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What Is A Rainscreen Wall?

p6 Summer 2016 • Vol. 7, No. 2

Materials • Technology • Trends

MANUFACTURED STONE VENEERS New technology = better performance p30

The Key To Resilience p14

BIM-M for Masonry: p22

Airflow And Drainage In Your Exterior Walls p36


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volume 7 | number 2

Summer2016 |contents

f e at u r e s 6 6

Technology / Moisture Control

What Is A Rainscreen Wall?

As wall systems evolve, masonry contractors are increasingly being asked to install rainscreen wall systems. Masonry cavity walls and rainscreen walls share many of the same time-proven design principals that control water and prevent water damage, including a weather-resistant façade and a cavity between the façade and substrate, but there are a few key differences between them. By Art Fox

14

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Education

Understanding Interdependencies Is The Key To Resilience

A perfect storm of risks threatens even the simplest of resiliency goals. And, if understanding and addressing these risks directly is not daunting enough, it perhaps is even more challenging to consider and address their interdependencies. By Donna M. Huey

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Technology / BIM-M

BIM-M for Masonry: New Design Tools And New Opportunities

Leaders from every facet of the masonry industry have been working together over the past few years to incorporate a better selection of masonry materials and systems into BIM software. By David Sovinski

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www.masonr ydesignmagazine.com LIONHEART PUBLISHING, INC. 506 Roswell Street, Suite 220, Marietta, GA 30060 Tel: 770.431.0867 Fax: 770.432.6969 E-mail: lpi@lionhrtpub.com www.masonrydesignmagazine.com Publisher John Llewellyn llewellyn@lionhrtpub.com Editor Cory Sekine-Pettite cory@lionhrtpub.com Art Director Alan Brubaker albrubaker@lionhrtpub.com Online Projects Manager Patton McGinley patton@lionhrtpub.com

On the cover: More and more communities are adopting the mixed material veneer look. Manufactured stone veneers add speed and economy to the building process, but also can dress up buildings more effectively than painted block with little effort.

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Assistant Online Projects Leslie Proctor Manager leslie@lionhrtpub.com Advertising Sales Marvin Diamond marvin@lionhrtpub.com Advertising Sales John Davis jdavis@masonrydesignmagazine.com Reprints & Subscriptions Kelly Millwood kelly@lionhrtpub.com

Photo courtesy of Echelon Masonry.

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Materials / Manufactured Stone

Selecting Manufactured Stone Veneers For Any Application

For light commercial building such as hospitals, retail buildings and senior living facilities, manufactured stone veneers are offering cost-savings, speed of installation and great looks. By Jim Cooper

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Technology / Moisture Control

Airflow And Drainage In Your Exterior Walls An Austin, Texas apartment uses Driwall™ Rainscreen 020-1 to help keep exterior walls from molding by creating ventilation and drainage. By Jim O’Neill

co l u mns & d epa r t me n t s 4 From the Editor 42 Supplies 43 Index to Advertisers w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

The editorial mission of Masonry Design is to educate and inform architects, engineers and specifiers about the vital role that masonry plays in the construction markets in the United States and Canada, as well as to promote masonry and masonry systems in building design (commercial, residential, institutional and educational), interior design and hardscaping applications. With each issue, readers will become better informed of the design trends, latest materials and newest technologies that will aid them in creating better masonry projects.

Masonry Design (ISSN 1941-0975) is published quarterly by Lionheart Publishing, Inc.

Subscription Rates – For a free subscription to Masonry Design and Masonry Design eNews, sign up at: www.masonrydesignmagazine.com Click on Subscribe

Copyright © 2016 by Lionheart Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. The copyright owner, however, does consent to a single copy of an article being made for personal use. Otherwise, except under circumstances within “fair use” as defined by copyright law, no part of this publication may be reproduced, displayed or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner, Lionheart Publishing, Inc. Send e-mail permission requests to cory@lionhrtpub.com.

Disclaimer – The statements and opinions in the articles of this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lionheart Publishing, Inc. or the editorial staff of Masonry Design or any sponsoring organization. The appearance of advertisements in this magazine is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised.

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from the editor

Daily Download

Cory Sekine-Pettite, editor To make comments or suggestions, send e-mail to cory@lionhrtpub.com.

Recently, I have been reacquainting myself with a TV series I loved as a teenager—Star Trek: The Next Generation. While watching an episode one evening, it occurred to me that there is at least one lesson we can take from the series (as well as the original series from the 1960s if that’s more to your liking) and incorporate into our professional—or personal—lives. If you’re a Star Trek fan, then you know that in every episode, the captain—and sometimes other members of the crew of The Enterprise—verbally enters reports into the ship’s log. In the show, the purpose of the log is to provide news and information to Starfleet, the governing body for the crew of The Enterprise. For viewers of the program, the logs deliver a narrative that moves the story along and offers summations from lengthy commercial breaks. What I think that we can take from this act is to start a daily log ourselves. Whether you prefer to use pen and paper, a blog, or desktop notes doesn’t matter; what’s important is that you “download” your thoughts. Journaling is a great way to clarify and organize your thoughts (especially critical from a business perspective), to get to know yourself better, to reduce stress, and more. Not only are you likely to become better organized at your job and perhaps more productive, but you’ll be

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healthier too. Experts tend to agree that journaling has multiple health benefits. I intend to start journaling myself—more so to help organize my thoughts than anything else. I juggle so many different tasks during my day, and usually I manage these tasks with Post-it notes and reminders in my iPhone. Plus, I often have other good ideas that I don’t bother writing down—article ideas, book ideas, etc. Usually, I tend to rely on my memory for these, which isn’t the most reliable means of preserving thoughts. So taking a cue from Caption Jean-Luc Picard of the starship Enterprise, I will be conducting a daily download to organize my thoughts, set my agenda, clear my head, and ultimately make myself a better editor and business professional. Tell me, do you already have a daily download routine? What is your process? Has it helped you improve your work? I would love to hear from you. Tell me your story! wMD

highlights coming in

fall ‘16

• Hardscaping • Masonry Coatings • Sands & Sealants

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TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL

