisciplinary experience deepened. James Nornberg (emeritus University of Virginia) vividly explained and added to Frye’s ideas on the archetypal themes in English literature. The geophysics guys loved talking about “doing science” in the summer. Tuzo Wilson regaled me with tales of the Mohole Project, and showed me the unlimited-expense plastic credit card he had as a consulting geophysicist. There were, nonetheless, some touchy moments. My turn at High Table, for example, saw the wickedly humorous Professor William Dobson goad me into talking about the possibility of a Republic in Canada. Had RD heard this, I would have been out in the street the next day (he was fortunately busy at that moment in a tête-à-tête with the Canadian Editor of Time magazine). Speaking of RD, I always thought he was a perfect Master: formidable, scary, intriguing, the soft persuasive whoosh of his voice so easily remembered. He was most kind to me – advising me in his office about good writing, and giving me an energizing talk when I was faint-hearted. Thank you, late Master. In my second year, I was beside two wonderful Junior Fellows: Winston Collins, English poet and scholar, and law student Lorie Waisberg. I vividly remember Lorie coming down the hall in a towel shouting: “I just got a call. There’s a Free Speech Movement at Berkeley. We gotta support them!” And where else could you have sat down beside Duncan Macpherson and watched him doing a hilarious editorial cartoon?

Dylan Matthew Cook – adopted October 15, 2010 by Trevor Cook (’07) and Sarah Cook Alexander – February 20, 2011, to Brenda Didyk (’01), a brother for Caroline Iker Koshal – July 7, 2011, to Anu Koshal (’10) and Erin Post Jeremy Carson Nohrnberg – April 10, 2010, a fourth grandchild for James Carson Nohrnberg (’63) Mairead Louise Nugent-McKee – May 5, 2011, to James McKee (’07) and Amy Nugent (’05), a sister for Pippa Lewis Joseph Ozon-Wells – January 18, 2011, to Marc Ozon (’96) and Sarah Wells (02) Owen Victor Ramraj Thompson – December 1, 2010, to Robert Thompson (’90) and Sharon Ramraj, a brother for Ian Jasper Robertson-Ronn – July 12, 2011 to David Robertson (’95 ) and Peter Ronn Henry Nolan Arthur – May 5, 2011, to Shannon Robinson (’97) and James Arthur

see FROM THE 60s – page 40

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

35


MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

• 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s • From the Decades • 1970s •

IN MEMORIAM We regret to announce the passing of the following members of our community. Colin Erdman Friesen Founding Bursar on May 7, 2011 Kathleen (Kitty) Griffin Quadrangler on July 13, 2011 James Robert (Robin) de Jager Jackson Senior Fellow on April 29, 2011 Doug Lavers Junior Fellow, ’63–’66 on July 11, 2011 Douglas Grant Lochhead Founding Librarian on March 15, 2011 Doug (John) McConachie Southam Journalism Fellow, ’80–’81, on April 27, 2011 Fr. Kurt Pritzl Junior Fellow, ’74–’77 on February 21, 2011 Michael Sutton Junior Fellow, ’72–’74 on April 17, 2011

COLIN ERDMAN FRIESEN (1922–2011)

by Judith Skelton Grant Colin Friesen served as Massey’s Bursar from January 1, 1963 until his retirement in 1988. Leaving behind a more lucrative career in banking, he came to the College at the invitation of Robertson Davies, who knew him to be a man of strong principles. As Davies anticipated, he managed the College’s financial resources scrupulously and well. Colin was intensely loyal to Davies and to the Founders’ conception of Massey as a diverse community learning from one other, from encounters with the larger community, and from the beauty of the building.

36

Library Report

Where Was Massey, Anyway? by Stephen Hume

I

first encountered Massey College during a freshman engineering scavenger hunt. A bottle of water from the Massey College fountain with a description of how you were able to obtain it was one of the items. Rumour had it that it was too hard to obtain and no one knew where Massey College was anyway. My father, Patterson Hume, became a Massey Senior Fellow, and when I was nearing graduation he encouraged me to apply to increase the representation of science students. I was now able to experience the mystery of High Table that my father had attended for many years (I would pass on the offering of cigars and snuff with no regrets). I remember that Karen Kain was a guest of honour at one High Table evening. She was at the peak of her dancing career and was receiving many accolades. All eyes followed her as she made the walk up to the High Table, as graceful as in any performance of Swan Lake. At one meet-and-greet sherry party, I received a stunned look and no response as a new Southam Fellow tried to figure out what sort of practical joke I was performing. It turns out that she had come across the country to Massey only to find out that someone was introducing themselves as Stephen Hume, her boss at the Edmonton Journal. A unique experience for both of us, I suspect. The Massey College community offered some memorable opportunities other than its being a quiet place for study. Everyone needs to add some fun to their schedules. A small gang of Junior Fellows enrolled in the popular evening ballroom dancing lessons at U of T. Every week we would learn the basics of many dance steps. Saturday Night Fever had been a recent blockbuster, and the Maple Leaf Ballroom (if I remember the name correctly) had disco nights that we would attend to practise our new-found dancing steps. There was also a graduate softball league, and our American Junior Fellows signed us up and did their best to recruit and coach a Massey College squad. I had last played in grade six and during one of our practices I remember playing 3rd base. I stopped a low line drive using my foot like a road-hockey goalie; then I picked up the ball for the throw to first base. I was subsequently coached into the correct cross-body dive with my baseball glove to make such a stop. Also, Jonathan Ostroff from South Africa would use his cricket skills to catch bouncing drives with one bare hand and half a baseball glove. I don’t remember our league results, so they were probably not stellar. After joining BellNorthern Research, this coaching was obviously good as I was asked to start up an expansion softball team. We stayed in the top division in the largest league in Canada. Massey College, it seems, was the start of becoming a recreational shortstop. Other memories come back. The Common Room as a great break from studies, a place where I could often find a game of bridge with others and the opportunity for casual chat. The walk through the basement corridors to my room passed by the hand printing press,

Thank you, donors!

by P.J. MacDougall, College Librarian

W

hat does not change is the will to change, ” said Charles Olsen, and there was a great will for change in the Robertson Davies Library this past year. First of all, Professor Patricia Fleming was appointed to succeed Professor Heather Jackson as Chair of the Library Committee. Thank you to Heather for her steadfast guidance and commitment to the Library since 2004, most notably during the past year of transition. And welcome to Pat, who brings with her a wealth of experience and deep knowledge of our collections. With the return of our printer, Brian Maloney, the press room has become a beehive of activity. In addition to holding an open shop for visitors two days a week during the academic year, Brian gave several printing demonstrations and lectures for graduate classes, took on three printing apprentices in partnership with the Book History and Print Culture Program (BHPC), and held weekend Letterpress Printing classes in the shop through the Canadian Bookbinders and Book Artists Guild (CBBAG). He is also putting his skill and talent to use once again for Massey in printing keepsakes on the presses for College events. Our three Massey printing apprentices ‒ Junior Fellows Claire Battershill, Lindsey Eckert, and Heather Jessup ‒ had a busy year developing their skills on the presses. Working with our large collection of wood type, they designed and printed a Christmas card that was quickly sold out in support of the shop, Hollywoodinspired tickets for the Winter Ball, and a multi-coloured onomatopoeia Batman poster. In April, they hosted a successful Printing Night for Massey Fellows to try their hand at printing and learn more about the presses. Junior Fellow Joe Culpepper also worked with Brian to learn about the Library’s unique collection of early twentieth-

1970s Stephen Hume technology which, as a computer scientist, seemed pretty obsolete to me. And, not much fun, having the flu at the Christmas break (I subsequently got my flu shots regularly after learning that it was likely A/Texas/1/77 (H3N2) and had killed healthy people my age). And I can now picture us playing croquet in the Quad. Placing hoops on the sloped sections beside the steps required accurate shooting, and there was nothing more pleasing than executing a croquet stroke to send an opponent’s ball into the bike racks. It was also satisfying to launch them into the fountain, but we did allow drops out of the water so as not to waterlog the balls. Then there was Dan Utrecht, who introduced me to some new music from his vinyl collection (we were, of course, pre-Walkman, pre-CD in 1978). I still listen to Taj Mahal’s The Real Thing album with its four tuba players. And because of Dan also, I remain a fan of Mississippi Blues. One final memory to share: a sherry-party conversation about how glad a new Junior Fellow was to escape Ottawa and continue her studies in the big city of Toronto. I remember this because I am now happy here in the national capital after having grown up in TO. It does makes you think: maybe Massey College is a waypoint for such changes in life. Stephen Hume was a Junior Fellow from 1977 to 1978, after which he accepted his dream job at Bell-Northern Research in Ottawa, where he had the opportunity to introduce many modern telephony services that we all use today, such as seeing the name of the person calling you. Following 27 years with Nortel, he now is an independent consultant. He is married to Lisa Fast, and they enjoy two sons, Tristan, 15, and Elliot, 13.

