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The Official Tourist Guide of Guyana 2011 EXPLORE GUYANA is published annually for the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) in association with the Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce and the Guyana Tourism Association (GTA) by: Advertising & Marketing Services (AMS) 213 B Camp Street P.O.Box 101582, Georgetown, Guyana Tel: (011592) 225-5384 Fax: (011592) 225-5383 E-mail: info@amsguyana.com Publisher & Editor: Lokesh Singh lokesh@amsstlucia.com Advertising Sales: Lokesh Singh Vickram Singh Susannah Johnson Adrian Pryce Graphic Design: Mensah Fox Donald Brower Editorial Contributors: Lokesh Singh Kirk Smock Godfrey Chin Robert Arrington David Martins Major General (Ret’d) Joe Singh Sharief Khan Samantha James Treina Butts Cynthia Nelson GINA Contributing Photography: Conservation International FotoNATURA Iwokrama Centre Dr. Raquel Thomas Annette Arjoon-Martins Godfrey Chin Mike Weedon Ian Craddock / Bushmasters Inc. Ken Wilson Judy Karwacki Karen Straus Julie Zickefoose Ashley Holland Cynthia Nelson Samantha James Mensah Fox Kevin Loughlin Donald Brower Col. Allen Morrison - http://www.tramz.com/gy/g.html © Copyright 2011. Reproduction of any material without the permission of AMS is strictly prohibited. AMS and THAG wish to express sincere thanks and appreciation to all parties who have assisted in making this publication a reality.

ADVERTISING & MARKETING S E R V I C E S LT D.

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CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

THAG TRAVELLER

7 Welcome Messages 9 Guyana - Alive with Nature 16 Guyana’s Trees Stand Tall

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Accommodations - Georgetown & Environs 94 Eco- Resorts, Interior Lodges & Attractions 95 THAG Members Services 103 Calendar of Events

ABOUT GUYANA 23 24

Map of Guyana Map of Georgetown/ Architectural Treasures

26 34 36 42 48 54 56 59

The 40’s in Guyana Mash it Up Wings to Treasure WaiWai - The Journey to Modernity Big Toothy Fish Growing Mangroves Legendary King Kaieteur Have a Wild Life

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PEOPLE OF GUYANA

FREE 2011 EXPLOR

President Bharrat Jagdeo Sydney Allicock Roy Geddes

E GUYANA

l Tourist Guide of Guyana

FOOD & FUN

2011

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The Officia l Tourist Guide of Guyana 2011

The Officia

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A Guyanese Christmas Guyanese Cuisine Guyanese Recipes

alive with

NATURE

ABOUT GUYANA

ON THE COVER

84 Country Facts 87 Government 90 Travelling 92 Money & Business

WaiWai Elder Marawanaw with his Bamboo Flute in Masakenyari, Essequibo River, Guyana.

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Visit, Enjoy, Experience

GUYANA

Alive With Nature

Paul D. J Stephenson President

T

his has been an interesting and challenging year for us all in the tourism sector, not only in Guyana, but elsewhere in the region where unlike Guyana, some destinations have shown a decline in visitor arrivals. This increase in leisure arrivals to Guyana is a positive indicator for all of us in this sector as these additional arrivals will mean greater opportunities for investment and improving our standards as the sector continues to grow. The increase in our tourist arrivals comprises of two main markets, - overseas Guyanese returning home to vacation, a strong and potentially an increasingly important segment, while the international birding market and eco related rainforest groups make up the balance of total leisure arrivals. Both of these markets are expected to produce additional numbers as our industry moves forward.

Paul Waldron Vice President

We must strive to attract new regional and international markets to develop our industry through linkages with new sectors such as sports , heritage tourism and business related markets that are available to us here in Guyana . We need to continue to focus on developing superior facilities and standards to help attract these additional markets in the years ahead. The North Rupununi continues to lead the sector as a recognized and successful in country destination. We now need to help develop new locations and facilities in the North West and Berbice and promote existing areas such as the Essequibo to mention just a few, in our development strategy as strong emerging in country destinations. Destination Guyana awareness, increased tourism facilities in more locations, domestic tourism, community based tourism and improved standards will continue to be the focus of the THAG Executive. The recognition of the tourism sector and its very real contribution to the GDP in a developing Guyana will also be a key component of the tasks for this coming year by the Executive. I would like to thank all involved in the sector here at home, especially our new and existing members of the association for your support. To all our international and local tour operators, for your support and the business you continue to send, thank you. We cannot forget those we are in business to care for, our visitors, A very warm welcome; enjoy your visit and thank you for selecting Guyana as your holiday destination.

Treina Butts Executive Director

Sydney Allicock Chairman Amerindian Affairs

Paul D. J Stephenson President Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana

Mitra Ramkumar Treasurer

Colin Edwards Committee Member EXPLORE GUYANA

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Dee George Committee Member

Abdoul Ba Committee Member


Alive With

T

NATURE

he world over human life has been affected by changes in our climatic conditions which have been blamed on the progressive development of the more developed countries and man’s obsession with creating wealth through the search for natural mineral deposits with resulting devastating changes to our natural landscape and lifestyle.

Guyana – our beautiful native land has been blessed with the great diversity of our land mass supported by wonderful eco systems which have been sustained and left untouched for generations due to our small population and their settlement in coastal areas covering less than 20% of the country’s land mass.

From its early formation as a part of coastal South America generations ago, Guyana today is a reflection of a land of imposing rock formations and mountain ranges, a network of magnificent great rivers and waterways to include stunning waterfalls and rapids, meandering across the terrain from the sources in the highlands through the dense Amazon rainforests, fertile valleys and plains, with the water flowing to the coastline where it meets with the mighty Atlantic Ocean. In the process a wonderful ecosystem became a reality and has been a natural breeding ground and habitat for a vast array of magnificent flora and fauna featuring the largest carnivores to the most minute and exotic birds and animal species not to mention the myriad varieties of indigenous and plants and beautiful flora.

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The Amerindians were the early settlers of this beautiful and bountiful land which they traversed without inhibition and conquered the wild rivers and dense terrain to establish settlements in the heart of the tropical rainforest at some of the most picturesque and dramatic locations with magnificent vistas across the landscape as they truly enjoyed the gifts of Nature. The discovery of the New World by the Spanish brought many Europeans to the New World in search of ‘El Dorado’, the fabled city of gold. Guyana was discovered and fought for by the Europeans who in the process discovered and conquered the Amerindians in their search for gold. Unable to find gold the Europeans turned to cultivating sugar on the vast flat coastal plains with abundant supplies of water for irrigation. The success of sugar brought a wave of British settlers and hence the importance of sugar in Guyana’s economy until today. The Amerindians were not suitable for work on the sugar plantations and large numbers of African slave labour were imported. With the abolition of slavery the Portuguese from Madeira, Chinese, and East Indians fromm India were imported as indentured labour. Over the years these peoples have resulted in Guyana being a nation of six races and a cultural pot pourri with a fantastic blend of multiple cultures and cuisine. Luckily, the large majority of the populace settled and stayed on the coastal plains as agriculture became the dominant industry and the city and towns were established at the confluence of the major rivers to serve as centers of commerce. This resulted in the preservation of the natural ecosystems of the mountainous interior regions and dense forested areas where the Amerindian communities and nature coexisted and thrived. Over the years the world has discovered Guyana and its treasure trove of Nature that includes the world famous Kaieteur Falls, the Mighty Essequibo River, imposing Mount Roraima, vast Rupununi Savannahs, the Great Arapaima – the world’s largest fresh water fish - and the massive uninhabited mountainous regions with dense rainforests all being home to a teeming abundance of flora and fauna; not to mention the many Amerindian tribes who have maintained their lifestyle, culture and traditions for generations. We welcome visitors to Guyana and encourage them to visit and enjoy all that our country has to offer as we are all proud of our heritage EXPLORE GUYANA

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and the wonderful gifts of Nature with which we have been endowed and we share with the world. Over the years our Government has embarked on a programme to maintain our biodiversity and to ensure that we protect our natural environment and especially our forest cover and ecosystems for future generations. The Kaieteur National Park and the Iwokrama Rainforest Reserve are among the largest protected rainforest areas where biodiversity is being propagated. These areas are now home to some of the largest and abundant populations of endangered species of flora and fauna.

been labelled and recognised as a “Champion of the Earth”. Other citizens such as Sidney Allicock have been similarly recognised for their similar efforts in developing and protecting their rural communities and the entire country has been sensitised.

Amerindian communities are being encouraged to maintain their traditions and open their communities to touristic enterprises as sustainable opportunities for their peoples especially with their intimate knowledge of the mountains, forests and river networks. Many Amerindians today serve as official tour guides for visitors going on tours into the interior regions to view and enjoy the many wonders of Nature. Many international organisations are now partnering with the Government and particularly the indigenous people to protect out Treasures of Nature across the country. World famous organisations such as Conservation International, World Wildlife Fund and others are all actively engaged in promoting and protecting Guyana’s biodiversity. Our country’s President has been recognised worldwide for his efforts in this regard and has

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Wherever you go you will note the effort to ensure that we are conscious of the importance of our environment. We ask you to join us in this thrust during your visit as we continue to protect and preserve the wonderful environment and habitat which is “Alive With Nature� for future generations.

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Capybara. Photo by Bushmasters Inc

Jaguar taking a drink. Photo by Bushmasters Inc

Guyana’s Trees Stand Tall By: Kirk Smock

“As we Preserve our Environment through a National Low Carbon Development Strategy in the Global Battle Against Climate Change”

I

didn’t truly appreciate the immense biodiversity contained within a rainforest until I spent two days alone in a very small patch of Guyana’s jungle. During my isolation – the culmination of a two-week jungle survival course – I had little more than the clothes on my back, a machete, fishing line, and a water bottle. The course (offered by Bushmasters Amazon, an adventure tour operator based in Guyana) included a week of learning safety and survival techniques and fascinating jungle knowledge from seven Makushi Amerindian guides from the forward-thinking and eco-friendly village of Surama.

We found potable water in vines, caught fish with hand lines, stalked elusive animals with bows and arrows, built fires using friction, learned the medicinal uses of plants and trees, mastered the use of our machetes, and built basic shelters from forest materials. It all provided a certain level of confidence that I carried into the jungle. But once I was actually alone in a dense tangled mess of green, I realized I was entirely out of my element. No wonder our Amerindian guides were incredulous over the fact that visitors would actually pay for such an experience. For travelers, part of the allure of any trip involving jungle immersion is getting to return home from holiday with stories of

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swimming with piranha and electric eel, shaking tarantulas from your boots, stalking aggressive wild boars, bathing where black caiman lurk, and sharing jungle trails with jaguars. But some come simply for the chance to spend time romping through the rainforest – a prospect that many believe to be as endangered as some of the creatures living within the trees. As the world’s rainforests continue to fall at alarming rates, it’s easy to see where that perception comes from. But Guyana has a longstanding conservation ethic that has allowed it to retain most of its pristine rainforest, and the country is now working hard to preserve its forests forever.


The slice of jungle I sat alone in for two nights is only a small fraction of Guyana’s standing forest, which covers nearly 80 percent of the country’s landmass. According to a recent study commissioned by Guyana’s Office of the President, Guyana’s forests are worth $5.8 billion. That’s if all timber is harvested, minerals extracted, and land used for commercial agriculture, plantation forestry, and ranching. Thankfully, Guyana has no plans of destroying its rainforests for money. Instead, Guyana is hoping its forests can be used to help combat climate change. In addition to storing the harmful carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to global warming,

rainforests provide a suite of ‘ecosystem services’ to the world that include generating rainfall, cooling the atmosphere, moderating weather conditions and sustaining biodiversity. Recognizing the importance of his country’s trees, in 2007 Guyana’s President, Bharrat Jagdeo offered to protect most of Guyana’s standing tropical rainforest to help address the issue of climate change. Over time, the President’s offer morphed into a more formal plan for Guyana: the Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS). Key goals of the LCDS include a nationwide overhaul of existing forest-dependent sectors (mining and forestry), investment in EXPLORE GUYANA

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a low carbon economic infrastructure (e.g. hydro-electricity), creation of new economic opportunities for Amerindian communities and the broader Guyana citizenry, and investment in high-potential, low-carbon sectors, such as aquaculture, select agriculture and ecotourism. Essentially, the LCDS seeks to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and global warming by protecting Guyana’s rainforests, while creating a model green economy for rainforestrich developing countries. But the LCDS isn’t the start (and certainly not the end) of a strong conservation movement within Guyana. In fact, for many years Conservation International and Iwokrama International

Aerial View Kaieteur Gorge. Photo by Ken Wilson

Boa Constricter. Photo by Ian Craddock


Catepillar. Photo by Ken Wilson

Pineapple Plant. Photo by Julie Zickefoose

Centre have been developing two additional large-scale projects in Guyana which have been setting an example of sustainable development and tropical rainforest conservation for the world. The foundation of the Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development (IIC) in central Guyana has played a fundamental role in establishing a conservation, sustainable development, and ecotourism movement in Guyana’s interior. The Government of Guyana and the Commonwealth Secretariat established the IIC in 1996 under a joint mandate to manage the Iwokrama forest “in a manner that will lead to lasting ecological, economic and social benefits to the people of Guyana and to the world in general.” The IIC consists of nearly one million acres (371,000 ha) of pristine Guiana Shield rainforest functioning as a living laboratory for scientific research, ecotourism, and sustainable tropical forest management. The IIC has become internationally recognised for its unique and ambitious conservation and development practices using traditional and scientific resource-based knowledge that seek to show how rainforest resources can be used sustainably while generating economic benefits for local communities. At Iwokrama, scientists, researchers, sustainable timber experts, ecotourists, and indigenous communities all come together to both preserve and use a rainforest to the benefit of local, national, and global populations.

By working with 16 local communities that are linked through the North Rupununi District Development Board (NRDDB) and the Bina Hill Institute, Iwokrama’s research and training centre arm, the IIC is looking to play its part in helping to arrest this potential downward spiral. The IIC is researching the links between climate, vegetation and ecosystems in the Iwokrama Forest and the bordering Rupununi Savannah region with hopes of being able to provide a better understanding of how such frontier rainforests may be impacted by environmental and climatic change. Iwokrama and UK investment house Canopy Capital also have an ongoing partnership in a deal that will eventually allow investors to pay for the ecosystem services of a forest while supporting conservation efforts. Iwokrama is also working closely with the Government of Guyana in the ongoing development of the country’s Low Carbon Development Strategy. Another important player in Guyana’s conservation movement is the internationally renowned nonprofit organisation Conservation International. In 2002, nine years after they began working in Guyana, Conservation International Guyana (CIG) grabbed the world’s attention when they signed an agreement with the Government of Guyana that created the world’s first conservation concession.

Through the agreement, Guyana’s government granted CIG a 30-year logging lease for 200,000 acres in the Upper Essequibo River watershed. But instead of deforestation, CIG established the conservation concession with plans of protection. Under the agreement, CIG pays Guyana fees and taxes as if the land was being logged, and they also set up a Voluntary Community Investment Fund (VCIF) to benefit local communities. The VCIF pays an annual amount to the three Amerindian communities closest to the conservation concession: Rewa, Crashwater and Apoteri. The communities use the funds to establish community development projects. In 2005 Rewa village used their funds to build a community-run ecolodge. Rewa is an excellent example of how CIG’s direct involvement has resulted in making the community more conservation oriented. Rewa, which is located at the confluence of the Rewa and Rupununi rivers, is seen as one of the rising stars within Guyana’s ecotourism industry, and their conservation programme to protect Giant River Turtles and the endangered Arapaima (the world’s largest scaled freshwater fish), are being touted as great success stories. Conservation efforts in Guyana are built with, by, and for the local population, but the hope is always that the benefits and positive impacts will be realised on a global scale. Through the

School Kids in Boat. Photo by Ken Wilson

Tropical frontier rainforests like Iwokrama and the communities that directly depend on their resources are particularly threatened by more extreme conditions stemming from global warming, including floods, droughts and fires. And it’s not just their forests that are threatened. Natural resources typically degrade alongside the cultural and social capital of indigenous peoples and local communities, often aggravating poverty.

Rainbow Boa

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Tree root reflection in water. Photo by Ken Wilson

LCDS, Guyana is now aligned with the U.N. Framework Convention for Climate Change, which is set to replace the Kyoto Protocol when it expires in 2012, and their Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) programme. Deforestation is responsible for releasing nearly 20 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions – more than the world’s entire transportation sector – and REDD seeks to drastically reduce this number. Guyana has made it known to the world that in order to preserve its standing forests, the country is in need of funding to create a new low-carbon economy. In November 2009, Guyana and Norway signed an agreement that has Norway providing up to US$250 million through 2015 to help protect and pay for the ecosystem services of Guyana’s forests. It is the largest nationalscale agreement of its kind in the world, and next to Brazil’s Amazon Fund, the second largest forestry protection scheme. With this new support and focus, Guyana is moving forward with creating what is billed as a “working example of what it takes to forge a low-deforestation, low-carbon, climate-resilient economy.” Research is continuously eliminating any doubts that are raised about climate change, and as it becomes more evident that humans and modern civilization are the root cause, people around the world are growing concerned. We are listening to our forests, and as I found during my jungle survival course, ecotourism provides their rich biodiversity a voice. Through ecotourism, people can experience firsthand the forest’s biodiversity, its cultures, its indigenous inhabitants, its ecosystem services, and the current efforts that are being implemented to preserve all of it. Travellers can then return home and share their stories. Developing countries with remaining forests that can be used to fight climate change are very few, mainly because history has shown that market demands always win. The immediate monetary gain that can be realised by razing forests for timber, farm lands or for valuable minerals is a powerful force. Guyana is in a unique position to change this and become a leader within new business opportunities and emerging market demands that can create revenues while focusing on a greater good for all living things, including travelers looking to experience pristine rainforests. For more information on Guyana’s Low Carbon Development Strategy, visit www.lcds.gov.gy. Go to www.iwokrama.org and www.conservation.org to learn more about Iwokrama and Conservation International. Ready to experience jungle immersion for yourself? Learn more about the adventure holidays by contacting a reputable tour operator. See list of THAG members on Page 101. Kirk Smock is author of the Guyana guidebook published by Bradt Travel Guides.

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Pegasus Hotel Guyana, has long been hailed as one of Graced by Royalty and Heads of State alike, it’s the Situated on the Delta of the Demerara River and the Atantic Ocean, the Pegasus Hotel Guyana holds the most stunning seascape views and is within walking distance of the major commercial center & tourist sites, making it an ideal location for both business and leisure travellers. The hotel continues to enjoy a well earned reputation for superior personalised service, suitably appointed accommodation and cuisine. We take enormous pride in hotel ensuring every guest has a memorable experience. Tel: 592 225 2855 Fax: 592 225 3703 Email: enquiries@pegasushotelguyana.com Website: www.pegasushotelguyana.com


Aracari Resort Grand Coastal Hotel

Jubilee Resorts

Hurakabra

Wonotobo Resort

Fair View

Atta Lodge Iwokrama Canopy

Karasabai

Adventure Guianas Villa & Courtyard

Surama Walkway Aranaputa Wowetta

Conservation International Concession

Rewa

Yupukari

Savannah Inn

Nappi

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9

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LALU

4 1 7 3

DENOTES CITY HOTEL LOCATIONS Please refer to page 93 for details of Hotel listings 8

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AL HOTEL TO GRAND COAST

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MIDDLETON STREER

RAILWAY STREET

LAMAHA STREER

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6

ANIRA STREET

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UNI STREET

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Forties In Guyana Our Age of Innocence By: Godfrey Chin

The Decade of the Forties – like milk – can truly be called ‘half and half. During the first half, the World on the Road to Ruin – the second half, the World on the Road to Recovery.

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n my homeland British Guiana, the Forties was ‘Our Age of Innocence’. Many reading this, ‘were not even born yet’ – They were a germ in their father’s sperm – a glint in their mother’s eyes – justifying this Nostalgia. In 1940 while WW11 engulfed Europe, the Correira Family opened the magnificent Astor Cinema at Church & Waterloo Sts with the showing of the movie ‘Golden Boy’ starring William Holden and Barbara Stanwyck. The Mudland, or British Guiana as Guyana was called then, had begun to suffer the effects of blocked sea lanes with several shortages of fuel, foodstuff, spares and our first genuine ‘buy local’ – eat what you grow was expected.

