Issuu on Google+


Searching for the right college is like starting an art project– the slab of clay in front of you, the white canvas, the blank screen–the possibilities are endless. You hold the power to make your mark, make a decision. You are the maker, and you have to start somewhere. The future is in front of you. If you are determined to challenge yourself and to further your scope as an artist, designer, or educator, our Boston location is the ideal laboratory. Our studios are an extraordinary resource for making art. MassArt Galleries are an ever-changing lab and classroom of professional practice. Boston is an arena for every kind of creativity; it’s a city full of inspiration, expertise, and strength. Our partnerships and cross–registration with Colleges of the Fenway (Emmanuel College, MCPHS University, Simmons College, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Wheelock College) and the ProArts (School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Emerson College, The Boston Conservatory, Berklee College of Music, The Boston Architectural College) are part of our integrated Boston possibilities. We want to provide the best education for all our students–a concentrated, dynamic learning experience that really works. Welcome to the world of MassArt. I hope you enjoy this viewbook. — D AW N B A R R E T T, P R E S I D E N T


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Calla Grace Fogarty  Printmaking

Becca Cahan  Illustration

Alanna Robbins  Jewelery

Ashley Smith  Photography


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Emily White  Sculpture

I am in love with my dogs. When you photograph someone, you are making a map of them in a way. Switch back to life and you see them in a new way. The map helps you know them, and you get more and more attached.

William Wegman ALUMNUS

Aristide Little-Lex  Architectural Design


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There is an edge to every creative domain where new things are unfolding. It’s sloppy, dynamic—and this is important—wide open for reworking and reinvention. That’s always where the action is. And it’s where you’ll find the best, smartest people at play.

Brian Collins

Dana DiPlacido  Jewelry and Metalsmithing

ALUMNUS

Quinn Gorbutt  Photography

Mishal Kizilbash  Fashion Design

Jordan Piantedosi  Painting


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William Vanaria  Jewelry and Metalsmithing

Umez Lilauwala  Industrial Design

Katharena Rentumis  Glass Paige Peterson  Studio for Interrelated Media

Jessica Tenczar  Fashion Design

Daniel J. Foster  Photography

Shane Maxwell  Fashion Design


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Erin Shaw  Fibers

The years I spent at MassArt immersed in learning gave me the necessary tools I needed to become a confident designer and take risks to find my voice.

Kelly Wearstler ALUMNA

Alexandra Grahame  Painting


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Andrew Meyer  Ceramics Erik Michel Lund  Graphic Design

Alexandra Bye  Animation

Elizabeth Viggiano  Photography

Molly Stone  Illustration


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We promise not to throw too many facts at you like square footage of studio space. Let’s just say it’s a lot.We promise not to use worn-out phrases like “personal attention,” “caring faculty,” or “close-knit community.” Those are givens here. And we promise not to tell you, “We have something for everyone.” The truth is, we’re not for everybody. No college is. But for students who do come here, we offer an experience that’s unlike any other art and design college in the country.

Instead, we’re going to tell you what MassArt is really like. Not the sugar-coated “It’s so wonderful to make art” version. But the “hands caked in clay at 2 a.m. on a Tuesday morning as you frustratingly try to perfect a corner because you absolutely love it” version. And to do that, we’ve called on the people who know MassArt best—students, alumni, and faculty. We hope that letting them share their stories, in their own words, will help you learn what you really want to know— Is Mass Art for you?


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VISUAL BLOG

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Q:

IS IT FOR ME?


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A LOT OF SCHOOLS I VISITED SEEMED STERILE. BUT WHEN I TOURED MASS ART, IT WAS CLEAR TO ME THAT REAL ART WAS HAPPENING HERE. — C A D Y F O N TA N A , A L U M N A

Our students come in with a sense of

There is no pretense here.

They are extremely talented and focused.

Everyone just works really hard.

— F R E D L I A N G , FA C U LT Y

And I think because it’s a nurturing environment, not an intimidating one, students who have the potential to grow, grow immensely. — S O N D R A G R A C E , FA C U LT Y

After 20 years at MassArt, it’s still a very compelling place to me, visually and intellectually. I never tire of it. — E L L E N S H A P I R O , FA C U LT Y


When you’re making your own art, it’s easy to get stuck in one mode. But when you have a diverse group of students around you who are doing things in ways you never imagined, you can always find inspiration and new ideas.

— T Y L E R H AY W O O D , A L U M N U S

I fell in love with the community and the people and It wasn’t pretentious at all.

all the I felt at home in that kind of atmosphere. — M AYA L U Z , A L U M N A

— R I C K B R O W N , FA C U LT Y

The quality that distinguishes MassArt students is

They are not afraid to ask

anything, do anything. They have astounding creativity and great passion.

— E L L E N S H A P I R O , FA C U LT Y


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I made friends with people who really wanted to make a difference— and wanted to work really hard. They challenged me to be better. — B R I A N CO L L I N S, A LU M N U S

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— A I M E E B E L A N G E R, A LU M N U S

As a student, if I wasn’t in class, I was always in my studio. I spent all my waking hours there. — C A D Y F O N TA N A , A L U M N A

The longer I’ve stayed at MassArt, the more energetic, engaged, and impassioned I’ve become as an artist—and it’s mainly because I work with young artists. — D AV I D N O LTA , FA C U LT Y


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“MassArt’s a great environment for working in teams. Because it’s studio based, people say, ‘Oh, I know how to do this. You know how to do that. Let’s work together.’ So you pick up a lot of random skills along the way.” For Cailigh, that teamwork’s also extended to off-campus projects, especially at Handshouse Studio, a nonprofit founded by MassArt Professors Rick and Laura Brown (Sculpture ’93), where Cailigh volunteers re-creating historical objects. Last summer, she worked for for Handshouse in Poland, helping to reconstruct a 17th-century wooden synagogue for a museum in Warsaw. Before she started at MassArt and learned these things, Cailigh admits she was a little scared. She wondered, “What can I do with a degree in art?” Now she knows the answer — “Anything.”