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

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ALUMNI

1996 Lisa Talbot is a Partner,

Litigation and Dispute Resolution, Torys LLP. She now has a two-year -old son, Benjamin. h ltalbot@torys.com

1998 Andrea Russell became

Executive Director, Office of the Dean, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, last September. She also teaches a course in International Criminal Law. h andrea.russell@utoronto.ca

1999 Nicos Fassler, after briefly

operating his own criminal law practice, has returned to his

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Charlotte Gray John Gray James Greene Edward Greenspan Kathleen Griffin Scott Griffin Franklyn Griffiths Phyllis Grosskurth Rhonda Grunier Marc Grynpas Richard Gwyn Elizabeth Haddon Cecil Hahn Anthony Hall

1848 Imperial Press in the Massey College Printing Room century zinc stereotype blocks originally used to illustrate the catalogue of a Toronto magic shop. Space in the Library was at a premium this year as studious fellows shared tables with researchers from both within and outside the university consulting our collection. There’s more to see in the Library these days as students in the BHPC program are now mounting small exhibits connected to their coursework and showcasing our holdings in the display cases. Items are continually being added to the Library’s collection and are now being listed on the Massey website at See LIBRARY – page 10 ALUMNI

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former position at the Ministry of the Attorney General as an Assistant Crown Attorney. He lives in Toronto with his wife, Nadia, son, Theo, and daughter, Isabel. h nicos.fassler@gmail.com

2000

Jane Gardiner is a Clinical

Professor, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, at the University of British Columbia. She specializes in pediatric ophthalmology. h jagkm@mail.ubc.ca

David Pantalony is Curator,

Physical Sciences and Medicine, Canada Science and Technology Museum. He lives in Ottawa and has a second child on the way, a sibling for Dominic. h dpantalony@technomuses.ca

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Benjamin Alarie is Associate

Dean, First Year Program, and Associate Professor, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. His research can be viewed on-line at <http://ssrn.com/author=384494>. He is also involved with the Canadian Tax Wiki Project, <http:// www.taxwiki.ca>.

Prize for Excellence in Research_ ____ Adam Chapnick is Deputy Director, Education, Canadian Forces College, and an Associate Professor, Defence Studies, Royal Military College of Canada. He was given the John Scott Cowan Prize for Excellence in Research, a RMC Faculty Research Award. h achapnick@hotmail.com

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Roger Hall Rick Halpern James Hansen David Harris William Harris Joan Harrison Elizabeth Harvey Lynn Hasher Margaret Hayes Sandra Hazan Nona Heaslip Chantal Hébert Colette Hegarty John Heintz Ralph Heintzman Stephen Herbert Peter Herrndorf Anna Hilderman David Hilton Judith Hinchman Mimi Hollenberg Patricia Holtz Thomas Homer-Dixon Michiel Horn Chaviva Hošek Janette Housego Margret Hovanec Robert Hulse Martin Hunter Philippa Hunter Adam Hurley Linda Hutcheon Michael Hutcheon

9


Life at Massey College

Thank you, donors!

Arthur English Diana Ericson Gay Evans George Fallis Curtis Faught Catherine Fauquier Federal Elevator Systems Inc. Brian Felske George Fetherling Marilyn Field-Marsham Alice Finlay Terence Finlay Patricia Fischer Alison Fisher Derek Fisher James Fleck Catherine Foote Charles Foran Sally Forrest Ursula Franklin Danielle Fraser Josephine Frayne Kathleen Freeman Martin Friedland Colin Friesen Murray Frum Heather Gardiner Jane Gaskell Meric Gertler Pamela Gibson Gary Goldberg David Goldbloom Edward Goldfarb Joan Goldfarb Cynthia Good Mary Goodwin Peter Goring Allan Gotlieb Katherine Govier Bryan Graham Catherine Graham

ast year, numerous prizes were presented to Junior Fellows at the Fellows’ Gaudy night (the last High Table for the academic year). Of long standing, the Moira Whalon Prize honours a Junior Fellow who – in the opinion of the Master and Officers, Don of Hall, and Junior Fellow members of the House Committee – has contributed most to the College spirit and its values. It is named in honour of Massey’s first Secretary of Corporation (and Robertson Davies’ long-time assistant). The prize consists of a first edition copy of a Davies work (presented by Pendragon Ink) and a cheque for $500. Last year, the prize was awarded to Jessica Duffin Wolfe. The second longstanding award is the Morris Wayman Prize, given to the Junior Fellow who did the most to explain his or her work to the community, or fostered interdisciplinary understanding. The prize, awarded last year to Ruediger Willenberg, consists of a reference book, a plaque, and a cheque for $500, and is named after the late Professor Morris Wayman from the University of Toronto. His son, the poet Tom Wayman, was Writer-in-Residence •

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1993 Duncan MacLellan was

promoted to the rank of Associate Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, Ryerson University. He lives in Toronto. h dkmaclellan@bell.net

Katherine (Kate) Bell

(Journalism Fellow) is a doctoral candidate in media studies at the University of Washington in Seattle. h katbell@gmail.com

Ronald Graham

1994

William Graham

Shannon Robinson is the

Jack Granatstein Judith Skelton Grant

8

Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy night

L

Howard Engel

• 1980s • From the Decades • 1980s • From the Decades • 1980s • • From the Decades • 1980s •

Writer-In-Residence at the Interlochen Center for the Arts. This past May, she completed her

in 1996, and he and his family set up the prize in Professor Wayman’s honour. In addition, the Vincent Del Buono Prize (a book and $300) for outstanding contribution by a Junior Fellow to the Junior Fellowship, was presented to Pierre Lairez. The late Mr. Del Buono was a former Don of Hall and one of the first Adrienne Clarkson Laureates in Public Service. In addition on this Fellows’ Gaudy night, funds provided by an anonymous Senior Fellow donor are used to give a reference book prize, along with a

plaque printed on our presses, to every Junior Fellow who “has completed the work to become a doctor of the university.” Last year’s recipients were Daniel Bader (Philosophy), Tim Barrett (Juris Doctor), Rochelle Côté (Sociology), Josh Elcombe (Juris Doctor), Kate Galloway (Musicology), Noam Miller (Psychology), Andrea Paras (Political Science), Jordan Poppenk (Psychology), Jeff Ryback (Juris Doctor), and Kim Stanton, (Doctor of Juridical Science).

Massey Grand Rounds hosts fifth annual symposium by Judith Seary Due to meteorological difficulties, Dr. David Secko joined us remotely for his keynote address on “Health Journalism: What Would Make It Matter?”. The afternoon concluded with lively discussions moderated by Kevin Finnerty and Michael Valpy. Thank you to everyone who planned, participated in, and supported the symposium.

Massey Grand Rounds had another fantastic year and hosted its fifth annual symposium on April 27th, 2011 titled “Medicine and the Media: Exploring the Issues.” Members of the Massey and University of Toronto communities came out to hear inspiring talks by Carolyn Abraham, Dr. Michael Evans, and Dr. Molly Shoichet.

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MA in Fine Arts at Washington University in Saint Louis. She also had her first child, Henry, and is married to James Arthur. h shannonlkarobinson@yahoo.ca

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Vincent Gaudet is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo. h vgaudet@uwaterloo.ca

1995

Inducted into Hall of Honour_ ______

Martin Chang is a Staff

Burton MacDonald is a Senior

Pathologist at Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pathobiology at the University of Toronto. His main research interest is in the molecular pathology of breast and ovarian cancers. He is married to Alexandria Jong and they have a daughter, Saffron Leela, born in 2009. h mchang2@mtsinai.on.ca

Research Professor, Department of Religious Studies, St. Francis Xavier University. He is Director of “The Shammakh to Ayl Archaeological Survey, Southern Jordan” project, a second infield season for which was carried out last April–June. He was also inducted into the St. Francis Xavier University “Hall of Honour” last October. h bmacdona@stfx.ca

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

’80s Echoes of Massey from the West

He never regretted his decision to accept Davies’ offer. Indeed, when the CIBC tried to entice him back, seven or eight years after the College opened, he turned the offer down. He felt honoured to have been part of the tightly knit cadre who helped make the dream of Massey a reality. When I interviewed him in the early 1980s, he said that working at the College had been “a fulfillment.” He would “never trade what I have had, the experience I have had, the love for the College that I’ve had, for anything else I might have done.”

by Cathie Foote

T

he Calgary school where I now work has a quotation from Schiller hand-painted in calligraphy above the door of our assembly hall: “Only through the gates of beauty canst thou pass into the realms of knowledge.” Massey College taught me the truth of that idea, and Massey reveals that Schiller’s claim can be a reality. Even before anything was said or done, Massey’s beautiful physical space had a profound effect on how I regarded myself as a student within a communal tradition of learning and scholarship. Although I was working on my doctorate in Social Work during the two years that I lived at Massey as a Junior Fellow, a series of circumstances and decisions have brought me to be Administrator of the Calgary Waldorf School (CWS). When my daughter, Kate, graduated from CWS in grade 9 (when our school ends), she chose to finish high school within Waldorf education, and so she attended grades 10, 11, and 12 at the Toronto Waldorf School, graduating from there this June. Visiting Kate in Toronto these past three years gave me a chance to see Massey again, on occasion with her in tow for a walk-by. As I write this reminiscence, I think of what I would like to tell Kate about living in the College and the particular gifts that experience gave to me – things I hope she, too, will find in her own university studies to come. As a graduate student, you can easily find yourself working in an academic silo, with little opportunity to meet students outside your own discipline. Massey changes that. I was surrounded by students from every corner of the University of Toronto, hearing their academic enthusiasms and suddenly realizing what could be fascinating about some other field of study. It’s a terrific place for piquing your curiosity. Massey can even leave you with the illusion that you yourself had actually studied a bit in all those different fields! We could also compare the procedures of different departments and the foibles of different supervisors, including those who took the longest to comment on papers or dissertation proposals. But it was my friends’ fascination and struggles with what they were studying that I remember most. Because I arrived at Massey somewhat older than the other Junior Fellows, and as a married graduate student who had been maintaining my own household for several years, one very pleasant shock of arrival was suddenly being so well and so completely taken care of. From the Porter at the gate to the kitchen and maintenance staff, all these people were dedicated to giving me time to work and, yes, have fun. Most memorable was Tina, the staff member whom I got to know best and who kept my room spick and span. If Massey was rich in its staff, it also offered unique material resources. In those pre-Internet days, a real library had a greater importance. And however completely libraries are digitized, reading on a screen can never match the discovery of actual manuscripts.