‘Grow More Food Campaigns’ as well as regular blackouts were instituted. Our food mainstay was ‘ground provisions’, cassava, cassava bread, eddoes & yam, callaloo and ochro, with fish and poultry. The St Vincent de Paul Society distributed ‘free loaves of bread’ at St Mary’s R.C School on Brickdam, whenever shipments of flour were available. The local government instituted some censorship of mail, cables, and telegraph – while prices were controlled to limit profiteering on scarce commodities. Even bar salt soap for washing was scarce and I remember my mother giving every visitor to our home ‘a wafer slice’ as a goodwill gesture. Her heart was bigger

An Arial View of Old Georgetown

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than her eye. ‘Greedy man usually vex twice’ was her favourite quote. The Lend Lease Programme in March 1941 permitted the US Seabees to commence construction of the Air Base 25 miles up the Demerara River which was named Atkinson Field after Major Atkinson, who headed the construction team. By 1943, a long cigar like Zeppelin crossed the city twice daily to patrol for U-boats off the coast. The U.S. bases in Jamaica, Trinidad and B.G. acquired under the Lend Lease Programme were intended to be the outer defence of the USA. Dr. Vibert Cambridge advised that ‘Drums of


The Old Atkinson Airport Terminal at Timehri

Fu Manchu – the native favourite action serial opened at the Astor, Jan 1941. ‘Drums’ was released in Hollywood in 1939 which indicates that shipping lanes were open to BG for the first two years of the war. This is corroborated in that ‘Gone With the Wind’ which opened in Atlanta in Dec 1939 was released at the Metropole in Feb 1941. (Thanks Vibert for this nylon) I conclude therefore that the sea lanes to the Caribbean were not blocked until after the Lend Lease Programme commenced in March 41, and the USA declared war vs Japan after Pearl Harbour in Dec 1941. 400 Ships were sunk in the Caribbean Sea, as bauxite from Suriname and BG, as well as oil from the Aruba Refinery were invaluable to the war effort . The Wismar/ MacKenzie mining area boasted they won WWII for the allies as aluminum became an essential item in arms production. At that time there were fewer than 20 miles of paved road in rural Guyana. Most were 2 strips of concrete inlaid in the centre of a one lane red burnt earth, dusty strips in the dry season, muddy quagmires when the rain fell. Of course there were fewer than 500 motor cars and approaching traffic would share the outer concrete strips. Recording car numbers wasa favourite past time of schoolchildren. Bicycle and dog licenes were compulsory.

Travel abroad would be by Pan Am Clipper Seaplane which landed off Stabroek Market / Rowing Club or by the Lady Boats, Nelson and Rodney, and Caribbean schooners. The coastland was served by the T&HD Railway from Georgetown to Rosignol and Vreed-enHoop to Parika. The S. S. Queriman was the Demerara River mouth ferry, while Sprostons ‘R.H. Carr’ carried passengers to McKenzie.

on the road outside the destroyed Ferreira & Gomes. At seven, I was already an accomplished ‘cook-shop-fly’. Ya think it easy!

Beef was first air freighted from the Rupununi on Sept 9th 1945. The 23rd of Feb 1945 at 3:25pm was a major Black Friday when fire broke out at Bookers Drug Store, crossed over to the Assembly Rooms and continued to destroy 37 businesses – 18 buildings including Fogarty’s, RACS, the Post Office, Ferreira & Gomes, The Museum, Demerara Meat Coy and Geddes Grant. Only the concrete structures of Hand in Hand Insurance, GTM, Royal Bank of Canada, Barclay’s Bank prevented the entire Georgetown Shopping Commercial Centre downtown from being destroyed.

Friday May 9th 1947 was yet another Black Friday, when fire broke out at Hincks St., destroying the Savoy Hotel at Regent & High Sts. and the entire block of businesses. During the decade smaller Booker Drug Outlets at Camp & Regent Sts and Cummings & Middle Sts were destroyed by fire. The site at Camp St later became Kwang Hing’s Super Market.

Two days later I climbed the southern staircase of Chronicle House which was less than 12 feet from the destroyed Bookers Drug Store and was miraculously saved by a strong north eastern trade wind. After surveying the smothering embers, I walked to Water St where the glass cases of the Demerara Meat Co. were strewn EXPLORE GUYANA

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In August, the nation celebrated the end of WWII, while the school children gathered at the Astor Cinema for a thank-you of patriotic songs for VJ Day. Germany capitulated Aug 8th and Japan surrendered Aug 14th.

The Forties was our Age of Innocence. We slept with our doors open – no bicycle locks were necessary and the only larceny was raiding the neighbour’s fruit trees, and ‘fowl coop thieves’. The jail on Camp St had enough accommodation for all ‘recalcitrants’ – while wayward youngsters were dispatched to Onderneeming, Suddie in the Essequibo. The Jagans – Dr. Cheddi with his wife Janet returned in 1944 and by the end of the decade had aroused the natives interest in self


and commerce. Mothers stayed at home as Domestic Engineers – cooking, cleaning and ensuring their chicks were happy and contented. There were no electrical appliances to help in the burden of household chores. Cooking was by coal pot and the need to dab ‘chula’, ironing by flat iron, pointa broom to sweep and hell to play when rain fell and napkins on the ‘clothesline’. Woodward’s Gripe water was a blessing. Savings were kept in puzzlin boxes, box hands, soo-soo, friendly Burial Societies, Post Office Savings Accounts and the two banks - Royal & Barclay. 1940’s Bookers Fire In Central Georgetown Water Street, Georgetown, looking towards Stabroek Market

governance and local politics. Janet formed the Women’s Political and Economic Organisation and co-founded the Political Affairs Committee thereby arousing the working class to seek better wages and working conditions. Dr. Cheddi Jagan was elected to the Legislature in the 1947 election, and by 1950 formed the People’s Progressive Party. The Trades Union Council was registered earlier in 1941. The local census in 1946 was 375,819. There was a wholesale diffusion of condoms, locally known as ‘Yankee Bladder’ during the war. My father worked at the Base and on Xmas Day 1944, I entertained the kids in the yard while the older folks were drinking upstairs, by stealing a large box from under his bed and distributing the condoms to the kids. Can you imagine the ole mas when they looked through the window and saw two dozen children playing ‘star war’ and ‘cowboy’ with long white sabres? I was dressed appropriately as Wild Bill Hitchkcock and received a ‘Max Schmelin cutass. Ya think it easy. Our Governors for the decade were George Douglas Owen, Sir Gordon James Lethem, and

Sir Charles Campbell Wooley. Our Mayors were Hon Claude Vibart Wight (3 times), Hon Joseph Gonsalves, Hon Edward Marcel Gonsalves and Percy Claude Wight. Refer to Hammie Green’s anthology ‘Georgetown’. I remember Mr. & Mrs. Jagan with their son Joey, ‘surveying’ Claude Vieria’s school on Robb St. which later became Freedom House. Forbes Burnham was a 1942 Guyana Scholar just eclipsing Stella Jackson who went on to be an excellent Latin teacher at Central High. She was known belovedly by her students as the ‘Latin Terror’. In 1948 the striking sugar estate workers at Enmore Estate clashed with the Police resulting in 5 workers being killed to become the Enmore Martyrs. During that year the Volunteer Force was established and became our local militia until Independence in 1966 when they were replaced by the Guyana Defence Force. While the Forties was our Age of Innocence, it was also the Age of Challenges as parents sacrificed relentlessly to ensure their offsprings received better education than they did and qualified for jobs in the Civil Service

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In sports, the annual Inter-colonial Cricket between BG, Trinidad and Barbados dominated the decade with exchange visits and exciting matches were witnessed at Bourda during the dry season of Feb/March and Sept/Oct. Local cricket stars included R. J. Christiani, Berkeley Gaskin, John Trim, Peter Bayley, George Comacho, Neville Thomas, Bruiser Thomas, Norman Wight, Baijnauth, Jezzer Hill, Ganesh Persaud, Joe Elvis, Bruce Pairedeau and Harry Christiani. Overs were eight balls and the schoolboys stand was built on the north eastern end of Bourda while the ground section was fenced to prevent intrusions onto the field. Jamaica with Frank Worrell and J K Holt visited BG for the first time Oct 1947. Christiani made his highest score 181 against their attack led by Esmond Kentish. MCC under Gubby Allen visited 1947/48, Christiani, Trim and McWatt toured India in 1948. And by 1950 the W.I. established themselves as a ‘cavalier cricket force’ defeating England in their backyard. Ramadhin and Valentine – were ‘those friends of mine’! The football mecca was GFC with Ted Nurse, Selassie Small, Mannie Da Silva, Jim Parks, Bruiser Thomas, the Van Genderen Brothers, Stanley Moore, O T Donald and E D Small our local wizards. Laddie Lewis and Tarrant Glasgow held off any visiting opposition in cycle sports at Olympiads at GCC and BGCC. Aquatic Sports were held at the GFC Pool and Colgrain House with rowing at the Demerara Rowing Club, south of Stabroek Market. The Demerara Turf Club held at least two horse racing meetings annually at Durban Park with Dancing Master, Joan’s Choice, Rockfel, Havoc, Potoro, China Clipper and Demosielle en Greis being top thorougbreds. Lloyd Luckhoo was the announcer, Henry Gomes the Starter while Sunich & Beckles were top jockeys. Dancing was popular at the clubs with Tom Charles Syncopators, Al Seales Washboards, Sonny Thomas and Cecil Nelson Lucky Strike all having popular fan bases. Venues such as


Haley’s, Rest Hall Above the Laundry, Frolic Hall, N. P.C., the Friendly Burial Societies and Lodge Halls were popular venues. ‘Waist lines’ were measured and patrons paid by the ‘inch’ Man…..if this happened today – promoters would all become Rockefellers with ‘the present refrigerator waists’. Parliment Buildings in the Early Days

The Georgetown cinemas included London, (Camp St), Empire, Metropole, Astor, Olympic, (Lombard St) Rialto (Vlissengen Rd), and Capitol (Albouystown). Top movies in the decade were Great Expectations, Hamlet, Casablanca, Best Years of our Lives, Bells of St Mary’s, Song to Remember and Song of Bernadette. De Mille’s lavish technicolour spectacles Reap the Wild Wind, Unconquered, Story of Dr Wassel, Royal Canadian Mounted Police as well as John Ford’s / John Wayne’s western epics, She wore a Yellow Ribbon, Rio Grande and Fort Apache. Sands of Iwo Jima and Mighty Joe Young were popular pit favourites at the Empire. Olympic Cinema added a roof and after refurbishing 1947/48 was popular with Kidnapped, Good News, Scott of the Antartic, and Abbott & Costello in African Screams. Hollywood Cinema in Kitty was built by the end of the decade. They opened with Dicken’s Christmas Carol.

Georgetown City Hall at Christmas

Lamaha Service Canal, Georgetown

Radio broadcasts were from the ZFY Studios at North & New Garden Sts. with popular programmes including BBC News at 7:15am, 12:15pm and 7:15pm. The station closed at 9:00 pm with John Phillips Sousa’s Washington Post March. Vivian Lee’s quiz programme ‘Time is Money’ was a hit as was the Ovaltine Show and later Mrs. Snodgrass comedy. Popular hit tunes included Rum & Coca Cola, Tennessee Waltz, Dance Ballerina Dance, Five minutes more, Time after Time, You’ll never know, If, Tree in the Meadow, You are my Sunshine, Paper Doll, This is the Army Mr Jones, Cruising down the river, Golden Earrings, Ol Lamp Lighter, Caledonia, To each his own, Lovely bunch of coconuts, Open the door Richard, It’s Magic, Manana, Slow Boat

Main Street Canal, Georgetown EXPLORE GUYANA

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to China, Dear Hearts, Gentle People and Gypsy. Local Shanto hits were Donkey City, Fan me Soldier Boy Fan me and Fifteen Cents. Radio was our foremost entertainment media other than cinema, which went ‘dodo’, after TV reached Guyana around 1985. Bill Rogers, Sam Chase, Jack Mello, Madam O’lindy, Mighty Joe Young and Sam Dopie were our Vaudeville stars. Len Houston, Dewan Singh, Young Joe Louis and Kid Tanner fought for boxing purses every Boxing Day at Olympic Cinema. The Muttoo Bros Band was the top Vaudeville band in these days and influenced our music – shanto to calypso especially in Trinidad. Refer to ‘Black Praxis Writings on Guyanese Music’ – a must read Anthology of Guyanese Music written by Dr Vibert Cambridge, Ohio University. The Christmas hit was Bing Crosby’s White Christmas from Holiday Inn 1942 even though ironically the only snow locally we knew was ‘snow cone’. 1949 Gene Autry’s Rudolph the Rednose Reindeer was a hit also as well as Mel Torme’s Christmas Song sung by Nat King Cole. Western hits included Deep in the Heart of Texas, Don’t Fence me in and Pistol Packing Mama. The current Carifesta Ave was Kelly Dam – a narrow pathway track to the Golf Club, Thomas Lands and well kept playing fields including CYO, Teacher’s, Scout’s Ground, the back of St Stanislaus ground, Cable & Wireless, Rifle Ranges and Northern Rangers. The Demerara Golf Club became Queen Elizabeth Park after 1963 when their lease expired while the Rifle Ranges and environs became the GDF’s Camp Ayanganna. The site of Pegasus Hotel was a huge ‘Government Pond’ adjacent to King’s Ground. The Militia Band gave public performances weekly in the Bandstands of the Botanic & Promenade Gardens and the Sea Wall. For most of the decade, the foreshore off the Bandstand was ‘pristine beach’ with the wreck of the KeyHolt an attraction visible off Fort Groyne. By 1950 the RACS and Museum were rebuilt as was Bookers Universal. Our top departmental Stores were Bookers, Fogarty’s Bettencourt (Eclipse & Unique ), D M Fernandes, Kawall, Sanbach Parker, Kirpalani’s, Majeed, Khouri, A H & L Kissoon and Hutchinson. Also joining the fray at the end of the decade was Bata, Saraka and Searchlight were our stores for ‘juta’, Yatching Shoes and strap-over slippers being the standard wear. Serge suits was a must for church and funerals while pleated skirts and covered buttons and belt were the fashion from Bellas Hess and La Belle Magazines. Yong Hing’s, Kwang Hing’s, Resaul Maraj, Alexander


and Albert Chin were the popular groceries with Bookers, Ramcharran, Burrowes, Cendrecourt, Lachmansingh’s, Carfit’s, Bostwick and Green’s the dependable drug stores. Patent medicines included Carter’s Little Liver Pills, Mendaco for Asthma, Bronchitis & Hay Fever, Phyllosan for ‘looks & vitality’, Moore’s Emerall for all skin infections, Ferrol Compound for cough, De Witts Pills for joint pains. Amridathra House on Regent St. pioneered lots of local medicine while Bookers Limacol was the ‘freshness of a Breeze in a bottle’. Nara, Ring worm, Goady and Big Foot were common afflictions. Of course there was Soft Grease for blind boils and local bush remedies ‘sure cures’ in addition to each school term ‘clean out’ with cascara, epsom salts, senna and castor oil. Popular bush medicine included Ant’s Bush for Trush, Eucalyptus, Fitz Weed, Cunga Pump, Leaf of Life, Suriname Cherry, Quashie bitters, Aloes, Sweet Broom and Lemon Grass. There was no ‘ready made clothing’ – so cloth was bought by the yard and tailors and seamstresses sewed our clothing. The men’s 1Br suit cost $20. After the war Imported chicken neck & back was cheap and popular as was Corned Beef, Nut Butter and KOO Grapes in cans from South Africa (later banned with apartheid). Classic comics – DC’s Superman, Spy Smasher, Batman, Capt America and Fawcett’s Capt Marvel were popular while the kids scrounged the library for Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, Biggles, William & Billy Bunter. The Bedtime Stories series started our reading career. Popular liquor was rum from DIH – Russian Bear, Houston’s and Demerara White at Light & Fifth Sts. I remember a case of rum, 12 bottles was sold for $12. Empties fetched 4 cents for pocket money and half-price tickets at the cinema pit. Brown Betty rebuilt was our Mel’s Diner with Ferraz, Coppin’s, Gunie’s Chuck-A-Sang, Mount Eagle’s and Castanheiro being popular cake shops / parlours. Deliveries were mostly by dray cart and carrier bikes while W & R introduced the 3 wheel motorised carts to deliver ice. Sue-A-Quan’s & Correira’s wine and pac-pac were also popular. Brown Betty introduced Popsicle, Fudgicle and Creamsicle in three wheel bicycle carts by 1946. I remember a whole snapper, ice fish of 24 inches for 24 cents, 5 crabs or hassars for 2 bits and 8 Buxton spice mangoes for a bit. A penny was a mouthful mauby and bun treat. Toddy, Icing glass and Cogue were popular.

Demelec, Georgetown

Popular local beverages were DIH Club drinks, Vimto and Pepsi, W&R Coca-Cola, Rahaman’s Red Spot, Juicee flavours from Hardina and Durban Sts, Verdun’s Lemonade, DeRyck’s and Mount Eagle Mauby. Shave Ice compress were from hand carts as was cow manure and pots and pans tinkering/soldering knives were sharpened from passing street vendors.

Saint Stanislaus at the other end of Brickdam celebrated its 80th anniversary in 1946. Top local hotels were Tower while Trent House (Punch Bowl) and Park Hotel also provided accommodation for visitors. The popular ‘HO’ House was Mom’s at Wellington & South Road while Londonderry House, another favourite became Cambridge University later.

Oscar the blind newspaper vendor, Walker the British, Cato, Bertie Vaughn and Law & Order were popular street characters. At Christmas the popular street entertainment was the Santapee Bands which behaved themselves to become Masquerade Bands with their Mother Sally and Mad Bull, fife and drums kicking dust. Steel bands which originated from Trinidad on VJ Day did not become popular on the city streets with Tramps, until Queen Elizabeth’s Coronation in June 1953.

Taxi service was provided by Bookers, Tower, and Norman’s Garage. The Motor Transport Bus Service was introduced by the end of the decade. Following the destruction of the Assembly Rooms, the Georgetown Club was reestablished at Camp Street to become the new meeting place of the ‘aristocracy’. There was a dearth of suitable venues for ‘plays and theatre’ after the Assembly Rooms were destroyed, and the Schools Philarmonic Hall was inadequate for theatrical and dramatic productions. The Theatre Guild filled the void in 1957 and the National Cultural Centre followed in 1972.

Local newspapers were Chronicle, Graphic and Argosy with the Chronicle Christmas Annual a popular favourite. Queens Collage on Brickdam clashed annually with St Stanislaus and Berbice High in cricket and football for the (Jacob and Dias Cup) while their annual athletic sports produced many future national sports stars. The other secondary high schools – Central, Enterprise, Tutorial and Chatham also provided education to Cambridge Junior, Senior and Higher Senior level and attracted many rural kids to travel daily to Georgetown to improve their education. Do you know that Queens College (QC) occupied the site of Bishop’s High School before that institution was erected at Carmichael & Murray Sts.? Bishop’s founded 1870, became a Government institution and was built at Carmichael St after QC moved to Brickdam in 1950. Field hockey was introduced at QC in 1949,

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Piped water was introduced by 1950 and stave vats in yards and the large galvanised tanks in Albouystown by St George’s and the Promenade Gardens were dismantled. You previously fetched pails of drinking water for 2 cents a bucket. Merriman’s Mall was a canal flowing to the Water Works at Camp St and with the canals on South Road, High St, Lamaha St, East St and Punt Trench well maintained and at least 6 feet deep – I can’t remember any flooding in the city except for Camp St Avenue. Wordsworth McAndrew who went to Christ Church School delighted in splashing barefoot in this flooded avenue, while admiring the girls at St Roses. There was a minor flooding around 1949 when the koker off the later Banks DIH compound broke. Those were the days when Guyana was an El Dorado. It was our Age of Innocence when


Georgetown Seawall In the Old Days.

neighbours regardless of colour, race, creed, or religion were all Macmays – looked out for each other, sharing the little they had and cared, scolded any child as if they were their own. Around 1958 when I read of a ‘bombing’ in Port-of-Spain Trinidad I felt totally safe in my homeland, boasting that will never happen ‘locally’. I ate my words 4 years later when all hell broke loose on Friday Feb 16,

Railway Station, North Carmichael Street, Georgetown

1962. Ya think it was easy! For more Nostalgias - refer to NOSTALGIA de Book – Golden Memories of Guyana 1940 to 1980 or go to Godfrey Chin at Google or Yahoo. NOSTALGIAS de Book is on sale in Georgetown at various book stores or you can also order online at: http://www.godfreychin.com/book.php Godfrey Chin


MASH IT UP

Get With the Spirit

M

ashramani, often abbreviated to “Mash”, is an annual festival that celebrates Guyana becoming a Republic in 1970. The festival, usually held on 23 February – Guyana’s Republic Day, includes a parade, music, games and cooking and is intended to commemorate the “Birth of the Republic”.

The word “Mashramani” is derived from an Amerindian word and in translation means “the celebration of a job well done”. It is probably the most colourful of all the country’s festivals. There are spectacular costume competitions, float parades, masquerade bands and dancing in the streets to the accompaniment of steel band music and calypsos. Masqueradrs frequent the streets performing acrobatic dance routines, a vivid reminder of Guyana’s African heritage. Calypso competitions with their witty social commentaries are another integral part of “Mash” and this culminates in the crowning of a King and/or Queen of the bands annually.