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN / SCULPTURE, 2012 Cailigh MacDonald knows how to build a couch. By hand. From scratch. And not just something you’d throw on the front porch of a frat house. Something you’d find in a store. A nice store. It’s not that Cailigh has a passion for couches. Or furniture, even. She just likes to build things. All types of things — especially using metals. And she gets to do a ton of that at MassArt. In fact, she has to do a ton of that at MassArt. It’s required for her majors — Industrial Design and Sculpture. “There’s a passion and motivation factor here. You get to go to work every day and do something you love to do. And there’s a big studio culture at MassArt, which is a huge benefit because it

CAILIGH acDONALD encourages you to do your best work.”

The couch Cailigh built was part of her yearlong senior project in Industrial Design. She had to do everything from conceptual designs to consumer research to construction. So she learned about lumber and joinery and recyclable materials and manufacturing costs — everything that goes into

the actual production of a couch. And she learned it, like she’s learned a lot of things at MassArt, by interacting with lots of different people.

MassArt’s a great environment for working in teams. Because it’s studio based, people say, ‘Oh, I know how to do this. You know how to do that. Let’s work together.’

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PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

PAUL HAJIAN

Paul Hajian didn’t plan on teaching — at MassArt or anywhere. He’s an architect. He designs things.

That’s what he does and who he is. His dad was an architect. It’s part of his DNA. But when a colleague, who was teaching a class at MassArt in the evenings, asked Hajian to fill in for him for a few weeks back in 1986, he accepted. It wasn’t like he didn’t enjoy teaching. He did. He even knew his way around a classroom, having taught at MIT, where he earned bachelor and master degrees in architecture. And teaching was also in his genes. His mom was a teacher. From that one-night-a-week gig, Hajian was invited back. And back. Eventually, he accepted an invitation to join the MassArt faculty full-time. Now he says that he had a calling to go along with his career. More than 25 years later, Hajian continues to teach and practice architecture. He and his brother, David, also an architect, have run a successful design firm in Watertown, Massachusetts, for several years. Hajian says being a practitioner of your discipline, like many of his MassArt colleagues, provides for that organic and invaluable two-way learning experience.

I drag my students to job sites so they can see the framing directly and can see me interacting with my clients. I’ll also show them my work and get their critiques. It’s this exchange, passion, and desire to help each other that Hajian says makes MassArt a rare place. And not just because it happens within departments. But because it happens across departments, across disciplines, and across campus. Take his architectural students, for example. There was a small group interested in interior design that wanted to lend a hand with MassArt’s new residence hall. So Hajian introduced them to the architectural firm doing the work. And the students conceptualized, designed, and successfully pitched their plan for the hall’s café to the firm, the president, and the review committee. “Things happen at MassArt because the people here are committed to this community. It’s not just the faculty and the students, either. It’s everyone. We watch out for each other. The best stuff comes out of the entire community participating.”

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Q:

WILL I BE CHALLENGED?


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There are so many electives we could take, I wish I could come back for a fifth year so I could take advantage of all the electives. —A L E X BA R BOSA , A LU M N U S

OH MY GOD, I CAN’T BELIEVE I GET TO GO TO SCHOOL FOR THIS. — M AYA L U Z , A L U M N A

One of the things I really cherish about MassArt is that students still learn to make things. While other colleges are moving toward more conceptual thinking, MassArt is flourishing because our students are

When I heard about five-hour classes, I said, “I get to draw for five hours? Yes!” I loved that idea. Count me in. —A N G E L A J O N E S , A L U M N A

still making things. They’re having one-toone contact with the physicality of the world and learning how things function. So they have a connection to the world that other students don’t get. — R I C K B R O W N , FA C U LT Y


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The students make FACULTY FABULOUSNESS Work by MassArt faculty is exhibited and collected around the world.

me more adventurous. They make me aware that photography and

Art Basel  Miami Beach, FL and Basel, Switzerland

Even though we’re

technology are always

not as small as

Belem Cultural Center 

changing. And they

we used to be, the

Carnegie Museum of Art

influence my general

faculty is still very

Centre Georges Pompidou 

approach to making

hands-on, which

remarkable teachers

pictures.

helps you stay

who understood that

connected with the

students become

Art Gallery of Ontario

Contemporáneo–Mexico City Dallas Museum of Art

My number one goal is to expose

deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

my students to

Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum

new ideas and not

High Museum of Art

be an obstacle to

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

their development

Institute of Contemporary Art  Boston, MA

as artists.

Irish Museum of Modern Art Israel Museum J. Paul Getty Museum MASS MoCA Metropolitan Museum of Art Moscow Museum of Contemporary Art

— D AV I D N O LTA FA C U LT Y

—LAURA McPHEE FA C U LT Y

I had really

students. That’s

the way you speak

just the MassArt

about them. And

way, and it works. —SONDRA GRACE FA C U LT Y

MassArt toughened me up. I can now take criticism, without taking it personally, and I can give criticism that’s constructive and not threatening.

Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, El Conde

People seem to be

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes Buenos Aires, Argentina

amazed by that.

Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes Havana, Cuba Museo Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art  Chicago, IL Museum of Contemporary Art Skopje, Republic of Macedonia Museum of Contemporary Art Sydney, Australia Museum of Fine Arts  Boston, MA Museum of Fine Arts  Houston, TX Museum of Modern Art  New York, NY National Art Museum of China National Gallery of Jamaica National Museum of Natural History National Portrait Gallery Oberhausen International Film Festival Palais Des Beaux-Arts Republic of Senegal National Collection Royal Lyceum Theatre San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Shanghai Biennale China Tate Modern Uganda Museum Kampala Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography Walker Art Center Whitney Museum of American Art

—A I M E E B E L A N G E R A LU M N A

they spoke about me with heightened expectations. I think they did a good job of imagining new possibilities with me. —BRIAN COLLINS A LU M N U S


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The printmaking facility is 9,000 square feet — 

IT’S GIGANTIC

As a painting major, you’re offered a huge amount of space. You have the freedom to try new ways of working.

— N O N A H E R S H E Y, FA C U LT Y

— CO R EY CO RCO RA N , A LU M N U S

If you go across all disciplines, I think we might have There are many times that others have come here and modeled their facilities after ours. If other schools are coming here, — M A R C H O L L A N D , FA C U LT Y

FUN FACTS

More classroom, gallery, studio, and workshop space than exhibition space in the Louvre and Smithsonian American Art Museum combined 139 years of art and design 10 college galleries and 2 performance spaces 39 student clubs and organizations A “green roof” large enough to fit 40 “Smart” cars side by side Cross-registration (and cross-fun) at 10 Boston colleges Three residence halls, designed for artists, with one on the way 120,000 images in our slide library with access to more than 1 million images online Film/Digital Photography facilities big enough to stretch across nearly five average-size movie screens (30 feet x 60 feet) 3D studio and workshop facilities with more floor space than you’ll find on all six floors of the White House

In the Pozen Center there’s an equipment room we call, The Crypt. There’s every piece of equipment in there that you can imagine. You name it, they’ve got it. It’s a ridiculous room. I could not have paid a rental company as little as what I paid in tuition—and that’s out-of-state tuition I’m talking about. — S C O T T H A D L E Y, A L U M N U S


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I think MassArt made me fearless. I know that sounds cheesy, but it’s also the artist mentality of not doing the status quo. STUDIO FOR INTERRELATED MEDIA (SIM), 2004/2005 It was professional suicide leaving Disney. At least that’s what Matt Moore (SIM ’05) feared at the time. And for good reason. He was essentially dumping Mickey for … Fizzy. An animated icon loved by kids around the world, for a “scatter-brained” professor who — at least for nine guaranteed episodes — was going to try to win kids over by talking about eating healthy and exercising. On a website. Fizzy is the main character of Fizzy’s Lunch Lab, an animated series created by Dave Schlafman (Animation & SIM ’04) and Evan Sussman. After PBSKids.org greenlighted the project in May 2009, Schlafman called Moore out in LA to see if he could help. They’d been good friends since working together on projects at MassArt’s Studio for Interrelated Media (SIM). And Schlafman knew Moore could create a killer website for the show. Something really fun and really interactive. Something that kids would love. “It was a huge risk and a huge leap of faith,” says Moore. “But I loved Boston and loved the idea of working with Dave on this. So I said, ‘I’m going to go with my gut and move back.’” Moore’s risk paid off. Big. Since launching in November 2009, Fizzy’s continues to build its fan base. And for the third year in a row, it’s been nominated for a Daytime Emmy® Award. It also gave Schlafman and Moore something truly invaluable — credibility. Which has helped them land more clients. Big clients, like Scholastic. And launch their own production company, called CloudKid. “If you told me two years ago that we’d have a studio with 10 other people working here and we’d be

DAVE SCHLAFMAN

working on these big projects, I wouldn’t have believed it,” says Schlafman. “But we’ve trusted our instinct, and we’ve tried to learn something new every day — and that started at MassArt.”

Especially at SIM, say Moore and Schlafman. Because that’s where they were given the freedom to explore, the resources to bring big ideas to life, and the chance to learn one of the most

valuable skills of all — how to talk about art. Any type of art. It’s why they look for those same qualities in new hires.

“We continue to hire a lot of MassArt grads,” says Schlafman. “I see us as having a long-term

relationship with the college. There’s a lot of potential to keep really talented MassArt grads working right here in Boston. We can create opportunities for them here.”

MATT MOORE


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PHOTOGRAPHY, 1999 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FILM/VIDEO Forget the road less traveled. Try the road never traveled. Because one didn’t exist for Soon-Mi Yoo to follow when she decided to pursue a career in photography in the mid 1990s … with bachelor and master degrees in German literature … from a Korean University … as an immigrant living in the United States … with very few contacts. But from a single photography class she took while living in Washington, D.C., Yoo discovered a creative outlet. And a potential career. So she decided to get her master’s in photography at MassArt and build her own road. “I didn’t know what was going to happen or how it was going to turn out. I was just figuring out for myself how to make work when I didn’t have a lot of resources and how to express myself to the world.”

After graduating from MassArt’s MFA program, Yoo expressed herself through a combination of experimental films and videos, photographs, installations and text, often dealing with the Korean War. Not the kind of stuff you’ll probably ever see at the local Cineplex. But the kind of stuff that challenges the senses and makes you think about serious subjects in ways you probably never would have. In other words, art. Her work has appeared in festivals, museums, and galleries around the world. Over the years, Yoo also discovered a passion for teaching. She joined MassArt in 2009 after teaching at Syracuse University for a few years. And she’s discovered that the things she liked about MassArt as a grad student are pretty much the same things she likes now. “My sense of the kind of place MassArt is hasn’t changed much. It still holds a very strong attraction for me as a place where the students get exposed to a very good education and art making, and acquire the confidence that they can compete.”