1980s Cathie Foote For me, Massey’s collection of original reports from the Great Exhibition of 1851 was a surprise treasure. I discovered them accidentally, and they allowed me to write one of my major seminar papers on the origins of statistical records and social-class experiments, a couple of the innovations of Prince Albert’s Great Exhibition. What Massey added was the thrill of having these records housed downstairs, literally, and I could work at the quiet tables there, poring over the wonderfully huge, heavy Victorian texts. Massey provided so many unusual opportunities, each quaint and curious sounding in itself, and even a bit surreal looking back now from more than 25 years away – but together they created the experience of being the bearer of a tradition. Recitation of Latin graces in gowns at supper; being invited to sit at High Table (and trying the snuff afterwards); evening drinks and board games; croquet in the Quad (often having to hit balls out of the fountains); and the wonderful festivals that punctuated the year and gave us rhythm and ritual. All these practices came alive in the presence of the truly remarkable people who came and went for longer or shorter periods of time. I felt especially fortunate that the Founding Master, Robertson Davies, was still in the College when I was there. His characters were constantly being interpreted for clues as to who had provided the real-life model, and his sculptured nose gave me good luck whenever I stopped by for a respectful polishing. Most lasting to me have been the College friendships. Beauty and knowledge in Massey, yes, but what moves me the most as I remember and write this from Calgary in 2011 and look back on my two years in Toronto is the following. see FROM THE 80s – page 40

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

Although he was something of a fussbudget, Colin was always scrupulously fair and generous. His many acts of kindness – loaning money, sticking up for the rights of a Junior Fellow against the demands of a more senior individual, helping Fellows in difficulty – were noticed and appreciated. Two stories give the measure of the man. During World War II, when he served in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Colin participated in missions over Europe. One involved dropping bombs on a railway station in Frankfurt. He made the pilot circle the area three times, even though fuel was running low, until he was certain that he had the right target in his sights. As he later said, it would have been most unfortunate to drop bombs on any of the many Friesens below. Proposals to admit women to the College caused him serious anguish. Since the Act that brought the College into being in 1961 stated that it was for men only, he was acutely “conscious of a trust,” and felt that “come hell or high water, there should be no changes made.” However, when the Masseys themselves accepted the admission of women, he gave in gracefully, and later found himself pleased at the impact that the women had on College life. Young men who had been wont to throw buns from one table to another, he remarked, suddenly turned into wellmannered gentlemen. The College is very fortunate to have had a person of Colin’s dedication as its Founding Bursar. 37


MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

• 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s • From the Decades • 1990s •

Kathleen (Kitty) Griffin (1912–2011)

Kitty Griffin died on July 13th, 2011 in her 100th year. An enthusiastic Quadrangler, particularly keen on the Society’s Book Club, she was the wife of Tony Griffin, to whom she was married for 74 years; mother of Quadrangler and College benefactor Scott Griffin; and sister of Walter Gordon, a Senior Fellow of Massey College, after whom the annual Walter Gordon Symposium is named, and an event that Mrs. Griffin always attended. During her lifetime she was an enthusiastic golfer, skier, and sailor, the last of these activities resulting in the publication of her book, The Sea Has Many Voices. She was also an avid supporter of the arts and a long-time volunteer at the Art Gallery of Ontario. In addition to her husband and her son Scott, she leaves behind her daughter, Ann, sons Ian, Peter, and Tim, 15 grandchildren, and 26 great-grandchildren.

James Robert (Robin) de Jager Jackson (1935–2011)

Robin Jackson, a great Coleridge scholar and a Senior Fellow of Massey College since 2004, died in Toronto on April 29, 2011. He was born in St. Andrews, Scotland in 1935, and his death came after a long illness borne without bitterness. He taught English at Victoria College from 1964 until his retirement in 2001, and worked on research projects at the British Library in London every summer for even longer. Starting as a specialist on Samuel Taylor Coleridge but steadily broadening his range, he was the author of many books on the literature of the Romantic period, from theory and criticism to editions and biographies, including a study of poetry by women that was dedicated to his two daughters.

38

Douglas Coupland delivers 2010 Massey Lectures

Culture Vultures at Massey by Vinay K. Chaudhri

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nce again, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), Massey College, and House of Anansi co-sponsored Canada’s most important lecture series, the five-part Massey Lectures. In October 2010, the lectures, entitled PlayerOne: What Is To Become of Us, were delivered by Douglas Coupland, the international bestselling author of Generation X and 11 other novels. In fact, the lectures, for the first time in the history of the series, were presented as the five chapters of “A Novel in Five Hours.” The first of the public presentations, “Cue the Flaming Zeppelin,” took place at the University of British Columbia. The subsequent

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fter being the Hart House Music Committee secretary, I was looking for a new way to broaden my perspectives, so I applied to be a non-resident Junior Fellow at Massey College. As an international student, I had thought that the College was too expensive for me, so I might as well just enjoy it from outside. But then I got a call from Janice Du Mont, the Don of Hall at the time, inviting me for a tour of Massey. I was taken around the College by Glenn Moulaison, a graduate student in French. I was quite mystified by Glenn’s almost expressionless demeanour and the seriousness with which he walked me to the College chapel through the dark halls of the basement. I thought that the common areas and the resident Junior Fellows’ accommodations were simply lovely, and decided to change my application to be a resident. Since the love of music was still thriving in my heart, I suggested to Sean DiGiovanna, the chair of the Lionel Massey Fund, that we organize a group called Culture Vultures. Sean totally loved the idea, which evolved into a focal point for cultural excursions. The Vultures devoured numerous cultural delicacies, whether it was grabbing lastminute inexpensive tickets to the symphony or carefully pre-planning trips to see Tosca. There was also a thought-provoking tour of a showing of the Group of Seven at the Art Gallery of Ontario led by Senior Fellow David Silcox. The year ended with a live performance in the Quad by a folk band called Shadow Puppets. With their eclectic mixture of instruments and sounds (especially the fine bassoon playing of Jeff Burke), the Puppets mesmerized their Massey audience. To top it all, the Puppets played for us for us free of charge, doing so simply for their love of sharing music. The Elizabethan night at the College gave me a perfect opportunity to connect with a friend who was active with the Society for Creative Anachronism. He set me up with a period costume for a prince, an aspiring suitor of the queen, which I decided to wear at the ball. This plan was a bit at odds with the expectations of some fellow residents, who thought that I would dress up in Indian clothes and be an ambassador to the English court. I, however, found the period costume much more adventurous and out of the ordinary. With little historical and cultural context for my character, it was difficult for me to find a place in the ball, but I nonetheless had a lot of fun posing for pictures. All the activities I’ve been describing are not characteristic of a computer scientist, which is my profession. Once in a while I got asked by fellow residents to help solve their problems with Microsoft Word, but I was ill-equipped to help them, as my expertise was with an esoteric typesetting program called LaTeX that was of little use to most other residents at the College. Sapere Aude • Dare to know

1990s Vinay K. Chaudhri And let me not forget the opportunity I had to lunch with the Nobel Laureate John Polyani, at the time when, through the College, I got tickets to hear seven laureates make presentations on campus. I may never reach the same heights as these scholars, but I feel confident that my time at Massey gave me an opportunity to rub shoulders with the best and the brightest from all fields of study. All this set a course for my life and inspires me still. Vinay K. Chaudhri lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a program director at SRI International, where he leads a project building an intelligent textbook that answers questions. For the last two years, he has taught a graduate-level course on knowledge representation and reasoning at Stanford University. He also recently completed an Olympic distance triathlon. He was a resident Junior Fellow from 1992 to 1994. h vinay_chaudhri@yahoo.co

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1983 Angela Colantonio is a

Senior Scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and a Professor at the University of Toronto. She received the 2010 Brain Injury Association of Canada Research Award and the University of Toronto Physical and Occupational Therapy Alumni Achievement Award. h angela.colantonio@utoronto.ca

1985 Michael Baur is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Law at Fordham University. He lives in New York City. h mbaur@fordham.edu

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four readings – “The Best of the Rest of Your Life,” “God’s Little Dumpsters,” “Hello, My Name is: Monster,” and “The View from Inside Daffy Duck’s Hole” – were delivered respectively at the University Regina, the University of Prince Edward Island, the University of Ottawa, and the University of Toronto. The last lecture took place in Convocation Hall on October 29, and all five readings were broadcast in their entirety on the CBC Radio One program Ideas. Set in an airport cocktail lounge during a global disaster, Coupland’s five readings explored modern crises of time, human identity, society, religion, and the afterlife. The Master hosted a reception in the Common Room of the College at the end of the last public lecture in Toronto. Similar receptions were hosted across Canada after each of the other lectures. A five-CD set or podcast of the 2010 Massey Lectures can be ordered from the CBC at <http://goo. gl/QwVeS>, and the book version from House of Anansi at <http://goo.gl/tLO2J>. ALUMNI