The search for a name to replace carnival began and it was suggested by Basil Butcher that an Amerindian name be chosen. This was agreed to and several individuals including Mr. Allan Fiedtkou, an Amerindian, were contacted. Mr. Fiedtkou held discussions with his grandfather who explained a type of festival that was held by Amerindians whenever they gather to celebrate a special event. This event he said was like “Muster Many” (or Mashirimehi in Amerindian) and sounded in Arawak like Mashramani. Steps were taken to confirm this. Adrian Thompson concluded that since no one could have confirmed or denied that the Arawak word for Festival was Mashramani, then the festival could be called Mashramani. On 23 February 1970 the Festival called “Mashramani” was launched and became a huge success with people drawn from all Regions of Guyana to Linden welcoming Guyana’s status as a Republic with over three days of frolic and fun. After witnessing the massive crowds, glitter and level of competition, Mr. David Singh, a Government official, held discussions with the

The Jaycees Chapter of Linden had been organising an Independence Carnival in Linden, formerly Mackenzie, since Guyana became independent in 1966. When Guyana became a Republic in February 1970, they formed a Jaycees Republic Celebrations Committee. Basil Butcher was selected as Chairman but due to his being selected to tour Australia with the West Indies cricket team, Jim Blackman was appointed as the Deputy to carry on. A broadbased committee, including resource personnel such as Wordsworth McAndrew, Arthur Seymour and Adrian Thompson, began planning the organisation of the carnival activities.

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Jaycees Committee about bringing the event to Georgetown, the nation’s capital. Approval was also given by the then President Forbes Burnham for Mash to be a national event as part of the annual Republic celebrations. Mash activities were rotated in Linden, Berbice and Georgetown but due to sponsorship, the Costume Bands contest remained in Georgetown. With Guyana being as large as it is, people travel from miles out of town to be a part of the celebrations bringing children, food and all, because they see this day as a day of great national celebration. The annual Mash Day depicts a hive of activity from Vlissingen Road and lrving Street in Georgetown all the way to the National Park, with an air of expectancy. Thousands of people take to the streets to participate in the annual Mashramani celebrations, which has been a part of Guyanese culture for over 40 years. Mashramani Day is considered to be the ultimate party. Both men and women alike join the various bands sponsored by the local private and public sector and dress up in bright and colourful costumes depicting the rich history and traditions of Guyana as portrayed in the various sections. When it comes to costumes on Mash Day, there is serious rivalry and revelry between the many bands and the various


sections as they dance their way through the streets of the capital city, Georgetown all the way to the National Park prancing to the sweet sounds of steel bands and popular local calypso music of the day and hoping that their band will be crowned as winners of the various titles and prizes as their crowning glory. The celebrations get bigger and better each year as new designers and groups launch new bands with larger sections displaying a growing creativity and mastery of the art of costume design and manufacturing. The costumes have even become larger and more colourful. The celebration of Mashramani has now become truly national and is celebrated nationwide in many different communities. The Ministry of Culture has a fully structured secretariat established to plan and execute the various components of the annual Mash festivities. Plan your vacation and come home for ‘Mash’. You can register to join a band, choose your section, purchase a costume and be part of the prancing and dancing in the streets or just hang with your friends and family and enjoy yourself in true Guyanese style from the sidelines with fabulous food, world famous Guyanese beverages and be part of the biggest street party in all of Guyana.


Wings to Treasure Birding in Coastal Guyana Especially In & Around Georgetown By: Kirk Smock

Images of Harpy Eagles, Guianan Cock-of-the-Rocks and Scarlet Macaws often lead birdwatchers in Guyana to focus on the country’s interior, where places like the Iwokrama Forest of Rupununi Savannah harbour some of the world’s most exotic bird species.

B

ut those who skip Guyana’s coast – especially in and around the capital city of Georgetown – miss out on some spectacular birding, including some species that can’t be found in the interior.

Black Capped Donacobius. Photo by Mike Weedon

Some favourite spots of local and international birders alike include the Georgetown Botanical Gardens, where more than 180 bird species have been identified; the Mahaica River for good looks at the primitive Hoatzin; the Abary River trail, where the Bloodcolored Woodpecker is regularly seen; and some mudflats along the Atlantic Coast or Demerara River to see shorebirds including the Scarlet Ibis.

Georgetown Botanical Gardens A country’s capital city may not be the first place that comes to mind when planning a birding trip, but Georgetown, with its location at the convergence of the Demerara River and the Atlantic Ocean, is awash with Neotropical bird species. Out of Guyana’s 800-plus species of birds, more than 180 from 39 different families have been recorded here.

Yellow Crowned Amazon Parrot. Photo by Karen Straus

If you ask the experts from Guyana’s birdwatching society, the Georgetown-based Guyana Amazon Tropical Birds Society (GATBS), to show you one of the best birdwatching locations in the city, they would surely take you to the Georgetown Botanical Gardens. The Botanical Gardens date back to 1877 when British Guiana’s Court of Policy granted the Royal

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The main ornithological highlight here is the Blood-colored Woodpecker, an astonishingly colorful Veniliornis found only in the three Guianas. Within its range, the bird is almost wholly limited to the narrow coastal plain, and the gardens are one of the best places in Guyana to find it. Also present are the Great Horned Owl, Green Ibis, Golden-spangled Piculet, White-bellied Piculet, Black-crested Antshrike, Spotted Tody-Flycatcher, and Wingbarred Seedeater. Around the garden’s ponds are healthy populations of Great, Snowy and Cattle Egret along with Pinnated Bittern, Black-capped Donacobius, Wattled Jacana, Black-crowned

a variety of tropical flowers and a host of different palms. The gardens were also decorated with manmade monuments and structures, some of which still serve as centerpieces today. The famed Kissing Bridge is a pair of ornamental cast iron bridges that lead to two small islands, while the Caretakers Hut – seen upon entering the gardens – was built in 1881 to provide lodging for the gatekeeper. Also famous is the Place of the Seven Ponds, which was built in 1969 as a shrine to Sir David Rose, the first Governor General of Guyana. Former President Hugh Desmond Hoyte and poet Martin Carter are also laid to rest there. While the national monuments are a draw, come early in the morning or late in the afternoon and chances are you’ll see birders with binoculars running around the paths. It could be argued that some of the most famous inhabitants of the Botanical Garden are the West Indian Manatees, which have been present in the ponds since 1895, but there are a few species of highly sought-after birds that are also doing their best to lure visitors.

Night, Tri-Colored and Little Blue Heron. Raptors can include Peregrine Falcon, Snail and Gray Kite and Yellow-headed Caracara. Red-and-green Macaw, Red-shouldered Macaw and Brown-throated Parakeet are also present, as are all five species of Amazonian parrots found in Guyana: Festive, Mealy, Blue-cheeked, Orange-winged and Yellow-crowned. A Toco Toucan or two have also been known to show their flashy bills. Birding in the centrally-located Georgetown Botanical Gardens is easily done from the main road that intersects the grounds, but it’s always recommended to enlist a local birding guide so you can safely explore the furthest reaches of the gardens while not missing any of the spectacular birds.

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Toco Toucan. Photo by Karen Straus

Agricultural and Commercial Society permission to create a Botanical and Horticultural Garden in Georgetown. To facilitate the process, the government purchased 276 acres of the backlands of an old coffee plantation called Vlissingen. Roughly 185 acres of this land were set aside for the gardens. To transform the swampy fields a Mr. Prestoe of the Trinidad Gardens designed a plan, and Mr. J F Waby (also from Trinidad) was appointed head gardener. Eventually another botanist, Mr. G S Jenman, was added to the project to assist Mr. Waby in developing the gardens. The two oversaw a team of workers that filled the gardens with an array of ornamental trees,


Botanical Gardens, Georgetown. Inset photo of the Kissing Bridge

Mahaica River Heading east along the Atlantic coast from Georgetown, the Mahaica River is less than an hour’s drive. Here, the birding is done from small boats that ply the tannin-rich water that winds through mangrove gallery forest and savannahs. More than 150 species have been recorded along the Mahaica River and some that you’ll likely hear your guide call out include Black-capped Donacobius, Wing-barred Seedeater, Point-tailed Palmcreeper, Moriche Oriole, Rufous Crab-Hawk, Black Hawk-Eagle, Boat-billed Heron, Pied Water-Tyrant, Tropical Kingbird, Silver-backed Antbird, Green-rumped Parrotlet and Great Black-Hawk. An impressive list, but the real draw here is the abundance of Guyana’s national bird, the

Hoatzin. Locally called the Canje Pheasant, the Hoatzin is believed to provide a direct link to the Archaeopteryx, the first known bird. The social birds live in family groups of up to 40 birds along the river, making the chances of seeing them quite good. Their long tail feathers and elongated neck topped with a tiny head bearing blood-red eyes ringed in blue skin and a punkish crest of long feathers makes this bird one to see.

Abary River Just a short drive from the Mahaica River site is some excellent birding along an easy walking trail within protected Abary River mangrove forest. The trail provides great chances of seeing

The Mahaica River

West Indian Manatee. Photo by Julie Zickefoose

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many endemic and coastal species, including the Blood-coloured Woodpecker, Guianan Gnatcatcher, White-bellied and White-barred Piculet, Spotted Tody-Flycatcher, Northern Scrub-Flycatcher, Great-billed Seed-Finch, Long-winged Harrier and Bicolored Conebill. As the trail gets closer to the Atlantic, you may also see the endangered Rufous Crab-Hawks scour the marshes for their namesake food.

Shorebirds A coastal birding trip near Georgetown wouldn’t be complete without ticking off several coastal species, and there are two excellent options for doing just this. On route to the Mahaica and Abary river birding sites, there are some birdy mudflats near Ann’s Grove. From the seawall, you can easily spot numerous shorebirds, including Scarlet Ibis, numerous plovers, Western Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Clapper Rail, Whimbrel, Tricolored and Yellow-crowned Night-Heron and Rufous Crab-Hawk.

Yellow Headed Caracara

Another option to spot shorebirds near Georgetown is to bird along the beautiful Demerara River when the tides are out and the mudflats are exposed. This trip offers a choice of birding from a drifting boat or by walking along the mudflats; either option provides good looks at Scarlet Ibis, Rufous Crab-Hawk, Little Blue Heron, Tri-coloured Heron and Magnificent Frigatebird.

Plan Your Trip One of the best ways to experience any of the birdwatching tours in and around Georgetown is to contact the expert tour operators specialising in birding tours. See list on page 103.

Wattled Jacana. Photo By Karen Straus

For more on birdwatching throughout Guyana, visit www.guyanabirding. com, where you’ll find information on planning a trip to Guyana (including itineraries, tour operators and lodging information), archived birding news and newsletters, and up-to-date information on new developments within Guyana’s birdwatching industry. From here you can also download A Field Checklist of the Birds of Guyana, which was recently updated by the Smithsonian Institution.

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Snail Kite. Photo by Karen Straus


WaiWai Youth fishing with Bow and Arrow in the upper Essequibo-1950s. (Photo: Courtesy - The Smithsonian)

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WaiWai Youth at Kanashen in the 1950s-(Photo- courtesy Smithsonian)

I

n the deep South West of Guyana, at the village of Masakenyari (place of mosquitoes) live the approximately 250 descendants of the original group of WaiWai who had crossed over in the 1930s to British Guiana from Brazil and who settled in the upper Essequibo River alongside its tributaries - the Kassakaityu, the Kamoa and Sipu rivers. The location of this village, established in 1999 when the WaiWai relocated from the lower, flooded village of Akotopono, has positioned the WaiWai as the custodians of the source of the mighty Essequibo River, the monitors of territorial integrity on Guyana’s south western frontier and the guarantors of the biodiversity and ecosystems within their titled boundaries.

Canoe, Bible and Internet

WAIWAI’S Journey to Modernity By: Major General (Ret’d) Joe Singh

The modern history of the WaiWai commenced with the birth of Elka, the Great Kayaritomo or Chief in 1933 at Tohoniti Pona (Big Rocks in the River) at the confluence of the Kiricici (Old Bead), a tributary of the Mapuera River, and the Mapuera in Brazil. His father died after his birth and his father’s friend, Tumika, bargained with his uncle Mapari (his mother’s brother) for Elka and agreed on a barter of one otter skin and five feathered arrows. His uncle subsequently took Elka in 1948 WaiWai family on the move in their Canoe in the upper Essequibo River in the 1950s - (Photo courtesy - The Smithsonian)

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The Author (second from left) in conversation with Kayaritomo Mawasha (2nd from right) with Bible-Kanashen, 1984. ( The Author)

at age 15 to Erofoimo (old baking pan) in British Guiana where he underwent his ‘stinging ants’ test. Belts of stinging ants were tied to his legs to test his courage and resolve. His leadership qualities and standing in the community were such that even before he was 20 years old he was recognised as a Shaman (Witchdoctor) at his village of Yaka Yaka (Banana). Meanwhile, in 1949, missionaries from the Unevangelised Field Mission, Pennsylvania, journeyed up the Essequibo River to WaiWai country and established a mission one mile from Yaka Yaka, at Kanashen (God loves you). The tension between the spirituality of the Shaman and the Christian missionaries came to a head in 1954 when Elka the Shaman failed to save the life of a child Ekufu, who suffered from convulsive fits. He felt that God had possessed him to curb his Shaman’s powers and he underwent traditional rituals which seemed to convince him that the Christian God was more powerful than he. This led to the conversion of Elka from witchdoctor to Christian. Kanashen became the focal point for WaiWai who converted to Christianity. The WaiWai first major encounter with coastal civilization was in 1972, when Kayaritomo Elka and 30 WaiWai were brought from Kanashen to build the Umana Yana in Georgetown. This indigenous structure would provide an

entertainment and relaxation venue for the conference in 1972 of the Foreign Ministers of the member countries of the Non Aligned Movement. The structure has since been maintained as a National Heritage Structure. It was in the early 2000s that increasing interest in biodiversity, ecosystem, and landscape conservation, and land tenure for Amerindians, led to the WaiWai being vested with ownership of their ‘space’, 625,000 hectares (1.54 million acres) of land on the northern border of Brazil’s Para State.

Three years later, in 2007, the WaiWai achieved another milestone with the designation of their land as a protected area and adopted a management plan, developed with the support of Conservation International. As managers of their Community Owned Conservation Area, they are intent on building a ‘conservation economy’ based on sustainable use of their natural resources. The WaiWai community since 2004 has also benefited from the use of appropriate technology in that their village lighting system and water

Aerial Photograph of the WaiWai village of Masakenyari in the upper Essequibo River in SW Guyana(Photo-the Author)

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WaiWai Elder Marawanawa imparting knowledge

WaiWai Elder Marawanawa with his Bamboo flute

WaiWai Benab Under Construction at Masakenyari

WaiWai Youth Engaged in Sustainable Harvesting of Fruits of the Turu Palm.

pump are powered by photo-voltaics. In April 2009, having been facilitated by Conservation International with access to satellite bandwidth, they are benefitting from information technology and the Internet. Anyone who has interacted with the WaiWai within their ‘space’ could not avoid being

impressed by the beauty and functionality of their traditional dwellings and communal meeting places, their versatility in fishing, farming, hunting and construction, their physical prowess whether in the forest or in the rivers, their infectious humour, love of music and musical instruments, their levels of functional literacy, creativity, self reliance, genuine hospitality, unselfishness, resourcefulness and intellect. The WaiWai’s traditional beliefs and practices are embedded in their psyche and manifested through their dances (the shoriwiko-a dance which is preceded by wrestling; and the Yamothe dance of the anaconda) and in their material and spiritual connection with the biodiversity and ecosystems of their environment and with their ancestral spirits.

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These provide the moral, ethical and communal strengths, which, to a great extent, have allowed them to successfully transition the journey that began with the movement by canoe from Brazil, through the watershed of the mighty Essequibo, to their first settled village at Kanashen. There the influence of the Christian missionaries and the Bible, impacted


on their spirituality, and, when infused with the strength of their traditions and their umbilical connections with the environment, helped shape and reinforce their moral and ethical value systems. These have given them the confidence and the courage to manage, at a pace with which they are comfortable, their relationship with the modern world. There is the need to provide the WaiWai with continuing support through improving their lines of communication while mitigating environmental impacts; reducing high costs associated with logistics; stimulating sustainable economic enterprises based on niche tourism and their unique craft; and, building capacity - especially among young people, to continue the journey in the modern world. Such sustained support will be crucial to the survivability of this unique community and the sustainable management of their remote and treasured ‘space’. Major General (retd) Joseph G Singh is a former Chief of Staff of the Guyana Defence Force (1990-2000) and former Executive Director, Conservation International Guyana (2001-2005). He has been closely associated with the WaiWai since 1969.

The WaiWai Administration Hut with Satellite dish and solar panels. Masakenyari, upper Essequibo-2007 (Photo: The Author)

Former WaiWai Kayaritomo, James Suse at the IT Centre at Masakenyari

Kayaritomo Paul Chekema,(c) Elder Wachana Yamochi (r) outside of the WaiWai ethnomuseum, Akotopono -2009 (Photo-The Author)


Big Toothy Fish In the Land of Many Waters

By: Robert Arrington

As a boy growing up in South Florida I dreamed of the opportunity to explore the tropical rainforests of South America in search of crazy fish with big teeth. 48 |

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Piranha. Photo by Judy Karwacki

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n October 2008, when James Curry, host of the television show Birding Adventures, invited me to join him on an expedition to Guyana, I jumped at the chance. I knew absolutely nothing of Guyana; I wasn’t even sure where it was; just that it had pristine rainforest and I was going to have a chance to fish. I packed my bags. During our travels we visited Surama village and that is where my quest to explore the many waters of Guyana began. During long conversations with many locals it became apparent to me that the many rivers and oxbow lakes that make up Guyana’s landscape are teeming with loads of spectacular game fish. As we continued to explore Guyana in search of birds, I began planning my return to search for my true love: big fish. In March 2009 I returned to go on an epic catch-and-release sport fishing journey that would cover 280 miles on five rivers that wind through the Iwokrama rainforest. My fishing crew consisted of five Amerindian guides and a cameraman to film the trip for future episodes of my television show, Respect Outdoors. We packed two aluminum boats with our supplies and started our journey on the Burro Burro River. Our first day was meant to be strictly travelling but I talked my main guide, Freddie Allicock, into stopping at a couple of his honey holes and it didn’t take long to land some beautiful Black Piranhas and two beautiful mid-sized Piaras. Due to the large amounts of brush and logs in the Burro Burro, lures weren’t the best bait, but we had luck with live and cut bait. As we neared our first campsite I was thrilled when our bowman, Milner, and Capt. Freddie calmly commented, “You haven’t seen anything yet.” Needless to say, my expectations grew through the night. The next day we made it to the Siparuni River, which is where my dreams of catching crazy fish with big teeth were truly fulfilled. Every five minutes I would say, “Hey, let’s try here.” Capt. Freddie would shake his finger in a simple way of saying, “Trust me, I’m taking you to a spot you’ll never forget.” Sure enough, as we rounded a hard turn to the left my eyes saw a portion of the river that looked handcrafted to be a fisherman’s delight. It was wide open and perfect for casting any type of top water or shallow running lure. There were large rounded rocks all along the bank and you could see many upwellings

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indicating perfect underwater structures that would harbour giant game fish. I quickly pulled out one of my rods and on my first cast I went with a pearl white Strike Pro Buster Jerk, which is a type of suspending Glide bait, and it lasted about ten seconds before I felt some kind of wild explosion on the other end of my 60# braided line.

I had hooked a monster. This fish pulled like a freight train, ripping drag from my reel at will. As he neared the boat I could hear him croaking from under the water. Milner confidently said, “Piranha. Big one.” I knew that must have meant really big because the ones I caught the day before, which I thought were big, never got so much as a grin from him. He was right.

The serious expression that dominated my face instantly turned into pure joy as I knew

As the giant Black Piranha broke the surface at the edge of the boat all I could see was 50 |

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a massive set of powerful jaws lined with razor sharp teeth; the fish had an attitude to match. Carefully I reached down and grabbed him by the tail and pulled out my leatherman to remove the hooks. For the next couple of hours we all enjoyed some of the best fishing I could have ever wished for. It was giant Black Piranha one right after another, and as we decided to move towards our next camping location, Milner turned to me and casually said, “It’s only going to get better.”


Piara. Photo by Judy Kawarcki

That night as we all drifted off to bed it wasn’t long till the wonderful silence of the jungle ruled the night. It was as if we were the only people on earth, complete isolation. As I drifted off to sleep, I just kept saying, “This is what it looked like in the beginning.” The subsequent days continued to bring fantastic fishing on the Essequibo, Rupununi and Rewa rivers, but I didn’t realise what was yet to come. After arriving

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at the Amerindian village of Rewa and settling into their Eco-Lodge, my guides all said, “This is where the fishing is.” What, I thought, have we been doing for the past week? After lunch we were back on the river and heading to Grass Pond. It’s a place I will never forget. As soon as we arrived I started casting top water plugs that were getting absolutely crushed by giant Arowana and Peacock Bass. Without a doubt it was the best freshwater fishing of my life. On several occasions there would be multiple fish going for my lure and when one would get it, the fight was on. Due to the extremely clear water in the pond I could sight fish and cast directly to them with specific baits, but what worked best was a Red/White Zara Spook with 3X aftermarket treble hooks. The fish couldn’t get enough.