SO O N - M I YO O

Maybe that’s why she feels such a strong connection to her students. And why she works so hard to instill that “yes, you can” attitude.

“It’s very important to me that students feel whatever they want to do, they can do. It’s possible.” And who better to deliver that message?

It’s very important to me that students feel whatever they want to do, they can do. It’s possible.

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Q:

WHAT’S THERE TO DO?


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Boston is a brilliant city. I’ve traveled from Colombia to Karachi to Iceland and believe Boston is the best city in the States—and one of the best cities in the world—for college students. — B R I A N CO L L I N S, A LU M N U S

VISITING ARTISTS A sampling of artists who have visited MassArt.

Richard Phillips Lisa Yuskavage Tristin Lowe Antony Gormley Edgar Arceneaux DJ Spooky/Paul D. Miller Mary McFadden Pae White Alec Soth Gregory Crewdson William Christenberry Bruce Yonemoto Trenton Doyle Hancock Robert Lazzarini Bradley McCallum & Jacqueline Tarry Beverly Semmes Nicole Cherubini Beatriz Milhazes

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22 17

15 16

SOMERVILLE

13 14 INMAN SQUARE

HARVARD SQUARE

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18 CENTRAL SQUARE

NORTH END

KENDALL SQUARE

20

CAMBRIDGE

12

FINANCIAL DISTRICT

BEACON HILL

19

THEATRE DISTRICT

8

7

BACK BAY

CHINATOWN

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1 23 SOUTH BOSTON SEAPORT

BROOKLINE BOSTON

10

FENWAY

3

6

4 SOUTH END

2

5

9

MassArt

A TASTE OF THE ART SCENE IN AND AROUND BOSTON

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You could go to a different event every night of the week if you wanted. There are so many great galleries and collective groups and music and museums — A I M E E B E L A N G E R, A LU M N A

BOSTON INSTITUTIONS/VENUES ★

Paine & Bakalar Galleries

1

Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA)

2

Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

3 4 5

SoWa (South of Washington Street)

6

Axiom Center for New and Experimental Media

7

Boston University Art Gallery

8

Photographic Resource Center

9

Mobius

10

Coolidge Corner Theatre

11

Boston Public Library

ARTIST COMMUNITIES IN BOSTON 22

In Somerville: Brickbottom Studios, Joy Street Studios, Central Street Studios, Vernon Street Studios, Mad Oyster Studios, Miller Street, and Mudflat Studio

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

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The Fort Point Artist Community

Boston Center for the Arts (BCA)

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The Distillery

CAMBRIDGE INSTITUTIONS/VENUES 12

MIT List Visual Arts Center

13

Harvard Fogg Museum

14

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

15

American Repertory Theatre

16

Brattle Theatre

17

Harvard Film Archive

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Kendall Square Cinema

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Gallery 263

20

The Dance Complex

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Lilypad

EVENTS & HAPPENINGS

First Fridays and SoWa Open Market Boston Cyberarts Festival First Thursdays in Jamaica Plain Art openings in galleries and independent shops Boston Open Studios Yearly or biannual events in over a dozen Boston neighborhoods (Somerville Open Studios is the largest in the country)

OUTSIDE BOSTON

deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum  Lincoln, MA The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University Waltham, MA Peabody Essex Museum  Salem, MA Fuller Craft Museum  Brockton, MA


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I think Boston is incredible. It’s a great place for the type of work I want to do. And there’s I really like all the independent theaters and small venues.

There are a lot of really smart people in Boston. I felt at home there right away. — M AYA L U Z , A L U M N A

— T Y L E R H AY W O O D , A L U M N U S

Because Boston’s such a big college town, as a student you get access to things that are probably better than anywhere else in the country. — M A R C H O L L A N D , FA C U LT Y


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PHOTOGRAPHY, 1997

ELLIE BROWN

Ellie Brown does what all artists want to do. What everyone wants to do for that matter. “I make

work that I want to make,” she says.

Popularity? That’s not what drives her. At all. Instead, she searches for things that inspire her. That spark her creativity and curiosity and energy. Those things that most people pass by without a second glance, but that an artist sees and says, “Hmm… .” And that no-regrets, “follow your own path” philosophy, it’s worked well for her. Because, well, she works really hard. It’s something she says she learned at MassArt.

They instilled a work ethic in me. The idea that the most important thing is making work. For her work, Brown has picked up a fair share of awards and grants over the years. And her photos have appeared in galleries around the world. She’s also been teaching photography for the past decade, most recently in Philadelphia, where she lives. And she’s modeled her teaching style after MassArt Photography Professor Laura McPhee, whom Brown says had a big influence on her. “She was tough. She just says it like it is, and I really appreciated that and really responded to that. I remember we had a techniques class, and she put me on the spot to answer some technical questions. I was really flustered at first, but then it finally clicked.” Brown also runs her own consulting company, POP!sicle Artist Marketing, to share what she’s learned about the business side of art. How to land grants and fellowships. Market your artwork to galleries. Get media coverage. Things like that. “A lot of people are so focused on the studio aspect of their art that they neglect the other half — getting your work out into the world. It just makes me feel more well rounded. I think helping other artists is a good thing to do. People have helped me, so I feel I should help others, too.”