Stanley Oziewicz is the

home-page news editor for globeandmail.com. He lives in Toronto. h soziewicz@sympatico.ca h soziewicz@globeandmail.com

1987 Robert Thompson is a

senior member of the Alpha Collaboration, which attracted considerable media coverage as they are the first to trap atomic antimatter. He was named Chair of the Department of Physics and a Member of the Board of Governors at the University of Calgary. In addition to all of this, he has welcomed his second child, Owen. h rthompso@ucalgary.ca

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1988 Nicholas Halmi is a University

Lecturer in Romantic Literature, Oxford University, and a Fellow of University College, Oxford. During this past winter, he was at Stanford University as a Visiting Professor in the Department of English. h nicholas.halmi@ell.ox.ac.uk

1989 Eve Egoyan has an upcoming CD

release concert on November 3 at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto. Her previous release, Simple Lines of Enquiry, was designated one of ten top classical discs of 2009 by Alex Ross of the New Yorker. h emu@interlog.com

Sapere Aude • Dare to Know

Thank you, donors! Christine Clement Andrew Cohen Elizabeth Cohen Judith Loeb Cohen Elizabeth Comper Martin Connell Eleanor Cook William Corcoran Brian Corman Jack Costello John Court James Coutts Elizabeth Cowper Margaret Anne Craik Patrick Crean Maxine Crook John Cruickshank Abdallah Daar Mary Daniher Gary Davis William Davis Natalie Zemon Davis Ruth Davis Dianne De Fenoyl Honor de Pencier Marni de Pencier Martha Deacon Philip Deck Jon Dellandrea Thomas Delworth Ramsay Derry Donald Dicks Brenda Dinnick John Dirks Wendy Dobson Kevin Doyle Jane Drake Rupert Duchesne Anne Dunlop Dorothy Dunlop J. Stefan Dupré Fredrik Eaton Noel Edison Elizabeth Edmison Peter Edwards Gordon Elliot Robin Elliott Sheila Embleton

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Life at Massey College

Walter Gordon Massey Symposium addresses democracy, expertise, and politics

Thank you, donors! Henry Borden Elaine Borins Alan Borovoy Marian Botsford Fraser Robert Bowden Walter Bowen Alan & Carolyn Bowker Diana Bradshaw Suzanne Bradshaw Donald Brean Robin Breon Peter Brigg Alan Broadbent Stephen Brooke Robert Brown Russell Brown Sandra Brown Francis Brunelle Michael Bryan Catherine Buck Ian Burgham Ben Burston Peter Calamai Brendan Calder David Cameron Teddy Cameron David Campbell Dona Campbell Joanna Campion CanadaHelps Edmund Cape James Carley Tim Casgrain Rosann Cashin Wendy Cecil Edward Chamberlin Adam Chapnick Barbara Charles Michael Charles Janet Charlton Emmanuel Chomski Kathy Chung Catherine Clark Ian Clark Thomas Clark John Clarry Michael Clarry

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• 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s • From the Decades • 2000s •

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he 2011 Walter Gordon Massey Symposium, entitled “Democracy, Expertise – and Politics” took place at the Isabel Bader Theatre, University of Toronto, on March 22. Featured on the panel were Mel Cappe, then President and CEO of the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP); Antonia Maioni, Director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada; and Munir Sheikh, former Chief Statistician of Canada. Misha Glouberman, a professional facilitator, moderated. The symposium panel addressed the growing tension between unelected experts, elected politicians, and the unmediated voice of the public, looking at questions such as: Was the Canadian government bound by some virtuous responsibility in the case of the mandatory long-form census? How can the public arrive at informed decisions on building more prisons when crime rates are declining? How can a responsible sex-education curriculum be instituted in public schools when the government withdraws proposals from its expert officials the moment a minority religious leader speaks up? There were also two invitation-only follow-up sessions in the Upper Library on the morning of March 23, attended by several government officials, academics, and others who play important roles in policy-making. Panellists for the session on “Talking to the Public” were Don Lenihan, Vice-President of Public Engagement at the Public Policy Forum, pollster Frank Graves, Ryan Merkley of Mozilla Foundation, and Karim Bardeesy of The Globe and Mail. The second panel addressed the topic “Serving the Public.” This panel featured Anthony Doob, Professor at the University of Toronto’s Centre of •

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Joan Colquhoun McGorman was a consultant for the estate of renowned music critic Jacob Siskind. She helped make the arrangements for his collection of over 30,000 sound recordings, books, scores, and archival material to be donated to Carleton University in this past January. She also participated in the conference of the International Association of Music Libraries in Moscow. She is a retired library scientist living in Ottawa. h joan_mcgorman@yahoo.ca

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Criminology, and Paul Thomas, Ph.D. candidate in Canadian Politics. Neil Seeman, Director of Health Strategy Innovation Cell, moderated the morning’s proceedings. Inaugurated in 1990 in honour of the distinguished Canadian statesman and public servant, the late Honourable Walter Gordon, a Senior Fellow of Massey College from 1973 until his death in 1987. Through his example and encouragement, he endorsed the mandate of the College to nourish learning and serve the public good. The annual two-day conference on public policy, open to the public at no charge, is made possible by generously granted seed monies from the Walter and Duncan Gordon Charitable Foundation. In 2009, the School of Public Policy and Governance (SPPG) at the University of Toronto became a partner in the Symposium. Each year, distinguished speakers are invited to discuss a topic of immediate significance to Canada before an interested audience drawn from the public, academic, corporate, and government worlds. The main organizers of the 2011 event were Junior Fellows Grant Bishop, Jessica Duffin Wolfe, Daniel Goldbloom, James McKee, and Margaret Olszewski; SPPG students Tiffany Blair, Hillary Connolly, Bridget Nardi, and Melissa Wheeler; Senior Fellow Michael Valpy; and Anna Luengo, College Administrator. The next Walter Gordon Symposium will focus on “Struggling Toward Global Governance in Finance, Security, and Sustainability,” and it will take place at the Isabel Bader Theatre on March 20, 2012. Details will be announced on the Symposium’s website: <http://www.waltergordonsymposium.com> ALUMNI

and currently publishes in the area of Gender Studies in Medieval and Early Modern England. h mc.bodden@mu.edu

Andrew Johnson is a Senior

Producer, Independent Documentaries, at the CBC News Network. He has been with this unit of the CBC since 2001 and has won three Gemini Awards, for which he has been nominated 13 times. He currently helps program The Passionate Eye on the CBC News Network.

Christine Koch has returned to

1981 Mary Bodden is Associate

Professor at Marquette University specializing in Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Literature and Language,

St. Johns from Woody Point to install a new exhibition for October at Devon House, “BLACK and WHITE: Twenty Years of Linocut Prints.” Some of them can be

To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

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viewed on her website: <www. christinekoch.com>.

Jonathan Rose was elected as

Foreign Associate, United States National Academy of Engineering. He is a Professor at the University of Toronto, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. h jayar@eecg.utoronto.ca

1982 Peter Calamai (Southam Fellow) was inducted as a Distinguished Alumnus at Brantford Collegiate Institute and Vocational School on occasion of its 100th anniversary celebration. He is freelance writer, editor, and communications consultant living in Ottawa. h pcalamai@magma.ca

Brick of discomfiting orange, it’s for the strong of knee

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by Tracey Thompson (Tremaine)

y first awareness of Massey College came when I abruptly realized, as I laboured in Saskatoon to finish my master’s thesis, that I had nowhere to stay if I were going to start doctoral studies at the University of Toronto. My Internet search revealed that the established residence available for graduate students was a place called Massey College. So I applied and found myself, eagerly thrusting my head from side to side, riding in a taxi on a bright sunny day along Queen’s Park and onto Harbord Street, past Trinity College, to the iron gates of Massey. Barely had I arrived, struggled with my luggage up to my second-floor room, and settled myself blithely on a bench in the southeast quadrant of the courtyard, when I fell into conversation with another new Junior Fellow: Sharon Bouhnick. We talked. We talked some more. He found out, I am sure, that I was from The Bahamas. I found out that he was from Israel, but really from Europe, and I discovered some of the personal struggles that could mark the souls of sensitive persons born into societies which emphasized social distinctions. There began for me what was so characteristic of living at Massey: meeting people from hither and yon who shared with me gifts drawn from their insight and experience. The Senior Fellowship, my peers in the Junior Fellowship, and the ladies and gentlemen who prepared our meals and cleaned our rooms all provided me with blessed things of value. Ursula Franklin, for example, helped me to forgive myself my innocence and naiveté as a young woman, and lent me courage to organize my intellectual life around my own questions rather than around others’ answers. Rahim Hirji, adept at combining professional study with addressing the needs of persons pushed to the margins of society, explained to me, when I asked him how he managed it all, “I take a minimalist approach,” meaning that he did only what was essential, and in that way covered more ground. From Dana Luccock I gained something even more valuable than good advice: I gained confidence and a whole new world of aspiration, for she explained to me that what I thought was my “hopeless ear”’ was in truth my trying to sing above my vocal range. So to set me straight Dana took the time to encourage me on from the land of the alto and into the land of the tenor. Then there was Sheila Ball, my best friend, who taught me that friendship is something fragile and sensitive, in need of protection, a precious gift to be reflected on and not taken for granted. John Neary reminded me that arresting looks and capable intellect could indeed walk hand in hand with humility and sheer niceness, while Craig

2000s Tracey Thompson (Tremaine) Handy, gentleman that he was, showed me that decency, though often innate, must also be actively cultivated. He spoke of how pleased his family was with the kindness and maturity displayed by his younger sister in handling certain challenges during her first year of college. And one particular janitor who confided her personal trials to me reaffirmed for me why I had come to the university: to make a difference for those persons rendered most vulnerable in society. And I could go on. But let me summarize. Massey, with its freezing water in the courtyard ponds, its brick of discomfiting orange, its stairs built for the strong of knee, and its Junior Fellowship, black-caped, congregating like crows, gave me a home and enriched my vision. It taught me not to underestimate the imagination and ambition of young people. It showed me how a wealthy society might celebrate talent, cultivate fellowship, and foster confidence among its young. The College was a rich dessert that I would have liked to have had more time to properly digest. Would that I could have brought my completed doctoral coursework and comprehensive examination notes with me when I first arrived. Then I could have spent three years of learning simply through participating in projects that mobilized the gifts and resources of the Junior Fellowship and through supping at table in the Massey milieu. Tracey Thompson (Tremaine) is an Assistant Professor of History at The College of The Bahamas. She was a resident Junior Fellow from 2001–2004.

