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January/February 2017 • Vol. 8, No. 1

Materials • Technology • Trends

720 UNIVERSITY PLACE Age-Old Tuck-Pointing Technique Restores New Glory p30 Cintec Aids in Restoration of 12th Century Castle p22

Bonded By Brick p16


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volume 8 | number 1

JanuaryFebruary 2017 |contents

f e at u r e s 16 Materials

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Bonded By Brick

Technological progress and Midwestern strength. Curving bands and clean lines. A vibrant atrium with views to an open prairie. Metal and brick. The University Center of Lake County is a triumph of contrasts, and its formula has been effective. By Douglas J. Ogurek, LEED AP

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Technology / Connectors, Anchors, & Fasteners

Cintec Technology Aids in Restoration of Award-Winning 12th Century Castle

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Cintec teamed up with architects and engineers from Mann Williams and Newport-based Protectahome to restore the castle. The restoration included structural repairs and stabilizing the remaining walls of the building prior to rebuilding. Cintec’s anchors were used to “stitch together” and strengthen the walls.

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Design Trends / Restoration

Age-Old Tuck-Pointing Technique Restores New Glory

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With building restoration projects, you have few or no options other than to use existing materials to replicate an old building back to its former glory. But that is not always easy to do. Some buildings have major problems, from correcting structural issues to matching the aesthetic appeal of its original design. Edited by Cory Sekine-Pettite Materials • Technolog y • Trends


www.masonr ydesignmagazine.com LIONHEART PUBLISHING, INC. 506 Roswell Street, Suite 220, Marietta, GA 30060 Tel: 770.431.0867 Fax: 770.432.6969 E-mail: lpi@lionhrtpub.com www.masonrydesignmagazine.com Publisher John Llewellyn llewellyn@lionhrtpub.com Editor Cory Sekine-Pettite cory@lionhrtpub.com Art Director Alan Brubaker albrubaker@lionhrtpub.com Online Projects Manager Patton McGinley patton@lionhrtpub.com

On the cover: Renovating an old building requires careful planning. In the case of 720 University Place at Northwestern University outside Chicago, BTL Architects and Berglund Construction worked diligently to restore the building its original splendor by using reclaimed brick and age-old tuck-pointing techniques.

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Assistant Online Projects Leslie Proctor Manager leslie@lionhrtpub.com Advertising Sales Marvin Diamond marvin@lionhrtpub.com Advertising Sales Aileen Kronke aileen@lionhrtpub.com Reprints & Subscriptions Kelly Millwood kelly@lionhrtpub.com

Photo courtesy of Berglund Construction.

The editorial mission of Masonry Design is to educate and inform architects, engineers and specifiers about the vital role that masonry plays in the construction markets in the United States and Canada, as well as to promote masonry and masonry systems in building design (commercial, residential, institutional and educational), interior design and hardscaping applications. With each issue, readers will become better informed of the design trends, latest materials and newest technologies that will aid them in creating better masonry projects.

Masonry Design (ISSN 1941-0975) is published quarterly by Lionheart Publishing, Inc.

Subscription Rates – For a free subscription to Masonry Design and Masonry Design eNews, sign up at: www.masonrydesignmagazine.com Click on Subscribe

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8

co l u mns & d epa r t me n t s 4 From the Editor

38 Supplies

6 Industry Outlook [New Column!]

39 Index to Advertisers

8 Industry News

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40 Estimation

Copyright © 2017 by Lionheart Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. The copyright owner, however, does consent to a single copy of an article being made for personal use. Otherwise, except under circumstances within “fair use” as defined by copyright law, no part of this publication may be reproduced, displayed or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or by any information storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the copyright owner, Lionheart Publishing, Inc. Send e-mail permission requests to cory@lionhrtpub.com.

Disclaimer – The statements and opinions in the articles of this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Lionheart Publishing, Inc. or the editorial staff of Masonry Design or any sponsoring organization. The appearance of advertisements in this magazine is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised.

January/February 2017

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from the editor

Ten Years And Counting

Cory Sekine-Pettite, editor To make comments or suggestions, send e-mail to cory@lionhrtpub.com.

Ten years ago when I joined Lionheart Publishing (to spearhead a couple of other publications), I began almost immediately working with my publisher and colleagues on the creation of Masonry Design. As a group, we already had extensive experience in B2B publishing for the design and construction industries, and we saw a void in the marketplace. We worked for about one year on polishing the concept for the focus of this magazine, gauging industry interest and seeking out editorial contributors and advisors, and developing a circulation list. I’ll never forget toiling over the editing and production of the debut issue because I was visiting my in-laws in Tokyo at the time. Talk about putting in odd work hours! But in the end, it all worked out and the first issue of this magazine was published in winter 2008 as the Jan/Feb issue. Perhaps some of you still have your copy! If you do, please let me know; I would love to speak with you about the industry and your thoughts on our publication. And I’d also like to thank you personally for making us part of your library. I’m just as proud of that debut issue as I am of this issue—our return to print after several years as a digital-only magazine. In fact, to commemorate this occasion, we are reprinting our cover feature from our debut. That article, “Bonded By Brick,” appears here beginning on page 16, and profiles a Legat Architects project for the University Center of Lake County in Illinois. I think you’ll find

Follow our Blog: http://masonrydesignmagazine.com/category/blog/

JanuaryFebruary 2008 • Vol. 1, No. 1

M a t e r i a l s • Te c h n o l o g y • Tr e n d s

Bonded by Brick The University Center of Lake County, Grayslake, Ill.

Green Building Restoration and Rehab Mason Contractor Certification Spotlight: Designing Relationships - Legat Architects

the project both interesting and edifying; it’s a beautiful structure. I would like to once again thank Douglas J. Ogurek, LEED AP for sharing that article in 2008 and for his continued support of Masonry Design over the years. Ten years has flown by, and Masonry Design has seen its ups and downs just as the industry we cover has seen both bright and gloomy days. Of course, we persevere. We survive. Looking to the future, I see nothing but blue skies. wMD

highlights coming in

March/April ‘17

• Specifying & Designing Masonry Flashing

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• Advances in Brick, Block, & Stone

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• Healthcare Facility Design

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@cspettite and @Masonry_Design 4 |

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Materials • Technolog y • Trends


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Industry Outlook

Between A Rock And A Dollar Sign

By Duo Dickinson, AIA About the author: Duo Dickinson, AIA, graduated from Cornell in 1977, and opened his own architectural practice in 1987. His work has received more than 30 awards, including Architectural Record, Record House, Metropolitan Home Met Home Awards, and Connecticut and New York AIA design awards. He is the first non-member award-winner of the Society of America Registered Architects’ 2009 Special Service Award and the 2015 Sacred Landscape Award from the Interfaith Forum on Religion, Art and Architecture. The co-founder of The Congress of Residential Architecture (CORA), Dickinson has taught at Yale College and Roger Williams University.