Himara. Photo by Ian Craddock

Later in the afternoon, my guides showed me a behemoth of a fish, although due to its protected status we couldn’t catchand-release fish for it. As we paddled along quietly looking for a fish I knew nothing about, one of the boys whispered, “There!” Up to the surface came a belching Arapaima, the largest freshwater fish on earth. Thanks to a local rehabilitation project they are making a comeback in the oxbow lakes around Guyana where they can grow to more than six feet in length and be in excess of 600 pounds.

To arrange fishing tours in Guyana see the list of official tour operators in the THAG Members Listing on page 103.

Peacock Bass. Photo by Judy Karwacki Piranha Catch. Photo by Judy Karwacki

While fishing in Guyana all of my childhood dreams came true, but I also caught fish that my young mind could never have dreamed up. Guyana’s sport fishing industry is in its infancy, so it’s often just you and the locals on the rivers. The fish I caught in Guyana were legendary, and they remain, as we practiced strictly catch-andrelease fishing. A place like Guyana needs to be preserved for generations to come.

Robert Arrington is the host of the sport fishing show, Respect Outdoors. For videos and pictures of his fishing trips to Guyana, visit www.respectoutdoors.com.

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Ian Craddock with Himara


Growing Mangroves Protecting the Natural Habitat from the Sea By: Dave Martins

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n a time of rising sea levels threatening coastal communities, Guyana has embarked on a wide-ranging programme of restoration and preservation of its traditional mangrove forests as a barrier to the invading sea. Eventually, it will be man-made seawalls and nature’s mangrove combining to repel the Atlantic waves that threaten below-sea-level Guyana. Dubbed the Guyana Mangrove Restoration Project, the programme is jointly funded by the Government of Guyana and the European Union and is in keeping with the Low Carbon Development Strategy pioneered by Guyanese President Bharrat Jagdeo which has committed to the country’s development via the low carbon pathway. Indigenous to Guyana’s rivers, and its coastline facing the Atlantic Ocean, this natural sea barrier has been depleted in recent years by changing sea conditions and by degradation by man. Now, there is a concerted effort to replace the depleted forests. From a purely scientific standpoint, mangrove coastland forests sequester 10 times as much carbon than the better known tropical hardwood forests that Guyana is known for.

Kids on Hope Beach with Mangrove seedlings

Much of Guyana’s northern coastline is rimmed with concrete barriers to the sea, but mangrove can contribute to this protection process at much less cost (1 meter of concrete wall = US$3,000. 1 meter of mangrove = US$15.) Begun in March 2010, the project seeks to achieve its aim of “natural sea defence” through a number of thrusts which include the protection and management of existing

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mangrove, the meticulous and tedious replanting of mangrove seedlings on the Atlantic coastline, a multi-media education outreach to increase public understanding and support for mangrove protection and research.


Birds in Pomeroon River estuary in front of Mangroves

The Mangrove Action Committee (MAC) which is comprised of members from all the relevant national agencies is administering the project under the National Agriculture Research Institute (NARI) which is an arm of the Ministry of Agriculture. The project has already generated public attention through radio and television spots, newspaper articles and highly visible billboards carrying the message, “Mangroves protect us from the sea – let us protect them.” The laborious physical work of planting mangrove in Guyana’s coastal mudflats is well under way. As Minister of Agriculture Robert Persaud noted, “As of October 2010, we have already successfully planted 40,000 mangrove seedlings in two pilot sites located in the most vulnerable areas. As a clear demonstration of our commitment to mangrove preservation, the Government has recently passed legislation, under the Forest Act, to make all mangroves in Guyana a protected species.” Although planted in mudflats where shifting tides are at play, the young plants take hold

quickly. NARI’s Executive Director Dr. Oudho Homenauth who visited the Hope Beach site one month after the planting, said, “I was struck by how well the seedlings had withstood the very high tides and extreme wave energy they had been exposed to. For such young plants, they proved to be very resilient.” Chairperson of the MAC, Annette ArjoonMartins, pointed out that mangrove’s ability to create land by trapping sea-borne sediment is of value to a low-lying country such as Guyana. “Also, for visitors to the country, our mangrove forests are prime areas for bird-watching – such as the Scarlet Ibises, Snowy Egrets, Roseate Spoonbills and numerous migratory species. Additionally, in areas such as Fort Wellington, to sample the marvelous black mangrove honey produced by bees foraging in the forest is a treat.” The MAC Chairperson is also inviting visitors to Guyana to participate in the mangrove replanting. “You will see our wildlife up close, contribute to our sea defence, and reduce your carbon footprint at the same time. Contact us at macsecretariat@gmail.com and we’ll get you going.”

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Mangrove forested sea shore at Vreed en Hoop

Groyne around which Mangroves grew land

Planting new Mangrove seedlings


Legendary

KING KAIETEUR Custodian of Nature’s Gifts

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he Kaieteur falls is undoubtedly the crown jewel of Guyana’s interior. With a sheer drop of 741 ft and a total height of 822 ft, it is one of the highest waterfalls in the world, twice as high as Victoria Falls and nearly 5 times higher than Niagara Falls and reputed to be the highest single-drop waterfall in the world. Amerindian legend has it that Kaie, one of the great old Patamona chiefs, committed selfsacrifice by paddling his canoe over the falls to appease Makonaima, the great spirit, in order to save his tribe from the savage Caribisi tribe. This folklore has served as the basis for the legend of Kaieteur which is world renowned. Up until the 1800s Kaieteur was known only to the Amerindians. The first European to see Kaieteur Falls was a geologist named Barrington Browne during a visit to the area in 1870. A recount of his travels and discovery of the Falls paved the way for many subsequent visits by other early European visitors and designation as a protected area. In 1929, The British Colonial Administration designated an area of the Potaro river, including the Kaieteur Falls as a National Park. The Park, covering a 45 square mile area was established principally for the preservation of the natural scenery, and the fauna and flora of the area and at that time, was one of the first protected areas established in South America. However, in 1972, the Park was downsized to 4.5 square miles. This apparently was done under pressure to open up the area, rich in gold and diamonds to mining claims. However, these mining activities began to take their toll on the wider Kaieteur environment and during the 1990’s with increased mining activities and the adoption of better technologies in the industry instances of discoloration of Kaieteurs’ water were being observed. In an effort to protect the Kaieteur Falls and the many water catchment areas of the wider area, the Park boundaries were extended in 1999 by an Act of Parliament. Today, the Kaieteur National Park covers an area of 224 square miles, approximately 62 700 ha. At one time there existed no human settlements within the National Park, the nearest community being Chenapau, situated some 30 miles on the Potaro river, upriver from Kaieteur. Chenapau, with a population of approximately 250 persons is a Patamona community with a close cultural linkage to the Kaieteur area. Over the years, Kaieteur, with its airstrip allowing easy access by aircraft, has become the main point of entry for miners working in the wider Potaro area and a transient settlement at the base of the falls, next to the Potaro river, emerged. Menzies Landing, as it is commonly known has now become an integral part of the Kaieteur landscape. The splendour of Kaieteur Falls has often overshadowed the other attributes of the wider area which is situated within the middle Mazaruni region, a highland region of Guyana known for its forest covered mountains, rivers, waterfalls and rapids. The geographical features of the wider area support a unique habitat with a mix of dense tropical forests and open savannahs. Plant and animal collection and research conducted in the area has still not scratched the surface of the Kaieteur National Park. Recent research has revealed a number of new species of frogs and lizards


endemic to the Kaieteur area. The Smithsonian Institute has spent many years studying plants at the Falls area and species collected around the area number over 1100 species with 22 being endemic to the Kaieteur National Park, and this still remains an underestimate of the total number of species of the Park. Indeed, Kaieteur National Park is home to a host of rare and endangered species as well as unique landscapes and forest types. Most notable are those which occupy the immediate environs of the Falls, the rarely seen Cock-of-the Rock (Rupicola rupicola), and the Golden Frog (Colostethus beebei) which spends its entire time within the Giant Tank Bromeliads (Brocchinia) micrantha. Under the vast shelf of rock on the face of the Falls live flocks of white chinned and white collared swifts (Cypseloides Cryptus). These can be seen during the late afternoons. Kaieteur remains Guyana’s premier tourist attraction and a major conservation site. With an average of 200 visitors a month, it is Guyana’s most visited natural site, with a record 1401 visitors during Cricket World Cup 2007. Unlike many other Parks and Protected Areas, Kaieteur, though well known, is remote, accessible mainly by light aircraft and lacks the substantial infrastructure and facilities associated with similar tourist destinations. However, this in itself has been known to add to the mystery and lure that Kaieteur offers. The push to develop Kaieteur for increased tourism is getting stronger. At the same time, we have only scratched the surface in our discoveries of the unique, rare, and threatened species of flora and fauna while recognising the importance of the many ecosystems and habitats of the wider Park. How do we realise the potentials of tourism while maintaining and securing the high conservation value of the area? Is this delicate balance achievable? There is no simple answer, but at least for now, there seems to be a balance, perhaps at the expense of expanding economic development. Guyana has taken initiatives to conserve and protect its rich biodiversity through efforts to protect endangered and threatened species as well as habitat and ecosystem management through the establishment of conservation areas. Perhaps the most well known of these is the Kaieteur National Park, Guyana’s first National Park and legally Protected Area. A visit Guyana is not complete without a visit to this wonder of Nature. For those of you visiting for short periods a Day Tour is recommended. This allows you to truly enjoy a good experience of Guyana’s vast and rich interior region. The more adventurous travellers can also do overland trips to the Kaieteur Falls. Whatever your fancy it will be a once in a lifetime experience to engage King Kaieteur in full splendour. You can book your trip through one of the many reputable Tour Operators. See THAG Member Listings on page 103.

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HAVE A WILD LIFE Wildlife Clubs of the North Rupununi By: Samantha James

Since 2001 the wildlife festival has been held in Annai, North Rupununi, for three days. And in keeping with the spirit of sharing, clubs from all over Guyana are invited to attend and take part in the celebrations. EXPLORE GUYANA

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A long time ago, in a forest far, far away, researchers worked day and night peering under rocks, water and the earth. They searched high in the canopy and between the leaves, learning about the plants and animals that live in the Iwokrama Rain Forest. This work was so interesting and informative, that neighbouring community members decided to get involved in environmental research in their own backyards, and, 10 years ago, the Wildlife Clubs of the North Rupununi were born. Wildlife or environmental clubs are community initiatives and provide an

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opportunity to gain firsthand experience of the natural resource management and to develop a strong sense of caring for the environment. Club activities marry traditional or local knowledge with scientific techniques and create a powerful tool for local management of natural resources in a fun and interactive manner. For example, in the North Rupununi, Iwokrama has been supporting wildlife club activities such as bird monitoring and rainfall data collection. As a result, club members are versed in the techniques and technology which can give them a foothold for alternative sustainable livelihoods in activities such as tourism and guiding. Club activities help youth understand the natural environment as well as building self confidence, and setting the stage in developing conservation leaders and


understanding of environmental issues such as climate change. As Guyana is at the fore in discussions about REDD+, many club members have been involved and already understand basic concepts related to this issue. This is an essential knowledge base as Guyana is championing ground-breaking steps with the Low Carbon Development Strategy. Iwokrama visits the wildlife clubs and primary schools in the North Rupununi and provides support to local monitoring initiatives, as well as hosting two centralised meetings a year where three club members from each community gather to meet, discuss, and present solutions to environmental and social issues in the community, which affect youth. But the main event for club members is the annual Wildlife

Festival, a celebration of the environment and of Makushi culture. Since 2001 the wildlife festival has been held in Annai, North Rupununi, for three days. And in keeping with the spirit of sharing, clubs from all over Guyana are invited to attend and take part in the celebrations. The festival provides an opportunity for club members to exchange ideas, talk about club activities, and to celebrate the North Rupununi’s rich wildlife and their own culture. The festival is usually held the weekend before the Easter holidays and over 250 youths between the ages of 8 and 20 showcase their costumes, banners, poetry, art, music, skits

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and dances, all of which reflect the theme club members created in a February planning meeting. Generally, these activities are about animals, plants, forests, wetlands, and savannahs, but there are also discussions on social issues selected by the youth themselves. Past social issues have included HIV AIDS, domestic violence, and alcohol and drug abuse, and volunteers from organisations including the Guyana Red Cross, Help and Shelter and the Makushi Research Unit provide guidance and advice on these key issues. Organisations such as the Chicago Zoological Society, the National Audubon Society, Conservation International Guyana, the WWF Guianas and the EPA Guyana, have supported wildlife clubs through Iwokrama over the years as it has become obvious that local interest in the environment leads to local management of resources. Next year, 2011, will mark the 10th anniversary of the annual Wildlife Festival of the North Rupununi, a huge mark of success and interest in wildlife clubs, as we rely on support from the public and private sectors to host this event. Past club members have grown up are into careers and areas of work which promote conservation, governance and social development in the North Rupununi and we hope to see them and the clubs continuing

to flourish, ensuring that our wildlife stay wild and our environment stays healthy. If you will be travelling to the Rupununi the weekend before the Rodeo, why not stop in Annai and take part in the 10th annual wildlife festival? There will be art and poetry competitions, an environmental quiz, or you can try your hand in the traditional skills competitions of cotton spinning, cassava grating, fire lighting. If you are interested in joining a wildlife club in your area, contact the Environmental Protection Agency, to find out where the nearest club exists or for guidelines and national registration for clubs.


PEOPLE OF GUYANA Stephenson feels the positive press that will come from this award “will only help to enhance the Guyana product, our country and people, our integrity and respect worldwide, not to forget its developmental impact of our young nation through this internationally respected policy by a young President. What a legacy this man will leave us all and what a footprint for the future leaders of Guyana to follow.”

President Bharrat Jagdeo

Guyana’s Champion of The Earth Awarded for Leading the Way

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EVELOPING Guyana’s tourism sector is an important aspect of the country’s Low Carbon Development Strategy (LCDS) which has won it acclaim around the world as a model for protecting tropical forests and helping the global climate change cause. And its tourism profile is set to go up appreciably after President Bharrat Jagdeo, in April, was named among the 2010 Champions of the Earth Award by the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP). Reactions across the board reflected how much this can do to boost Guyana’s international image and bolster its tourism offerings, much of which are pinned on ensuring the pristine nature of its sprawling forests. Mr. Jagdeo received the prestigious award for his outstanding international leadership on combating climate change and his pioneering model on low carbon economic development. The award was presented to the President at the 4th Annual Business for Environment (B4E) Global Summit and UNEP Champions of the Earth gala awards event in Seoul, South Korea. Presenting the award, UN Under-Secretary-

By: Sharief Khan

General and UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner, stated that, “President Jagdeo is a powerful advocate of the need to conserve and more intelligently manage the planet’s natural and nature-based assets. He has recognised more than most the multiple Green Economy benefits of forests in terms of combating climate change, (and) also in terms of development; employment; improved water supplies and the conservation of biodiversity.” Paul Stephenson, President of the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) sees good dividends in the award for tourism: “This award is also recognition of (Mr. Jagdeo’s) plan to generate revenue for this country and importantly for our indigenous communities, whilst at the same time protecting our rainforests and where we live.” “This endorsement of the President’s policy in protecting sustainable development, albeit in a new way, also helps develop our emerging tourism product by protecting and encouraging cultural and rainforest tourism for years to come”, he said. EXPLORE GUYANA

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“It was great to see such international recognition of the President’s role in leading the fold in the field of climate control, a subject which will positively affect us all in Guyana and indeed the rest of the world.” According to Stephenson, the LCDS programme was well received when it was launched and is now gathering well deserved and keen international support. “Why? Because it’s right. Yes, it is new but it also produces real value to the people on the ground, living and working in Guyana, and most importantly sets an example for the world to follow and adopt”, he added. Immediate congratulations were sent by Lord Nicholas Stern, widely credited with changing global understanding of the economic impact of climate change. Lord Stern said: “I warmly congratulate President Jagdeo, with whom I serve on the UN Secretary General’s Advisory Group for Climate Finance. He has been one of the world’s foremost heads of government in advocating for a global low carbon future, and his tireless advocacy, particularly on the urgent need to protect the world’s forests, has made a tremendous contribution to the international climate change agenda. I know that he shares my view that a future high carbon world is one of disaster, and we must re-double our international efforts to build a prosperous, low carbon future.” According to the UNEP, the award is given to people and organisations truly distinguished when it comes to making a real difference in protecting the planet earth. UNEP’s Champions of the Earth Awards honour the “best and brightest as they strive to take action for our planet through their visionary thinking, unwavering dedication and committed action towards the sustainable use of the planet’s resources for global green growth”. 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Winner Wangari Maathai said: “I would like to congratulate President Jagdeo on becoming a ‘Champion of the Earth’. His tireless work to keep the world’s attention on the importance of saving our forests has been an inspiration to many across the world. His leadership continues to remind


us that progress is possible and that we can save the world’s forests while at the same time fostering prosperity and improving the lives of our people”. Professor Maathai won the Nobel Peace Prize for her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace. She was the first African woman to win the prize. The Champions of the Earth Award for President Jagdeo comes on the heels of other significant recognition of his pioneering and aggressive policies on sustainable economic growth through the LCDS.

The strategy is premised on the concept of Avoided Deforestation which allows Guyana’s 15 million hectares of rainforest to serve as a carbon sink, a process that is critical to combating global climate change. Deforestation accounts for about 20% of human-generated greenhouse emissions. Guyana is to receive payments for avoided greenhouse gas emissions, and will soon start investing those payments in a new low carbon economy. This will remove virtually the entire energy sector from fossil fuel dependence,and will catalyse new economic sectors to provide

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Guyanese with valuable economic alternatives that do not put pressure on Guyana’s forests. To support the LCDS, the governments of Guyana and Norway have agreed a groundbreaking model where Norway will pay US$250 million towards Guyana’s forest climate services between now and 2015. This is the second largest agreement of its kind in the world.


PEOPLE OF GUYANA

Sydney Allicock

2010 Laureate of the Prestigious Sabga Caribbean Award for Excellence for Public and Civic Contribution

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istinguished Gentleman, respected counsel, story teller and able colleague, are just a few of the fitting descriptions for Mr Sydney Allicock. Proudly, we add 2010 Laureate of the prestigious Sabga Caribbean Award for Excellence for Public and Civic Contribution. Born on Jan 6, 1955 in Kwatamang, Annai District, North Rupununi of Guyana, Sydney recollected that his fondest childhood memories were of those when he was asked to care for the younger brothers and sisters, and ensuring that fights were amicably resolved and that they knew that he loved them all equally. He remembered his school teacher Mr Bonny Smith, who was very serious about education and building rounded personalities, of his experience in herding the family’s cattle in the Rupununi and the lessons learnt that led to his managing the family operations in full at the young age of nineteen. It was during these formative years that he decided to get into politics as he hoped he would be able to make a difference in the lives of his people.

Sydney Allicock with Mr. Anthony Sabga

Sydney Allicock with community members

And that he did. Today, Sydney Allicock is a proud leader of his native Makushi community, Surama and is an Iwokrama trustee. He is credited with having created a developmental model of environmentally benign tourism which encourages partnerships among locals, business, government, and international agencies. Mr Allicock also is credited with improving the state and status of the indigenous peoples and the environment, and creating sustainable economic activity outside the state apparatus. Mr Allicock is also credited with the establishment of the North Rupununi District Development Board (NRDDB), of which he is the Chairman. The NRDDB is the local umbrella NGO organisation, representing all 16 communities of the North Rupununi and working closely with Iwokrama in areas of conservation and sustainable development activities. Additionally, he was instrumental in the formation of the Bina Hill Institute and its Youth Learning Centre and the Surama Village Eco-Lodge/ Community Eco-Tourism business venture. He is the Toshao of the Annai Amerindian District and a member of the Multi-Stakeholder Steering Committee of Guyana’s Low Carbon Development Strategy. When asked about his immediate reactions to learning that he was nominated as the Public and Civic Contributions Laureate of the Sabga Award, Mr. Allicock chuckled and said, “I could not believe that it was a true thing. It took [me] some days to believe.” His first realisation that it might be true came from the congratulatory messages received from Major General (Ret’d) Joseph Singh, as well as the Honourable Minister of Agriculture Robert Persaud and Dr David Singh of Conservation International. “I was still very sceptical when I received the call from Trinidad with the official notification and confirmation. It was only after that conversation, that I began to cautiously inform persons about the award.” It was not until the event began to unfold, with the arrival of the key officials and dignitaries, did it register with his consciousness.