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“I think the space is a big part of it because sometimes I need to build things and sketch things. And it’s a real working environment. You can see what your neighbors are doing and get their opinions and ideas. It helps me focus and makes me really want to do my work.” Diego’s work was good enough to land him one of just 300 invitations nationally to attend the annual Art Directors Club in New York City. Now he’ll have a chance to get his portfolio in front of ad execs at some of the biggest agencies in the country — people who can hire him. He’s still not sure which of his professors nominated him, or why, but he’s thankful they did. And he thinks it’s another example of how they’re helping him grow as an artist. “The teachers have always been great mentors to me. They are really honest with all the things I do right and all the things I do wrong. And they are always pushing me and challenging me to present my work. I think they are awesome.”

GRAPHIC DESIGN, 2011 Diego Tang sees the world differently now. He notices things he missed before. Curves and lines and shapes. All those little details that go into the design of products, posters, and artwork. And when something grabs his attention, he thinks about it. Then he asks himself, “What is it about that design that I like?” He blames MassArt. Or, well, credits MassArt. Especially his professors, who changed his whole approach to design. “More than anything, they teach you how to think about your work, to communicate your ideas. They challenge your conceptual thinking. That was really important in my education here, and I really appreciate that because I think it makes me a better designer.” Diego also thinks the studio space had something to do with it. It’s big and open. It gave him the

IEGO TANG

room to stretch out and make it his own by tacking up inspirational posters, book covers, and typography on the walls. Things that inspire him. And he feeds off the creativity around him.

The teachers have always been great mentors to me. They are really honest with all the things I do right and all the things I do wrong. And they are always pushing me and challenging me to present my work. I think they are awesome.

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Q:

WHERE WILL IT TAKE ME?


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I’m comfortable describing myself as an artist. When I say I’m an artist, I believe that. — C A D Y F O N TA N A , A L U M N A

NO MATTER WHAT THE PERCEIVED MOVEMENT A NEED FOR CHANGE THAT’S WHAT MOVES

ECONOMY IS, OR THE IS, THERE’S ALWAYS AND CREATIVE IDEAS. THE INDUSTRY. — S O N D R A G R A C E , FA C U LT Y

The world’s not an easy place for creating things. Having your work critiqued in class is nothing compared to what’s waiting for you in life. A lot of what happens after college involves failure and rejection, so it’s important to be prepared to face it, learn from it, and recover from it so you can continue on doing what you love. — L A U R A M c P H E E , FA C U LT Y


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ALUMNI AT WORK A sampling of companies where MassArt alumni are employed.

Puma

Juice Pharma

New Balance

Harvard University

Reebok International

Apple

West Elm

Hasbro

J. Jill

Fidelity Investments

MTV Networks

Black & Decker

Fossil

Tommy Hilfiger

Harmonix Music Systems

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Hill Holiday

TJX

Arnold Worldwide

Museum of Science

Brigham & Women’s Hospital

Gilt Groupe

Marc Jacobs

Yahoo!

Oxfam America

Art Institute of Chicago

Vans

Polo Ralph Lauren

PBS Kids

BAM

Converse

Juicy Couture

It sets you up to put your best foot forward. You can actually say,

whatever you are—designer, painter. I felt fully confident although I still have a lot of things to learn. — M AYA L U Z , A L U M N A

— A I M E E B E L A N G E R, A LU M N A

MassArt prepares students for careers in the arts and design as well as any school in the country. I really believe that. You can find success stories coming out of every major.

One of the things that I find very interesting about young artists, in general, is they don’t really care what job they have, so long as they are making work and showing work. Their identity is so different from the norm in society where people ask, “What do you do?,” which usually means, “How much do you make?” — N O N A H E R S H E Y, FA C U LT Y

S G N I H T G I B BIG, From the movie industry to fine artists to people in the design field, there are a lot of big names who have graduated from here. — M A R C H O L L A N D , FA C U LT Y


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When they get here they realize, ‘Oh my gosh, this is unbelievable.’

ART IS A THING THAN THEY EVER THOUGHT WAS POSSIBLE. They discover this world that they never knew about and enter this realm they never imagined. And they learn to express their creativity through their work— and when they graduate, they leave a very different person from when they started. — R I C K B R O W N , FA C U LT Y


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FASHION DESIGN, 1999 Engineering? Nope. Medicine? Uh-uh. Those would have been the safe bets for Dayanne Danier. The roads that everyone expected her to travel when she was deciding on college back in 1995. Instead, she took a risk and decided to chase her childhood dream of becoming a fashion designer at MassArt. Turns out, it was a pretty good decision. After graduating in 1999, Danier went on to design menswear for Perry Ellis and then Phillips-Van Heusen before launching her own brand of women’s clothing last year, called Bien Abyé (“well dressed”). Not bad for someone who didn’t know how to sew when she arrived at MassArt. “On this one project, I think I must have ripped open the seams at least 15 times,” she says and laughs. “But the fact that I didn’t know how to sew turned out to be a plus for me, because it forced me to work even harder.”

It was through that trial and error, that ripping and sewing, and poking and pulling, and stretching and measuring — over and over again — that Danier says her creativity and aesthetic sense emerged. Sure, it was frustrating at times. Heck, she even questioned why they were forced to take on certain projects. But looking back now, she gets it. “The one thing about my MassArt education that I really value — and I would have never thought this at the time — is that your first couple of years are spent building your foundation as an artist. It makes me stop and realize how important those classes were.”

DAYA N N E DA N I E R

Those classes took on even greater meaning this year when Danier traveled to her parents’ home country, Haiti, to once again volunteer her time and talents to help the country rebuild after the

catastrophic earthquake in 2010. Unlike the first trip, when she taught kids art, this time she’ll be teaching sewing teachers from a vocational school how to draft patterns.

“I want to help build independence. There’s talk that Haiti can spark its economy through the garment industry.”