There are many reasons to use masonry in building. The single most commonly used reason not to use masonry is cost. Wood, steel, plastic, and glass are all cheaper cladding. Even CMU’s and brick are pricier than most other options. But cost is always relative in construction. What seems cheap when installed can be pretty expensive if it needs replacement in the short term—and chronic maintenance of any building component is painful beyond the dollars-and-cents cost. If installed well, masonry lasts far longer with less maintenance than almost any other exterior building product. Beyond durability, using stone to create surfaces and shapes has unique properties almost no other option can offer, including the following: 1. Masonry forms curves with ease and efficiency when compared to wood or steel—fieldstone masonry forms its own armature for support; its surface is its substrate. Being built of independent pieces, stone can easily transition into curves. This applies to openings as well as surfaces. 2. Masonry has zero solar degradation. Wood gets brittle and erodes with sun. All paint fades over time. 3. If kept pointed, masonry resists water intrusion better than any other surface, simply because its surface is its core. 4. Masonry’s appearance is either inert or enhanced over time—even dirt, moss, and lichens can enhance a fieldstone surface. 5. But if you disdain weathered aesthetics, you can scrub masonry to

If installed well, masonry lasts far longer with less maintenance than almost any other exterior building product. 6 |

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A design by Duo Dickinson that shows how stone uniquely forms curves—and needs none of the yearly maintenance these wood steps require.

a completely pristine state because of its tough, dense, and integral composition. Beyond the tangibles of money spent initially and over time, almost no other building material evidences the humanity embodied in craft like stone. Wood can be magic in its intricate weaving realities, steel dynamic and precise, but fieldstone can mesh the essence of natural expression and the human hand better than any other building technology. While cut stone eschews the organic aesthetics of fieldstone, the subtle grain of even the blankest of granite has an iridescence no synthetic material can duplicate at any price—and its durability over time is unmatched. Anecdotally, when an extensive restoration of Yale’s Beinecke Library designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore Owings & Merrill confronted the 50-year-old marble cladding, the fear was there could be real issues, given its completely exposed situation. However, the restoration just involved cleaning and coating, with a few cracks filled; there was zero degradation. Everything in building—and perhaps life—can be seen as a cost-benefit equation. Masonry has the unique visual characteristics of a natural product, but embodies the extreme durability synthetic materials aspire to. When costs are applied to its undeniable benefits, stone can have a value that actually pays for itself over the long haul. wMD Materials • Technolog y • Trends


Industry News

Gluckman Tang’s Design for Museo Del Prado Expansion Revealed Gluckman Tang Architects was the only American firm out of eight finalists in an international competition that featured the world’s foremost architecture firms. After an international design competition, Gluckman Tang Architects has released its design for the Museo del Prado’s new expansion into the Hall of Realms in Madrid, Spain. New York-based Gluckman Tang was the only American firm on the final shortlist of eight teams asked to reimagine this former wing of a 17th-century palace, which was acquired by the Prado in 2015. All proposals currently are on display at the Prado. “While the role of the museum today is still to preserve, present, and educate, it also acts as an armature or facilitator for new ways to interpret, discover, and compare art from diverse origins and typologies,” explains Richard Gluckman, FAIA. “In the Hall of Realms, or Salón de Reinos, we had the opportunity to frame a great program in an historic building with multiple narratives that our design made use of, edited, and complemented. Gluckman Tang was pleased to associate with the offices Estudio Álvarez-Sala, S.L.P., and Arquitectura Enguita y Lasso de la Vega, S.L.P., for the competition.” The winning team was Foster + Partners and Rubio Arquitectura. Gluckman Tang Architects is one of the most sought-after museum architecture firms in the world. Among the historic structures that have benefited from the firm’s sensitive renovations are the Museo Picasso Málaga and

the Andy Warhol Museum. In New York, the firm’s thoughtful approach is evident in the Staten Island Museum and the Andrew Carnegie Mansion for the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The Prado competition, which began with an open call for entries, sought architects with experience transforming older buildings into museums to redesign the Hall of Realms. With the addition of the Hall of Realms, the Prado gains more than 8,000 square feet of exhibition space and 9,500 square feet of supporting space. “Our transformation is an intervention that introduces clear access, circulation, and orientation, with a new exhibition venue at the top of the building, expanding the curatorial imperative of the Prado. It is a transformation that celebrates the past, animates the present, and anticipates the future, transforming the 19th-century museum model into a 21st-century version worthy of one of the world’s great art institutions,” says Gluckman. Historically used by Spanish royalty, the Hall of Realms most recently housed the Museo del Ejército, or Army Museum, before becoming a part of the Prado in October 2015. Gluckman Tang’s competition design for the Salón de Reinos allows the Prado to re-contextualize its collections within a building of historic and cultural importance. The new context is not only a frame for this grand obligation, but also a lens into the relationship between the art and the cultures that nurture it. Historic Building Gluckman Tang’s design for the project replaces early 20thcentury infill with a contemporary intervention that repurposes and realigns the forced symmetry of the 19th-century military museum, supporting a historic narrative that eases the transition from the 17th century to the 21st-century intervention. A new atrium creates a celebratory space that defines the orientation and circulation

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strategies of the new museum: the basic diagram locates art venues at the top two floors and ancillary functions on the three lower floors. The primary route is clear and simple: the visitor ascends to the Primera Planta, the historic Hall of Realms from the original palace; from there, the visitor ascends to new exhibition galleries at the top floor. The addition maximizes natural light and mutable space, enhancing the curatorial imperative of the Prado. About Gluckman Tang Architects Gluckman Tang Architects is a multi-faceted firm based in New York City and offering services in architecture, planning, and interior design. Over

the course of 40 years, the firm has grown from a studio focused on art installations and galleries to an internationally recognized practice with an emphasis on cultural and educational institutions. Among the firm’s major museum projects are the Perelman Building at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, and the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, Downtown. Other recent and current projects include the Syracuse University College of Law, a major renovation of the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University’s Korman Center, and four major museums in China. wMD

Google Cardboard Support Introduced in Latest Release of GRAPHISOFT BIMx GRAPHISOFT, the leading Building Information Modeling (BIM) software developer for architects, has announced virtual reality (VR) functions to its multi award-winning BIM presentation and communication app, BIMx. BIMx users worldwide have requested the addition of virtual reality capability to BIMx. This enhanced functionality provides architectural and interior design firms an immersive way to share their projects, the developer says. New VR functionality added to BIMx with Google CardboardTM viewer (version 2.0) for Android and iOS smart phones allows users to navigate in the 3D space simply by turning their heads in the desired direction. “Affordable equipment such as Google’s Cardboard viewer help spread Virtual Reality beyond gaming,” said Gyuri Nyitrai, BIMx product manager at GRAPHISOFT. “Architects’ models truly come alive during BIMx presentations using VR functionality, significantly raising BIMx’s already evident wow factor.” For a full demonstration of the new VR capability added to BIMx, please watch the ‘Using Google Cardboard with BIMx on iPhone and Android’ video. With this update, BIMx users on iPads and Android tablets can use the Multitasking and Split View features, using two apps side-by-side. URLbased data exchange between BIMx and other apps offers a smooth user experience. w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