WHAT IS A RAINSCREEN WALL? By Art Fox All images courtesy of Mortar Net. AS WALL SYSTEMS EVOLVE, MASONRY CONTRACTORS ARE INCREASINGLY BEING ASKED TO INSTALL RAINSCREEN WALL SYSTEMS. Masonry cavity walls and rainscreen walls share many of the same time-proven design principals that control water and prevent water damage, including a weather-resistant façade and a cavity between the façade and substrate, but there are a few key differences between them. A masonry cavity wall is a wall type that has been around for more than a century and one masons are very familiar with. It is defined as a wall with a masonry veneer material separated from the substrate by a one-inch or greater air space, or “cavity.” The substrate can be wood or steel studs covered with panels such as plywood, OSB or gypsum, or concrete masonry units (CMUs). Flashing systems and mortar dropping collectors are part of the design, and because of increasingly stringent energy requirements, most modern masonry cavity wall designs also include continuous rigid insulation (RI) in the cavity and an air and/or vapor barrier over the substrate. The definition of a rainscreen wall is a little harder to pin down. While the term “rainscreen” originally referred only to the outer shell of the façade, common usage has expanded the definition to mean the façade only, the complete rainscreen system consisting of all the components in a rainscreen wall, or some of the individual components. For the purposes of this article, “façade” will refer to the exterior veneer, “rainscreen” will refer to the entire system, and individual components will be called by their more common names, such as drainage mesh or air barrier.

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Terra Cotta rainscreen veneer on a support column creates a unique appearance and texture, and shows the veneer’s versatility. 6 |

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TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL

[BELOW]

Masonry cavity walls and rainscreens both offer a wide variety of design choices, and when they’re properly detailed and installed to manage moisture effectively, they provide reliable, sustainable buildings.

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The outermost and most visible rainscreen component is the façade material, which is usually chosen for aesthetic purposes, and which functions as the primary barrier against the elements. Façade material is typically panels made of terra cotta, precast concrete, composite, metal, thin stone, wood, or glass. Panels can vary dramatically by color, texture and size, so rainscreen systems provide a wide variety of design choices. The façade material is fastened to a framework attached to the substrate, not directly to the substrate itself. Mounting systems can be as simple as wood furring strips, which are typically used behind shiplap-style siding on residential, multi-family or light commercial buildings, or complex metal rail systems, which are typically used on commercial and industrial buildings to support large steel, masonry or glass panels. Rainscreen façades are not designed to be waterproof. They are designed to deflect the majority of moisture and wind, with the water and vapor barrier on the substrate preventing water that gets past the veneer from penetrating the substrate. Moisture in both liquid and vapor forms is by far the most common cause of damage to walls of all types. Masonry cavity walls are designed

Materials • Technolog y • Trends


with the expectation that water in both forms will get into the cavity, either through leaks or humidity in the air, so the wall is designed to control and manage both forms of moisture. To remove liquid water, flashings extending from the substrate beyond the face of the veneer are installed at the base of the walls and over masonry wall openings to channel water in the cavity to the outside of the wall through weep holes. Air barriers are used on the substrate. In pressure-equalized rainscreens, the open material-to-material joints found in many rainscreen facades allow air to move much more freely into and out of the cavity than the weep vents in a masonry cavity wall allow. Pressure-equalized rainscreens also use compartmentalization within the cavity to allow rapid pressure equalization in small areas of the cavity, rather than throughout the entire cavity as a masonry cavity wall requires. Drained/back-ventilated rainscreens do not use compartmentalization and do not have the same rapid pressure equalization characteristics as pressure-equalized rainscreens. Rapid pressure equalization is valuable because it prevents negative pressure in the cavity—that is, pressure inside the cavity that’s lower than the outside pressure. Since water will always move from higher pressure to lower pressure areas, negative pressure will, in effect, suck moisture into the cavity. The greater the negative pressure and the longer the pressure differential stays negative, the more water will be sucked in. The more often negative pressure can be prevented or reduced, the drier the cavity and substrate will be and the less likely it will be that moisture damage will occur. Pressure-equalized rainscreens are compartmentalized because differences in air movement at wall corners, edges, and higher up create pressure differentials that can be significantly greater than in the center of the walls. By creating smaller chambers at the areas where pressure differentials are greatest, the pressure inside the cavity within small chambers can adjust much more rapidly than it can throughout an entire, undivided cavity. It’s like the difference between deflating a child’s balloon versus a truck tire—the balloon will deflate, or pressure equalize, much faster than the tire because there’s far less air to move. Compartments are created using stainless steel, composite, rubber or foam strips placed both vertically and horizontally to fit snugly in the air gap. In addition, rapid pressure equalization can help prevent water damage caused by wall “pumping,” a condition in which the wall is deflected by air pressure, which creates pressure inside the cavity w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

[ABOVE]

The outermost and most visible rainscreen component is the façade material, which is usually chosen for aesthetic purposes, and which functions as the primary barrier against the elements.

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TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL

[BELOW & INSET]

Terra Cotta rainscreen veneer during installation.

that forces water through openings in the substrate. Pumping can occur across large wall faces and can force water through openings such as those caused by electrical or plumbing penetrations, cracks that occur over time, and even through some fastener holes. Like modern masonry cavity walls, rainscreens frequently include insulation installed outside of the substrate, and should include flashing systems and air and/or water barriers. Drainage mats installed continuously between the façade and substrate are becoming more common and provide both added protection and cosmetic value. They include a water-resistant fabric on the outward-facing side that helps protect the substrate from moisture that gets past the façade, and they guarantee a continuous channel for water to flow to the bottom of the wall where it’s collected by the flashing and directed out of the wall. They are frequently dark colored so they hide the substrate or insulation that might otherwise be visible through gaps in the façade. Masonry cavity walls and rainscreens both offer a wide variety of design choices, and when they’re properly detailed and installed to manage moisture effectively, they provide reliable, sustainable buildings. wMD Art Fox is in charge of marketing and communications for Mortar Net Solutions. He has been involved with the company and the masonry industry in various roles since 1992. During the 1980s, he ran his own construction company in Albuquerque, N.M.

