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gg GILL SANS STD


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Gill Sans Std

By Eric Gill

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Gill Sans Std Type Specimen Booklet By Mason Brennan Text From Elliot Earls


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W V IC TU S AL IT QR yz T P x H G NO uvw LI M rst D ST IJKL pq S N H no SA FG klm L E ij IL G CD fgh AB bcde a


LIGHT 12/14.4 LIGHT ITALIC 48/57.6

Type design has lost its urgency, and has regained its soul. Type design was viewed as THE shortcut to graphic design fame.

THINGS HAVE CHANGED. I learned that the craft of drawing by hand is still a most valuable asset when it comes to designing fonts, and that computer tricks are a poor substitute for intent. Type design has lost its urgency, and has regained its soul. Type design was viewed as THE shortcut to graphic design fame. Things have changed. I learned that the craft of drawing by

Most valuable

hand is still a most valuable asset when it comes to designing fonts, and that computer tricks are a poor substitute for intent.

MOST VALUABLE

LIGHT ITALIC 11/13.2 LIGHT 24/28.8

TYPE DESIGN HAS LOST ITS URGENCY, AND HAS REGAINED ITS SOUL.

Type design was viewed as THE shortcut to graphic design fame.Things have changed. I learned that the craft of drawing by hand is still a most valuable asset when it comes to designing fonts, and that computer tricks are a poor substitute for intent. Type design has lost its urgency, and has regained its soul. Type design was viewed as THE shortcut to graphic design fame.Things have changed. I learned that the craft of drawing by hand is still a most valuable asset when it comes to designing fonts, and that computer tricks are a poor substitute for intent.


When an individual sets out upon the arduous journey of designing a typeface, I suggest that the generative formal impulse can be located in one of three areas: HISTORICAL REVIVAL,VERNACULAR INTERPRETATION, OR EXCLUSIVELY FORMAL EXTRAPOLATION. When one is giving birth to a font not spawned directly from an existing model, what is needed most is the establishment of a biological discourse between looking and drawing-between retina and cortex. When an individual sets out upon the arduous journey of designing a typeface, I suggest that the generative formal impulse can be located in one of three areas: historical revival, vernacular interpretation, or exclusively formal extrapolation.When one is giving birth to a font not spawned directly from an existing model, what is needed most is the establishment of a biological discourse between looking and drawingbetween retina and cortex.

REGULAR 12/14.4

RETINA and CORTEX When an individual sets out upon the arduous journey of designing a typeface, I suggest that the generative formal impulse can be located in one of three areas: historical revival, vernacular interpretation, or exclusively formal extrapolation.When one is giving birth to a font not spawned directly from an existing model, what is needed most is the establishment of a biological discourse between looking and drawingbetween retina and cortex.When an individual sets out upon the arduous journey of designing a typeface, I suggest that the generative formal impulse can be located in one of three areas: historical revival, vernacular interpretation, or exclusively formal extrapolation.When one is giving birth to a font not spawned directly from an existing model, what is needed most is the establishment of a biological discourse between looking and drawing-between retina and cortex.

BOLD 72/86.4

ITALIC 11/13.2


But as they say, “God (or the Devil, or possibly both) is in details.” Quite possibly the biggest challenge facing type designers who are just starting out is that most cannot see, nor can they draw ( I should amend that slightly; most haven’t looked, nor can they draw.) Students who begin drawing typefaces must first learn to look at typefaces. One often notices a complete lack of rigor, coupled with a hyper-kinetic line quality.

G

BOLD CONDENSED 10/12

BOLD 90/108

Trust Not The Mind

SHADOWED 60/72 LIGHT SHADOWED 48/57.6

REGULAR 12/14.4

I stress that this process, in order to be successful, is non-linguistic. The eye, and how it relates to mark making, or more accurately, how it respnds to the mark made, is the most important thing. Letterforms are in large measure governed by social contract and simple optical principles. As the letterform progresses through successive stages of development and refinement, the process becomes increasingly optical. One must cultivate a feel for proportion, solidity, balance, etc. I’m suggesting that one develops a feel not magically, or through attendance at the finest schools, but through rigorous application, and through working damn hard at acquiring a set of very concrete skills, then forgetting them.