The update also enables selection of more than one element from an inbound hyperlink, facilitating easy data access on construction sites and with Facilities Management. BIMx offers a feature for locating building components in the Virtual Building easily, which greatly helps with checking and marking up these elements on site. To access BIM elements in the 3D model quickly, insert these hyperlinks into any website, a Facilities Management database or into a product catalog application. wMD

BIMx users worldwide have requested the addition of virtual reality capability to BIMx. January/February 2017

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Industry News

ASLA Launches First Landscape Architecture VR Video
 Video Brings to Life Toronto’s Underpass Park The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) has released its first virtual reality (VR) viewing experience to the public, featuring exclusive footage of Toronto’s Underpass Park, which won the ASLA 2016 Professional Award of Excellence. The ASLA VR video takes viewers on an exciting journey through this unique park found under a highway underpass, guided by landscape architect Greg Smallenberg, FASLA, principal at PFS Studio. Free viewing options Option 1: Watch a 360 video via the YouTube mobile app at https://youtu.be/ IUr2g5rabaU (please note that this video will not work on your mobile browser). Be sure to turn around while watching so you can see all angles of the park!

With video,you can pack in even more information about a work of landscape architecture.

Alternatively, from your desktop computer, go to https://youtu.be/IUr2g5rabaU using your Chrome browser. Use the sphere icon to navigate through the park! Option 2: Watch a 3-D 360 video on Samsung Gear VR. If you own a Samsung Gear VR headset and compatible Samsung phone, go to Samsung Gear via the Oculus App and search for “Underpass Park” or “ASLA” to find our video. Why Underpass Park? 
 ASLA selected Underpass Park for the video because it won the ASLA 2016 Professional Award of Excellence. Less than one percent of all award submissions receive this honor. The award highlights Underpass Park because it’s a prominent example of reusing abandoned, derelict space. This award says that even underpasses can become great parks, ASLA reports. It’s the organization’s hope that other cities will follow suit and take a new look at their underpasses, too. Why virtual reality? 
 With video, you can pack in even more information about a work of landscape architecture, much more than you can in simply a photo or text. With video, you can get a sense of the sight, sound, and Underpass Park won the ASLA 2016 Professional Award of Excellence. It’s the organization’s hope that other cities will follow suit and take a new look at their underpasses, too.

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“feel” of a place. You can see people interacting with the design, bringing it to life. Virtual reality takes video to the next level: as you move your phone or VR headset, you control your experience in the landscape. It more closely mimics the experience of exploring a place in person. In part, it recreates that sense of discovery one gets in real life. Why did ASLA make this VR film? 
 The organization says it always is looking for more effective ways to promote the value of landscape architecture to society. Virtual reality has proven to be a powerful tool for explaining how the places people love—like Underpass Park—are designed experiences. Virtual reality allows us to educate the public about landscape design in a more compelling way, ASLA says. The ASLA has multiple goals with the video: It hopes to use the video to promote the potential of virtual reality among the landscape architecture community, which totals approximately 25,000 design professionals in the United States and Canada. It also hopes to use the video to explain the incredible value of landscape architecture to the public, and the ability of landscape architects to turn an unloved place like an underpass into a beloved community park. The ASLA also wants community groups or local advocates to make use of the video for their own goals. For example, when the organization was filming the video, they met a family visiting from Buffalo, N.Y. The mother of the child who was skateboarding there said it was a “no brainer to put a skatepark under an underpass.” She immediately got that the space was accessible when it’s raining or snowing because it’s covered. Ideally, this video will become a tool for her to promote the idea of an Underpass Park in Buffalo, ASLA says. Why should landscape architects use VR? 
 Virtual reality is a powerful tool for landscape architects, architects, planners and developers— really anyone involved in designing our built and natural environments. In the example of Underpass Park: many will never have the opportunity to visit the park in person, but with our video, they can get a good sense of what it is like to be there. For landscape architecture firms, this is an excellent way to really show clients that a place they’ve designed works—that people enjoy hanging out there, that kids love playing there, that people are drawn to events there, ASLA says. wMD w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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Industry News

New Construction Starts in 2017 to Increase 5% to $713 Billion Dodge Outlook Report Predicts Moderate Growth for Most Project Types According to the Dodge Data & Analytics (http://www.construction.com) “2017 Dodge Construction Outlook,” total U.S. construction starts for 2017 will advance 5 percent to $713 billion, following gains of 11 percent in 2015 and an estimated 1 percent in 2016. “The U.S. construction industry has witnessed signs of deceleration in 2016, following several years of steady growth,” stated Robert Murray, chief economist for Dodge Data & Analytics. “Total construction starts during the first half of this year lagged behind what was reported in 2015, raising some concern that the current construction expansion may have run its course. However, the early 2016 shortfall reflected the comparison to unusually elevated activity during the first half of 2015, lifted by 13 very large projects valued each at $1 billion or more, such as a $9-billion liquefied natural gas export terminal in Texas and a $2.5-billion office tower in New York City. “As 2016 has proceeded, the year-to-date shortfall has grown smaller, easing concern that the construction industry may be in the early stage of cyclical decline,” he continued. “Instead, the construction industry has now entered a more mature phase of its expansion, one that is characterized by slower rates of growth than what took place during the 20122015 period, but still growth. Since the construction start statistics will lead the pattern of construction spending, this means that construction spending can

The full report is available at www.construction.com.

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be expected to see moderate gains through 2017 and beyond.” On balance, there are a number of positive factors, which suggest the construction expansion has room to proceed, Murray said. The U.S. economy in 2017 is anticipated to see moderate job growth, market fundamentals for commercial real estate should remain generally healthy, and more funding support is coming from state and local bond measures. “Although the global economy in 2017 will remain sluggish, energy prices appear to have stabilized, interest rate hikes will be gradual and few, and a new U.S. president will have been elected,” Murray said. “For 2017, total construction starts are forecast to rise 5 percent to $713 billion. Gains of 8 percent are expected for both residential building and nonresidential building, while non-building construction slides a further 3 percent.” The pattern of construction starts by more specific sectors is the following: • Single-family housing will rise 12 percent in dollars, corresponding to a 9-percent increase in units to 795,000 (Dodge basis). Access to home mortgage loans is improving, and some of the caution exercised by potential homebuyers will ease with continued employment growth and low mortgage rates. Older members of the Millennial generation are now moving into the 30- to 35 year-old age bracket, which should begin to lift demand for single-family housing. • Multifamily housing will be flat in dollars and down 2 percent in units to 435,000 (Dodge basis). This project type now appears to have peaked in 2015, lifted in particular by an exceptional amount of activity in the New York metropolitan area, which is now settling back. Continued growth for multifamily housing in other metropolitan areas, along with still generally healthy market fundamentals, will enable the retreat at the national level to stay gradual. Materials • Technolog y • Trends


• Commercial building will increase 6 percent on top of the 12-percent gain estimated for 2016. Office construction is showing improvement from very low levels, lifted by the start of several signature office towers and broad development efforts in downtown markets. Store construction should show some improvement from a very subdued 2016, and warehouses will register further growth. Hotel construction, while still healthy, will begin to retreat after a strong 2016. • Institutional building will advance 10 percent, resuming its expansion after pausing in 2015 and 2016. The educational facilities category is seeing an increasing amount of K-12 school construction, supported by the passage of recent school construction bond measures.