Surama Village, North Rupununi.

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experience nature and spend time in the village. However, they did not believe. It was not until the early 1990s when partners in tourism enquired about packaging tours to Surama that it was discussed at the community level.

Sydney at Award Ceremony

Sydney and Family

The vision for the community was refined to address issues relating to health, economy and business development for the cottage industries after the unsuccessful attempt to develop a community hospital at Annai Central. The developmental initiatives, including the hospital, were all intended to create benefits for the communities. Sydney explained that had he to live his life over, he probably would have focused more on identifying persons who could have made a difference in shaping the country in their own way, doing so locally, and not focusing all on overseas support, getting more persons involved in local development. “I wish I had stepped up the work than being afraid.” Speaking of the proposal to develop a cottage hospital in 1993, “I wanted to do a cottage hospital at Annai, with volunteer doctors who would train the locals and they would train the locals, through Canadian support.” It was with this determination that the tourism development project commenced with guidance from Mr Colin Edwards and support from Mr and Mrs Malcolm and Margaret Chan A Sue, who often visited Surama. This was further endorsed by the Iwokrama Botanist who required accommodation and encouraged their involvement in tourism, explaining what it was and ways the community would benefit. Speaking on the Low Carbon Development Strategy, Mr Allicock stated that it was an appropriate initiative by the Government of Guyana. It came as a huge support for natural resource management and with support of Conservation International and Iwokrama International Centre through their support of the Wildlife Clubs.” We know that it is important, that we cannot put a dollar sign on the forest. However with the efforts of the Government, we are understanding the importance of protecting our standing forest, based on what has been happening in the developed world. We could not relate to that as many of our people have not travelled outside of the forest and believe that the rest of the world is the same as where we live. We only became aware through our interactions with visitors who remarked that we should work to keep the forest as it is.” “On the payment for services we will let the specialists work that out to show how it will trickle down to the communities as the more we know, the better we will be able to understand and not feel cheated out of anything.” Many more will also be more inclined to opt in to the programme as information becomes available, hence awareness and education are important and consultations with the Toshao’s Council is beneficial to getting the communities on board.

Needless to say having both his Father, Mr Fred Allicock and his daughter, Peggy present to share in that moment, was quite remarkable. Sydney, in his usually calm manner, conveyed his appreciation of the Award and in keeping with the efforts of Dr Sabga, expressed hope that regionally, we can continue to help us all reach a level playing field, enabling persons at the community and local levels to gain recognition and support for their efforts, thereby bringing the work of the common man to the national and regional attention.

He said the LCDS will encourage education and awareness, tourism and hospitality, organic agriculture that will lead to food security, self sustainability, protection and prevention of flooding from the sea. We, in the North Rupununi, have learnt from partnerships, made some mistakes and learnt from them, through using foresight rather than hindsight, and we need to move away from looking hindsight. In a way, “we need to take in consideration when we verbally abuse others we are using clean air to say foul things and we need to imagine what it would be like if we did not have this air.” Imagine what life would be like if we had no fresh air to breathe.

On getting involved in tourism at the community level, he said it was a recommendation made by Dr Davis, a regular visitor to the village, who landed his aircraft at their airstrip when it was still operational. This airstrip was used for exportation of balata and bring in medicine as well as for church business. On one of his visits, Dr Davis requested to do a tour of the community, Sydney and Clifford, his fellow guide, were once again encouraged to develop their tourism product as persons would pay to come to

Sydney Touring his Community EXPLORE GUYANA

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PEOPLE OF GUYANA

Roy Geddes “Steel pan is not only about music…steel pan was born in the poor neighborhoods of the Caribbean, among the ordinary folk.”


Guyana’s Legendary Pan Man By: Sharief Khan

R

OY Geddes simply refuses to give up on his steel pan dreams, even after 57 years.

Now 71, and looking like he’s in his 50’s, his life is still all about pans and helping to ensure its place in the history and culture of Guyana and the Caribbean. Roy is the Ultimate Pan Man, steeped in pan and all its sweet trappings in a story that began when he was just 13.

He was from a single parent family and it was tough. “Before I was out of school I was working in a blacksmith shop (but) it was a blessing in disguise”, he reflected in a recent interview. He said he was forced out of school to work to supplement the family income but he was bombarded by pan music. “I was living at Leopold and Lombard Streets (Charlestown, Georgetown) and there were recognised steelbands in those days (the Chicago, Casa Blanca, Tripoli, Quo Vadis… those were the established steel bands in those days.” There was no escaping the steel pan growing up in such a frenetic environment of panyards that reverberated with the uniquely harmonious sounds that only finely-tuned steel oil drums can produce. Roy was hooked and the course of his life was set. Like a dog tag ever present on a soldier, he is never without a solid gold pendant shaped like a steel pan hooked to an equally solid gold chain around his neck. “My love for the steel pan is respect for the art form. My mission is to bring about the commercialisation of the art form and the respectability of the art form. It’s very important to Roy Geddes.” He speaks simply but forcefully and there’s no mistaking the intensity he feels for the humble musical instruments that clearly are vital to him as the clean air he breathes in his garden and home in the modest working class neighbourhood of Roxanne Burnham Gardens in Georgetown. His home is also a museum to the pan. The parapets on the street in front of his yard, the garden and the garden path, the bottom and upper flats of EXPLORE GUYANA

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are…lacking in the society – like a sense of patriotism…discipline, respect and love”. Roy says he tells his students “talent is just a small part of it; the big part is leading a disciplined life”. And it is this self-discipline and “trying to live right” that keeps him looking trim and fit for his age. He has been honoured for his sterling contributions to music by several Presidents of Guyana, including the late Forbes Burnham and Cheddi Jagan. He was awarded a Medal of Service in 1971 and an Arrow of Achievement in 1996 and is proud of both national honours. While he is determined to press on in trying to pass on his passion for the pan and all that it can mean to national culture and development, Roy is pragmatic. his house are all adorned with pans, photos, trophies and a wide array of objects and other stuff associated with his music and what he has achieved. His home is also a school where he teaches pan music to young people. Employed by the Culture Ministry, he also teaches the music at the GRECO Institute at Victoria on the East Coast Demerara. “Steel pan is not only about music…steel pan was born in the Caribbean, among the ordinary folks. When I say ghetto, I don’t mean in the sense of immorality and vice – in the sense of economics because our parents were poor.” He firmly believes the steel pan can help mould a person to better cope with life. “The love of the art form…pan helped Roy Geddes. I am a living example. It helped me develop my way of thinking. I have learned so

many things through the steel pans because steel pans have taken me places.” Roy has travelled extensively because of his association with the pan and recalled that he has been to “different environments”. He has been to Tanzania and other parts of East Africa, Cuba and the Caribbean “making and teaching pan.” Along the way, he formed the Roy Geddes Silvertones which he calls the “most recognised band in the Caribbean”. (I remember dancing to the music of his band at the Pegasus Hotel poolside and other party venues when the band was in its heydays and it kept the fun going for hours.) Formerly the Demtoco Silvertones, it was disbanded for reasons he didn’t want to go into. He wants to sustain pan “by trying to impart good principles in the young people which

“The love for the art form is not there like it was before…this is being honest. The love is not there. “With the love, you must apply the discipline because you can’t have love without discipline. Discipline is love and the discipline that I’m speaking about is self-discipline – living with restrictions and imposing strict guidelines on yourself; not forced discipline.” He feels “something is lost” among young people. “Something has gone wrong in terms of having the ability to adapt...not only in academics… people talk a lot about academics but you got to be rounded. When you are rounded it means you have love, respect and these qualities are very, very important…” His handshape is firm and the glint in his eyes is sharp as we take our leave after spending time with Roy. And you get the feeling that the Ultimate Pan Man will not be giving up on beating out his pan messages any time soon.

(The Roy Geddes Steel Pan Museum is at 190 Roxanne Burnham Gardens, Georgetown. Phone 592-226-9844. The museum is open daily from 10am to 5pm. Visitors can also get a lecture on the history of the steel pan and a demonstration of how the pan is made.)


A Guyanese Christmas “There’s No Place Like Home For The Holidays” By: Godfrey Chin

P

erry Como’s “There’s no Place like Home, in Guyana, for the Holidays” is a truism I endorse and can attest to, having had the privilege of spending the last three Christmases in Guyana, with a bonus of my three sons joining me each year for wonderful, delightful and memorable holidays. Fabulous fetes, arm pulling hospitality, invitations like bush every night, gourmet indigenous Guyanese cuisine and lavish drinks where one must learn quickly to sip slowly, as the local friends and relatives refill your drinks instantly and constantly. Not to negate the celebrations of the overseas Guyaspora in their snow-bound castles, keeping homesick traditions of the Pepperpot, Garlic Pork, Ginger Beer, Black Cake and nuff presents under a Rockefeller size Christmas Tree. “Ya still can’t beat Guyanese to show-off on their fellow mudlanders”.

But there is something special about the Guyanese Christmas spirit back home that stamps it as ‘renowned and memorable’. It is the genuine sincere hospitality, where rich and poor observe the old traditions of Christmas, putting their best foot forward, keeping the house spic and span, wearing the latest fashion, sharing every bit they have and spreading their joys. It is as infectious as ‘grapevine gossip’. Whether you are a ‘mudlander’, coming home for the holidays or a first time visitor, the Christmas holidays locally is an Ali Baba’s treasure of 1001 delights. Local Christmas traditions abound from reverent worship to every childhood and adult fad and fancy. The hallmark is warm hospitality ignited by the natives extending friendly welcomes, all the while, fulfilling the true Christmas spirit of love and sharing. The Christmas shopping offers unique gifts

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of designer fashions, exotic jewelry, craft of tie dyed, hand painted and batik, and exotic indigenous souvenirs. The shopping is unique in an infectious atmosphere of caroling, street entertainment by steel bands, costumed masquerade with ‘Mother Sally’ and ‘mad bulls’, all adding to the Christmas cacophony and cheer that fills the holiday air. With three national recognised holidays being Christmas, Boxing and New Year’s Day, the entertainment at night is a ‘fortnight of invitations that exceed days to celebrate’. The Christian festival celebrating the birth of Christ is symbolised with Christians, Hindus and Muslims competing with each other, tastefully decorating their homes, outside and inside, in ‘fairy lights’ splendour. The Ministry of Tourism hosts the Main Big Lime on Boxing Day – a grand street fair and welcome party for all of the holiday visitors. The New Year


is greeted with ‘Ole Year’s Night’ dances at hundreds of hotels, clubs and house parties throughout the land while individual private home entertainment are Valhalla feasts. We don’t boast sandy beaches but offer swimming, fishing, bird watching, hunting, trekking in lush tropical forests of magnificent splendour. A visit to Kaieteur Falls the crown jewel of eco systems is a must. A trip to our Interior is an opportunity to commune with nature in fantastic landscapes, majestic mountains, captivating waterfalls, pristine rainforests with exotic flora and wildlife that include large predators, colourful birds and butterflies of all descriptions. Eco resorts, interior lodges such as Adele’s Rainforest Resort, Arrowpoint Nature Resort, Baganara Island Resort, Hurakabra River Resort, Karanambu Ranch, Lake Mainstay and Rock View Lodge offer fun in the great outdoors. Iwokrama with its canopy walkway offers a ‘rare opportunity’ to view Animal Kingdom extremes and rarities such as the Arapaima, the largest freshwater fish, Giant Otters, Pit Vipers, Caimans, Freshwater Turtles and South America’s largest bat, eagle and snake. And after your lavish servings of Pepperpot, Garlic Pork, Black Cake, Ginger Beer, Black Pudding and Souse, plus the local ‘grog’ - don’t forget to ‘eat a piece of Labba and drink the Creek Water’ – cause as the legend goes – you will visit us again – very soon – after enjoying a memorable and unforgettable ‘Christmas in Guyana’.

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Guyanese Cuisine A Real Cook-Up

E

ating in Guyana is exciting. No two meals are ever the same, and that’s because of the diversity of the cuisine, which draws its influence from Africa, India, China, Portugal, the United Kingdom and Guyana’s Indigenous People. When Guyanese entertain, the food spread is impressive. As you walk the length of the table, you are transported to all the places from which this multi-cultural society is made up. Take a little of each of the dishes on offer, and you’ll look down at your plate and marvel at the melange. For those new to the cuisine, phrases like “East meets West” and “Fusion Food” will quickly spring to mind. For us Guyanese, it’s the food we grew up on and love.

Direct Connections The pancakes made in honour of Shrove Tuesday (the day before Ash Wednesday), is the Portuguese-style pancakes known as malasadas. Garlic Pork (a pickle) made and enjoyed at Christmas time also has its roots in Portugal.

There are certain dishes in which you can see the direct connection to the original cuisine and then there are methods of preparation in which the influence is seen.

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By: Cynthia Nelson


Chokas (a savoury type of chutney made with fire-roasted vegetables, coconuts or potatoes) hails from the state of Bihar in India. The curries and roti(s) – various types of flatbreads and dhals come to us from Northern and Southern India. Foo-Foo (boiled and pounded root vegetables, aka ground provisions) has its roots in Africa, so too does Cornmeal Cou-Cou (think polenta). Conkies – a steamed sweet pudding made of pumpkin, coconut and spices comes to us directly from Africa. Mettagee – ground provisions cooked in coconut milk, is often thought of as an Afro-Guyanese dish though it’s origin is said to be Portuguese. The many Chinese dishes made and eaten in Guyana have their foundation in Guangdong cuisine, known to us as Cantonese cuisine. Take dim sum for example. Guangdong is known for its dim sum, which we love so much. This snack-like meal consisting of savoury and sweet buns steamed with fillings of meat, vegetables and bean pastes is enjoyed by us all. The moon cake (Chinese cake) is one of those Chinese pastries that gets packed and sent abroad for all Guyanese yearning for a taste of home. Black pudding is the Guyanese version of the British blood pudding, a type of sausage. While we make ours with blood too, the main filler is rice cooked with fresh coconut milk and highly seasoned with fresh sweet basil and thyme. There is also the white version, cooked without any blood, for the faint hearted. Chester Cake and pastries sold throughout Guyana also have ties with United Kingdom, particularly our Christmas cake. Pepperpot, one of our national dishes and a must have at Christmas, is from our Indigenous Peoples. Pepperpot is a slow-cooked stew of

pig’s feet (aka trotters) cowheel, pork and beef cooked with cassareep (cassava extract) and spices. Cassava bread, many local homemade wines and organic cocoa sticks among other things have their origins with the Indigenous People for whom the region has always been home.

Cook-Up Rice Cook-Up Rice is a one-pot rice dish that can aptly describe Guyanese cuisine – it is made up of a little bit of everything. Rice, peas or beans, meat (fresh and salt-cured), poultry, fresh herbs and coconut milk all coming together to create a singularly unique dish that is loved by all. Cook-Up Rice is a highly adaptable dish and can cater to the dietary needs or restrictions of any one. If you don’t eat beef or pork, you can make a chicken cook-up or vice versa; if you don’t eat any type of animal flesh, the dish can be made vegan or vegetarian. If seafood is your preference, then you can have a seafood cook-

up. The foundation remains the same – rice, peas or beans, herbs and coconut milk, the protein is up to you. Cook-Up Rice, like many dishes throughout the world, was born out of a need to makedo, hence the use of various bits of meat and variety of ingredients. And Guyanese will tell you, making do, is one of the many, things we do best. For me, Cook-Up Rice is Guyana on a plate; it shows how a diverse set of ingredients, like a diverse set of people from various cultures and heritages, can come together to create a one-of-a-kind dish. If there is one thing you must have when in Guyana, it is a plate of Cook-Up Rice. My recommendation is homemade. Be sure to get it with some steamed okra, fried ripe plantains and of course, some fried fish, preferably bangamary. Wash it all down with a glass of mauby, and I’d say you’ve had a taste of Guyana.


A Taste of Home

Ingredients

Cook-up Rice

2 tablespoons oil 1 cup diced onion, divided (First use – ½ cup to sauté and cook meats) (Second use – ½ cup to cook rice and peas) 4 sprigs fresh thyme, divided (First use 2 sprigs to sauté and cook meats) (Second use 2 springs to cook rice and peas) ½ pound tripe, cleaned and cut up Salt and pepper to taste 3 ½ cups boiling water 1 lb salt meat (combo of pig tail and salt beef), cut up. 1 cup of dried black-eyed peas soaked overnight 4 cups coconut milk (preferably fresh squeezed) 2 cups long grain parboiled rice, washed 1/3 cup diced tomatoes 2 green onions, thinly sliced Whole hot pepper 2 sprigs basil, leaves torn

Equipment 1 Pressure cooker 1 Large pot

1 Large spoon 1 Large bowl

Directions 1. Heat oil in pressure cooker 2. Add ½ cup onions and thyme and let cook until onions become translucent 3. Add tripe, salt and pepper to taste and fry for 2 – 3 minutes 4. Add water and bring to a boil 5. Close pressure cooker; pressure cook for ½ hour (time starts from the first whistle) 6. Release the valve of the pressure cooker letting out the steam 7. Add the salt meat and peas to the pressure cooker, close and pressure cook for 10 – 12 mins. 8. Release the valve of the pressure cooker, letting out the steam 9. Place large pot on stove, add coconut milk 10. Transfer the peas and meat mixture along with any drippings or remaining liquid to the pot with the coconut milk. Stir, cover and bring to a boil 11. Add rice to pot as soon as mixture comes to a boil along with the remaining thyme, onion, tomatoes, green onions, hot pepper and basil

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12. Stir, taste for salt and pepper and adjust 13. Cover and bring to a boil 14. Let cook until you begin to see the top of the rice and the liquid has reduced some (do not stir); approximately 6 minutes 15. Turn the heat to simmer and let cook for 30 mins. or until all the liquid is completely gone 16. Stir once and remove pot from heat. Leave the cover slightly off 17. The rice should be moist, in separate grains and cooked through 18. Let the cook-up rice rest for 10 minutes then serve

Notes • If you are not using a pressure cooker, then

• •

cook the tripe for at least 45 minutes as it is very tough; more water would be needed also. The salt meat and peas should boil for at least 20 minutes. Long grain white rice and brown rice would also work well with this dish. Any meat or chicken can be used in this dish as well as your favourite peas or beans, fresh or dried.


A Taste of Home

Grey Snapper Curry Ingredients 2 tablespoons curry paste (recipe follows) ¾ cup diced tomatoes, divided in half 2 pounds of gray snapper, cut into large pieces and pat dry Salt and pepper to taste ¼ cup all-purpose flour Oil 3 – 3 ½ cups boiling water

Curry Paste 1 tablespoon ground garam masala 1 tablespoon ginger-garlic paste 2 tablespoons minced coriander leaves 2 teaspoons ground turmeric Minced hot pepper to taste A few drops of water

Equipment 1 small bowl 1 small spoon 1 shallow frying pan 1 spatula

1 large plate lined with paper towels 1 large deep frying pan 1 large spoon

5. 6.

Directions For Curry Paste: Add all the ingredients to a bowl and moisten to a paste with the water, set aside.

For curry: 1. 2.

3. 4.

Season the fish with salt and pepper, lightly dust with flour and set aside Heat oil in a large pan to shallow fry and fry fish. At this stage, you are just firming up the fish so that it does not break up once added to the curry, so be sure not to cook it completely. You just want a gentle browning of the fish. Set aside on paper towels Add 2 tablespoons oil to a deep pan and heat until oil is shimmering Add 2 tablespoons of curry paste, reduce heat to low and sauté for 1 – 2 minutes; add salt to taste

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7.

Turn heat to high and add tomatoes and continue to sauté for about 30 seconds Pour in boiling water, stir and let come to a boil. Let the liquid reduce by half and then add fish to the sauce along with tomatoes and let cook for 6 – 8 minutes or until the desired sauce consistency. Taste for salt and adjust if necessary Serve hot with roti or rice

Notes •

This curry can also be made with trout, red snapper or any firm white fish

Use tamarind pulp or green mango as your souring agent if you like

Garam masala mixtures vary; use the one you like best

You may have excess curry paste, reserve in an airtight container in the fridge for another use.