And to help them out, Danier says she packed up some valuable resources — her old pattern books from MassArt.

Your first couple of years are spent building your foundation as an artist. It makes me stop and realize how important those classes were.

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P : // HTT  .ME/ ST U R W RE AND

What I learned is that if you think you’re finished, you probably aren’t. PRINTMAKING, 2013 Andrew Stearns had a lot of those same questions. You know the ones. What’s the workload going to be like? Will it be a struggle to keep up? Is it super competitive? And how will I stack up against my classmates? Sure, he was a pretty good artist in high school. But this was college. Art college. Every student there probably fits that description, right? But after a couple of years at MassArt, Andrew found his answers. And they might not be what you think. The workload, for one. Yeah, it’s a lot. Andrew logs a ton of time in the printmaking studio. But it’s nothing he can’t handle. And there’s this really cool thing that happens when you’re in the studio. Because it’s this big open space, you talk to people. Exchange ideas. Ask questions. “You can’t help but look at what other people are doing, and that opens up a lot of conversations about what you’re working on. And I get inspiration from seeing what other people are working on.” Make no mistake, though, says Andrew, it’s challenging. In fact, MassArt is harder than he expected. Sometimes you get pushed to the limits. Even a little beyond. Like the assignment where he had to stay up for 24 hours straight and draw on a six foot by six foot piece of paper. “It was painful. I had a plan going in, but I accomplished it and then had to figure out what else to do. What I learned is that if you think you’re finished, you probably aren’t. And there will be times when you don’t want to do art anymore, but there’s something inside of you that makes you want to keep going.”

ANDREW STEARNS

As for the competitiveness, well, it’s really not, says Andrew. It’s been more like a team. People try to lift each other up, not tear each other down. And he likes that.

If you visit campus, you’ll meet a lot of students like Andrew. Feel free to ask them your questions.

And they’ll give you honest answers. Because not so long ago, they were sitting where you are. And they had a lot of those same questions.


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FIND OUT MORE ONLINE.

www.MassArt.edu/answers

EARNING A BFA In order to complete a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, students must complete

18 MAJORS

a total of 120 credits. Generally, credits are broken down as follows: 78 credits in studio course work (foundation and major studio requirements and studio electives), 42 credits in liberal arts/history of art (typically, 30 liberal arts and 12 history of art). It’s important to note that course requirements for particular majors may vary.

ACADEMICS YEAR 1

ACCREDITATION Massachusetts College of Art and Design offers a comprehensive range of programs in fine arts, design, art education and history of art, and awards bachelor of fine arts, master of fine arts, master of architecture, and master of arts in teaching degrees as well as a number of certificates.

Foundation Year  30 credits • 2 semesters of Drawing (figurative/breadth)  6 credits • Visual Language (2D/3D principles)  3 credits • Time  3 credits • Form Study (3D)  3 credits • Studio Elective  3 credits • Written Communication  3 credits • Freshman Seminar  3 credits

The College holds accreditation from

• Intro to Western Art  3 credits

the New England Association of Schools

• History of Art Elective  3 credits

and Colleges (NEASC) and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

YEAR 2

Sophomore Year  30 credits • Major Requirements  12 credits

MassArt is also a member of the

• Studio/Open Electives  6 credits *

Association of Independent Colleges of

• Liberal Arts/History of Art

Art and Design (AICAD), a consortium

Electives  12 credits

of 43 leading art schools in North America­ —  39 in the United States and four in Canada — and three international affiliates.

YEAR 3

Junior Year  30 credits • Major Requirements  12 credits • Studio/Open Electives  6 credits * • Liberal Arts/History of Art Electives  12 credits YEAR 4

Senior Year  30 credits • Major Requirements  12 credits • Studio/Open Electives  6 credits * • Liberal Arts/History of Art Electives  12 credits * Depending upon departmental requirements, electives may be studio, open, liberal arts, history of art, or departmentally required. Please consult the departmental course requirement listings.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

ANIMATION ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN ART EDUCATION CERAMICS FASHION DESIGN FIBERS FILM / VIDEO GLASS GRAPHIC DESIGN HISTORY OF ART ILLUSTRATION INDUSTRIAL DESIGN JEWELRY AND METALSMITHING PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY PRINTMAKING SCULPTURE STUDIO FOR INTERRELATED MEDIA

Please note that students enrolled in one of the two Art Education tracks which prepare students for licensure will need to complete more that 120 credits. In some cases, students may find themselves between curricular years if they transfer to MassArt or carry less than a full course load.


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OPPORTUNITIES

TOURS

CROSS-REGISTRATION MassArt maintains consortium arrangements with other colleges and art schools

STUDY ABROAD The International Education Center at MassArt offers a wide range of study abroad options to meet the needs of every MassArt student. From choosing

in the Boston area, including Colleges of the Fenway (Emmanuel College, MCPHS University, Simmons College, Wentworth Institute of Technology, and Wheelock College), ProArts (Berklee College of

PORTFOLIO REVIEWS

Music, The Boston Architectural College,

Portfolio reviews are conducted by

The Boston Conservatory, Emerson

appointment in the Admissions Office on

College, and The School of the Museum

a daily basis as well as at many off-cam-

of Fine Arts), and Massachusetts Institute

pus events, including National Portfolio

of Technology as well as the other

Days and regional portfolio days.

Students are able to apply for a number

eight Massachusetts State Universities.

In-person reviews are not a requirement

of exciting, faculty-led, international

Students also have the ability to par-

but provide information on how to best

travel courses every year. These are

ticipate in domestic exchange programs

prepare your artwork for applying.

three-credit, elective courses open to

with domestic exchange programs with

all majors. In the past, our students

colleges of art and design located in the

have traveled to China, Mexico, Italy,

United States and Canada through the

New Zealand, Poland, and Cuba, just

Association of Independent Colleges of

to name a few.