His last work, recently completed, was a comprehensive database of Romantic poetry in English. An expert once introduced him to an audience as “a scholar’s scholar” and a “human being’s human being.” In his obituary in The Globe and Mail, he was described as “learned, funny, gentle, and stubborn as a mule.” His several strong connections to Massey College include time as a Senior Resident when he was a young academic. Master John Fraser fondly remembers warm and amusing anecdotes of the early days of the College, especially of Professor Jackson having occasional breakfasts with Vincent Massey in what used to be known as the Senior Fellows Common Room (now the Private Dining Room). His loyal and loving wife, Professor Heather Jackson, a fine scholar in her own right, is a Continuing Senior Fellow, and was for many years Chair of the Library Committee of the College. Master Fraser added that Robin Jackson was as close as he ever met to Chaucer’s “very gentil parfait knight.”

Douglas Grant Lochhead (1922–2011)

by Michael Laine Douglas Lochhead, our Founding Librarian who died on March 15, 2011, was born in Guelph, but he often claimed that his heart was in the Maritimes, the subject and inspiration for most of his poetry. Destined by virtue of his undergraduate training for a career in medicine, following service in World War II, he had somewhat of an epiphany and began an M.A. in English at the University of Toronto.

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable, to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

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Life at Massey College

After some time in the government and at Cornell, Dalhousie, and York, he was asked in 1963 by Robertson Davies to open a library at Massey, where he then served as librarian, archivist, curator, and printer until 1975, when he left us to become the second Davidson Professor of Canadian Studies at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick. The excellence of our collections testify to his expertise and devotion. In addition to his administrative duties, he taught, in his role as Professor of English, bibliography to graduate students. At Massey he established, along with friends in publishing, the graphic arts, and the printing trades, the Massey College Press as an extensive museum and archive for nineteenth-century printing and as a specialized facility for teaching printing and bibliography. Throughout his career at Massey and at Mount Allison, Douglas continued to publish distinguished poetry. He was nominated in 1980 for the Governor-General’s Award for Poetry for High Marsh Road, and received the Carlo Betocchi International Poetry Prize in 2005 (the first non-Italian to do so) for the same work. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1976 and subsequently received honorary degrees from Saint Mary’s, Dalhousie, and the University of New Brunswick. In 1983, he spent a year as Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at the University of Edinburgh, where his inaugural lecture was called “Something Still to Find,” a title that can stand as a sign for the way he led his life as a scholar and as a poet. It would, however, fail to emphasize his warmth and his kindness as a teacher, a colleague, and a friend. Despite his fugitive heart, he was devoted to Massey College, and we will remember him through a scholarship established in his name. We are very fortunate to have had him here. 40

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From the Master Emerita

From the 60s from page 35

Where else could you have been collared coming in late to lunch (with Dave Trott) by Lionel Massey and taken over to join Vincent Massey, the Visitor himself, former Premier Leslie Frost, then U of T President Claude Bissell, and then Education Minister Bill Davis discussing how Ontario had been overwhelmed by student numbers after the War and should have planned better for it. And then there were the tennis games. The entire Davies family delighted many a Junior Fellow with them. I recall a morning doubles tennis match with Brenda, Miranda, and Jennifer. I showed up in Alpine attire, including a pair of tattered black hiking pants. I thought I played nicely with them, and so it seemed did they. Only half way through was it necessary for them to discretely let me know that my fly was wide open! Perhaps the best memory is of the older Junior Fellows of the time. They so kindly shared their experience of graduate work and life. Eric Rump, Derek Breach, and Ken Windsor provided most gentle, wise counsel and great wit. And Tom Surridge was my closest friend through Massey. I will never forget his incisiveness about life and his passion for it. The Upper Library sums up my Massey experience. There I encountered in 1963 the first issue of the The New York Review of Books, which has nourished me through the years ever since. And there, in 1964, I first saw my future and, alas, now late wife, the wondrous Janet Slone, at a meeting of the Graduate History Club. (I am forever grateful to you, Mike Horn, for introducing us.) Dale Taylor did his B.A. at York University, his M.A. in Political Science at U of T, and doctoral work at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He was a Junior Fellow from 1963 to 1965. A retired civil servant, he was an economist with both the Federal and Ontario governments. He is now an economic development consultant, and is completing two works of historical fiction. Dale lives in Richmond Hill, Ontario. He has one son and two grandsons. h daletaylor@rogers.com

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fter reporting to us last year that she had completed her edition of the correspondence of W. B. Yeats and his wife, George, for Oxford University Press, Professor Saddlemyer is very pleased to announce that the 624-page work is now published. She travelled to Dublin last March for its European launch and, while there, gave a lecture at the National Library of Ireland. This was followed by the volume’s North American launch in May in New York, where she delivered two lectures on the subject. (Full bibliographical information on this and her other publications this past year appear on page 32.) Professor Saddlemyer continues her long-time connection with the Shaw Festival Theatre, Niagaraon-the-Lake, where she is a Corresponding Scholar, Academy of the Shaw Festival Theatre Board. In addition, she wrote a program essay for Lennox Robinson’s Drama at Inish, which was performed at this world-renowned festival, and she is on the Board and the Advisory Committee of the Council of the International Shaw Society. She also serves on various committees of the Royal Society. Professor Saddlemyer continues her involvement as one of the General Editors of the Cornell Yeats and of the Selected Irish Plays series. This series is published by Colin Smythe, where the Master Emerita serves as a member of the Publishing Board, as she still does with Hedgerow Press, in British Columbia. As well, she remains an Editorial Board member of The Correspondence of Bernard Shaw, Irish Studies Review, and the Shaw Annual; and a member of the Advisory Boards of the Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, the Irish University Review, and Studi irlandesi.

New non-resident Junior Fellow Saeed Selvam signs up to tutor in the Massey College Student Tutoring and Mentoring Program. Now enrolled as a Masters in Public Policy student at the U of T School of Public Policy and Governance, Saeed was himself part of College program in its earliest days, and was tutored and mentored by Alumni Patrick Byrne and Olivier Sorin. Now approaching its tenth anniversary, the tutoring program pairs Junior Fellows with high school students who show promise despite poor academic showing because of language and other problems.

From the 80s

from page 37

Connie showing me that the original of my favourite A.Y. Jackson painting was hanging at St. Hilda’s next door, in view from the street, so I could walk by and have a peek every time I felt homesick for southern Alberta. Mark bringing me into his unique circumstance and warm home life as the Master’s son, plus pronouncing it “chee-hoo-a-hoo-a” dog in one of our marathon Trivial Pursuit games. Charlie having contests with me at supper over who would get stuck with the little brown buns or whose tapioca pudding could stay upside-down in its dish the longest. My fellow night owl Sheldon competing with me to see who could make breakfast the least number of times in the year, and insisting that I do the ordering at very late brunch at The Bagel just so he could start his day laughing. All those Massey conversations late into the night. Thank you, my friends. Cathie Foote was a resident Junior Fellow between 1983 and 1985 while pursuing her Ph.D. in Social Work at the University of Toronto. She then returned home to Calgary, working for the next 13 years as a therapist, researcher, and university teacher in the field of death and grief, in particular with families who have lost a child. For the past 13 years, Cathie has served the Calgary Waldorf School in many roles, currently as the School Administrator. Her husband Arthur Frank is about to retire as a Professor of Sociology (University of Calgary); her daughter, Kate Foote Frank, just graduated from the Toronto Waldorf School,has just headed off on a gap year before moving to Halifax to attend the University of King’s College.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

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He has just published Fast Media, Media Fast, described by one reviewer as “a stimulating, provocative, and compelling account of the consequences, both personal and cultural, of freeing ourselves from, or at least controlling, the mediated world in which we live.” He would love to hear from any colleagues passing through or near Boston. h twcooper@comcast.net

1975 Donald Baronowski is

a retired Faculty Lecturer, Department of History and Classical Studies, McGill University. He lives in Châteauguay, Québec. h donald.baronowski@mcgill.ca

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1976

1977

Paul Bolton is Deputy-Director-

Carolyn Roberts Finlay is a

General, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, in Kyoto, Japan. He specializes in intense-laser-plasma physics and laser-driven accelerators. He lives in Melo Park, California, but also spends considerable time in Kyoto. The legacy of his name continues with the birth of his grandson, Paul R. Bolton III, in Chicago this past year. h boltonpr@gmail.com