Recipes provided by Cynthia Nelson. For more Guyana recipes by Cynthia Nelson visit www.tasteslikehome.com


About Guyana Country Facts EMERGENCY NUMBERS

CLOTHING

Police: 911, 564 Police: Emergency Response Unit: 225-6411 Fire: 912 Ambulance: 913

Lightweight, causal clothing can be worn throughout the year. HEALTH

TIME ZONE GMT - 04:00 LOCATION Guyana is located on the North East of South America and is the only English speaking country in South America. Between 1o & 9o North Latitude and 57o & 61o West Longitude, bordering Venezuela to the West, Brazil to the South, Suriname to the East. GEOGRAPHY Guyana is the third smallest country in South America after Suriname and Uruguay; it has four distinct geographical areas: the Low Coastal Plain; the Hilly Sand and Clay Belt; the High Land Region and the Interior Savannah. The area in square kilometers is 214,970 (83,000 square miles). About 85% of the land area is still forested, and only 2.5% is cultivated. The Coastline lays 1 to 1.5 meters below sea level at high tide necessitating an elaborate system of drainage canals. The most valuable mineral deposits are bauxite, gold, and diamonds. The main rivers are the Demerara, Berbice, Corentyne and Essequibo. CLIMATE Guyana is a tropical destination that is pleasant and warm for most of the year, humid, moderated by northeast trade winds; two rainy seasons (May to June, November to January). Average temperatures 24 °C– 31 °C. Mean temperature of 27 ° C and the average temperature range from 24 ° C to 31 ° C. Rainfall is approximately 2,300mm a year in Georgetown. 84 |

There is a risk of malaria in certain parts of the interior. Consult your doctor for the required precautions if you intend to travel there. Georgetown and coastal areas are Malaria-Free. Georgetown has one public and several private hospitals, these include: 1. Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation – (592) 227 8210-2, 227 8204-7, 227 8241-7 2. St. Joseph’s Mercy Hospital, Parade Street, Kingston – (592) 227 2072-5 3. Georgetown Medical Centre Inc.-Prashad Hospital, Thomas Street – (592) 226 7214-9 4. Davis Memorial in Lodge Backlands- (592) 227 2041-3 5. Dr. Balwant Singh’s Hospital, East Street South Cummingsburg – (592) 226-5783 226-4279 227-1087 227- 0539 6. Medical Arts Centre, Thomas Street – 225-7402 7. Diamond Diagnostic Centre, Diamond Public Road – 265-4681-5 8. Bartica Hospital- (592) 455 2339, 455 2846 9. Fort Canje Hospital, East Berbice – (592) 333 2141-4 10. Fort Wellington Hospital, Mahaicony, Berbice (592) 232 0304 11. Lethem Hospital (592) 772 2206, 772 2006 12. Linden Hospital Complex (592) 444 6127 Municipal Hospitals and Health Care Centres exist within rural and outer lying communities with medivac services available in cases of emergency. Further information can be obtained from the Ministry of Health on Telephone Numbers: (592) 226 7338 or (592) 226 1366.

EXPLORE GUYANA


INTERNET For most customers, internet service is available nationally from independent providers. Service is also available in most hotels and at many internet cafés which have been established across the country. Most hotels and restaurants provide WI-FI at no charge to patrons using their laptops. The major Internet Service Providers in Guyana are: • • • • •

Guyana Telephone & Telegraph Co. (www.gtt.co.gy ) Guyana .net(www.guyana.net.gy) Inter Net Works(www.networksgy.com) Soultion2000(www.solution2000.net) E-Networks (www.ewirelessgy.com)

The informative home pages of these service providers have useful links to other sites. The sustainable development programme site, www.sdnp.org.gy.has links to several NGOs, conservation groups, and international organizations as well. LANGUAGE The official language is English. Often spoken with a Caribbean Creole flavour. Guyana is also the only English speaking country in South America. MEDIA There are four daily papers: Stabroek News, Guyana Chronicle, Kaieteur News and the Guyana Times. The

well respected Catholic Standard and The Mirror are published weekly. There are over 20 TV stations: most rebroadcast US and other imports. GTV and GBC have merged as one entity- National Communication Network (NCN) operating as Voice of Guyana and 98.1 FM, the main radio stations. PLACES TO WORSHIP The predominant religious groups are Christians, Hindus and Muslims. Each is well represented with its own churches, temples, mosques. They are found across the country where the major landmarks featuring traditional architecture may be seen. POPULATION Guyana’s population is approximately 751,223 (Census 2002) of whom 90% live along the coastal strip and banks of major rivers.


About Guyana GOVERNMENT Guyana became independent from Britain in 1966 and a “Cooperative Republic in 1970, when a non executive President replaced the Governor-General. A new constitution in 1980 gave the President wide executive powers. The Cabinet is headed by the President, and there is a 65-member National Assembly elected by proportional representation.

Guyana’s Missions Overseas BELGIUM Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H.E Dr. Patrick Ignatius Gomes Ambassador 12 Avenue du Bresil 1000 Brussels, Belgium Tel: 322 - 675 - 6216 Fax: 322 - 672 - 5598 E-mail: embassy9.guyana@skynet.be BRAZIL Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H. E. Harry Narine Nawbatt Ambassador SHIS Q I05 Conjunto 19 Cassa 24 Lago Sul , CEP 71615 – 190 Brasilia DF , Brazil Tele: 55-61-3248–0874, 3248–0875, 3364-5319 Fax: 55-61-3248–0886 E-mail: embguyana@embguyana.org.br / harrynawbatt@hotmail.com CHINA Embassy of the Republic of Guyana Mrs. Choo Ann Yin Charge d’ Affaires No. 1 Xiu Shui Dong Jie Jian Guo Men Wai

Beijing, China Tele: 8610 - 6532 - 1601 Fax: 8610 - 6532 - 5741 E-mail: guyemb@public3.bta.net.cn CUBA Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H. E. Mitradevi Ali Ambassador Calle 18, No. 506 Entre 5ta y 7ma , Miramar , Havana, Cuba . Tele: 537 - 204 - 2094 Fax: 537 - 204 - 2867 E-mail: embguyana@enet.cu INDIA High Commission of the Republic of Guyana H. E. Jairam Ronald Gajraj High Commissioner F-8/22 Vasant Vihar New Delhi - 110057 , India Tel: 91 11 4166 9717-8 Fax: 91 11 4166 9714 E-mail: hcommguy.del@gmail.com LONDON High Commission of the Republic of Guyana H. E. Laleshwar K. N. Singh, C.C.H. High Commissioner 3 Palace Court, Bayswater Road, London, W2 4LP, England Tele: 44 - 207 - 229 – 7684 /792-1178 Fax: 44 - 207 - 727 - 9809 E-mail: ghc.1@ic24.net / laleshwarsingh@hotmail.com Website: www.guyanahc.com NEW YORK, USA Consulate General for the Republic of Guyana Mr. Brentnold Evans Consul General EXPLORE GUYANA

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Mr. M.R. Khan Deputy Consul General 370 7th Avenue Room 402, New York, New York 10001, USA Tel: 212 - 947 – 5115-6, 947 – 5110-9 Fax No: 212 - 947 - 5163 E-mail: infor@guyanaconsulate.com NICKERIE, SURINAME Consulate General for the Republic of Guyana Mr. Arlington Bancroft Consul General Gouverneur Straat & West Kanaal Straat #10 Nickerie, Suriname Tele: 597-211-019 Fax: 597-212-080 E-mail: guyconsulnick@sr.net OTTAWA, CANADA High Commission of Guyana H. E. Rajnarine Singh High Commissioner 151 Slater Street, Suite 305, Ottawa, K1P 5H3, Canada Tele: 613 - 235 – 7240, 235 -7249 Fax: 613 -235 -1447 E-mail: guyanahcott@rogers.com / rajnarine.singh@sympatico.ca PARAMARIBO, SURINAME Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H.E. Merlin Udho Ambassador Henckarron Straat No. 82 P.O Box 785 Paramaribo, Suriname Tele: 597 - 477 – 895, 472 - 509 Fax: 597- 472 - 679 E-mail: guyembassy@sr.net


PERMANENT MISSION TO THE UNITED NATIONS Mr. George Talbot - Charge d’ Affaires a.i. 801 Second Avenue, Suite 501 (Fifth Floor) New York 10017, USA Tele: 212 – 573 – 5828-9 Fax: 212 -573 - 6225 E-mail: guyana@un.int TORONTO, CANADA Consulate General of the Republic of Guyana Mr. Danny Doobay Honorary Consul General 505 Consumers Road, Suite 206 Willowdale, Ontario M2J 4V8, Canada Tele: 416- 494-6040, 494-6059, 494-2679 Fax: 416 - 494-1530 E-mail:info@guyanaconsulate.com / ddoobay@guyanaconsulate.com VENEZUELA Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H.E. Dr. Odeen Ishmael, C.C.H. Ambassador, Quinta Roraima Avenida El Paseo, Prados del Este Caracas, Venezuela Tel: 58 - 212 - 977 – 1158 / 975 - 3687, Fax: 212 - 976 – 3765 E-mail: embaguy@cantv.net WASHINGTON Embassy of the Republic of Guyana H.E. Bayney Karran, Ambassador 2490 Tracy Place, N. W. Washington, D.C. 20008, USA Tel: 202 - 265 - 3834, 265 – 6900, 328 – 1567 Fax: 202 - 232 -1297 E-mail: guyanaembassydc@verizon.net

AMBASSADORS & HIGH COMMISSIONS REPRESENTED IN GUYANA H. E. Manorma Soeknandan AmbassadorEmbassy of the Republic of Suriname and Dean of the Diplomatic Corps 171 Peter Rose & Crown Streets Queenstown, Georgetown. Tele: 592 226 7844; 225 2631; 225 2846 Fax: 592 225 0759 Email: surnmemb@gol.net.gy H.E. Luiz Gilberto Seixas de Andrade Ambassador Embassy of the Federative Republic of Brazil 308 Church Street, Georgetown Tele: 592 225 7970; 226 9693 Fax: 592 226 9063 Email: bragetown@solution.2000.net guibrem@solutions2000.net

H.E. Simon Bond High Commissioner (ag) British High Commission 44 Main Street, Georgetown Tele: 592 226 5881-4 Fax: 592 225 3555 Email: bhcgeo@networks.gy.com H.E. Francois Montour High Commissioner Canadian High Commission High & Young Street, Kingston Georgetown Tele: 592 227 2081-2 Fax: 592 225 8380 Email: grgtn@international.gc.ca H.E. Zhang Jungao - Ambassador Embassy of the People’s Republic of China Track ‘B’, Mandela Avenue, Georgetown Tele: 592 227 1651; 227 1652 Fax: 592 225 9228; 226 4308 (Commercial) Email: prcemb@networks.gy.com or chinaguyana@yahoo.com H.E. Dario Morandy - Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Venezuela 296 Thomas Street, Georgetown Tele: 592 226 1543; 226 6749; 226 9041 Fax: 592 225 3241 Email: embveguy@gol.net.gy H.E. Pavel A Sergiev - Ambassador Embassy of the Russian Federation Public Road, Kitty, Georgetown Tele: 592 227 1738: 226 9773 Fax: 592 227 2975 Email: reing@networks.gy.com H.E. Subit Kumar Mandal High Commissioner Indian High Commission 307 Church Street, Georgetown Tele: 592 226 3996; 226 8965; 226 3240 Fax: 592 225 7012 Email: hoc.georgetown@mea.gov.in Ms. Karen Williams - Charge d’Affaires Embassy of the United States of America Young & Duke Streets, Kingston, Georgetown Tele: 592 226 3938; 225 7960; 225 4900 Fax: 592 2270240; 592 225 8497 Email: usembassy@hotmail.com H.E. Raul Gortázar Marrero - Ambassador Embassy of the Republic of Cuba 40 High Street, Kingston, Georgetown Tele: 592 225 1883, 226-8842 Fax: 592-226-1824 Email: embguyana@networksgy.com

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H.E. Fernando Sandoval Flores Ambassador Embassy of United Mexican States 44 Brickdam, South Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tele: 592 226-3987-90 Fax: 592 226-3722 Email: mexicoembassy@gmail.com

INFORMATIVE WEBSITES ON GUYANA Travel and Tourism: • Guyana Tourism Authoritywww.guyana-tourism.com • Tourism & Hospitality Association of Guyana- www.exploreguyana.org • Iwokrama International Centre – www.iwokrama.org Investing in Guyana: • Guyana Office for Investmentwww.goinvest.gov.gy • Guyana Lands & Surveywww.lands.gov.gy • Private Sector Commissionwww.psc.org.gy • Georgetown Chamber of Commerce & Industry - www. georgetownchamberofcommerce.org • Guyana Manufacturers & Services Association - www.gma.org.gy Non Governmental Organizations (Conservation): • Conservation International Guyana – www.conservation.org • World Wildlife Fund ( Guyana)www.wwfguianas.org/ • Iwokrama International Centre – www.iwokrama.org • Kaieteur Park and Fallswww.kaieteurpark.gov.gy


About Guyana TRAVELLING

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

TRANSPORTATION

All visitors to Guyana are required to have a valid passport to enter and depart Guyana. All visitors to Guyana should ensure that their passports have at least six months of remaining validity. Those arriving by air require an onward plane ticket. Visitors who wish to extend their stay may contact the Ministry of Home Affairs at 60 Brickdam Street, Georgetown. The Central Office of Immigration, located on Camp Street, Georgetown, must also note the extension in the visitor’s passport. Travelers for purposes other than tourism should check with the Ministry of Home Affairs for information about requirements for work permits and extended stays. On arrival, Guyanese Immigration normally grants visitors a stay of no more than thirty days. Visas are necessary for all visitors except nationals of the following countries:

DRIVING IN GUYANA

Commonwealth countries, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy Japan, Republic of Korea, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and United States of America For further information contact the Embassy or Consulate of Guyana nearest to you or visit the Guyana Foreign Office nearest to you.

Traffic drives on the left. Seat belts are necessary by Law. If travelling to Guyana and you wish to drive, please enquire with the Customs Officer upon entry into Guyana. Be sure to walk with your international licence to show. The permit is granted on the spot and is free of charge. TRAVEL VIA TAXIS FROM THE CHEDDI JAGAN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT-TIMEHRI Tourists should ONLY use the official taxi services registered to operate at CJIA. They can be identified by their uniforms (Crème ShirtJackets, Black Pants and ID Badges. Fares are listed at the Airport and are fixed). If a decision is made to use one of the other taxis, please agree upon the fare for the trip into Georgetown before entering the vehicle. Fares charged from Airport to Georgetown rate between US$20.00 and US$25.00.

TAXI AND BUSES Georgetown is well served with taxis, which operate throughout the city and to other urban centres. Taxis are easy to find outside most hotels and throughout Georgetown. Enquire of

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the rates before embarking upon travel. Private taxis are easily arranged through your local hotel or by calling one of the recommendable taxis services. There are also ultra –cheap minibus service running around town and along the coast, or to the Cheddi Jagan International Airport and Linden. Check and confirm the fares before entering the vehicle. Transportation around the city is provided by privately owned mini buses which operate in allocated zones for which there is a wellregulated fare structure. This arrangement extends to all mini bus routes throughout the country. Taxis afford freer movement around the city. Travel around Georgetown by Bus: Short stops within the limits of the city are approximately G$60.00 and longer stops G$80.00. Travelling by taxi for short distances: approximately G$300- $GY400.00; longer drops G$500.00- ?? as these prices will vary from location to location. Rented cars are also available.


RIVER BOATS & FERRIES With the opening of the Bridge between East and West Berbice, travelling time is lessened for commuters from Georgetown to Berbice and onward travel to Suriname via the crossing at Molson Creek. Both Bridges are tolled bridges and commuters are charged based on vehicle capacity and type. Commuters to West Demerara have a choice of road transport via the Demerara Harbour Bridge or by the Demerara River Ferry from the Stabroek Stelling to Vreed-en-Hoop which is obliquely opposite each other. The highway which begins on the West Coast of Demerara is heavily trafficked since it provides a link to Parika on the East Bank of Essequibo River which has become an important centre of economic activity in the Essequibo region. For example, speed boats or other types of transportation can be hired to take passengers as far as Bartica or other hinterland resorts and back in a single day.

from Europe are routed through Antigua, Barbados, or Trinidad. There are direct flights from Miami, New York, Toronto, Brazil, and Suriname. • Caribbean Airlines Tele: 1-800-5382992 www.caribbean-airlines.com • LIAT Tele: 227-8281/1-888-538-2992 www.liatairline.com • Meta Airlines Tele :225-5315 www.voemeta.com • Suriname Airways Tele: 225-4894/3473 www.surinamairways.net • Delta Airlines Tele: 225-7800 www.delta.com • Blue Wings Tele: 225-9647 www.bluewings.com

CAMBIOS These are licensed currency exchange houses. Most cambios are open from 8am to 5pm, and on Saturdays from 8am to 12pm, sometimes to 2pm. keep your cambio receipts, you will need to produce them in order to change Guyanese dollars on departure.

TRAVEL TO GUYANA’S INTERIOR

MONEY & BUSINESS GUIDE

Travel arrangements may be made with local bus service, jeeps, chartered planes and speedboats. A guide is advisable for longer distance travel to the interior.

Listing of the main Commercial Banks operating in Guyana includes:

DOMESTIC AIR SERVICE

Air transportation is readily available for traveling to several parts of the hinterland, whether for business or for pleasure. Several local airlines depart from Ogle International Airport on the East Coast of Demerara and from Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Timehri. Information on their availability and movement is easily obtainable from their office and from tour operators. Private charter companies operate flight into the interior from the upgraded Ogle International Airport. • • • • •

Air Services Tele: 222-4357/222-4368 www.aslgy.com Roraima Airways Tel:225-9647/8 www.roraimaairways.com Trans Guyana Airways Tele: 2222525/2861 www.transguyana.net Air Guyana Tele: 222-6513 www.airguyana.biz Wings Jet Tele: 225-9233

INTERNATIONAL & REGIONAL CARRIERS

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Bank of Baroda. Ave. of the Republic, Georgetown. Tel: 226 4005/6 Bank of Nova Scotia. Carmichael Street, Georgetown (Branches in Bartica, New Amsterdam and Parika) Tel: 225 9222 Citizens Bank. Camp Street, Georgetown • Tel: 226 1705/6 Demerara Bank. Camp Street, Georgetown Tel: 225 0610/9 Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry. Water Street, Georgetown (Branches in Vreed-en-Hoop, Parika, Essequibo and Corriverton)Tel: 226 8430/9 New Building Society. Ave. of the Republic, Georgetown (Branches in Linden, Berbice, Corentyne, Rosignol, Rose Hall and Essequibo) Tel: 227 4444 Republic Bank Guyana Ltd. Water Street, Georgetown Tel: 226 1691/5/4091 (ATM Machines for Scotia Bank ATM are accessible to persons with ATM Debit Cards and those in possession International Cirrus Credit Cards ( Master Card and Visa Card). Scotia Bank in Guyana offers visitors the option of advance payment using your credit card; Cirrus Master Card.

Guyana’s international airport, named after the late president, Cheddi Jagan International is at Timehri 25 miles south of Georgetown. Flights EXPLORE GUYANA

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BANKING HOURS 08:00 and 14: 00 hrs on Monday to Thursday 08:00 and 14: 30 on Friday BUSINESS ATTIRE Men wear long or short sleeved shirts, a Jacket is optional. Shirt and tie attire is common in most offices. Females are expected to dress conservatively.

CURRENCY The Guyana dollar is the only legal tender accepted in this country. It is a floating currency and the value fluctuates in accordance with the changes in the value of the US$. Visitors may exchange their currencies at banks, cambios and most hotels. The rate of the dollar fluctuates and the exchange is approximately US$1 – GY$201.00. Major credits cards and traveller’s cheques are generally accepted at many resorts, hotels, gift shops, restaurants and tour operators.

TAXES DEPARTURE TAX There is an exit tax of G$2,500.00 plus a security charge of G$1,500 (being a total of G$4,000). This is paid at the airport at the GRA booth. (The US dollar equivalent for this exit tax may vary with exchange fluctuations.) Please note that this is payable in GY$ or foreign currency. VALUED ADDED TAX Valued Added Tax (VAT) is charged to a value of 16% on most items save those that are 0-Rated or VAT exempt.

ECONOMY The agricultural sector accounts for half the national GDP, producing sugar and rice for export, with extensive timber operations and a range of other products, from coffee to fish and fruits, and fresh vegetables well –respected brands of rum. Gold, bauxite and diamonds are mined.


About Guyana MONEY & BUSINESS

GUYANA STOCK EXCHANGE

Guyana Association of Travel Agents

Gasci was incorporated on June 1st, 2001 Trading commenced on June 30th, 2003. The Stock Exchange was formally launched on September 25th, 2003. Its members consist of the four securities companies registerd to trade on the Stock Exchange viz. Beharry Stockbrokers Ltd., Guyana America Merchant Bank Inc., Hand-in-Hand Trust Corporation Inc. and Trust Company (Guyana) Ltd. It is governed by a board of six directors. Trading currently takes place on Mondays and on Wednesdays when Monday is a holiday. Trading starts at 10:00am.

157 Waterloo Street, Georgetown • Tel: 223-7405/6 Email:gma_guyana@yahoo.com • www.gma.org.gy

GASCI is a “self-regulatory Organization” which was formed for the purpose of developing a Stock Market in Guyana. It is the result of earlier work undertaken by the Adam Smith Institute funded by the UK Department.