More growth is expected for the amusement category (convention centers, sports arenas, casinos) and transportation terminals. • Manufacturing plant construction will increase 6 percent, beginning to recover after steep declines in 2015 and 2016 that reflected the pullback for large petrochemical plant starts. • Public works construction will improve 6 percent, regaining upward momentum after slipping 3 percent in 2016. Highways and bridges will derive support from the new federal transportation bill, while environmental works should benefit from the expected passage of the Water Resources Development Act. Natural gas and oil pipeline projects are expected to stay close to the volume that’s been present in 2016. wMD

Laticrete Unveils Product-Specific EPDs and Updated HPDs Laticrete has released three, new product-specific Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and updated Health Product Declarations (HPDs). An EPD is a comprehensive, globally harmonized, and independently verified report created by a product manufacturer, which documents the impacts on the environment throughout its lifecycle. Information on the impacts to the environment include raw material acquisition, energy use, energy efficiency, content of materials, chemical substances, emissions to air, soil and water, as well as waste generation from “cradle-to-grave.” An EPD is created and verified in accordance with ISO 14025, and is based on a lifecycle assessment according to ISO 14040 and ISO 14044. The intent of an EPD is to simply provide transparent information on the lifecycle impact of the product. An HPD is an open standard, which provides complete, transparent disclosure of the potential chemicals of concern by analyzing and comparing all product raw materials to authoritative chemical hazard lists from around the world. Health Product Declarations are governed by the Health Product Declaration Collaborative and are primarily used in North America. HPDs can be used to fulfill Option 1 (Material Ingredients Reporting) of the LEED v4 w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

Building Product Disclosure and Optimization – Material Ingredients credit. Laticrete will be offering three product-specific EPDs. These EPDs will be for cement grout, cement mortar, and cement self-leveling underlayments. These EPDs will be valued at one full product each in fulfilling Option 1. Laticrete will be the only company with a full product-specific EPD for cement selfleveling underlayments. The manufacturer will be able to provide industry-wide EPDs for cement grouts and cement mortars in conjunction with the Tile Council of North America (TCNA) and several other manufacturers of these products types. “Laticrete is committed to manufacturing products which meet or exceed the requirements of green construction standards to promote a healthy environment for everyone,” said Mitch Hawkins, technical services manager. “It is the goal of Laticrete to provide maximum disclosure so as to allow the design team and building owners a better opportunity to make more informed decisions when it comes to choosing what products will go into their projects.” Laticrete says it is committed to making information for green construction readily available by using the Laticrete LEED Project Certification Assistant at laticrete.com. wMD January/February 2017

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Industry News

Pavestone Creates Custom Paver for Centro Plaza Transit Hub 80,000 Square-Feet of CityLock Pavers Help Connect Natural Landscape with Modern Design Recently opened Centro Plaza, a $16 million, multi-modal transit center for the VIA Metropolitan System of San Antonio, features an architectural design that celebrates the beauty of the natural landscape with a modern, illuminated twist. In addition to incorporating lights, stainless steel, aluminum and glass into the new downtown transportation hub, CityLock and Eco-City Lock pavers from Pavestone® were installed to help bring the project vision of landscape architect Bender Wells Clark Design to life. The pavers, which also contributed to the sustainability requirements on the project, were custom manufactured specifically for Centro Plaza. Larry Clark, VP of Bender Wells Clark Design directed the design of the hardscape and complex water conservation system, the structural soils providing a healthy root zone, and the tree bosque. “We needed a goodlooking paving material that would serve for both the permeable and impermeable areas of this downtown plaza. It was a challenge to find a unified paver that would cover the entire plaza, allowing rainwater to pass through in some

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areas and not in others. Pavestone worked with us to develop a paver system that served both conditions. One paver lets water seep into the structural soils and sand layers below, while the other is a more conventional concrete paver, but they look alike. It is hard for most people to tell the difference between them, which is exactly what we wanted.” Natural and artificial light is projected across the 150,000-square-foot plaza to generate modern color variations against the buildings, canopies and other metallic surfaces throughout the day. Extending this complex lighting array to the surrounding environment required the installation of pavers that resembled the remains of the Alazan Acequia, a seven- to 14-foot deep irrigation system built in the late 19th century that ran through the plaza. Pavestone customized 4” by 16” plank CityLock pavers in a brown and beige color pallet to match the ripple stone associated with the Alazan Acequia. A permeable version of the paver, Eco-CityLock also was created to support the Centro Plaza underground stormwater recycling initiative.

Materials • Technolog y • Trends


“Centro Plaza is environmentally conscious. The plaza includes a sustainable underground stormwater storage tank. The water stored in this tank is used to irrigate the landscape and trees within the plaza and keeps on recycling and filtering itself,” said Mauricio Ramos, EIT, project manager. The gravity-feed underground storage and distribution system captures excessive stormwater that matriculates through the permeable pavers and structural soils in pipes that drain into a chamber, which can hold more than 20,000 gallons of water. A low-pressure, low-cost, lowmaintenance and low-flow pump redistributes the stored water to irrigate the surrounding trees. The process is projected to save 50 to 80 percent more water than conventional irrigation. Gratr Landscapes, founded to bring the best service in landscaping to the Greater San Antonio area, overcame difficult weather conditions to install about 80,000 square-feet of Pavestone CityLock pavers at Centro Plaza on schedule. Ramos noted that a major challenge to construction was the heavy spring rains, which

“The plaza and tower illumination is definitely one of a kind with almost every element of the project being illuminated.” –Mauricio Ramos occurred while the team was working on the underground and paving phases of the project. Centro Plaza is the first of three phases in a master plan to provide public transportation from downtown San Antonio to downtown Austin via commuter rail. It includes illuminated terminal, historic building renovation, a tower, an open landscape area, two semi-circle canopies, and a Primo canopy. “The plaza and tower illumination is definitely one of a kind with almost every element of the project being illuminated. The sophisticated wireless lighting system allows the plaza to change colors based on an astronomical clock and to communicate with the surrounding illuminated buildings, such as the Children’s Hospital,” according to Ramos. wMD

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

Materials

This article first appeared in Masonry Design in Jan/Feb 2008 as our debut cover feature. As we return to print with this issue, we wanted to commemorate the occasion by reprinting this article, which is both a symbol for where we’ve been and a sign of things to come. Enjoy!