Inducted into Engineering Hall of Distinction–––––––––––––––––––– Lloyd McCoomb is one of six new inductees into the University of Toronto Engineering Alumni Hall of Distinction. He is President and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority.

self-employed musician, teacher, and actress. She lives in North Vancouver. Following her performance in Don Mowatt’s play Weeping Muse, Broken Lyre, commissioned by the Vancouver Chopin Society to commemorate the bicentennial of the birth of composer-pianist Frédéric Chopin, she and Don Mowatt took the work to Poland, where they represented Canada at the Symposium of International Chopin Societies held in Warsaw. They were also invited to attend the 16th International Chopin Piano Competition in that city. h carolyn_r_finlay@hotmail.com

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

Thank you, donors! Donations made between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. In our last issue, Marilyn FieldMarsham was not included as a donor and Cornelia Schuh’s name was misspelled. Our sincerest apologies to the community members concerned. Nora Adamson Alice Adelkind Howard Adelman Toshiko Adilman Susan Ainley Bruce Alexander Ian Alexander Derek Allen Jocelyn Allen Richard Alway Cristina Amon R. Jamie Anderson Sally Armstrong James Arthur Philip Arthur Katherine Ashenburg Roger Bagnall Andrew Baines Cornelia Baines Mary Balfour Sarah Band Curtis Barlow Despina Barnard Donald Baronowski Joan Barr Isabel Bassett Belinda Beaton Helaine Becker Douglas Bell Jalynn Bennett Robert Bennett Alan Bernstein Suresh Bhalla Andrew Binkley Harriet Binkley Sonja Bird Robert Birgeneau Gloria Bishop John Bishop Shannon Black Robert Boeckner

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Life at Massey College

The Master’s Report

DEGREES RECEIVED

from page 3

Ashleigh Androsoff Rochelle Côté Jordan Poppenk Nicholas Riegel Gregory West Juris Doctor Sabrina Bandali Arya Ghadimi Ilene Solomon Master of Arts Julie Wilson Master of Business Administration Shannon Robinson Master of Fine Arts (Washington University, St. Louis) John-Christian Bourque Master of Public Policy Dennis Lee Master of Science Matthew Strang Master of Science in Planning Raili Lakanen

College Quiz

We do it in many ways, but the juxtaposition between the very young and the very old is of major significance. The young children of married or partnered Junior Fellows, for example, are important to us because their well-being has a direct effect on their parents’ scholarship. We make a point of welcoming children to many events at the College and at any meals which they and their parents can manage with comfort and ease. For that purpose, we keep two high chairs handy just off the doorway leading directly to the High Table. These delightful children always bring a sense of joy and family community to the College when they visit us. As well, we are known for providing babysitting and short-term child-care. From time to time, as a community, we are referred to by addled scholar parents as a “godsend.” As for the venerable veterans in our community, they bring the extraordinary experience of their careers and experiences to our varied uses, and their generosity on all levels is deeply moving. No one who has been inspired by Ursula Franklin or Vincent Tovell will question this, and this was so when I myself first arrived at Massey and fell under the spell of Professor Robert Finch and, especially, Professor Douglas LePan of blessed memory. What I got from the “venerables,” what Junior Fellows get, what midcareer Senior Fellows get, what we all get is an extraordinary sense of the continuity of life and learning. We also sense their delight in still being considered important to the community. I had the great luck of growing up in a threegeneration household, and my Glaswegian granny – my mother’s mother ‒ had an enormous impact on how I came to view life around me and indeed the •

From the collection of Jennifer Surridge, Photography © Jill Krementz

When was smoking banned in all indoor spaces at Massey College? If you don't know, check for the answer on page 34. Be sure to check also for our Founding Master in his nowannual appearance in our College photo spread on pages 22–23.

by John MacCormick

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Doctor of Philosophy

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MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

world itself. Every day at Massey, I have a strong sense that our Junior Fellows – uniquely on the campus – have something of the same privilege, and I rejoice in this as much as I rejoice in anything around this remarkable College. Finally, a short postscript on behalf of the Master Emeritus, Professor Patterson Hume. He sends his very best wishes to everyone and still enjoys coming to some College events. He is trying hard to master a life with limited eyesight and he continues to care for Mrs. Hume with great diligence, courage, and love. The Acting Master Emeritus, Professor Stefan Dupré, is also in mostly good spirits as he deals courageously with Alzheimer’s, and is being hugely and ably supported by his wonderful wife, Ann Dupré.

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1967

1971

DAVID DUPUY spent ten years

Vladimir Konečni is a Professor

on the faculty at St. Mary’s University, Halifax, in the Department of Astronomy, and served as Observatory Director and Department Head. In 1982, he moved to the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, where, in addition to teaching astronomy and electronics, he served as Director of the VMI Observatory. He is now retired and living just outside of Lexington. h dupuy41@gmail.com

Emeritus of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, and he recently published his autobiography. He lives in Solana Beach, California, with his wife, Miriam, and son, Dusan. h vkonecni@ucsd.edu and <http://www.vladimirkonecni.net>

Ian Story has been Professor of Ancient History & Classics, Trent University since 1974. h istorey@trentu.ca

1972 Terrill Theman retired from his

career as a cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon this past April. He lives in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. h ttheman@hotmail.com

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

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Graeme Wynn is a Professor of

Geography, University of British Columbia, where he holds the Brenda and David McLean Chair in Canadian Studies. He was awarded the Christenson Fellowship, St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, Trinity Term 2011. h wynn@geog.ubc.ca

1974 Fast Media_______________________

Tom Cooper is a Professor of

Visual and Media Arts at Emerson College in Boston, as well as head speechwriter for the CEO of Puma (sports gear), and is involved in projects at Harvard. He is also a black belt, union musician, poet, and playwright.

t is with gratitude for my great good fortune that I look back on the year I spent as Don of Hall. I am grateful, to begin with, for the tremendous privilege of being a part of this fellowship, and of coming to appreciate its beauty. As long as we belong to this community, we share our lives with one another, and I hope as Don to have been lucky enough to have helped to ensure that this communal life continues to be lived in a true spirit of fellowship. But if I have done so, I am hardly the one to be thanked: sheer luck has kept at bay the kinds of trouble that would have made my job much more difficult than it was – for that, my gratitude will know no bounds. And finally, my sincerest thanks are owed to the Junior Fellows themselves: you, my friends, are a wonderful group of people, whose support and whose company I have valued enormously. As you all know, the quality of communal life depends on the labours of many dedicated individuals, of whom I can now acknowledge but a few. Our thanks are due to the thoughtful and patient members of the House Committee, who have contributed to long and impassioned discussions during the past year: Lucas Badenduck, Claire Battershill, Dylan Gordon, Letitia Henville, Julia Lockhart, Massieh Moayedi, David Pereira, Rami Shoucri, and William To. These Junior Fellows have been a tremendous help to me during the time I have spent as Don. Their deliberations have been crucial to guiding our community through the challenges we faced. Though the year was peaceful, it was not without its share of issues. These included the community’s finances, the Rotman construction, and the maintenance of the College’s communal spaces. We also owe a great deal to a truly outstanding set of LMF Co-chairs – Jenn Amadio, Raili Lakenen, Ruediger Willenberg, and Albert Wu – who have been models of dedication and collegiality. Their hard work and their generous spirits – and those, too, of the LMF committee members, Bardia Bina, Ryan Doherty, Jine Jine Li, and Saba Mir – have been instrumental in forging the deep bond that has come to exist among the members of our fellowship. A number of other groups at the College have seen great success, and have helped to make this past year a very wonderful one.

From the Don of Hall The Junior Fellow Lecture Series, thanks to the leadership of Dan Goldbloom and to the labours of the other members of the committee – Stoney Baker, Yonsue Kim, Dylan Jervis, Arvid Agren, Utako Tanabe, William To, Robert Fraser – has become very popular this year, through its implementation of the WIDEN format that has been used by Junior Fellow Jessica Duffin Wolfe to exceptional effect in graduate workshops that have had an impact across the university. This replaces the single-lecture format with a moderated panel, and has been enthusiastically promoted as a podcast by members of the Fellowship, both on the College website and in the iTunes store, where it was even featured in the “New and Notable” category. Our Winterball Committee – made up of Francisca (Desh) Fernando, Saba Mir, Roxane Bejjany, Ryan Doherty, Andrea Holmes, Cameron Laird, Erik Leung, Lluís Vena, and William To – worked tremendously hard to hold an event on the theme of “Classic Hollywood”, an evening of beautiful food and music (the latter having been provided by Junior Fellow Jonathan Bright) that displayed the committee’s creativity, organizational talent, and terrifically good taste. The members of the non-resident committee, Chris Young, Jemy Joseph, and Gillian Reis, have been particularly active over the past year, organizing such initiatives

as the bi-weekly Non-ResidentsDine-in-Hall evenings. The Masseywear Committees of both this year and last were successful in bringing out a line of stylish College clothing that I think we’re very proud to wear. Finally, I should be remiss were I not to observe that this spring saw the foundation, by Ashish Deshwar, Brys Stafford, Mark McConaghy, Ryan Stoner, and Victoria Arrandale, of a lively new Committee for the Appreciation of Televised Sports, known to the Junior Fellows as CATS. There are many more Junior Fellows who deserve to be thanked: were it not for a want of space and for my own forgetfulness, all would have the mention they deserve. I should also like to recognize the Senior Fellows, Alumni, Quadrangle Society members, the Journalism Fellows, College Officers and employees, our beloved Master, and all the other community members who have made such an important contribution to every Junior Fellow’s experience of the College. It has been both a privilege and a pleasure to serve this community I love. I am grateful for the good fortune we have all enjoyed during this year of peace and comfort at Massey, and to the good friends who make this community what it is. With all my heart, I wish the best to Stoney Baker, the new Don of Hall, who has already shown herself to be a patient and dedicated servant of our community. May she have all the support and the good fortune that I have enjoyed! John MacCormick, a native of Bible Hill, Nova Scotia, studied Philosophy and Classics at the University of Ottawa before enrolling as a graduate student in the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the University of Toronto. John’s interests lie mainly in the field of ancient moral philosophy, and his doctoral work deals with the topic of agency and determinism in Aristotle and the Aristotelian tradition, with a focus on questions relating to character development and moral responsibility. His other interests include ancient hedonism as an ethical system, as well as Latin poetry.