Wm Fogarty Building, 34-37 Water St., Georgetown Tel: 227 7225 • Fax: 225 2513 Email:jimbacchus@inetguyana.net

Guyana Manufacturers & Services Association

Guyana Rice Millers’ and Exporters’ Development Association

216 Lamaha St, Georgetown • Tel: 225 5353

Guyana Rice Producers’ Association

104 Regent St, Georgetown • Tel: 223 7248

Guyana Tourism Authority

CREDIT CARDS

Major credits cards and traveller’s cheques are accepted by most hotels, restaurants, car rental agencies and tour operators. International VISA, Mastercard, Maestro and Cirrus credit and debit cards can be used to obtain cash from Scotiabank in Branch during banking hours or at ABMs. A similar service is also available at the Guyana Bank for Trade and Industry (GBTI) at their branches and at select ATM locations.

BUSINESS CONTACTS & ORGANISATIONS Berbice Chamber of Commerce and Development

12 Chapel Street, New Amsterdam, Berbice • Tel: 333 3324

Consultative Association of Guyanese Industry 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown • Tel: 226 4603 Email:caig@guyana.net.gy

National Exhibition Centre, Sophia, Georgetown Tel: 219-0095/6 • Fax: 219 0093 Email:visitguyana@networksgy.com Website: www.guyana-tourism.com

Institute of Private Enterprise Development

253 South Road, Bourda, Georgetown • Tel: 225 8949 Email:iped@solutions2000.net

Linden Chamber of Industry and Commerce

84 Riverside Drive, Watooka, Linden • Tel: 444 2901

Ministry of Tourism Industry & Commerce 229 South St., Lacytown, Georgetown Tel: 226 2505 • Fax: 225 9310

CARICOM - The Caribbean Community Secretariat P.O. Box 10827, Georgetown Tel: 226 9281/89 • Fax: 226 7816 E-mail: webmaster@caricom.org

Forest Products Association of Guyana

157 Waterloo St, Georgetown • Tel: 226 9848

Georgetown Chamber of Commerce & Industry 156 Waterloo St, Georgetown • Tel: 225 5846 Email:gtchamber@netwrksgy.com www.geochamberofcommerce.org

GO-INVEST(Guyana Office for Investment) 190 Camp & Church Sts, Georgetown Tel: 225 0658/227 0653 • Fax: 225 0655 Website: www.sdnp.org.gy/goinvest E-mail: goinvest@sdnp.org.gy

Private Sector Commission

Umbrella organization for more private sector business and employer’s organizations. More major companies are also members. 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown Tel: 225 0977 • Fax: 225 0978 E-mail: pscentre@guyana.net.gy

Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) 157 Waterloo St, Georgetown Tel: 225 0807 • Fax: 225 0817 E-mail: thag@networksgy.com

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THAG TRAVELER

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Georgetown and Environs

Whilst in Georgetown, you certainly will need to investigate quality accommodation and we recommend that you consider the city properties detailed below.

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All of these properties are members of the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana, and offer the quality of service we know will meet your satisfaction.

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Hotel and Casino 10 Princess Providence, East Bank Demerara

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Ariantze Hotel Sidewalk Café

176 Middle Street, Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592)226-5363/ 225-0634/ 225-0644 Fax: (592)227-0210 Email: ariantze@networksgy.com Website: www.ariantzesidewalk.com “Delightfully charming decor and our friendly, personalised service make a stay at Ariantze Hotel a pleasantly memorable experience in fine Guyanese Hospitality. Our boutique heritage hotel gives real meaning to the saying “Good things come wrapped in small packages!” Free continental breakfast and high speed wireless internet access, in-house restaurant with mouthwatering daily lunch buffet. Intimate dining, an appetizing menu and impeccable service are found in the Bourbon Restaurant. Scintillating musical entertainment to enjoy at the Sidewalk Cafe & Jazz Club.

Amenities

Free high speed wireless internet access. All rooms are air conditioned with mini bar, coffee makers, TV and DVD players. Restaurant and Jazz Club on location. Computer access for guests, 24 hour security and free movie night every Tuesday

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89-90 Pike Street, Campbellsville, Georgetown Tel: (592)226-1133/ 227-0989 Fax: (592)231-7001 Email: brandsville@gol.net.gy Website: www.brandsville.net Relax! You’re at Brandsville-located just short distance from the seawalls which boards the Atlantic Ocean and a corner away from the American School. Set among a quiet neighbourhood, three blocks offers 32 executives type rooms and suites to suit your needs. Inclusive of Jacuzzi, self catering facilities and customer amenities and wired and wireless networks. Swimming Pool, Hot & Cold water, Internet access wired & wireless, Gym, Restaurant & Bar.

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Cara Suites

1176 Middle & Waterloo Sts., Georgetown Tel: (592)226-1612/ 1684 .Fax: (592)226-1541 Email: carasuites@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com Located in the heart of diplomatic and business district Georgetown, with an excellent range of facilities including our Bistro 176 bar and restaurant and complimentary high speed internet access. The finest in cooperate executive accommodation!

Grand Coastal Hotel

1 & 2 Area M Le Ressouvenir, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592)220-1091/ 220-1288/ 220-2046 .Fax: (592)220-1498 Email: reservationa@grandcoastal.com Website: www.grandcoastal.com

Amenities

Rooms, Restaurant, Courtyard, Conference Centre, Pool, Gym, Bar, Cable TV, Laundry, Telephone, High Speed Wireless Internet Access, Reliable Taxi Service & Catering

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Herdmanston Lodge

65 Peter Rose & Anira Street, Queenstown, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-0808/ 0811 Fax: (592)231-7904 Email: stay@herdmanstonlodge.com Website: www.herdmantsonlodge.com An intimate heritage hotel in Guyana, Herdmanston prides itself in excellent guest service. One of only a few hotels in Guyana that has maintained Guyana’s distinctive colonial architecture Herdmanston is perched within extensive lawns and garden which is home to some of the gentle flora and fauna of central Georgetown. Located in residential Queenstown, just 5 minutes from central Georgetown, a close walk to the National Park and the sea walls our small hotel size allows us to offer to our guests a very personalized service for both accommodation, meetings and intimate events. Come, stay with us, our hallmark....... Fantastic Service.

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New Tropicana Hotel

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Palace De Leon Hospitality Inc.

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Pegasus Hotel Guyana

Cara Lodge

249 Quamina Street. P.O.Box 10833, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-5301/15 Fax: (592)225-5310 Email: caralodge@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com Guyana’s first Heritage House Hotel, Victorian tradition with all the comfort and service of a modern Hotel in a relaxed atmosphere. Our Bottle Restaurant is recognized as the best in Georgetown and we offer full conference and banqueting facilities, complimentary high speed internet access and mini gym.

The Princess Hotel Guyana is located a mere 25-minute drive from the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, boasts of 200 spacious and elegantly decorated presidential suites, VIP/ Executive suites, double and single occupancy rooms. Our international casino, the Princess Casino Guyana opens at 12:00 noon until 4am daily.

The Grand Coastal Hotel - International Outlook with a local flavour, offer excellent Services and friendly staff . Located in a safe and secure environment off souvenir shores only 7 kilometres from Georgetown, just a few minutes walking distance from the Atlantic Ocean.

Brandsville Apartments

Amenities

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Tel; (592) 265-7001-30 Fax; (592)265-7002 petal@princesshotelguyana.com Website: www.worldofprincess.com

177 Waterloo Street, South Cummingsburg Georgetown Tel: (592) 227 5701 Mobile: (592) 686-3437 Email: barbqbacchus@hotmail.com Website: http://www.newtropicanahotel.com/

71 Croal St. Stabroek, Georgetown Tel; (592)226-5278/227-7019/226-6374 Email: leonlesruth@yahoo.com

Seawall Road, Kingston, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-2853-9 .Fax: (592)225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana.com Website: www.pegasushotelguyanacom Guyana’s leading hotel. Pegasus Hotel Guyana offers 132 rooms ranging from standard to luxury, and an excellent array of facilities including pool, bars, a la carte restaurant, gym and conference facilities.

Suites Hotel 11 Radisson 83 Laluni Street, Queenstown, Georgetown.

Tel: (592)226-2145/ 227-4983 Fax: 592)227-5037 Email: info@guyanahotel.com Website: www.guyanahotel.com

Residence Inn 12 Roraima 8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park Georgetown.

Tel: (592)225-9647-8/225-9650, Fax: (592)225-9646 Email: rriops@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairawys.com Roraima Residence Inn, the first Boutique Hotel in Guyana, offers you an atmosphere of elegant ambience, where cleanliness and friendliness exceed your expectations. The Hotel is located in a gated Compound within the Residential Community of Bel Air Park, within walking proximity to the Botanical Gardens, the Bourda Cricket and Football Ground, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Pizza Hut and Popeye’s Seafood Restaurant.

Duke Lodge 13 Roraima 94-95 Duke Street, Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592) 231 7220, 227 2213 Fax: (592) 227 3816 Email: roraimadukelodge@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com

Situated at 94-95 Duke Street, Kingston opposite the American Embassy and neighbouring to the Office of the Empowerment and Court of Appeal is an old-fashioned colonial architectural house, called the Duke Lodge. This beautiful antique type Guest House is just 5 minutes away from all the busy bustle of the busiest city’s streets of Central Georgetown, and a mere 45 minutes away from the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. Duke Lodge is one of those splendid wooden buildings that form part of the architectural heritage of the capital, being utilized as a tasteful hospitality, entertainment and conference facility.

Inn 14 Savannah Lethem, Region 9

Tel: (592) 772-2035 Email: alfred@savannahguyana.com/ linda@ savannahguyana.com Website: www.savannahguyana.com In the most strategic, convenient and tranquil location Savannah Inn can be found at Lethem. A home away from home with comfortable air conditioned and self contained rooms and cabins, spacious dining area, huge green shed overlooking the Kanukus where you can relax, have a cool drink in peace and tranquility. Your comfort and pleasure is our business.

DENOTES CITY HOTEL LOCATIONS ON MAP Please refer to Page 24 & 25 for Georgetown City Map EXPLORE GUYANA

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front set against a backdrop of tropical forest, bamboo groves and mango trees.’

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C/o Wilderness Explorers, Cara Suites Address: 176 Middle Street, Georgetown Tel: (592) 226 2085, 227-7698 Fax: (592) 226 2085 Email: info@iwokramacanopywalkway.com Skype: tonywildex Website: www.iwokramacanopywalkway.com Atta Rainforest Lodge is situated approximately 500 metres from the Iwokrama Canopy Walkway. The Lodge is completely surrounded by tropical rainforest which offers a complete immersion in the rainforest experience. Iwokrama Canopy Walkway is a series of suspension bridges and decks up to 30 meters in height and 154 meters in length. It gives visitors a new view of the mid and upper canopy of the forest and allows wildlife to be relatively free from human intrusion.

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Adel’s Rainforest Resort

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Adventure Guianas Villa & Courtyard 3 Tabatinga & Beverly Hills Drive, Lethem, Rupununi. Tel: 227-4713 Fax: 225-9646 Email: info@adventureguianas.com Website: www.adventureguianas.com Adventure Guianas Villa & Courtyard offers guests the opportunity to relax in a serene atmosphere, overlooking the Kanuku Mts. and experience the cultural diversities of the Guyana/Brazil Frontier. The ranch-styled building and traditional thatched- roof benabs blend nature with modern architecture to ensure your comfort in a natural setting, every so often, being reminded of the rich birdlife of the Kanukus.

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Aranaputa Eco Basin Tours C/o Wilderness Explorers 176 Middle Street North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085

Baganara Island Resort Essequibo River, Guyana Pegasus Hotel – Seawall Wall Road, Kingston Tel: Pegasus Office - 225-4483-4 Ogle Aerodrome, Ogle, East Coast Demerara Tel: Ogle Office; 222-8050, 53-55 Email: bookbaganara@baganara.com Website: www.baganara.com In the mighty Essequibo river is this wonderful little paradise with 187 acres of lush green foliage and colourful tropical flowers. Five miles South of Bartica, it is the gateway to the unspoilt rainforest of Guyana and the junction where the great Essequibo and Mazaruni Rivers meet. The Resort has a seventeen room capacity and a modern conference facility that can accommodate up to 60 persons. You could enjoy a 20-minute flight directly to the island from Georgetown or a picturesque trip of a one-hour drive along the coast and one hour by boat

Amenities

We offer a variety of other outdoor activities including canoeing, fishing, water skiing, kayaking, volleyball, table tennis, pools, and pedal boats or simply sunbathing and swimming. We offer a number of off island tours i.e. Marshall Falls, Parrot Island, kayaking expeditions and more

Amenities

Accommodation, Tours, Entertainment, Restaurant & Bar (Guyana & Brazil Cuisine), Transportation.

Iwokrama Eco Lodge

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Karanambu Ranch

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Tel: 261-9286/ 225-9647-8 Fax: 225-9646 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Arrowpoint Nature Resort is named after the many Arrow Trees found in the area, which is used by the Amerindians to make their arrows for hunting. One of the finer examples of Guyana’s eco-tourism product, Arrowpoint coexists with its interior setting without ruffling the natural environment. The Resort itself is set against the backdrop of the Rainforest which is a haven for birdwatchers and nature lover since there is an abundance of wildlife including 350 species of birds.

Overnight facilities, Day visits, bird watching, etc.

Akawini Creek, Pomeroon River. Tel: (592) 771-5391 Tel (in the USA): 301 384 2396 Fax: 301-384-2396 Email: fredze@verizon.net Website: www.adelresort.com Adel’s is located in the pristine rainforest area of the Pomeroon River. It is surrounded by 60 acre farm that provides all the food you eat including vegetables, fruits, fresh meat and fish. We are within an hour’s boat ride of several Amerindian reservations and the famous Shell Beach where you can witness the turtles as they come in to lay their eggs when in season.

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Hurakabra River Resort - Essequibo River 168 Century Palm Gdns, Durban Backlands, Lodge Tel: 225-3557/ 624-8694 Fax: 226-0240 Email: gemmadhoo@gmail.com Website: www.hurakabragy.com A secret waiting to be discovered. A tranquil tropical oasis. Awake up to chirping birds and beautiful sunrises. A picture of calmness and serenity. The Resort features the beautifully appointed Mango Tree Villa and the cosy Bamboo cottage on the water

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Rupununi Region 9 Tel: 225-1504/ 225-7144 Fax: 225-9199 Email: iwokrama-general@iwokrama.org Website: www.iwokrama.org

Karanambu North Rupununi Guyana Tel: 226-5180. Fax: 226-2085 Email: karanambu.lodge@gmail.com Website: www.karanambu.com Enjoy Karanambu Rum punch, while being treated to true Rupununi hospitality by Ms. Diane McTurk, a living legend. swim with giant river otters, search the savannas for the Giant Anteater, sundowners over El Dorado, watch the Victoria Amazonica lily open, Hear the stories, come share in the Magic of Karanambu.

Amenities

Bed with netting turn down, Same day laundry service, Local bar Juice and local soda always available, Battery recharging, Wireless internet, Guided tours: include nature treks and boat tours. Persons in need a little extra assistance or families with small children are welcomed, they present no problems. The staff is always willing to go the extra mile to ensure the guests comfort and enjoyment of their time here.

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North Rupununi District Development Board (NRDDB) C/o Wilderness Explorers 176 Middle Street North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex

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Rewa Village North Rupununi Region 9 C/o Wilderness Explorers 176 Middle Street North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex Rewa Village is located where the Rewa River runs into the Rupununi River and the surrounding area is rainforest, mountains and oxbow lakes. The community of approximately 220 persons is predominately Macushi with a few families of the Wapishiana and Patamona tribes. The Rewa Lodge is situated on the bank of the Rewa River with tables and benches along the river bank offer a relaxing location to enjoy the river. The grassed clearing in the rainforest houses three benabs. The largest is the kitchen and dining area. Accommodation is in two benabs each with two bedrooms and a large patio with hammocks for relaxing. Three bathrooms with flush toilet, shower and basin are just a few metres from the bedrooms.

Nature Resort 5 Arrowpoint R8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown.

Amenities

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Overnighting, catering and self-catering, aquatic sports-skiing, neeboarding, kayaking. Jungle walk, birding, wildlife spotting

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Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex The best Peanut Butter you could ever think about. This is all natural and tasty made by the women of the Aranaputa Processors Friendly Society.

Atta Rainforest Lodge (CATS)

Amenities


View Lodge 12 Rock Annai, North Rupununi, Region 9 Tel: 645-9675 Email: info@rockviewlodge.com Website: www.rockviewlodge.com Ideally located in an Amerindian community affording good access to the Iwokrama Forest, the Atta Lodge and Canopy Walkway, Surama Village and Karanambu. Well furnished self-contained suites surrounded by savannas, mountains, rainforest and rivers, and a family atmosphere with an excellent library and art collection in the old ranch house, regional cooking and a swimming pool.

lives in the rainforest, and have an incredible understanding of nature and how to utilise its resources

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Rupununi, Region 9 C/o Wilderness Explorers 176 Middle Street North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex This isolated and idyllic location offers an escape from the concrete jungle to a serene and peaceful existence with nature. Dawn hikes, led by Surama guides across the savannah and up Surama Mountain, reveal a multitude of birds and fantastic vistas. The guides have lived their entire

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Timberhead Rainforest Resort 8-10 Providence, East Bank Demerara Tel: 233-5023 Fax: 225-0459 Email: timberhead@solutions2000.com, geb@solutions2000.net Website: www.timberheadguyana.com Located on the Pokeroro Creek in the Amerindian Reservation of Santa Mission. Day and evening jungle walks and canoeing, birding watching, swimming, sports.

Wonotobo Resort 34 Grant 1651, Crabwood Creek, Corentyne/ Orealla, Corentyne River Tel: 339-2430/ 339-2741 Fax: (592) 339-2741 Email: ganbros@yahoo.com/ cortoursinc@yahoo.com Wonotobo boasts three awesome and magnificent waterfalls that are situated in a semi-circle a) The Wonotobo Falls 2) The Frenchman Falls 3) Blue Crane Falls. Wonotobo offers nature walks along forest trails, water sports, bird watching, beach camping and lots more. The Resort boasts a seventeen room guest house on the beach with all the modern conveniences, a conference hall, restaurant and bar. There are also two hill top cabins overlooking the Wonotobo falls. There is never a dull moment.

North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex

17 Yupakari

Caiman House Yupukari Village, North Rupununi, Region 9 Email: info@rupununilearners.org Skype: caiman_house Website: www.rupununilearnersgy.com Caiman House Field Station is: a field station for ecological research and educational programmes; it is the headquarters of Rupununi Learners Incorporated; the office of Yupukari Crafters; the location of the Yupukari Public Library; A comfortable, rustic guest house for travellers, researchers and students.

Wowetta Rupununi, Region 9 C/o Wilderness Explorers 176 Middle Street

THAG TRAVELER

THAG MEMBERS SERVICES

All of these tourist services are members of the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana, and offer the quality of service we know will meet your satisfaction.

ADVERTISING & PUBLISHING COMPANIES Advertising & Marketing Services 213 Camp Street P.O.Box 101582, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-5384. Fax: (592) 225-5383 Email: info@amsguyana.com Publishers of Explore Guyana Tourist Magazine, the Guyana Tourist Map, Business Guyana, Horizons, Fast Lane & other Publications

AIR SERVICES DOMESTIC CHARTER & CARGO Wings Aviation Ltd. Ogle Aerodrome, Ogle, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222-6513, 226-9098. Fax: (592) 226-9098/222-5361 Email: info@airguyana.net/ wingjet2@networksgy.com Website: www.airguyana.biz Offering air charter services to over 40 destinations including Kaieteur and Orinduik Falls

Air Services Ltd Ogle Aerodrome, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222-4368, 222-4357 Fax: (592) 222-6739 Email: res@aslgy.com Website: www.aslgy.com Offering air charter and scheduled domestic services to Guyana’s interior and tourist attractions Roraima Airways Charters Ogle Aerodrome. Ogle East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222-2337 Fax: (592) 222-4033 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Our Domestic Schedule Flights offer you convenient Departure and Arrival Times. Our Aircraft are available for Domestic & International Charters. Over 20 Years Experience! Proven fast and efficient! We are capable of airlifting patients from the hinterland to Georgetown (Ogle) or from Georgetown to Trinidad, Barbados or Miami. Our Senior Pilots are instrument rated and are routinely called upon to coordinate and EXPLORE GUYANA

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render assistance in highly technical search and rescue operations. Trans Guyana Airways Ogle Aerodrome, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222-2525/2861. Fax: (592) 222-5462 Email: commercial@transguyana.net Website: www.transguyana.net We provide Air Transportation Services throughout Guyana, through our scheduled and charter Services including international scheduled services to Suriname. As a third generation family owned business, Trans Guyana Airways remain on the forefront of Aviation Development in Guyana. With a fleet of eight aircrafts, and the most qualified group of pilots in Guyana you can be sure we have your safety and comfort foremost on our minds

INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES Caribbean Airlines Regent & Avenue of the Republic, Georgetown


Tel: 1- 800-744-2225 Email: mail@caribbean-airlines.com Website: www.caribbean-airlines.com

forest use and conservation. The Forest is in the homeland of the Makushi people, who have lived here and used the forest for thousands of years.