Art and Design (AICAD).

the right program to re-acclimating to campus upon return, the International Education Center assists students in each stage of studying abroad.

PORTFOLIO PREP CLASSES/ PRE-COLLEGE/ SUMMER STUDIOS MassArt’s Youth Programs offer classes

Campus tours are offered most weekdays throughout the year. Your visit will typically include an information session with an admissions counselor and a student-led tour of the facilities and housing.

A SNAPSHOT OF OUR STUDENT BODY —

1,770 undergraduate students —

INTERNSHIPS

where high school students can build

150 graduate students

MassArt students are encouraged to com-

their portfolios. During the academic

plete one or two art and design related

year, students can register for Life

internships before graduation. After the

Drawing and Portfolio Development,

68% are female, 32% are male

completion of their sophomore year,

Saturday Studios, and Xtreme! Week pro-

students may receive three studio elective

grams. Summer Intensives and Summer

credits for a paid or unpaid internship that

Studios are offered in July and August to

meets MassArt’s Internship Guidelines.

allow serious students to develop their

MassArt also encourages students to

Career Services advertises over 500 art

technical skills and studio practice.

apply for other semester, summer and

and design internships each year on our

70% are from Massachusetts

academic-year programs through third-

job listing website, hosts an Internship Fair,

MassArt International Exchanges are full-immersion, semester-long programs designed for the independent and selfmotivated student. Students pay MassArt for the regular, full-time tuition and fees but study at one of MassArt’s exchange partnership institutions in Australia, Japan, the Netherlands, South Korea, Spain, or the United Kingdom.

and intensives throughout the year

party providers. Students may choose

and offers programming through the year

from a wide range of academic programs

to help students find internships

in over 100 countries.

ORIENTATION Orientation takes place during the week preceding the start of fall classes and includes programming for families, new

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION

ACADEMIC RESOURCE CENTER

students, and transfer students. During

The Academic Resource Center (ARC)

orientation students move into residence

provides students with access to aca-

halls, meet fellow classmates, receive

demic advising, the College’s learning

student IDs and course schedules, and

specialist, writing and subject tutors,

become acclimated to the campus and

and academic coaches.

the Boston area.

over 93% of students are full-time

19% are from New England 11% are from Out-of-State — As of academic year 2012–2013

FIND OUT MORE ONLINE.

www.MassArt.edu/answers


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EARLY ACTION

DEADLINES

Fall Admission priority February 1

Financial Aid priority March 1

Early Action December 1

Spring Admission * October 15

* Spring admission is only available for select transfer students. Please refer to massart.edu/answers for additional details.

If MassArt is your first-choice college, you may want to consider Early Action. This

A SNAPSHOT OF OUR  APPLICANTS

option is intended for students who have a propensity for art and strong academic

credentials. Admissions decisions for Early Action applicants are mailed in early January.

APPLY FIND OUT MORE ONLINE. www.MassArt.edu /answers

PORTFOLIO All applicants must submit 15–20 pieces of artwork, completed in the past two years. At least five pieces must be direct observational drawings of live situations or three-dimensional objects. The rest of your portfolio should reflect your passion, ideas, and strengths. Transfer applicants seeking credit in studio art classes must also submit three images per class for evaluation. Portfolios can be submitted online using SlideRoom.

To be considered for Early Action,

Most applicants (freshmen and transfers)

• Submit all application requirements

are required to submit official SAT I or

by December 1. • Indicate your interest in Early Action on your application. • Be a first-time freshman or transfer

applicants who have earned 60 or more Please note that if you are not accepted

college credits, including liberal arts

for Early Action, you may not reapply for

classes, are not required to submit

the regular deadline.

SAT or ACT scores.

students enter MassArt as transfers. In addition to our general admissions requirements, all transfer applicants

are required to submit academic records that have been converted to the U.S. educational equivalents. Course-by-course evaluations are required.

CEEB CODE A CEEB code is needed when you register for SAT Program tests or send score reports to colleges. MassArt’s CEEB code is 3516.

seeking credit in studio art classes must submit a transfer portfolio with three

• Transfer portfolio transfer students only

images per class for evaluation. Transfer

• Official high school transcript *

basis following review of the college tran-

• Official college transcript and course descriptions * if you have completed college-level classes

(for studio courses). Transfer placement/

• Résumé/List of activities

role in the review process, but will not applicant’s academic transcript. Transfer

credits are awarded on a case-by-case script, course descriptions, and portfolio level is based on the number of studio courses completed and how they pertain to MassArt’s curriculum, as well as the strength of the portfolio.

• SAT or ACT scores

*• International applicants

1846. Test scores can play an important

15 studio credits.

Approximately one-third of all new

• Two letters of recommendation

is 3516. MassArt’s ACT school code is

replace the importance/relevancy of an

• Application form

• Portfolio

ACT scores. MassArt’s SAT school code

student who has completed fewer than

TRANSFER PLACEMENT

• Statement of purpose

you must:

APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

• $50 application fee

SAT OR ACT SCORES

ENGLISH PROFICIENCY (TOEFL/IELTS) International students whose native language is not English are required to demonstrate proficiency in written and spoken English. To demonstrate English proficiency, an official copy of one of the following English proficiency exam scores is required: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum, Internet-based

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CREDIT

composite test score (iBT): 85. The International English Language

• Copy of alien registration card permanent residents only

For students who receive an exam score

• Verification and Declaration of finances international applicants only

Placement (AP) art exams in Studio Art

International students whose primary

(Drawing, 2-D Design and 3-D Design), and

language is English will be required to

3 credits in select humanities courses.

submit SAT or ACT scores. Please note

Please note that AP examinations in both

that the TOEFL or IELTS scores may

English Language and English Literature

substitute for the SAT or ACT scores.