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EDUCATION

UNDERSTANDING INTERDEPENDENCIES IS

THE KEY TO By Donna M. Huey, Senior VP and Client Technology & Innovation Director for Atkins Global

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RESILIENCE

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EDUCATION A PERFECT STORM OF RISKS THREATENS EVEN THE SIMPLEST OF RESILIENCY GOALS. There are key dangers to pay attention to while evaluating the relevance of context, contracting, and people as critical factors to achieve goals. Understanding the risks Starting with natural risks, resiliency is how vulnerable one is to hazards— understanding what the pattern or intensity of those hazards is, the response time, and how one can recover. In 2013, the New England Journal of Medicine reported that between 1980 to 2009, there has been an 80-percent increase in the growth of climaterelated disasters. In 29 years, losses have doubled because of disaster. The increasing densities of urban centers, particularly in coastal cities, only push the limit of property and human losses. Even when attributing some of the loss increases to improved reporting, scientists argue two-thirds of the increase is ‘real.’ Certainly, if one were to dispute the increase in frequency, the rising costs related to increased density in urban centers still would be clear. The key challenges of infrastructure risk include: • Adequately maintained structures; • The pace of technology and new material adoption to improve asset life and performance; and • Prioritizing maintenance or recovery plans based on risk and life line analysis. The ASCE 2013 Report Card for America’s Infrastructure estimates the need for $3.6 trillion to raise our infrastructure to acceptable standards. Further, the ASCE 2015 Report Card for New York’s Infrastructure showed only modest improvements with roads, bridges, and wastewater still reflecting “D” grades. And yet now another risk to consider: risk of cyber security. Recent reports show in the next five years we will see a move from 4 billion to 30 billion in Internet connected devices, with a trillion sensors emerging by 2022. Considering the prevalence of personal credit card hacks and identity theft, it is certainly within the realm of possibility there may be a data hack on a smart building or intelligent transport system. In 2014, many in the infrastructure community took careful note of the widely publicized study by Cesar Cerrudo on vulnerability of smart cities. Field tests conducted have shown exposure to traffic sensors in several U.S. cities. In 2015, he found the exposure still existed. Couple this with a growing popularity of cyber-attack related video games, such as Ubisoft’s Watch Dogs, and you can begin to quickly realize the growing risks.

Problems often arise in isolation, but together the challenges become a multi-variable problem. 16 |

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A multi-variable problem Problems often arise in isolation, but together the challenges become a multi-variable problem and infinitely more complex. Having personally worked in the IT side of the infrastructure industry for more than 25 years, this author has become familiar with the use of systems’ engineering principals and progressive assurance to protect people from these multi-variable problems—testing individual pieces of hardware or code independently before connecting them together. However, when the time comes to design or redevelop infrastructure, the luxury of a controlled setting is not always possible. Assumptions need to be made and the interdependencies of these variables must be modeled—it is the real-life, natural elements that will tell the true story of a successful design. Thus, the most important variable to be considered is people. Humans will use and interact with the infrastructure in the environment. “ There is no logic that can be superimposed on the city. People make it, and it is to them, not buildings, that we must fit our plans,” Jane Jacobs told Fortune Magazine in 1958. As a result, it is important to evaluate these multi-variable problems with a respect for context—taking into account economic risk, social risk and the maturity of the community in place to maintain and sustain. To better understand, one can analyze the exponential increase of sensors. The devices come in many shapes and sizes and some can even generate their own power. The devices are helping designers and engineers understand how their designs are performing—a new live feedback loop has been created because the infrastructure can now “talk.” For example, a new bridge structure loaded up with sensors can tell the operator everything from vibration to loads to wear and tear. Bridges in Atlanta or New York would be connected to servers with teams of people in well-staffed agencies or top-notch consultants evaluating, managing, and leveraging data to optimize maintenance, improve safety, w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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EDUCATION and develop improved designs. Incoming data would feed decision support systems or asset management systems generating predictions, automating work orders—a great example of making the best of all new technology has to offer. However, take the same bridge in a rural town struggling to make ends meet. It has barely enough staff to keep up with the basic needs. How can it take advantage of all this and not be left behind? What about in a developing country? The context in which this bridge sits all of a sudden becomes vitally important. The bridge in the urban setting is quickly integrated into the system of systems. Except in the rural setting, if the data being generated lacks a person or system to interpret or leverage it, there is no meaning to derive, no predictions to be made—would this just be a colossal waste of money? Such a perceived waste can be avoided if the context is evaluated early in the conceptual design stage. Assuming in each instance somebody is looking to achieve similar levels of resiliency leveraging the latest technology, the context requires different methods of implementation. In the case of the rural location, it means contracting remote monitoring and support; in the case of the developing country, perhaps simply the ability to apply the learning derived from similar sensor laden bridges in other parts of the world. In both instances, when context is considered, operators can still obtain valuable intelligence to ensure future designs are more sustainable. In the end, the data is generally only as good as the team or system that can interpret the data and leverage it for continuous improvement. It is important people do not become lulled into complacency with respect to technology and allow smart infrastructure make them inferior. These improvements can be readily shared so all stakeholders, regardless of context, to improve infrastructure investment and design decisions. The key is to treat the whole patient—step back and understand the context, before trying to devise and implement a more sustainable solution. Next-generation contracting In the previous bridge example, considerations are referenced for new methods of contracting in ways that will help cities less equipped take advantage of technological advancements. This is the tip of the iceberg as it relates to how interdependencies and new technologies could influence the next generation planning and contracting in the industry. As new technology helps us improve resiliency decision-making and funding constraints force us to find ways to extend life or lower lifecycle costs of assets, we are rapidly seeing changes in our delivery methods. Owners are taking a step back and starting to look at the bigger picture. 18 |