BONDED BY

BRICK

Pioneering facility combines 18 colleges and universities under one roof By Douglas J. Ogurek, LEED AP (all images) University Center of Lake County Photo copyright Timothy Hursley Floor plans courtesy Legat Architects

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FIVE YEARS AGO, THE UNIVERSITY CENTER OF LAKE COUNTY, a partnership between 18 Illinois colleges and universities, operated classrooms in shared buildings. However, it had no core facility—no “face” to show the community. The first facility of its kind in Illinois, the $19.8-million University Center of Lake County provides that face. The 91,000-square-foot, stand-alone academic center enables the organization to offer degree and workforce development programs from all its partner institutions under one roof. Five, separate “houses” surround an outdoor courtyard: three academic houses, a central house with core functions, and a multipurpose conference wing. Masonry façades on the north, east, and west sides present a formal face to the community. “Large and small recesses within and between the masonry houses break up the massing and suggest a Materials • Technolog y • Trends


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Materials

tt

“MASONRY’S INHERENT DURABILITY HELPS IT STAND UP TO NORTHERN ILLINOIS’ EXTREME WEATHER CONDITIONS BY PROVIDING THE THERMAL MASS TO BALANCE THE TEMPERATURE DROPS IN THE WINTER AND RETARD HEAT GAIN IN THE SUMMER.” – Wayne Machnich, Legat’s principal in charge of the project

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multi-building campus,” says project manager Scot Parker of Legat Architects, the architectural firm of record on the project. The south façade, which curls around the courtyard, is clad in metal and glass. The three-story facility contains 30 formal teaching spaces, including two fully equipped computer labs, two distance learning labs, a science lab, a tiered lecture hall, and a theater-style lecture hall with rear projection technology. Additional spaces include: nursing lab, elementary education classroom, open computer lab, library with computer space, and conference rooms usable as small seminar spaces. A 1.5-story conference space includes a multi-purpose room that divides into three smaller spaces for academic and professional uses. Materials • Technolog y • Trends


Distinct, Yet Compatible The center ’s location on the College of Lake County (CLC) campus posed a difficult challenge. “ We work closely with CLC,” says Hilary Ward Schnadt, associate dean for academic services and programs. “But we also work very hard to establish our independent identity as a higher education consortium that makes different academic demands on students and provides advanced college degrees. So we wanted the new facility to respect our connection to CLC, as well as our individuality.” Masonry helps respond to the challenge. “The brick is compatible with the color of neighboring campus buildings,” said Steven Brubaker, project designer. “However, its positioning in different patterns helps distinguish w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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Materials

Turning Brick Into Gold

Chicago’s reputation as a leader in innovative architecture reaches far beyond the Loop’s skyscrapers of grass and steel. Case in point: the University Center of Lake County.

The project was one of two out of 100 submissions to receive a Gold Award at the Illinois/Indiana Masonry Council’s 2007 Excellence in Masonry competition. “While the nature of this building is the bringing together of many college programs,” said one juror, “the nature of the design is the bringing together of many individual brick masses into one finely integrated whole. The experience inside and out of this building must be an inspiration to the students and faculty passing through it.” The project also received the Illinois Capital Development Board’s 2006 Thomas H. Madigan Award for Outstanding New Construction. The award is part of CDB’s “Pride in Partnership” competition, which emphasizes the contributions and benefits that partnering brings to projects. The selection committee consisted of CDB, architectural/construction industry, and higher education representatives. wMD

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the University Center as a separate entity.” Manufactured in Sergeant Bluff, Iowa, the brick is part of Sioux City Brick & Tile Company ’s Natural Ironspot Series. Designers devoted a great deal of attention to exterior masonry details. For instance, bands of protruding, lighter “Grand Canyon Smooth” accent brick run through the darker “Coppertone Velour” field brick. Also, alternating bands of recessed, level, and protruding brick wrap around each corner. At the main/north entry, a two-story glass wall and a four-story stair tower with a clerestory window further distinguish the University Center. Small glass panels punched into the masonry expose light from the interior at night. In the south courtyard, the brick frames the serpentine metal wall. “It demonstrates brick’s versatility in being collaged with other materials,” says Brubaker. Wayne Machnich, Legat’s principal in charge of the project, explains additional benefits of the brick: “Masonry’s inherent durability helps it stand up to northern Illinois’ extreme weather conditions by providing the thermal mass to balance the temperature drops in the winter and retard heat gain in the summer. Plus, its 100-plus year lifespan results in long-term savings.” A Traditional Material Suits a Contemporary Environment Another key challenge involved responding to the University Center’s primary audience. “Because our programs serve working adults enrolled in evening/weekend classes, there is much more active learning with small group Materials • Technolog y • Trends


work than in a traditional college environment,” Schnadt said. Living room style alcoves between classroom units echo brick patterns used on the exterior piers. The brick helps create comfortable nooks that encourage the spontaneous meetings and informal collaboration preferred by the University Center audience. “The design allows learning to extend beyond the traditional classroom,” says Schnadt.

Sioux City Brick & Tile

Partnering and Pioneering “Planning, designing and building one facility for a college or university is challenging,” says Illinois Capital Development Board (CDB) senior project manager Bruce A. Locke, “but going through that process for one facility that has 18 colleges and universities represented – that was a very special and unique challenge.” Such was the challenge that the design and construction team overcame. The project required a tremendous amount of teamwork between the CDB, the University Center, the College of Lake County, Legat Architects, Steve Brubaker (design consultant), HOK (design consultant), and the contractors (led by general contractor Henry Bros. Co.). The University Center provided strong leadership through an Architectural Review Committee, which balanced input from all parties. Sioux City Brick & Tile Co., is a long-time manufacturer of high-quality clay brick As the CDB project manager, Locke was and a distributor of related masonry products. The company is located in diligent in keeping the project moving forward. Sioux City, Iowa, with manufacturing plants in Sergeant Bluff, Iowa and Adel, “We knew from the beginning that the use Iowa. Sioux City Brick is known for it’s diverse product lines and colors— of brick would be a critical factor in meeting from FBX architectural brick to distorted texture residential products. The our demands regarding budget, quality and schedule,” he said. company has an annual production capacity of more than 140 million Because of the successful partnering of all brick. To learn more, visit www.siouxcitybrick.com. wMD these entities, the University Center became the only project to win the Thomas H. Madigan Award for Outstanding New Construction in CDB’s 2006 “Pride in Partnership” competition. “The University Center is a symbol of the highest level of collaboration between higher education providers and the community,” says Bryan Watkins, UC board chairman and executive director for the Institute for Adult Learning at Dominican University. A Triumph of Contrasts Technological progress and Midwestern strength. Curving bands and clean lines. A vibrant atrium with views to an open prairie. Metal and brick. The University Center of Lake County is a triumph of contrasts, and its formula has been effective. “The center admirably fulfills our mission of providing higher education to placebound students,” says Schnadt. “It creates a county hub for academic and professional enhancement, while enhancing our visibility.” wMD Douglas J. Ogurek, LEED AP, is a member of the higher education team at Legat Architects. He may be reached at 847.406.1141 or dogurek@legat.com. w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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TECHNOLOGY | Connectors, Anchors, & Fasteners