• TOEFL or IELTS scores international students whose native language is not English

of 4 or 5, MassArt will award 3 open studio elective credits for Advanced

will be awarded as liberal arts elective credit, and will not exempt you from Written Communication or Freshman Seminar.

we receive over 2,000 undergraduate applications

Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.0.

60–65% of applicants are admitted yearly —

the average GPA was 3.4 —

the average SAT score was 1650 — As of academic year 2012–2013


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SCHOLARSHIPS

THANK YOU

Special thanks to everyone who contributed to the Massachusetts College of Art and Design Undergraduate Viewbook.

10 Kelly Wearstler top photo: Mark Edward Harris bottom photo: Grey Crawford

which they are eligible. Students must be

PHOTOGRAPHY

23 bottom image, center: John Skibo

high academic achievers with strong

Thanks to Jörg Meyer for profile photography.

Thanks to all contributing photographers in alphabetical order:

Aimee Belanger Becca Cahan Karissa Carson Julie Chen Emily Cody Corey Corcoran Gina Cura Kent Dayton Rob Duarte Josh Falk Cady Fontana Sarah Gay Katie Giguere Scott Hadley Angela Jones Leah Klein Eric Lee Katie Loesel Mike Mai Geena Matuson Ryan McCune Fish McGill Jörg Meyer Coleen Palencia Stacy Petersen Doug Rickert Dan Rukas Meghan Rukas Ariana Schaefer John Skibo Danielle Spurge Andrew Stearns Essdras M. Suarez Sonia Targontsidis Joel Veak Helene Zuckerbrod

MassArt merit scholarships are quite

TUITION TUITION MassArt is pleased to offer tuition rates that are competitive with other private and public institutions of our size and cali-

competitive. All admitted students will automatically be reviewed for awards for

portfolios to be given serious consideration. Remember that both your technical and creative/conceptual skills should be equally represented within your portfolio.

ber. The full-time (nine credits or more)

It’s important to note that some of our

undergraduate tuition and fees for the

merit scholarships are also based on

2013 – 2014 academic year are as follows:

need. To receive fullest consideration

Massachusetts Residents $10,400

for all merit scholarships, complete your FAFSA by March 1. The Scholarship Committee begins reviewing accepted

New England Residents

applicants around March 1. Once the

$18,600

decisions have been made, scholarship

All Others $28,600

recipients will be notified by letter from the Scholarship Committee. Scholarship recipients being awarded solely merit-

Please note that while tuition and fees

based awards will be notified with their

increase on a yearly basis, MassArt is

decision letter. All other merit/need-based

committed to making its education acces-

scholarships will be reviewed after

sible through a variety of financial aid

March 1. Recipients will be notified of

offerings, including merit and need-based

these awards at the end of March and

aid, grants, and student loans.

beginning of April.

FINANCIAL AID Over 80% of MassArt students receive

HOUSING

some form of financial assistance. To be considered for financial aid, applicants must submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), available on the Federal Aid website at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Be sure to indicate MassArt’s Federal School Code (see below) while filing your FAFSA. Please note that only citizens and permanent residents of the United States are eligible for need-based financial aid.

FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE (TITLE IV SCHOOL CODE) The Title IV School Code is a Federal Institution code that you will need to complete your FAFSA. MassArt’s Title IV School Code is 002180.

HOUSING

MassArt houses students in our three residence halls: Smith Hall, the Artists’ Residence, and the Tree House. The Tree House opened in fall 2012 and is home to the Student Health Center. All of MassArt’s residence halls have unique facilities designed to address the needs

Thanks to the Bakalar & Paine Galleries for use of the following images:

44 large image: Reception for Sensacional! Mexican Street Graphics, Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt. 45 1st column, 2nd image: Inside Juan Angel Chavez’s Speaker Project, Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt.

of our student-artists. For more detailed information, please visit our website.

1st column, 4th image, and 2nd column, 6th image: Gallery reception, Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt.

47 large image: Gallery reception, Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt.

MEAL PLAN Resident students who live on campus are

49 top image, left: Reception for Mary McFadden: Goddesses, Sandra and David Bakalar Gallery, MassArt.

enrolled in a declining balance meal plan

top image, right: Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt.

3rd row, 2nd image: Visitors in the Sandra and David Bakalar Gallery, MassArt.

that works just like a debit card and can be used at locations on the campuses of MassArt and Wentworth. The type of meal plan is dependent on where you live.

50 large image: Stephen D. Paine Gallery, MassArt.

ARTWORK CREDITS

25 bottom image, left: Fish McGill, Robot Guts, artist-in-residence drawing project with Studio Foundations. 56 large image: Erin Kiewel 59 large image: Arisa Murouchi 60 center image: Scott Hadley

INSIDE FRONT COVER ARTWORK

left to right: Matt Kaiser Sydney Schofield Alyssa Maynard

INSIDE BACK COVER ARTWORK

left to right: Ian Gage Jonathan Boles Lauren May

MASS ART

Karen Townsend, Dean of Admissions Ana Davis, Executive Director of Marketing and Communications

DESIGN

Moth Design: Dan Rukas (’03), Katie Magee (’09), Tammy Dayton (’98), Ernesto D. Morales

WRITING

Mike Ransdell

EDITING

Linda Walsh

PRINTING

Universal



Viewbook