no correlation between time REGULAR 10/12

BOLD EXTRA CONDENSED 48/57.6

UL TR

A

Th

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nd “A

“P

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18

/21

.6

ry

In music, rigorous study of repertoire, theory, and physical application is what allows the musician the improvisational freedom to move the listener. Musical instrument performance represents the perfect synthesis of theory and practice. Theory is study understood and finally applied. In the visual arts, it is important to follow a developmental trajectory that after diligent application ultimately includes not so much forgetting, as not paying active attention to these principles. You must trust yourself, and work by feel. Rely on the totality of your experience. Rely on your history to guide you. I am not suggesting that the type design process necessarily adheres to a strict taxonomic progression. Its my contention that the edge condition, the tension that exists in the gap, is where the action is. But for the designer interested in beginning to come to grips with letterform design, locating ones work within the three categories described above is often helpful. Typefaces are not conceptual, they are formal (1). Second, I tell them to study examples such as Zuzana Lickos’ Mrs. Eaves, which is an excellent example of an historical revival; Christian Schwartz Los Feliz, which is an excellent example of vernacular reinterpretation; and Frank Hines Remedy, which is based on pure formal extrapolation.

and quality

ti

ce


/1

3.2

SH

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th

,b d in m .” e a th in t et o r n HE T

t

u

T o HR n O e U ca G n HT le H a IS rn PR toOC E tr SS u th st a t

“ M Th O e VE h in an sy d m an bi d o r ti e c ti lo na ck m st ust ep 11

ce a trt’s th E I bo LIN EY L H CA S T SI A HY P

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BOLD ITALIC11/13.2

Draw them big, with a ruling pen and Plaka, and some Pro White. Focus on the serifs or the termination of the character.Then refine the letterforms through successive redrawing. Sit back, evaluate them optically (with your retina).Then draw them again. Making them thinner here and thicker there.It’s when you begin with the blank page of purely formal extrapolation that the old skool skills are most important. Next, I must deal with the infinitely more difficult issue of exactly how one uses their craft to make work that moves the viewer.

“Draw Them Again...” Kathy McCoy encourages educators to abandon hand-based exercises in favor of the computer. I would absolutely agree if it pertains to typographic skills for tracking, kerning, leading, comping, font selection, etc. I would completly disagree when it comes to the typographic skills of letterform design. The ability to see, (no to feel) the correlation between the ruling pen, nib, chisel, and/or brush and the final letterform is essential. Fontographer (the computer) is a great tool for some, but a terrible tool for the tenderfoot, the greenhorn, the neophyte, novice, rookie, or initiate.

ITALIC 36/43.2 CONDENSED12/14.4


Gill sans std

BOLD EXTRA CONDENSED 24 PT

Gill sans std

ULTRA BOLD CONDENSED 30 PT

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Gill sans std

BOLD CONDENSED 14 PT

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Gill sans std

CONDENSED 24 PT

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Gill sans std

BOLD 30 PT

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Gill sans std

BOLD ITALIC 12 PT

Gill sans std

ULTRA BOLD 24 PT

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

Gill sans std Where do you begin? How do you get an idea or a concept for a typeface? One should never use the term “concept” in the same sentence as the word “typeface.”

EXTRA BOLD DISPLAY 18 PT


(no, to feel)


Gg Gg g G g G Gg

ULTRA BOLD CONDENSED 72/86.4 BOLD EXTRA CONDENSED 72/86.4

g G Gg g G Gg g G REGULAR 72/86.4

G g G g G g G Gg SHADOWED 72/86.4

ITALIC 72/86.4

BOLD72/86.4

EXTRA BOLD72/86.4

CONDENSED 72/86.4

BOLD ITALIC72/86.4

BOLD CONDENSED 72/86.4

EXTRA BOLD DISPLAY 72/86.4

LIGHT 72/86.4

LIGHT 72/86.4

LIGHT ITALIC 72/86.4

ULTRA BOLD 72/86.4


BOLD 18/21.6

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The “Blend� menu in Fontographer would take two fonts and mathematically extrapolate, to produce a third new font.This process took seconds, and the results were fluid, kinetic, and seemed, from an historical perspective, refreshing. Simply no correlation between time and quality, and that all things historical are not necessarily bad.

EXTRA BOLD 400/480


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Gill Sans Std

Mason Brennan Elliot Earls May 3, 2010 GDES1314.02


type specimen book  

gill sans type booklet.

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