CINTEC TECHNOLOGY AIDS IN RESTORATION OF

AWARD-WINNING 12TH CENTURY CASTLE Restored Astley Castle recipient of prestigious Riba Stirling Prize for Architecture

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TECHNOLOGY | Connectors, Anchors, & Fasteners CINTEC INTERNATIONAL, A LEADER IN THE FIELD OF STRUCTURAL MASONRY RETROFIT STRENGTHENING, REPAIR, AND PRESERVATION, reports that its patented anchors

Castle

were used in the restoration of Astley Castle in Warwickshire, England. Following its renovations, Astley Castle was awarded the prestigious Riba Stirling Prize for Architecture. Cintec teamed up with architects and engineers from interior Mann Williams and Newportbased Protectahome to restore the castle. Cintec assisted Protectahome with the first phase of restoration, which included structural repairs and stabilizing the remaining walls of the building prior to rebuilding. Cintec’s anchors were used to “stitch together ” and strengthen the walls. The process of restoring Astley Castle involved using a diamond drill to insert steel anchors into the building. Once in place, grout was pumped into a special sleeve surrounding the anchor, and air pumped out. Cores removed during this process were retained and reused where the anchors were installed, leaving an almost invisible repair. The work has ensured the survival of the original walls, allowing the award-winning

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As you can see, the restoration was not simply a patch job.

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Wire-Bond® is the largest manufacturer of truss and ladder wire joint reinforcement in the world. Its product line includes high-quality systems for masonry including truss and ladder masonry reinforcement designs, stone Anchors, veneer Anchors, and more. To view the company’s complete product line, visit http://wirebond.com.

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TECHNOLOGY | Connectors, Anchors, & Fasteners A view of the castle exterior and surrounding wall.

The castle is now available for vacation rentals.

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holiday home to be built within the shell of the ancient castle. The Riba Stirling Prize is the UK’s most prestigious architectural award. Judging is based upon original, imaginative and wellexecuted designs that excellently meet the needs of their users and inspire those who use and visit them.  “The restoration work on Astley Castle was an impressive enterprise, as anyone who saw the castle prior to its transformation could have been forgiven for thinking it a hopeless ruin,” said Peter James, managing director of Cintec International said. “To be awarded the Riba Stirling Prize demonstrates the true extent of its transformation. It has now been turned into a structurally stable building that will stand the test of time and can be enjoyed by many people in its reincarnation as a holiday home.” Cintec anchors have been used to restore historically significant buildings across the globe including Windsor Castle, the White House, and extensive work on Egypt’s pyramids. wMD

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TECHNOLOGY | Connectors, Anchors, & Fasteners

ABOUT ASTLEY CASTLE In winter 2015, Masonry Design featured Astley Castle on the cover, and we went in-depth on the restoration. Here’s a look at some of the facts related to the history of the structure: The castle dates back to the 13th century, and was on the verge of collapse following a fire in 1978. In the 1990s, the property came to the attention of The Landmark Trust, which vowed to restore the neglected castle. Today, it is used as a rental property for tourists. The Trust says of the landmark: “Groundbreaking modern accommodation has been inserted within the ruined walls of this ancient moated site to combine the thrill of modern architecture with the atmosphere of an ancient place.” According to the Trust, the site includes the moated castle, gateway and curtain walls, lake, a church, and the ghost of pleasure gardens in a picturesque landscape. In 2005, the Trust launched an open competition to find the best restoration plan that would create good, modern accommodation within the ancient ruins. The winning scheme, the Trust reports, by architects Mann Williams, maintains the sense of life and living within the castle, while making the most of the views – both into and out of the site. As The Landmark Trust explains: “After careful recording, those parts of the building beyond pragmatic repair were taken down. The new-build introduced also consolidates and ties together what could be saved of the original fabric as unobtrusively as possible, leaving the castle’s form in the landscape largely unchanged. There was further work on the wider setting, including repairs to the curtain walls and moat, and the 18th-century Gothic stable block. The historic parkland surrounding the moated site, much of which is a Scheduled Monument, has been opened up with public trails.

The castle now makes the most of the views of the surrounding parkland.

The castle’s early days By the early 12th century, the castle was held by Philip de Estlega (Astley) from the Earl of Warwick. Philip’s grandson Thomas de Estleye was killed at the Battle of Evesham fighting with Simon de Montfort in 1265. The castle was crenellated [having open spaces at the top of a wall so that people can shoot guns and cannons outward] and moated in 1266, when it briefly changed hands before reverting to the Astleys. By 1420, the manor had passed through marriage to the Grey family and became entangled with the succession to the throne of England. It was under the Greys in the late 15th century that the castle achieved its most mature form. However, after the death of Edward VI in July 1553, Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk seized the initiative and placed his daughter, Lady Jane Grey, on the throne. Jane’s reign lasted just nine days, before Mary I’s superior claims prevailed. Both Jane and later her father were beheaded for treason—Lord Grey rebelled a second time in January 1554 and was captured in a hollow oak tree at Astley. 28 |

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In 1600, the castle was bought by Sir Edward Chamberlain. The Chamberlains restored the church and improved the castle. During the Civil War in the 1640s, Astley became a garrison for Parliamentary soldiers. In 1674, it was bought by the Newdigate family, who owned the neighboring Arbury Estate, and the castle became a subsidiary dwelling. In the 1770s, a Sir John Astley leased the castle briefly and was responsible for the construction of the stables and coach house. Requisitioned during World War II for convalescing service men, a dilapidated Astley Castle was restored by the Tunnicliffes in the 1950s as a hotel. The castle completed its slide from grace when it was gutted by a mysterious fire in 1978, just days after its lease had expired. Vandalism, unauthorized stripping out, and collapse made its plight still worse. For many years, no solution could be found to give it a future and Astley Castle became a ruin. By 2007, English Heritage had listed it as one of the 16 most endangered sites in Britain. wMD Materials • Technolog y • Trends


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WIRE-BOND


DESIGN TRENDS | RESTORATION

AGE-OLD TUCK-POINTING TECHNIQUE RESTORES NEW GLORY Restoration project for Northwestern University Place Benefits Department Edited By Cory Sekine-Pettite Photos courtesy of Berglund Construction. Reprinted with permission from the Masonry Advisory Council

Matching the historical look of the 1890’s WITH BUILDING RESTORATION PROJECTS, you have few or no options other than to use existing materials to replicate an old building back to its former glory. But that is not always easy to do. Some buildings have major problems, from correcting structural issues to matching the aesthetic appeal of its original design. This work is not for the faint hearted because many times you won’t know what damage lies beneath the surface. [RIGHT]

720 University Place, formerly known as Music Hall, was built in 1897.

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DESIGN TRENDS | RESTORATION

[BELOW]

Berglund Construction took great care to blend the masonry units and matching the color and texture of the repointing mortar.