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It is truly im perative for traditional design firms to com plement this supply chain disruption with an equal level of disruption considering new ways of working, sparking whole-systems thinking and embracing deep technological shifts in the industry. There is a rise in public/private partnerships (P3), an increasing prominence of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), and many new terms and conditions in infrastructure design and construction contracts addressing shared risk. In the mist of the merging of physical and virtual worlds, evidence of new relationships is forming in the supply chain as well. Traditional engineering firms are finding new partners—more collaboration with large IT and system integration companies, more partnerships with financial firms and banks, and learning how to drive more progressive relationships with contractors on much larger scales. All these new relationships and contracting methods invoke a new line of questioning or self-reflection for many traditional design and engineering firms with respect to their position or ‘fit’ in this evolving supply chain. It is truly imperative for traditional design firms to complement this supply chain disruption with an equal level of disruption considering new ways of working, sparking whole-systems thinking and embracing deep technological shifts in the industry. When delving deeper into the fusing of the physical and virtual worlds, it is important to embrace these changes through a push to accelerate ‘digital engineering.’ Whether an individual leverages related terms such as building information modeling (BIM), this is about the automation of all or parts of the lifecycle of a built asset. Outside of certain BIM mandates for federal facility designs, most of the leading-edge push has come from the private industry. Why? In the private sector, the infrastructure owner is more intensely driven by commercial returns and when he or she sees the clear return on investment w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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EDUCATION (ROI) evidenced through the use of digital engineering and digital asset management, the owner understands and is able to quickly develop new requirements without complex government bureaucracy. The financial world sees it the same way. Lengthy concessionaire agreements on P3 contracts are about assuring the commercial returns. The benefits of de-risking the return on investment by proactive data management make second guessing enforcement of contractual requirements on the lead designer not an option. When examining the area of infrastructure resiliency, engineers can be leveraging BIM in more progressive ways—not just for obligatory contract requirements, but becoming invested partners in driving that ROI—share in the reward, as much as the risk. Addressing level of detail and information in early phase models, BIM can be leveraged for management of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) compliance. Modeling and optimizing carbon and energy efficiency during concept stage will lead to material long-term operating cost reductions. Additionally, designers can leverage frameworks for sustainable return on investment, putting a value on green infrastructure and showcasing longterm benefits for maintenance cost and resiliency. BIM and related digital engineering services are becoming more the norm and it will be imperative for the design and engineering community to step up and proactively guide how new technologies and research will be applied. Global standards organizations, such as the buildingSMART alliance and Open Geospatial are accelerating involvement to drive these discussions. It is important these talks are infused with infrastructure domain expertise. The design and engineering community need to help make the technology better—truly a call to action for this industry to lead what many call the fourth industrial revolution—this is not a time to just sit back and follow. Importance of people People are the last, and most important point to understanding resilience and interdependency risks. Education is the best investment for resilience of future cities when it comes down to it. People inherently live in ‘silos’—it is human nature to gravitate toward what is familiar and trusted. Since interdependencies by their very nature require there to be interaction, what happens if people refuse to interact? Will we leave it to the computers to model these interactions and make the decisions accordingly? Today, there is more data than ever and it is impossible to comprehend what that data set will look like one or five years from now. What has become increasingly more important today for our industry is that we learn to leverage this data and apply it in our next generation designs. The data can also be leveraged as a means to bring 20 |

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Climate change does not pick a specific type of infrastructure or location or socio-economic faction. It cuts across and requires a coming together of disci plines and ideas to drive solutions. people together – to break down ‘silos’ and analyze a situation as a team, recognizing the interdependencies and people are now living in a connected system of systems. It does not help to connect the bits and bytes if people are not connected to make higher order decisions. One of the most prevalent arenas where these ‘silos’ are present are where cities are addressing impacts of climate change. Climate change does not pick a specific type of infrastructure or location or socioeconomic faction. It cuts across and requires a coming together of disciplines and ideas to drive solutions. In a recent project supporting climate change management in the Dominican Republic, this author has observed that when discussions emphasize people-related aspects, building common interests, discussing experiences, and learning from different perspectives, the relationships that develop are what drives engagement and results. Conclusion Many sources of data, tools, and technology will aid and facilitate the work of understanding interdependencies as it relates to resiliency. Data and tools are used to help tell a story, but the heart and soul of these efforts is the coming together of the diverse discipline leaders, evaluating together the interdependencies, sharing knowledge, and ensuring connections are established to other people and resources. These are skills that surpass data and technology, skills that need to be taught and encouraged. They are sometimes tough abilities for a lot of nuts and bolts engineers, but the development of these services in our industry is what will enable clear recognition of the Established in 1938, Atkins interdependencies and truly drive resiliency. wMD

About Atkins:

Donna M. Huey is a senior vice president and client technology and innovation director for Atkins. She also chairs the company’s technical network that focuses on successful integration of digital solutions for Atkins and its clients. Donna has extensive experience in consulting related to technology selection, development, and implementation and has brought her particular expertise in geographic information systems to bear on projects ranging from transportation management systems to floodplain delineation and mapping programs. Donna has a bachelor’s of science degree from the University of South Florida and is a certified geographic information system professional, Corps of Engineers wetland delineator, and Esri ArcView instructor.

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is one of the world’s most respected design, engineering, and project management consultancies. With more than 18,000 employees in offices across the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, Atkins is involved in designing and planning everything from urban infrastructure to rail lines, and aerospace engineering to water management.

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TECHNOLOGY | BIM-M

BIM-M FOR MASONRY:

NEW

DESIGN TOOLS AND NEW

OPPORTUNITIES By David Sovinski, National Director of Industry Development for the International Masonry Institute and Executive Committee member of BIM-M. All images courtesy of IMI.