You must have taken the measure of your powers, tasted the fruits of your passion,

41


Life at Massey College

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011

T

by

Jill Clark, Bursar

t has been a good year for the College as we settled down to learn the lessons of the economic crisis a couple of years ago. We have successfully dealt with the shortfall in bursary support to Junior Fellows by making sure we never again promise what we can’t deliver. We have turned around the timing, so we only spend funds received at the beginning of the year, and in 2011 we paid out a record of $250,000 in awards. The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign will soon reach a successful conclusion. In total, we raised $1,460,000 with only $230,300 receivable in current pledges. The Bursar’s Office now has excellent and continuous discussions with the Don of Hall and representatives of the House Committee to make sure there are no surprises in upcoming budgets, particularly as they relate to student fees. On the staffing front, Edith Lorayes retired last December after 20 years of loyal service as a member of our kitchen staff. We will miss her tasty salads, and wish her all the best in her retirement years. And a special thanks to two young Alumni who help us with the crucial summer rental program, Christopher MacDonald and Ankita Jauhari. They have established a system and service second to none on the campus. Their work was sustained during noisy construction at the looming Martin Prosperity Centre next door, and they even came up with a great scheme to provide “noise bursaries” to compensate loyal Junior Fellows who remained in residence during the very trying construction period. We remain grateful for the generous contributions from all members of the College community. As Senior Fellows know, our experiment with a dining/bar minimum did not work out and was something of an administrative nightmare. We have ended it and are returning this fall to a regular annual solicitation for support for the traditional Junior Fellow wine fund and other good causes. In that spirit, the Quadrangle Society of Massey College continues its wonderfully generous support, which each year now comes to more than $120,000 and allows the College to do so many things other institutions on the campus only dream of. Massey College is a very special place on the University of Toronto campus. It is a pleasure to be a part of the College in the Bursar’s Office, where we get tremendous service from the Bursar’s Assistant, Tembeka Ndlovu.

Keepsake from Christmas Gaudy 2010

Postmark

Buckingham Palace

Keepsake designed by Brian Maloney, College Printer

I

here was a nice conjunction in the Common Room last May. I had just got back from a trip to the United Kingdom, and I was trying to get through the deluge of mail and messages waiting for me when I realized I needed the fortitude of strong coffee. Out I went to the coffee trolley, only to be waylaid by Pippa, the two-year-old daughter of Junior Fellow James McKee and his wife, Alumna Amy Nugent. Pippa’s dad was in charge that day as her mom was dealing with her newborn sister at home. And there, over by the door to the front hall giving me a big “welcome home” smile was our venerable Senior Fellow, Professor Ursula Franklin, who turned 90 a few months ago. Ursula still has an office at Massey and is one of the most productive of our Senior Residents. Not for the first time, it struck me what an extraordinary place Massey College is, in this case because it is a kind of home for both two-year-olds and nonagenarians. Now brace yourself! We don’t just have one active member of our community in her nineties. We have at least eleven more, nine of whom will acknowledge their age and two of whom deny it emphatically, pointing out to me in no uncertain terms that their minds are still strong and their age is irrelevant and if I ever expose them by name I will be “court-martialled.” Let me celebrate those I am allowed to mention. In the Senior Fellowship, in addition to Professor Franklin, they are: Professors Francess Halpenny, Lou Siminovitch, and Ernest Sirluck; also, outside the professoriate, are benefactor David Campbell and Massey Foundation representative Vincent Tovell. In the Quadrangle Society, they are: Elunid MacMillan (mother of Senior Fellow Margaret MacMillan), Mary Godfrey, and Dorothy Dunlop. Among these “venerables,” we also celebrate Brenda Davies, widow of our Founding Master, who floats above all titles at Massey College. •

N e w s

o f

ALUMNI

Ian Gentles has just published a

biography of Oliver Cromwell, Oliver Cromwell: God’s Warrior and the English Revolution, with Palgrave Macmillan.

Stan Loten is a Distinguished

Research Professor, Carleton University. He retired in 1999 and lives in Ottawa with his wife, Roberta Stopps. He was recently named a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada . h sloten@sympatico.ca

James Nohrnberg is an

Emeritus Professor, English, University of Virginia, and lives in

and learned your place in the world and what things in it can really serve you.

n e w s

o f

All degrees awarded by the University of Toronto unless otherwise specified.

FALL 2010 Doctor of Philosophy

The Master’s Report

There’s going to be a sharp focus on nonagenarians in the months ahead thanks to our Honorary Senior Fellow and Chancellor of Cambridge University, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. We also hope he may be able to visit his Canadian graduate college some time during the Diamond Jubilee celebrations that will mark our 50th anniversary. My point here, though, is that Massey College’s unique role on the campus is to transcend the normal definitions of what constitutes an academic community. THE MASTER’S REPORT — page 4 ALUMNI

n e w s

o f

a l u m n i

News of Senior Fellows begins on page 15, News of Quadranglers on page 27, and Publications on page 29.

1963

42

DEGREES RECEIVED

Charlottesville. He was a prize winner for his poem, “William Blake to William Herschel: Verses on the Universe, upon the Discovery of the Planet Uranus,” at a literary contest held to celebrate the exhibition “From Classic to Romantic: British Art in an Age of Transition” held at the University of Virginia Art Museum. As well, the spring 2011 issue of Arthuriana was dedicated to him. h jcn@virginia.edu

Nowhere. Once described by Time magazine as “Canada’s most consistently controversial newspaper columnist... a tangier critic of complacency has rarely appeared in a Canadian newspaper,” he has received two honorary degrees of D. Litt, from the University of New Brunswick and the University of Saskatchewan. h drfoth@sympatico.ca

Stanislav Kirschbaum was

1965 Boy from Nowhere ________________

Allan Fotheringham

(Southam Fellow) is just about to publish his memoir, Boy From

recently named Chairman of the Department of International Studies at York University, Glendon College.

To be happy, you must be reasonable, or you must be tamed.

Photography by Salim Bamakhrama

Report from the Bursar’s Office

Daniel Bader Alexa Bramall Katherine Edwards Laura Esmail Kathleen Galloway Kenneth Lee Noam Miller Andrea Paras Master of Arts Susan Bilynskyj Sara Elcombe Tyler Flatt John MacCormick Master of Engineering Taylor Martin Master of Science Andrew Bresnahan Wesley George

SPRING 2011 Doctor, honoris causa (Sorbonne) Natalie Zemon Davis Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (University of Toronto) Craig Kielburger Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (University of Western Ontario) Craig Kielburger Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (Law Society of Upper Canada) John McCamus Doctor of Laws, honoris causa (Law Society of Upper Canada) Robert Sharpe Doctor of Medicine Matthew Lincoln

3


Life at Massey College

From the Editor

Contact Us

ronically, we’ve never had more pages and I myself have never felt more squeezed for space, here, as usual, boxed within my spot on page 2. We’ve had to expand by four pages to accommodate the ever-increasing activity at the College, and you, our readers, are sending in more news than ever before. This is all terrific, of course, reflecting the dynamic place that Massey is as we build up to the 50th anniversary of our opening. I’ve been starting to think about that event and the MasseyNews issue for that year, just around the corner. I can hear Brian Dench, who so brilliantly designs and lays out this magazine, as he reminds me one more time about the harsh realities of “copy fitting.” I’m just about fitting in my own copy here right now. Who knows how much space I will have here in 2013? What I do know is that we’ll have all the space that’s needed to reflect what you and other members of our unique community are up to then. And that is as it should be. Do enjoy this issue. As always, my appreciation extends to the many Massey community members and College friends who contributed to this issue in one way or another – The Master, the Master Emerita, the Bursar, the Registrar, the Administrator, and the Librarian; Registrar Emerita Ann Brumell; Elizabeth MacCallum; College staff members Danylo Dzwonyk, Brian Maloney, Darlene Naranjo, and Tembeka Ndlovu; Matt Glandfield; Senior Fellows Judith Skelton Grant, Michael Laine, Vivian Rakoff, Abraham Rotstein, David Silcox, Jennifer Surridge, Carolyn Tuohy, and Michael Valpy; Senior Resident Dan White; Alumni Vinay Chaudry, John Court, Catherine Foote, Stephen Hume, Kari Maaren, Rosemary Marchant, Alexandra Sorin, Dale Taylor, Tracy Thompson (Tremaine), and the many others who sent in their news; Junior Fellows Daniel Goldbloom, Raili Lakanen, John MacCormick, Judith Seary, Ruediger Willenberg, Jessica Duffin Wolfe, and Christopher Young; Quadranglers Ramsay Derry and Ian Burgham; Barbara Moon Editorial Fellow Joshua Knelman; Sara Lochhead; Peter Kuitenbrouwer of the National Post; David Kent of the St. Thomas Poetry Series; and Chris Paul of Sybertooth Press. For photographs, thank you to Clara MacCallum Fraser, Simon Rakoff, and Junior Fellows Lucas Badenduck, Eric Leung, and Greg West. – Anthony Luengo, Editor

Massey College

I

MasseyNews L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 1 1 • t o r o nt o • OC T O B E R 2 0 1 1

This is the 42nd annual about life at Massey College. The 2011–2012 edition is scheduled for publication in the fall of 2012. Submissions may be sent to the aluengo@sympatico.ca, or by mail to the College, no editor directly by e-mail later than July 31, 2012. We also welcome any comments. MasseyNews thanks the staff at Print3 Yonge & Eglinton for their support and expertise . Every reasonable effort has been made to find holders of any copyright material included. We would be pleased to have any oversights brought to our attention.