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Restoring an old building requires careful planning This building was built in the 1890’s and was originally used as a music hall for an all-women’s college. Before starting this project, each masonry unit had to be carefully examined to determine how many replacement units were needed. The 12,000 square feet of exterior wall surface of the building has a wide range of brick colors, surface deterioration, changes to brick texture due to exposure, and brick sizes. Additionally, the structural masonry was a rough-cut, locally quarried stone that was cut a long time ago, with archaic equipment that is not likely in use today. Using age-old tuck-pointing techniques Berglund Construction, under BTL’s direction, restored it to its original splendor by using the reclaimed brick and age-old tuck-pointing techniques. All old repair mortars were removed by mechanical wet grinding so as not to expose the workers to any airborne hazards. The mortar was then replaced with the three original colors using a beaded finish joint, which would have been used in the original construction. Any deteriorated brick was removed and replaced in kind with reclaimed brick matching originals. High performance paint colors were selected based on period photos, which further enhanced the original historic look.

Materials • Technolog y • Trends


Since much of the historic mortar joints proved durable for many years prior to the restoration, careful planning was needed so the repointing would have an equally long life, and ultimately contribute to the preservation of the entire building. How the restoration was done During the restoration phase, the building was kept occupied and functional. Many of the more intrusive repairs were made during off hours and on weekends. Little by little, layers of dirt and deterioration were peeled away to reveal the craftsmanship of yesterday that had been hidden. Replacement units were blended in with the full range of masonry units rather than in separate brick or stone sections. Additionally, the original wood cornice was restored and many wooden elements were replaced with reclaimed wood that was fashioned to replicate the originals. The finished details Experienced masons understand the special requirements needed to work on historic buildings and the additional time and expense they require. Berglund Construction took great care to blend the masonry units and matching the color and texture of the repointing mortar. This re-pointing job can last at least another 30 years, and possibly as many as 50 to 100 years. A History of 720 University Place Excerpted from the Northwestern University Planning Study of Lutkin Hall and 720 University Place by Ann Beha Architects, Nov. 23, 2016.

720 University Place, formerly known as Music Hall, was built in 1897 to house the new School of Music at Northwestern University Woman’s College. Designed by the prominent Chicago architect, William Augustus Otis, the three-story building was built in the Romanesque/Italianate style with multi-colored brick above an ashlar stone base. Originally, Music Hall was built with a 350-seat concert hall at the top floor—a large flat floor auditorium with fixed seating, highlighted by exposed timber trusses and a manual pipe organ atop the wooden w w w.masonr ydesignmaga zine.com

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DESIGN TRENDS | RESTORATION

[BELOW - LEFT TO RIGHT]

During the restoration phase, the building was kept occupied and functional. Many of the more intrusive repairs were made during off hours and on weekends.

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stage. Today, that floor has been given over to open workstations that support the University’s Human Resources Department, which moved into building in 1977, and also occupies offices on the other two floors. Northwestern University Woman’s College established a Conservatory of Music in 1891, naming Peter Christian Lutkin as its director. In 1895, the Conservatory became the School of Music with Peter Christian Lutkin as its first dean, and Music Hall, now known as 720 University Place, was built in 1897 to house the new School. The new building was built directly to the north of the Women’s College Building, which was built in 1874 and became the Music Administration Building for the University in 1940. In 1941, construction began for Lutkin Hall immediately to the east of Music Hall, and the architect of Deering Library, James Gamble Rogers, was called on to design this recital hall. When the building was opened, it hosted a series of dedicatory concerts featuring the University String Quartet, the Evanston Musical Club, and the School of Music Orchestra, with receptions on the lower floor. The top floor also included dressing

Materials • Technolog y • Trends


rooms and classrooms, and the first floor contained the Dean’s office, the business office, a reception room, and practice rooms. To meet the School’s quickly expanding needs, the lowest floor of Music Hall, which was originally built as the gymnasium, was subdivided into 11 rooms just two years after the building was opened. The building’s exterior Music Hall was built with its main entrance facing east. The Romanesque/Italianate building is built in multi-colored brick, and

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720 University Place Restoration Project: Northwestern University Benefits Department at 720 University Place, Evanston, Ill.

Completion Date: October 2016

Architect: BTL Architects, Inc.

General Contractor: Berglund Construction

Mason Contractor: Berglund Construction

Materials: Reclaimed Chicago Brick, Reclaimed Period face brick, Reclaimed wood elements

Mortar: Type O in three different colors

Patching Materials: Conproco Matrix

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DESIGN TRENDS | RESTORATION a salmon-colored mortar. The ashlar base of the building is made of rough, grey-colored stones, capped with a dressed limestone water table forming the sills of the windows on the main floor. The east and west facades have pairs of double doors for the entrances at the main floor, and two pairs of double windows on either side of the entrances at the upper floor. There also are entrances to the lower floor, below the main entrance doors, on both facades. The long north elevation of the building faces the street with six pairs of double windows at the main floor set into tall reveals lined with red brick. The upper floor has six sets of smaller ganged windows with a limestone still that extends around all sides of the building to form a belt course of stone. The lower floor has six sets of smaller ganged windows in reveals topped by a segmental arch. The hipped roof is covered with rounded, red

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clay tiles, as are the hipped dormers on either ends of the building and the pair of dormers on the north and south sides. The roof has a deep overhang, supported by decorative wood brackets. The building’s interior The main level of the building has a double-loaded corridor with offices on either side that are largely in their original configurations and with original partitions. The corridor has a high flat ceiling that is punctuated by four, three-centered arches along its length. The lower floor also has a double-loaded corridor with offices on either side of the corridor. The corridor walls at this level have been built around structural trusses that have the bottom chord exposed in the corridor and offices. The upper floor, formerly the concert hall, is now occupied by open workstations. The structural trusses are exposed and feature stained wood clad timbers and dark painted steel chords and brackets. The original stage and rooms at the west end of the floor were removed in a 1980 renovation, and the ceiling areas between the trusses were insulated and covered with acoustical tiles. The rooms at the east end of the floor had been converted to offices and conference rooms, and they were renovated again in the 1980s. An open, wood monumental stair connects all three floors at the east end of the building. On the west end of the building, a smaller wood stair was modified in 2012 to remove the section of stair from the basement to the main floor. wMD

[OPPOSITE PAGE]

The east and west facades have pairs of double doors for the entrances at the main floor, and two pairs of double windows on either side of the entrances at the upper floor.