LEADERS FROM EVERY FACET OF THE MASONRY INDUSTRY HAVE BEEN WORKING TOGETHER OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS to incorporate a better selection of masonry materials and systems into BIM software. BIM for Masonry, or BIM-M is a broad-based industry group with several main funders: the International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, the International Masonry Institute (IMI), the Mason Contractors Association of America and the National Concrete Masonry Association, the Western States Clay Products Association and the Brick Industry Association who all serve on the Executive Committee which steers the goals and activities of BIM-M. The complete list of supporters, as well as more information on BIM for Masonry can be found at bimformasonry.org. The BIM-M Committee at The Masonry Society also helps with much of the program and content development. Internal efforts within each organization, as well as outreach to software developers, has resulted in many more design tools that will make it much easier for designers to use masonry. Here are just a few of the offerings for designers and contractors. 22 |

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TECHNOLOGY | BIM-M Modeling masonry buildings in Autodesk Revit This best practice guide for BIM Masonry Modeling in Revit is now available via free download. This guide will highlight ways to improve your masonry modeling using the Autodesk Revit software. Many architects and engineers create “work-arounds” to show masonry properly in Revit Models because masonry is not fully developed in the Revit software. This guide provides two separate, but complementary, approaches to modeling masonry in the Revit software. The guide covers everything from recommended Level of Development (LOD) for masonry, to how to model rebar in a masonry wall. In addition, using wall parts and modeling bond beams that appear during a clash detection are among the many elements that are addressed in this guide. Example Revit files of the two approaches also are available for download. While every firm approaches BIM and Revit within their own unique framework, this guide should assist in addressing best practice approaches to modeling masonry in Revit models. Readers will be able to use this information to create their own “best practice” approach.

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BIM-M REVIT Content – 2D CMU Shapes

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BIM-M video channel (bimformasonry.org/videos) Demonstrating advanced modeling techniques and teaching designers how to incorporate masonry into software, BIM–M commissioned a series of videos. Thanks to development by Integrus Architecture, the first video is now online on YouTube and the BIM-M website. Several additional videos also are in production. Integrus’ first video demonstrates hatching patterns for coursing representation for masonry that follows the Modeling Masonry Buildings in Autodesk Revit guide previously mentioned. Don’t have time to go through the whole guide? Take 10 minutes to view a video on selected topics.

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tt

THE PURPOSE OF CREATING GENERIC MASONRY REVIT CONTENT IS TO IMMEDIATELY PLACE BIM MASONRY

Future videos will include demonstrating coursing in building wall sections, approaches for showing how masonry elements are modeled between architects and engineers, bond beam modeling to show them correctly in section cuts and in use for clash detection, and modeling vertical reinforcing and grout.

Revit content library, phase III Currently in Beta testing, FINGERTIPS OF THE BIM-M has been working with CTC, an Autodesk DESIGN TEAM. developer, to create a plug-in with quality BIM Masonry content for the Autodesk Revit software. The purpose of creating generic masonry Revit content is to immediately place BIM Masonry Content at the fingertips of the design team so that they have access to masonry content and are choosing masonry easily within the software. The immediate targeted audience is architects and structural engineers, with an eye downstream to general contractors and masonry subcontractors. The goal is to give access to useful generic masonry content within the Revit software platform for use in the design and construction documents of building projects. The deliverable is a generic Revit Masonry Content Library with a Plugin for Revit. The content library can be added to existing firms’ libraries or accessed through a free plugin that provides a visual browser and drag-and-drop capabilities. The free plugin and masonry library content will be posted for download on several industry websites later in 2016.

CONTENT AT THE

3D models in SketchUp Designers and contractors have free access to details and masonry content available on SketchUp 3D Warehouse, at https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/ and then search for masonry. When contractors begin modeling in masonry they will find these beneficial since it is a library of accepted industry content, saving them the time and cost of developing this themselves. Architects can use this content to produce details as well. Wall Systems Library (WSL) Currently, IMI, with industry input, is standardizing a Wall Systems Library (WSL) informed by a taxonomy of wall assemblies and materials. Besides providing an organized classification system for masonry walls, this taxonomy will enable designers to clearly and consistently define the w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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TECHNOLOGY | BIM-M purpose and expectations of their wall system based upon its component parts. The WSL is based on the premise that every masonry wall system can be described in just seven or fewer sub-systems, or assemblies. Those wall assemblies are (from the inside out): • Structural assembly • Sheathing assembly • Air/Moisture Barrier assembly • Insulation assembly • Drainage assembly • Anchorage assembly • Cladding assembly IMI is using SketchUp to delineate what could amount to hundreds of wall systems; however, the real utility of the WSL will stem from how the walls are organized and identified. The goal of the WSL is to standardize the naming and numbering conventions of masonry wall systems and their component parts so they are consistent from BIM platform to BIM platform, from office to office, and from project to project. The Masonry unit database The BIM for Masonry Executive Committee just approved proceeding with the development of a generic masonry unit database that can be used by designers and contractors. Software developers also will have access to the database so as to incorporate masonry into their programs. Details on the database will be released starting in fall 2016. [BELOW]

BIM-M REVIT Content – Arch

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Deliverables guide for masonry contractors This first edition is available for free download online at the BIM-M website. It introduces BIM through 3D modeling with SketchUp. Case studies show

Materials • Technolog y • Trends


tt how various mason contractors improve communications, planning, and information flow by utilizing BIM concepts. These contractors, as shown in the case studies, emphasize cost savings through the benefits of BIM. Organizations can request a seminar or webinar that introduces BIM through 3D modeling with SketchUp. This guide is popular with mason contractors who are beginning to use the BIM capabilities with in-house staff to increase their efficiencies. The second edition of the guide is under development and will highlight further case studies using advanced SketchUp, Revit, and Tekla. Release is anticipated in late 2016 and will be available at the World of Masonry trade show in Las Vegas next year.

ORGANIZATIONS CAN REQUEST A SEMINAR OR WEBINAR THAT INTRODUCES BIM THROUGH 3D MODELING WITH SKETCHUP.