Running columns

2

Degrees Received 3 News of Alumni 3 Thank you, Donors! 5 News of Senior Fellows 15 Senior Fellows Elected 16 Senior Residents & Visiting Scholars 18 Spotlight on High Table 20 News of Quadranglers 27 Publications 29 Marriages 35 Births 35 In Memoriam 36

4 Devonshire Place Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 2E1 <http://masseycollege.ca> The Master

college Assistant

Administrator

Anna Luengo Tel: 416-978-6606 Fax: 416-971-3032 h annaluengo@masseycollege.ca Bursar

Jill Clark Tel: 416-978-8447 h jclark@masseycollege.ca

We still need more help from our Alumni. The burden of this campaign has fallen largely on the shoulders of the Senior Fellowship and members of The Quadrangle Society. Many Alumni have been wonderfully generous, but their numbers remain small and if you have not yet donated, we strongly urge you to consider a generous gift to your College – Now!

Bursar’s Secretary

Tembeka Ndlovu Tel: 416-978-2892 Fax: 416-978-1759 h tndlovu@masseycollege.ca LibrarIAN

P.J. MacDougall Tel: 416-978-2893 h pmacdougall@masseycollege.ca Registrar

Mary Graham Tel: 416-978-2891 Fax: 416-971-3032 h mgraham@masseycollege.ca

Please give or pledge as soon as possible. Charitable receipts are given for all donations. If you wish to discuss a proposed gift further, feel free to call the College Bursar, Jill Clark, at 416-978-8447, especially if you would like to donate by credit card. Cheques should be made out to “Massey College,” specifying “Visitors Challenge” in the memo field and sent to 4 Devonshire Place, Toronto M5S 2E1.

Catering Manager

Editor: Anthony Luengo • Contributing Editor: Amy Maish • Desktop & Design: Brian Dench

Tel: 416-978-2895 h porter@masseycollege.ca

members of DINE at We alwaysthewelcome Massey Community to dine in Hall MASSEY before any functions

SUMMER RESIDENCE CO-ORDINATOR

to a mind without scope and without pause, a mind driven by craving, pleasure or fear.

Nevertheless, it doesn’t finish officially until December 31, 2011, and we are still short of the revised goal of $2-million. May we remind you that this campaign was designed to let Massey College renew both resident and non-resident Junior Fellow facilities, enhance our ability to support the Junior Fellows through bursary endowments, and maintain College traditions.

Danylo Dzwonyk Tel: 416-978-2549 Fax: 416-971-3032 h ddzwonyk@masseycollege.ca

Darlene Naranjo Tel: 416-978-2894 h dnaranjo@masseycollege.ca

On-line events calendar <http://masseycollege.ca/activities/events-calendar>

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign is now reaching its final stages and has already passed its official goal of $1.5-million.

John Fraser Tel: 416-978-8448 h jfraser@masseycollege.ca

h

All you need do is call the Porter at 416-978-2895 by 1.00 p.m. of the same day to make reservations

The Visitors’ Challenge Campaign

Porter’s Lodge

Tel: 416-946-7843 Fax: 416-978-1759 h massey.summer@gmail.com

Thank you for carefully considering a gift to Massey College.

Alumni ASSOCIATION

Photography by Anthony Luengo

The Master's Report 3 College Quiz 4 From the Master Emerita 5 Walter Gordon Symposium 6 Massey Lectures 7 Prizes on Fellows’ Gaudy Night 8 Massey Grand Rounds 8 Library Report 9 Book History and Print Culture 10 Massey Talks... Massey Talks... 11 From the Lodging 12 Massey WIDEN inaugurated 13 Journalism Fellows 15 Scholars- and Journalists-at-Risk 17 Elizabeth MacCallum speaks 18 Junior Fellows at Play 19 First Editorial Fellow named 20 Writer-in-Residence 20 Christmas Gaudy Literary Prize 20 Clarkson Award 21 2010–2011 College Photo 22 Art at Massey: Harold Town 24 Quadrangle Society Book Club 26 Alumni Reports 26 Conversation: Ian Burgham 27 Reflections: Carolyn Hughes Tuohy 29 Senior Fellows at Lunch 30 Massey in the Media 31 Kitchen Creations 32 Connecting: Vivian Rakoff 33 Nooks & Crannies 34 From the Decades: 1960s 35 From the Decades: 1970s 36 From the Decades: 1980s 37 From the Decades: 1990s 38 From the Decades: 2000s 39 Don of Hall 41 From the Bursar’s Office 42 Postmark Buckingham Palace 42 The Visitors’ Challenge 43

MasseyNews • 2010 –2011 Photography by Brian Dench

what’s inside

Alexandra Sorin – President, Canada (outside Toronto) and International h alexandrasorin@gmail.com Kari Maaren – President, Toronto h kmaaren@gmail.com

Rose Wolfe and Hal Jackman To be happy, you must be wise. – George Santayana

43


L I F E A T ma s s e y c o lle g e • 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 11

MasseyNews College receives million-dollar gift

Journalism Fellowship celebrates 50 years by Abraham Rotstein, Senior Journalism Fellow , 1981–08

E

arlier this academic year, Massey College received a stunning $1-million gift from an Alumnus who wishes to remain anonymous. The donor requested that the fund serve two purposes: to add to the bursary endowment of the College and to assist, through interest gained, foreign graduate students at the University of Toronto elected as Junior Fellows of the College. In his thanks, Master John Fraser acknowledged both the generosity and keen insight of the Canadianborn donor, who had forged special friendships with foreign students while at Massey and the university, understanding very well their high tuition and transportation costs. Master Fraser added that the donor’s ultimate ambition is to make the bounty of this fund felt particularly for a few students of special merit. Nonetheless, the donor has accepted the Master’s wish to have the money more widely disbursed among foreign Junior Fellows until an equivalent sum can be raised for Canadian Three past Senior Journalism Fellows – Abraham Rotstein, students. As it stands now, this new Claude Bissell (1974–78), and Maurice Careless (1978–81) – in the fund automatically frees up more Quadrangle with a statue of Inkpik the owl, originally chosen as a bursary funds for Canadian students, so, as the Master told us, it’s a “win- symbol of the Fellowship because it is “an anxious, ungrammatical bird with a constant feeling that something astonishing has happened.” win” situation for everyone.

College loses two of its Founding Officers This past year, we lost two of our Founding Officers: Colin Friesen, Founding Bursar, and Douglas Lochhead, Founding Librarian. Obituaries for them appear on pages 36 and 39 respectively.

Colin Friesen

Douglas Lochhead

Over the hill I came into this strange place empty of danger, fear, deceit and death – only the talk of death which was not sad but ringing with unending changes, on and on. Discovering now, right here, that moment in celebration, in happiness of tears and revelation, a hanging out of the soul to dry.

From “Meditation at Wood Point” in the collection All Things Do Continue: Poems of Celebration by Douglas Lochhead (Toronto: The St. Thomas Poetry Series, 1997). Published with permission from The Estate of Douglas Lochhead. 44

Sapere Aude • Dare to know

Happiness is impossible, and even inconceivable,

M

y lunch with the two chief executives of the Southam Corporation some 30 years ago still stands out in my mind. That was when the late Gordon Fisher and the late St. Clair Balfour outlined what they had had in mind when they first started the Journalism Fellowship Program at the University of Toronto. I discerned that the program had little to do with their “bottom line” and everything to do with their genuine desire to contribute to the future of journalism in this country. I was struck by the sincerity and personal commitment of these founders, and when they asked if I would become the Senior Southam Fellow to look after it, I was pleased to accept. (My only credentials were those of a sometime editor of a small Canadian magazine). My predecessors in the program were no less than Vincent Bladen, the former Dean of Arts and Science, followed by Claude Bissell, the former President of the university, and Maurice Careless, the distinguished Canadian historian. See JOURNALISM – page 16

50 years ago… The Act to confirm an Agreement between The Massey Foundation and The Governors of the University of Toronto, and to incorporate the Master and Fellows of Massey College, had its first reading on March 14, 1961. It received Royal Assent on March 29, 1961. In the official records of the Government of Ontario, this statute is cited as “The Master and Fellows of Massey College Act, 1960–61.” Just a month before, on February 24, the appointment of Robertson Davies as the first Master had been announced. Almost a year later, in January 1962, construction of the College began.

Massey News 2010-11  
Massey News 2010-11  

Massey College at the University of Toronto Annual Newsletter