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Discover the unmatched realism and performance of our naturally-made full-bed and thin stone products. arriscraft.com |

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Supplies | Air & Vapor Barriers As defined by the Air Barrier Association of America, air barrier systems are comprised of a number of materials which are assembled together to provide a complete barrier to air leakage through the building enclosure. This system essentially “wraps” the building shell and ensures that it protects the building from the effects of air leakage. Air leakage can have detrimental effects on how a building functions and reduces the life span of a building.

Get Your Products Featured! The March/April 2016 Supplies section will feature brick, block, and stone. Send your product descriptions and images to Cory Sekine-Pettite at cory@lionhrtpub.com.

1

1 Driwall™ Rainscreen

http://www.keenebuilding.com

Keene Building’s Driwall Rainscreen system is a drainage mat for exterior wall systems. The entangled net product eliminates incidental moisture problems in most exterior veneer applications, including thin stone or brick, manufactured stone, and stone and brick masonry. Driwall Rainscreen is produced from an extruded polymer matrix of tangled monofilaments. The three-dimensional mat is heat-laminated to a non-woven lightweight, breathable fabric to provide a separation from cementitious sidings. The monofilaments are heat-welded at the junctions to form a structure that spaces exterior veneer away from the inner sheathing. Features and benefits of the system, according to Keene, include the following: • Drainage of excess moisture and ventilation in one product • Lightweight and easy to handle • Simple installation with mechanical staple hammer • Polymer core resistant to most known corrosive chemicals, including solvents • Wide rolls for fewer seams • Core absorbs and releases no moisture • Provides no source for the promotion of mold, mildew or bacteria.

2 Thermafiber Insolutions http://thermafiber.com

Thermafiber Insolutions from Owens Corning is a fivepronged approach to providing innovative insulation products and services to architects, specifiers, contractors and building façade manufacturers. Owens Corning collaborates with you to manage insulation details at every step by offering expert engineering judgments, recommendations for specific products, CAD drawings, and consultation on good design practices. Insolutions helps you save time, save money, and install environmentally friendly mineral wool that withstands the highest heat for the longest time. With a minimum of 70 percent recycled content, Thermafiber mineral wool contributes to 13 LEED® credit categories and conserves energy in buildings. In addition to the sustainability of mineral wool, its non-combustible, fireproof nature makes it a safer product to use in buildings.

2

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3 PROSOCO & CavityComplete Wall System

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www.prosoco.com As of November 2016, PROSOCO has joined the CavityComplete® Wall Systems team. As the new air and moisture barrier partner, PROSOCO will contribute category-leading components—such as R-Guard® VB—that have been tested and proven to work together with existing system solutions to help manage air, vapor, and water movement. R-Guard VB is a fluid-applied air and water-resistive barrier that stops air and water leakage in cavity wall, masonry veneer construction, as well as in stucco, EIFS and most other building wall assemblies. As PROSOCO is integrated into the program, www. CavityComplete.com will temporarily have limited content as materials are updated. Installation instructions and other support materials featuring PROSOCO solutions will become available on the revised site within the next few months. However, as of now, all information necessary to specify CavityComplete with PROSOCO products is available on the website. wMD

advertiser’s index page#

company-phone-website

37 Arriscraft

800.265.8123 www.arriscraft.com

800.243.4788 www.laticrete.com/mvis

888.773.2649 www.specmix.com

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Advanced Masonry Products

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11/3/16 3:47 PM Masonr yDesign | 39


Estimation

Western Specialty Contractors Facade Expert:

Preventative Maintenance for Building Exteriors a Must

By Mark Sheehan

Vice President of National Accounts and Field Marketing

About Western Specialty Contractors

Family-owned and operated for 100 years, Western Specialty Contractors is the nation’s largest specialty contractor in masonry and concrete restoration, waterproofing, and specialty roofing. Western offers a nationwide network of expertise that building owners, engineers, architects, and property managers can count on to develop cost-effective, corrective measures that can add years of useful life to a variety of structures. Western is headquartered in St. Louis, Mo., with more than 30 branch offices nationwide and employs more than 1,200 professionals who offer the best, time-tested techniques and innovative technology. For more information about Western Specialty Contractors, visit www.westernspecialty contractors.com.

40 |

Masonr yDesign

All matter breaks down over time. The structures that surround us today are no exception to that law of physics. Some building materials are more durable than others, but unfortunately the days of structures surviving thousands of years, like the Egyptian pyramids and Roman cathedrals, is over. Most of the structures erected today have a life expectancy of less than 100 years. Therefore, preventive maintenance of building exteriors has become more important than ever. Every building or structure should have a preventive maintenance program in place for its exterior components. How extensive the program needs to be will depend directly on the size of the building, number of different materials and components, geographic location, and personnel available to keep it updated. A preventive maintenance program consists of two major parts—the inspection and the execution. During inspection of a building’s exterior, some of the more complex structures may require special access and assistance from a contractor. However, for most structures, an in-house maintenance crew with a little bit of training is capable of doing the job. When performing the inspection, it is extremely important to document the findings and keep them in a consistent format from year to year. This can be achieved by simply using a three-ring binder with notes and pictures or a multi-layered spreadsheet. It also is necessary to inspect any work that has recently been performed, as those repairs may still be under warranty. Some specific items to inspect and document regarding a building’s exterior condition include: • Gutters, drains, downspouts, drainage, roof—Decaying leaves, pine needles, and dirt run-off can all contribute to ponding water and clogged gutters and downspouts, which is why it is essential that all roof drains remain clear of obstructions. In addition to the risk of water pouring into the tenant spaces should a breach in the roof occur, the freezing and thawing of ponding water during the fall and winter months can cause extensive roof damage.  |

January/February 2017

• Perimeters of doors, windows, and other wall penetrators—The exterior walls of a building can be a significant source of unwanted water leakage. Many openings are required in commercial building walls for plumbing, irrigation connections, lighting, HVAC system elements, exhaust vents, air intakes, joints around windows and doors, and fire alarms, to name a few. Unplanned holes may also be present caused by aging brick joints that need re-pointing, vanishing sealants, damage from acid rain, and settling cracks. • Building control and expansion joints—Like any other element of a structure, its controls and expansion joints can become damaged. Evidence of damage includes warping, cracking, leaking water, loosening screws, and building settlement or moving. • Copings and flashings—When surveying the roof, be sure to inspect the copings and flashings. Water damage to exterior and interior walls can be significant if these important elements are not maintained properly. The second part of any preventive maintenance program is the execution. The data collected during the inspection should be put into a budget for needed repairs. Depending on the condition of the structure, repairs may need to be prioritized. It also is important to evaluate the need for protective measures such as scalers or coatings. A specialty contractor with experience in facade maintenance and restoration can itemize each inspection item and offer specific recommendations for repairs. If you are in charge of a structure that does not have a preventive maintenance program in place for its exterior, you should think about implementing one immediately. A maintenance plan will prevent structural failures and promote safer structures; plus, a well-maintained exterior helps to attract and keep tenants. Preventive maintenance for any structure’s exterior is a must. wMD Materials • Technolog y • Trends



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