How to work in a BIM environment Criss-crossing the country with education for architects and contractors, both Fred Kinateder, Kinateder Consulting, a consultant to BIM-M; and Mark Swanson, AIA, IMI director of industry development, are finding receptive audiences to the BIM-M message. Kinateder is meeting with contractor groups to showcase BIM-M and how it benefits their business operations. Swanson has spoken to architectural and construction groups in nearly a dozen major metropolitan areas with his popular program, “Operating in a BIM Environment.” This program also was a successful webinar, and is currently being recorded for on-demand use. Contact BIM-M through our website to arrange one of these programs for your firm or group. wMD

w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

[BELOW]

BIM-M REVIT Content – Brick wall hatches

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SPEC MIX® INTEGRAL WATER REPELLENT M

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Available in custom colored mortar or standard gray, SPEC MIX IWR mortar delivers a highly workable m bond strength to mitigate water intrusion. When SPEC MIX IWR Mortar is specified there is no jobsite bat and room for error. Project owners, designers and contractors get product performance and quality ass

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THE ASTM E 514 WATER PENETRATION TEST EQUATES TO A WIND VELOCITY OF 62.5 MILES PER HOUR AND A RAINFALL RATE OF 5.5 INCHES PER HOUR APPLIED TO THE WALL FOR 4 HOURS. THE OUTCOME; THE SPEC MIX IWR MORTAR TEST PANELS SHOWED NO SIGNS OF WATER OR DAMPNESS.


MATERIALS | MANUFACTURED STONE

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SELECTING

MANUFACTURED STONE VENEERS FOR ANY APPLICATION By Jim Cooper, National Director for Artisan Masonry Stone Veneers All photos courtesy of Echelon Masonry.

[OPPOSITE PAGE]

Echelon Masonry’s Lamina Stone was used for a medical facility interior and exterior front façade, with design flexibility due to multi ple shapes and sizes—textured ends mean no need for corner pieces.

[LEFT]

Echelon’s Lamina Stone was used for a hotel development where city ordinances required a stone aesthetic.

FOR LIGHT COMMERCIAL BUILDING SUCH AS HOSPITALS, RETAIL BUILDINGS AND SENIOR LIVING FACILITIES, manufactured stone veneers are offering cost-savings, speed of installation and great looks. Rather than having a painted block building, communities are demanding—often through government-approved ordinances—that buildings blend in to local surroundings and have better aesthetics. That is where stone veneer comes into play and for developers and builders, where new technology in masonry can help achieve this at a better cost and with higher performance. The choices in manufactured stone veneers have expanded, which can lend both performance and customized aesthetic advantages. And, the manufacturing processes to achieve certain performance characteristics have greatly advanced. w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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MATERIALS | MANUFACTURED STONE tt

THE DRY-CAST VENEER PROCESS HAS THE ABILITY TO CREATE COLORS, TEXTURES, WIDTHS AND PROFILE SIZES SIMILAR TO NATURAL STONE.

Technology advances and performance Traditionally, both lightweight and full-depth stone veneers have been manufactured through a wet-cast process using latex molds for lightweight veneers. In wet-casting, natural stones are arranged in a pattern with latex sprayed on the stones to create a mold. When it came time to cast the veneers, the molds were hand-painted with the colorant specified to resemble a particular variety of stone. The resulting veneers were only colorized on the outermost layer. If the veneers chipped accidentally, or purposely cut during installation, the non-colored aggregate on the interior was exposed. In addition, special corner and trim pieces are needed to obtain finished, real-stone looks without sacrificing color consistency. By comparison, a new mold technology known as the dry-cast production method offers significantly longer life spans and results in a dimensionally stable product. The proprietary process is similar to paver technology, and begins by

[INSET & BELOW]

Dry-cast stone production is similar to the manufacturing process for pavers.

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[RIGHT]

Echelon Masonry’s Waterford Stone was used at the Trevecca University Hardy Alumni Center in Nashville, Tenn., to achieve a hand-chiseled texture reminiscent of natural stone using a modular fullbed depth system. scanning natural stone and turning those scans into patented mold technology. A low-moisture mixture of fine aggregates, cement, admixture and integrated colorant are densely compacted into the molds, then stripped from them and cured in a high‐humidity environment. It also contains water repellents in the mix and uses 40 percent less water than wet-cast in the process. The resulting veneers contain only 6-percent moisture, whereas wet-cast has 33 percent. So the dry-cast veneers are more resistant to de-icing salts that are sprayed on sidewalks, while wet-cast stone tends to soak that in and disintegrate. Dry-cast veneers are perfect for ashlar, stacked, and square applications that require a stacked look while resisting freeze/thaw, water absorption and fading, typically at significantly less cost than wet-cast veneers. It is well suited for retail and light commercial construction for speed of installation and versatility. In addition, the lightweight and full-depth veneers manufactured through dry-casting offer a PSI strength that is two to three times stronger than traditional veneer and have color integrated throughout the unit, which eliminates the need for special corner pieces and reduces waste caused by chipping. The dry-cast veneer process has the ability to create colors, textures, widths and profile sizes similar to natural stone, which also allows the two materials to be used together. But when might you use a lightweight or thinner profile vs. a full-depth profile? Full-depth vs. lightweight veneers Choosing full-depth vs. lightweight veneers can vary by personal taste and comfort level, and largely depends on the application. Wall height can be a factor as well. It is rare, but manufactured lightweight veneers, which use adhered masonry, may have less of a comfort level when installed on a high wall in the rare case one were to come loose. In that application, the builder or retailer may prefer to spend more on a cavity wall to accommodate a full-depth veneer, which is typically 3 5/8 inches. Stone veneers are easy to match to natural stone, which are cut to the same width as a full-depth or thin veneer. Full-depth veneers have a bed depth like a brick, so you can mix those as well. Many customers will choose lightweight veneers as an economical facade, such around a retail building or a senior living facility, which is a huge opportunity, as mixed material looks of siding, stucco, and stone foundation facades and accents are trending. w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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1625 Miami St, South Bend IN 46613 * 888-698-8705 info@masonrycosmetics.com masonrycosmetics.com Summer 2016

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MATERIALS | MANUFACTURED STONE Another advantage for dressing up a light commercial building is to blend manufactured stone and brick. A sill is still required to separate them, but the bed depth accommodates a set-in product like full-depth veneer, although the cost is higher than an adhered application.

[BELOW]

Westpeak Onyx stone veneer from Echelon Masonry.

Manufactured stone veneer color choices When measuring wet- vs. dry-cast advantages, consider that dry-cast colors can be customized onsite, especially for an architecturally distinctive structure more so than retail. A recent largescale, 40,000-square-foot museum did just that to match colors in the natural environment, and then saved significant costs by blending manufactured full-depth veneers with locally sourced stone. The colors of nature were easily blended onsite in a way that the architect desired. For national retailers, manufactured stone veneers add speed and economy to the building process, but also can dress up buildings more effectively than painted block with little effort. For example, a popular trend for retail is to do integral colors of split-face block combined with Quik Brik, a manufactured structural concrete brick that can provide the look of brick but can cost half of what a cavity wall required for brick would cost. As more aesthetics in communities come into play, look for more retail buildings to adopt the mixed material veneer look, which will likely be manufactured thin or full-depth based on cost. Smaller retailers, condos, hotels, and senior living facilities are going in this direction to blend in nicely with the community and meet local ordinances. The exploding trend of senior living facilities due to the aging baby boomer population are a prime example of making a residence building feel like home, both on the exterior and interior. These structures are typically 1 – 5 stories, with a band of stone veneer around the lower level and stucco or siding on the upper wall. Manufactured lightweight veneers can provide the beautiful textures and colors, but with much higher performance, low moisture and low cost. For light commercial application exteriors, it pays to look at the overall project—what are the aesthetic needs, moisture considerations, the de-icing chemicals used and will the project require a cavity wall or more decorative adhered aesthetic look. For long-term performance, drycast manufactured stone veneers provide easy installation, fewer headaches, significant cost savings and a fast and easy installation for any light commercial project. wMD Jim Cooper is the National Director for Artisan Masonry Stone Veneers—part of the Echelon Masonry portfolio of products from Oldcastle Architectural. Previous to his role with Oldcastle, Cooper worked for Cultured Stone as a national sales manager. Visit www.EchelonMasonry.com.

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THE MASONRY REVOLUTION STARTS HERE

Whatever your vision, you can see it through with Echelon, your single-source masonry solution. As the consolidated brand of masonry products from Oldcastle Architectural, we are advancing a new generation of building products and services. You can integrate the best of both worlds into your projects — the irreplaceable character of masonry along with reliable performance that delivers for years to come.

Discover the next generation of masonry.

EchelonMasonry.com

Š 2016 Oldcastle. Echelon is a registered trademark of Oldcastle. Oldcastle Architectural is a registered trademark of Oldcastle. All rights reserved. ECH16-001

M A SON R Y PR ODUCTS F R OM


TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL

AIRFLOW AND DRAINAGE IN YOUR EXTERIOR WALLS By Jim O’Neill All photos courtesy of Keene Building Products

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An Austin, Texas apartment uses Driwall™ Rainscreen 020-1 to help keep exterior walls from molding by creating ventilation and drainage.

w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

LOCATED IN AUSTIN, TEXAS, THIS COMPLEX OFFERS LUXURY ONE-BEDROOM AND TWO -BEDROOM APARTMENTS. Each of the 13 unique floor plans feature hardwood or stained concrete flooring, granite or quartz countertops, stainless steel appliances, spacious walk-in closets, and private balconies. Residents can enjoy the vast amount of amenities, including the highquality athletic center, the resort-style swimming pool, or the outdoor grilling area. Take a short drive and explore the Austin Music Hall, hit some golf balls at Austin Top Golf, have a shopping day at Arbor Walk, or grab a bite to eat at the various restaurants. Everything you desire in multi-family living is provided right here.

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TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL

Driwall Rainscreen 020-1 installation

The three-dimensional mat is heat-laminated to a nonwoven lightweight, breathable fabric in order to provide a separation from cementitious sidings. 38 |

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Driwall Rainscreen is allowing the walls to breath and stay dry. In order to provide extended life of the apartment complex and peace of mind for the tenants and owners of this building, it is important to make sure that it does not mold and decay, ruining the profitability of the project. Eliminating as many concerns as possible about moisture issues is important to everyone. With the increase in building thermal protection, moisture problems are on the rise throughout all new construction. Creating a greater need for hydrostatic pressure release and a ventilation method is significant. Adding a rainscreen product is the answer to these problems. Let’s learn more about rainscreens. There are multiple reasons why adding rainscreen to your wall cavity is beneficial. For thin veneer stone, stucco and other masonry veneers when it rains, large quantities of that moisture will be stored in the wall system. When it is cooler and dryer inside and it stops raining outside, water-driven moisture will be forced through the weather-resistant barrier. This process is called solar-driven moisture. The best way to reduce this is to add an air space that can act like a chimney to relieve the pressure on the weather-resistant barrier. One of the most common places for moisture issues is when you see transitions between dissimilar materials. For example, where stucco goes into a window, or when brick goes into fiber cement board siding. This is because there is too much reliance on flashing details, and flashing details often is installed incorrectly, resulting in moisture issues. If you can create an air space outside of those flashing areas, it can help overcome any errors that occur by introducing airflow and drainage. A great resource from 2008 is the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) 1 article: “Improving Drainage and Drying Features in Certain Conditions: Rain Screen Designs for Absorptive Claddings.� In this guide, the author discusses how a typical water-resistive barrier or housewrap is not the best drainage material for exterior walls, and that there is a need for rainscreen designs. You may be familiar with the study done in 2007 by the Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ)2 where the drying rates were measured in a series of wall panels over a period of three years. The biggest conclusion discovered in this study was that the rate of drying is significantly different back inside the wall then it is behind the exterior wall veneer. Another discovery is that and open rainscreen wall dries significantly faster than walls without air space. Driwall Rainscreen 020-1 is a nominal quarterinch, randomly oriented, geometric patterned drainage and ventilation mat. It is designed to w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

When Driwall Rainscreen is used, no mortar or other debris can enter the cavity, which ensures proper drainage and ventilation.

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TECHNOLOGY | MOISTURE CONTROL eliminate moisture and moisture vapor in masonry and other siding. The threedimensional mat is heat-laminated to a nonwoven lightweight, breathable fabric in order to provide a separation from cementitious sidings. The monofilaments are heat-welded at the junctions to form a structure that spaces exterior veneer away from the inner sheathing. The product is useful in cavity wall designs and rainscreen systems in which air space is needed for drainage and ventilation. By increasing energy efficiency without introducing a ventilation and drainage method, siding applications see an increase in moisture issues. It is essential to have a means of drainage and circulation of air to help prolong the life and look of the stone, stucco, and fiber cement used on this apartment complex. When Driwall Rainscreen is used, no mortar or other debris can enter the cavity, which ensures proper drainage and ventilation. The full-wall DriwalI Rainscreen 020-1 product rolls over the weather-resistant barrier to separate it from the exterior veneers. The air space that is provided will assure that any moisture that penetrates the siding can drain to the exterior. For this particular Austin apartment complex, Keene Building Products’ Driwall Rainscreen 020-1 was incorporated to alleviate any future concerns related to moisture behind the variety of exterior veneers including: stone, stucco, and fiber cement. Proper airflow and ventilation are essential for quality construction. By applying Driwall Rainscreen, this Austin, Texas apartment complex is allowing the walls to breath and stay dry, prolonging the life and durability of the whole structure. wMD Jim O’Neill is division manager for Building Envelope Products at Keene Building Products. He can be reached at jmo@keenebuidling. com.

References:

1. National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), “Improving Drainage and Drying Features in Certain Conditions: Rain Screen Designs for Absorptive Claddings.” 2008. Available from: https://www.nahb.org/en/research/legal-issues/~/media/04DFC0575FBB4EE48669520B85DC9C28.ashx 2. Bassett, M. “Examining Drying Rates In Walls,” Build #100, June/July 2007 (Building Research Association of New Zealand), at pages 66-67. Available from: http://www. buildmagazine.org.nz/assets/PDF/B100-66-DryRateWalls.pdf

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Increase Moisture Drainage, Ventilation and Isolation

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Supplies | Design & Analysis Software The technological advances in architectural and engineering software may sometimes seem voluminous and daunting, but keeping up with the changes could bring significant benefits to your firm. Below are the latest offerings and updates from some of the leading developers of design and analysis software.

Get Your Products Featured! The fall 2016 Supplies section will feature sands and sealants. Send your product descriptions and images to Cory Sekine-Pettite at cory@lionhrtpub.com.

1

1 B2W Software

www.b2wsoftware.com

B2W Software, a leading provider of heavy civil construction management software, has expanded its platform for estimating and operations with a new application for capturing data and turning it into actionable intelligence. B2W Inform was released in June. The application mines data enterprise-wide from electronic documents and delivers reporting capabilities to support analytics and data-driven decision making. Features for fast, easy creation of electronic form templates also enable companies to standardize and improve data collection, capture rich content in real time, and replace inefficient paper-based processes. B2W Inform is cloud-based and accessible through any modern web browser. User interfaces, forms, and reporting configure automatically for desktop or mobile devices.

2 GRAPHISOFT

www.archicad.com

GRAPHISOFT, a leader in Building Information Modeling (BIM) solutions for architects, has started shipping ARCHICAD 20. Information is the most valuable part of BIM and ARCHICAD 20 helps designers to bring out the most of it, the developer says. Brand new Graphical Favorites provide excellent visual feedback about saved element settings with automatically generated, colored 2D or 3D thumbnail previews—available instantly for every Tool. Additionally, ARCHICAD 20 brings project visualization to the next level by updating the CineRender Engine and enabling more accurate handling of “free-form” (Non-Uniform Rational Basis Splines) shapes. Finally, the fully refreshed user interface maximizes working area; the clean and modern tool and command icons look sharp. Tab-based navigation keeps you where the action is: right in front of you.

2

3 Vectorworks 2016

www.vectorworks.net

3

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The latest release from Vectorworks includes more than 100 updates and features for its award-winning CAD and BIM design solutions, including Vectorworks Designer, Architect, Landmark, Spotlight, Fundamentals, and Renderworks. From streamlined project sharing, graphical scripting and point cloud support, to subdivision modeling and a system that measures a design’s energy performance, users will be poised to generate, define, build and explore form and function through enhanced workflows and improved design processes. To fully support Vectorworks’ customer-centric philosophy, over 70 percent of the 2016 version’s updates and features were born from customer feedback, with the entire research and development efforts for the new release led by the company’s Chief Technology Officer Biplab Sarkar.

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4 Structural Masonry Design Software Version 7.1

4

http://ncma-br.org/sw-nbs.asp Generate fully compliant structural designs of masonry elements in minutes using the latest software available from NCMA. Key features and new additions include: • Select code basis options ranging from the 2006 to the 2012 International Building Code; including appropriate references to the masonry design provisions of TMS 402 and corresponding loading criteria from ASCE 7. • Choose from either allowable stress design or strength design methodologies; each with options for reinforced (fully or partially grouted) or unreinforced masonry assemblies. • Design walls for in-plane (shear walls) and out-of-plane loads, columns, pilasters, and lintels including codeprescribed detailing requirements for seismic loading, lap splicing, shear reinforcement, stirrups, and more. • Multiple output options including code-referenced design calculations and axial load/moment capacity interaction diagrams. • Serviceability checks including deflections and second order P-delta effects. • Analyzes and checks for all code-prescribed load combinations based on user input or provides the option for the user to directly input design loads.

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Amerimix

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Masonry Cosmetics, Inc.

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SPEC MIX, Inc.

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Castia Stone

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Mortar Net Solutions

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800.664.6638 www.mortarnet.com

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Hohmann and Barnard, Inc.

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844.495.8211 www.EchelonMasonry.com

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Laticrete International, Inc.

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Tradesmen’s Software

Oldcastle / Echelon

800.645.0616 www.h-b.com

800.243.4788 www.laticrete.com/mvis

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Masonry Design - Summer 2016