BARS & NIGHT CLUBS Jerries 177 Waterloo Street, South Cummingsburg Georgetown Tel: (592) 227 5701 Email: barbqbacchus@hotmail.com Website: http://www.jerriesguyana.com

National Parks Commission Thomas Road, Thomas Lands, Georgetown Tel: (592)225-8016/ (592)226-7974. Fax: (592)223-5379 Email: natpark@networksgy.com Website: www.kaieteur.gov.gy

HOTELS Latino Bar The Pegasus Hotel Guyana Seawall RoadKingston, Georgetown Tel. (592)225-2853-9 Fax: (592)225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana.com Website: www.pegasushotelguyana.com Sidewalk Café & Jazz Club 176 Middle Street, Georgetown Tel: (592)225-4634/225-4644/226-5363. Fax: (592)227-0210 Email: sidewalkcafegy@yahoo.co.uk Website: www.ariantzesidewalk.com The Rock Bar Roraima Residence Inn 8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-9648. Fax: (592) 225-9646 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com

COMPANIES ORGANIZATIONS Guyana Telephone Telegraph Company Limited 79 Brickdam, Stabroek, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225 1315 Fax: (592) 231 7637 Email: marketing@gtt.co.gy Website: www.gtt.co.gy Website: www.cellinkgy.com Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation CIDA Building, 77 High St., Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592)225-1504/7144. Fax: (592)225-9199 Email: iwokrama-general@iwokrama.org Website: www.iwokrama.org The Iwokrama Rainforest is a vast wilderness of one million acres. This protected area was established in 1996 as the Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development. Iwokrama is a protected area with a difference - the full involvement of people. Iwokrama is exceptional among conservation organizations because it joins with local people in every aspect of its work. From research to business, Iwokrama ensures local economic and social benefits from

Ariantze Hotel 176 Middle Street, Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592)226-5363/ 225-0634/ 225-0644 Fax: (592)227-0210 Email: ariantze@networksgy.com Website: www.ariantzesidewalk.com “Delightfully charming decor and our friendly, personalised service make a stay at Ariantze Hotel a pleasantly memorable experience in fine Guyanese Hospitality. Our boutique heritage hotel gives real meaning to the saying “Good things come wrapped in small packages!” Free continental breakfast and high speed wireless internet access, in-house restaurant with mouth-watering daily lunch buffet. Intimate dining, an appetizing menu and impeccable service are found in the Bourbon Restaurant. Scintillating musical entertainment to enjoy at the Sidewalk Cafe & Jazz Club. Amenities Free high speed wireless internet access. All rooms are air conditioned with mini bar, coffee makers, TV and DVD players. Restaurant and Jazz Club on location. Computer access for guests, 24 hour security and free movie night every Tuesday Brandsville Apartments 89-90 Pike Street, Campbellsville, Georgetown Tel: (592)226-1133/ 227-0989Fax: (592)2317001 Email: brandsville@gol.net.gy Website: www.brandsville.net Relax! You’re at Brandsville - located just short distance from the seawalls which boards the Atlantic Ocean and a corner away from the American School. Set among a quiet neighbourhood, three blocks offers 32 executives type rooms and suites to suit your needs. Inclusive of Jacuzzi, self catering facilities and customer amenities and wired and wireless networks. Amenities Swimming Pool, Hot & Cold water, Internet access wired & wireless, Gym, Restaurant & Bar. Cara Lodge 249 Quamina Street. P.O.Box 10833, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-5301/15 Fax: (592)225-5310

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Email: caralodge@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com Guyana’s first Heritage House Hotel, Victorian tradition with all the comfort and service of a modern Hotel in a relaxed atmosphere. Our Bottle Restaurant is recognized as the best in Georgetown and we offer full conference and banqueting facilities, complimentary high speed internet access and mini gym. Cara Suites 176 Middle & Waterloo Sts., Georgetown Tel: (592)226-1612/ 1684. Fax: (592)226-1541 Email: carasuites@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com Located in the heart of diplomatic and business district Georgetown, with an excellent range of facilities including our Bistro 176 bar and restaurant and complimentary high speed internet access. The finest in cooperate executive accommodation! Grand Coastal Hotel 1 & 2 Area M Le Ressouvenir, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592)220-1091/ 220-1288/ 220-2046 Fax: (592)220-1498 Email: reservationa@grandcoastal.com Website: www.grandcoastal.com The Grand Coastal Hotel - International Outlook with a local flavour, offer excellent Services and friendly staff . Located in a safe and secure environment off souvenir shores only 7 kilometres from Georgetown, just a few minutes walking distance from the Atlantic Ocean. Amenities Rooms, Restaurant, Courtyard, Conference Centre, Pool, Gym, Bar, Cable TV, Laundry, Telephone, High Speed Wireless Internet Access, Reliable Taxi Service & Catering Herdmanston Lodge 65 Peter Rose & Anira Street, Queenstown, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-0808/ 0811 Fax: (592)231-7904 Email: stay@herdmanstonlodge.com Website: www.herdmantsonlodge.com An intimate heritage hotel in Guyana, Herdmanston prides itself in excellent guest service. One of only a few hotels in Guyana that has maintained Guyana’s distinctive colonial architecture Herdmanston is perched within extensive lawns and garden which is home to some of the gentle flora and fauna of central Georgetown. Located in residential Queenstown, just 5 minutes from central Georgetown, a close walk to the National Park and the sea walls our small hotel size allows us to offer to


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our guests a very personalized service for both accommodation, meetings and intimate events. Come, stay with us, our hallmark....... Fantastic Service.

Community of Bel Air Park, within walking proximity to the Botanical Gardens, the Bourda Cricket and Football Ground, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Pizza Hut and Popeye’s Seafood Restaurant.

New Tropicana Hotel 177 Waterloo Street, South Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 227 5701 Cell: (592) 686-3437 Email: barbqbacchus@hotmail.com Website: www.newtropicanahotel.com

Roraima Duke Lodge 94-95 Duke Street, Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592) 231 7220, 227 2213 Fax: (592) 227 3816 Email: roraimadukelodge@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Situated at 94-95 Duke Street, Kingston opposite the American Embassy and neighbouring to the Office of the Empowerment and Court of Appeal is an old-fashioned colonial architectural house, called the Duke Lodge. This beautiful antique type Guest House is just 5 minutes away from all the busy bustle of the busiest city’s streets of Central Georgetown, and a mere 45 minutes away from the Cheddi Jagan International Airport. Duke Lodge is one of those splendid wooden buildings that form part of the architectural heritage of the capital, being utilized as a tasteful hospitality, entertainment and conference facility.

Palace De Leon Hospitality Inc. 71 Croal St. Stabroek, Georgetown Tel: (592)226-5278/227-7019/226-6374 Email: leonlesruth@yahoo.com Pegasus Hotel Guyana Seawall Road, Kingston, Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-2853-9 .Fax: (592)225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana. com Website: www.pegasushotelguyanacom Guyana’s leading hotel. Pegasus Hotel Guyana offers 132 rooms ranging from standard to luxury, and an excellent array of facilities including pool, bars, a la carte restaurant, gym and conference facilities. Princess Hotel and Casino Providence, East Bank Demerara Tel: (592) 265-7001-30 Fax: (592)265-7002 petal@princesshotelguyana.com Website: www.worldofprincess.com The Princess Hotel Guyana is located a mere 25-minute drive from the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, boasts of 200 spacious and elegantly decorated presidential suites, VIP/Executive suites, double and single occupancy rooms. Our international casino, the Princess Casino Guyana opens at 12:00 noon until 4am daily. Radisson Suites Hotel 83 Laluni Street, Queenstown, Georgetown. Tel: (592)226-2145/ 227-4983 Fax: 592)227-5037 Email: info@guyanahotel.com Website: www.guyanahotel.com Roraima Residence Inn 8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park Georgetown. Tel: (592)225-9647-8/225-9650, Fax: (592)225-9646 Email: rriops@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairawys.com Roraima Residence Inn, the first Boutique Hotel in Guyana, offers you an atmosphere of elegant ambience, where cleanliness and friendliness exceed your expectations. The Hotel is located in a gated Compound within the Residential

Savannah Inn Lethem, Region 9 Tel: (592) 772-2035 Email: alfred@savannahguyana.com/ linda@ savannahguyana.com Website: www.savannahguyana.com In the most strategic, convenient and tranquil location Savannah Inn can be found at Lethem. A home away from home with comfortable air conditioned and self contained rooms and cabins, spacious dining area, huge green shed overlooking the Kanukus where you can relax, have a cool drink in peace and tranquility. Your comfort and pleasure is our business.

VACATION RESORT Aracari Resort 160 Versailles West Bank Demerara, Guyana Tel: (592) 264 2947-49, 264 3311 Fax: (592) 264 2949 Email : info@aracariresort.com Website: www.aracariresort.com The Aracari Resort of Guyana offers a full line of hospitality services. This 150,000 square-foot Resort features 36 magnificent one bedroom apartments, a fine dining & Fast Food Restaurant and bar, an internet Café, a fitness Gym, an incredibly exciting pool, poolside entertainment and a line of warm and hospitable staff

NATURE RESORTS Atta Rainforest Lodge (CATS) C/o Wilderness Explorers, Cara Suites Address: 176 Middle Street, North Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 226 2085, 227-7698 Fax: (592) 226 2085 EXPLORE GUYANA

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Email: info@iwokramacanopywalkway.com Skype: tonywildex Website: www.iwokramacanopywalkway.com Atta Rainforest Lodge is situated approximately 500 metres from the Iwokrama Canopy Walkway. The Lodge is completely surrounded by tropical rainforest which offers a complete immersion in the rainforest experience. Iwokrama Canopy Walkway is a series of suspension bridges and decks up to 30 meters in height and 154 meters in length. It gives visitors a new view of the mid and upper canopy of the forest and allows wildlife to be relatively free from human intrusion. Amenities Overnight facilities, Day visits, bird watching, etc. Adel’s Rainforest Resort Akawini Creek, Pomeroon River Tel: (592) 771-5391 Tel (in the USA): 301 384 2396 Fax: 301-384-2396 Email: fredze@verizon.net Website: www.adelresort.com Adel’s is located in the pristine rainforest area of the Pomeroon River. It is surrounded by 60 acre farm that provides all the food you eat including vegetables, fruits, fresh meat and fish. We are within an hour’s boat ride of several Amerindian reservations and the famous Shell Beach where you can witness the turtles as they come in to lay their eggs when in season. Adventure Guianas Villa & Courtyard 3 Tabatinga & Beverly Hills Drive, Lethem, Rupununi, Guyana, SA Tel: (592) 227-4713 Fax: (592) 225-9646 Email: info@adventureguianas.com Fax: www.adventureguianas.com Adventure Guianas Villa & Courtyard offers guests the opportunity to relax in a serene atmosphere, overlooking the Kanuku Mts. and experience the cultural diversities of the Guyana/Brazil Frontier. The ranch-styled building and traditional thatched- roof benabs blend nature with modern architecture to ensure your comfort in a natural setting, every so often, being reminded of the rich birdlife of the Kanukus. Amenities Accommodation, Tours, Entertainment, Restaurant & Bar (Guyana & Brazil Cuisine), Transportation Arrowpoint Nature Resort R8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown. Tel: (592) 261-9286/ 225-9647-8 Fax: (592) 225-9646 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Arrowpoint Nature Resort is named after the many Arrow Trees found in the area, which is used by the Amerindians to make their arrows for hunting. One of the finer examples of Guyana’s eco-tourism product, Arrowpoint coexists with


its interior setting without ruffling the natural environment. The Resort itself is set against the backdrop of the Rainforest which is a haven for birdwatchers and nature lover since there is an abundance of wildlife including 350 species of birds. Baganara Island Resort Essequibo River, Guyana Pegasus Hotel – Seawall Wall Road, Kingston Tel: Pegasus Office - (592) 225-4483-4 Ogle Aerodrome, Ogle, East Coast Demerara Tel: Ogle Office; (592) 222-8050, 53-55 Email: bookbaganara@baganara.com Website: www.baganara.com In the mighty Essequibo river is this wonderful little paradise with 187 acres of lush green foliage and colourful tropical flowers. Five miles South of Bartica, it is the gateway to the unspoilt rainforest of Guyana and the junction where the great Essequibo and Mazaruni Rivers meet. The Resort has a seventeen room capacity and a modern conference facility that can accommodate up to 60 persons. You could enjoy a 20-minute flight directly to the island from Georgetown or a picturesque trip of a one-hour drive along the coast and one hour by boat Amenities We offer a variety of other outdoor activities including canoeing, fishing, water skiing, kayaking, volleyball, table tennis, pools, and pedal boats or simply sunbathing and swimming. We offer a number of off island tours i.e. Marshall Falls, Parrot Island, kayaking expeditions and more

Hurakabra River Resort Essequibo River 168 Century Palm Gdns, Durban Backlands, Lodge Tel: (592) 225-3557/ 624-8694 Fax: (592) 226-0240 Email: gemmadhoo@gmail.com Website: www.hurakabragy.com A secret waiting to be discovered. A tranquil tropical oasis. Awake up to chirping birds and beautiful sunrises. A picture of calmness and serenity. The Resort features the beautifully appointed Mango Tree Villa and the cosy Bamboo cottage on the water front set against a backdrop of tropical forest, bamboo groves and mango trees.’ Amenities Overnighting, catering and self-catering, aquatic sports-skiing, nee- boarding, kayaking. Jungle walk, birding, wildlife spotting Iwokrama Eco Lodge Rupununi Region 9 Tel: (592) 225-1504/ 225-7144 Fax: (592) 225-9199

Email: iwokrama-general@iwokrama.org Website: www.iwokrama.org Karanambu Ranch Karanambu North Rupununi Guyana Tel: (592) 226-5180. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: karanambu.lodge@gmail.com Website: www.karanambu.com Enjoy Karanambu Rum punch, while being treated to true Rupununi hospitality by Ms. Diane McTurk, a living legend. swim with giant river otters, search the savannas for the Giant Anteater, sundowners over El Dorado, watch the Victoria Amazonica lily open, Hear the stories, come share in the Magic of Karanambu. Amenities Bed with netting turn down, Same day laundry service, Local bar, Juice and local soda always available, Battery recharging, Wireless internet, Guided tours: include nature treks and boat tours. Persons in need a little extra assistance or families with small children are welcomed, they present no problems. The staff is always willing to go the extra mile to ensure the guests comfort and enjoyment of their time here. Rock View Lodge Annai, North Rupununi, Region 9 Tel: (592) 645-9675 Email: colin@rockviewlodge.com Website: www.rockviewlodge.com Ideally located in an Amerindian community affording good access to the Iwokrama Forest, the Atta Lodge and Canopy Walkway, Surama Village and Karanambu. Well furnished selfcontained suites surrounded by savannas, mountains, rainforest and rivers, and a family atmosphere with an excellent library and art collection in the old ranch house, regional cooking and a swimming pool. Timberhead Rainforest Resort 8-10 Providence, East Bank Demerara Tel: (592) 233-5023 Fax: (592) 225-0459 Email: timberhead@solutions2000.com, geb@ solutions2000.net Website: www.timberheadguyana.com Located on the Pokeroro Creek in the Amerindian Reservation of Santa Mission. Day and evening jungle walks and canoeing, birding watching, swimming, sports. Wonotobo Resort 34 Grant 1651, Crabwood Creek, Corentyne/ Orealla, Corentyne River Tel: (592) 339-2430/ 339-2741 Fax: (592) 339-2741 Email: ganbros@yahoo.com/ cortoursinc@ yahoo.com Wonotobo boasts three awesome and magnificent waterfalls that are situated in

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a semi-circle a) The Wonotobo Falls 2) The Frenchman Falls 3) Blue Crane Falls. Wonotobo offers nature walks along forest trails, water sports, bird watching, beach camping and lots more. The Resort boasts a seventeen room guest house on the beach with all the modern conveniences, a conference hall, restaurant and bar. There are also two hill top cabins overlooking the Wonotobo falls. There is never a dull moment.

FUN PARKS AND RESORTS Jubilee Resort Dakara Creek, Timehri C/o 106-107 Lamaha & Carmichael Street Georgetown Tel: (592) 691-7313/ 628-4263/ 225-8915 Fax: (592) 226-5340 Email: reservations@jubileeresort.com Website: www.jubileeresort.com Amenities Restaurant and Bar, Swim Shoppe, Hammock and Benabs, Swimming Pool and trained lifeguards Splashmins Resort & Eco Adventure Tours Madewini Creek, Linden Soesdyke Highway Tel: (592) 223-7301-4 Email: info@splashmins.com Website: www.spashmins.com We are a magnificent taste of what Guyana has to offer all in one place. This breathtaking resort offers luxury vacations in tranquil villas, a man-made lake for an array of aqua sports and sporting facilities for fun under the sun, bars, restaurant and conference and banquet halls. Get in touch with nature on the other half of this resort where relaxing in hammocks, camping and outdoor cooking is all done on 25acres of lush green landscaped Eco grounds Amenities Conference Room, Bar, Restaurant, Banquet Hall with private bars, water rides and swimming facilities, wetland and eco tours, football, cricket and basketball facilities, BBQ and outdoor cooking facilities, camping facilities.

RESTAURANTS Bistro 176 Cara Suites Cara Suites, 176 Middle & Waterloo Sts., Georgetown Tel: (592) 226-1612/4. Fax: (592) 226-1541 Email: carasuites@carahotels.com Website: www.carahotels.com Bottle Bar & Restaurant Cara lodge 294 Quamina St., Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-5301. Fax: (592) 225-5310 Email: caralodge@carahotel.com Website: www.carahotels.com


Recognized as the best restaurant in Guyana with a dazzling display of antique Dutch bottles. A perfect setting for enjoying Guyana international cuisine. Café Tepuy Residence Inn 8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-9648. Fax: (592) 225-9646 Email: rriops@hotmail.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Brown’s Café Pegasus Hotel Guyana, Seawall Road Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-2853/59. Fax: (592) 225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana. com Website: www.pegasushotelguyana.com El Dorado Restaurant Pegasus Hotel Guyana, Seawall Road, Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-2853/59. Fax: (592) 225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana. com Website: www.pegasushotelguyana.com Sidewalk Café & Jazz Club 176 Middle St., Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-0152/226-5363. Fax: (592) 227-0210 Email: sidewalkcafe@yahoo.co.uk Website: www.ariantzesidewalk.com

Savannah Inn Restaurant Lethem, Region 9 Tel: (592) 772-2035 Email: alfred@savannahguyana.com/ linda@savannahguyana.com Website: www.savannahguyana.com SPORTS –TENNIS The Pegasus Hotel Guyana Seawall Road, Kingston, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-2853-9 Fax: (592) 225-3703 Email: reservations@pegasushotelguyana. com Website: www.pegasushotelguyana.com

TOURISM CONSULTANTS Public Communications Consultants 168 Century Palm Gdns, Durban Backlands, Lodge Tel: (592) 225-3557/ 226-0240 Fax: (592) 226-0240 Email: kitnasc@gmail.com

Website: www.hurakabragy.com Consultant for Yachts and cruisers to Guyana. Arranges clearance for their arrivals and departures. Hurakabra River Resort provides moorings. Port Master for Ocean Cruising Club.

TOUR OPERATORS Adventure Guianas Mickel Plaza, 53 Pere Street, Kitty, Georgetown, Guyana, SA Tel: (592) 227-4713 Fax: 225-9646 Email: info@adventureguianas.com Fax: www.adventureguianas.com Adventure Guianas specializes in nature and adventure tourism and offers travel itineraries to all parts of Guyana, cross border tours to Suriname, French Guiana, Brazil and Venezuela. Our knowledge and experience allows us to customize tours to suit your itinerary, interest and budget. Our Guides are, primarily, from the indigenous tribes, whom as custodians inspire their respective communities to develop and sustain our tourism product “Guyana Naturally” Air Guyana Tours Ogle Aerodrome, Ogle, East Coast Demerara Tel: (592) 222-6513, 226-9098. Fax: (592) 2269098/222-5361 Email: info@airguyana.net/ wingjet2@networksgy.com Website: www.airguyana.biz Bushmasters Inc. 40 Beverly Hills Drive, Lethem, Guyana, SA Tel: (592) 682-4175 Email: amazon@bushmasters.co.uk Website: www.bushmasters.co.uk Jungle survival, 4x4 off road, safari, venture, riding and cowboy - extreme adventures! Christine’s Executive Tour Services 83 Laluni Street, Queenstown, Georgetown Tel: (592)645-7333/ 677-5924, 225-2566 Fax: (592)226-2145 Email: cets09@hotmail.com Website: www.guyanahotel.com Looking for Adventure or a somewhere to relax in tranquility with nature? Then contact Christine Executive Tour Services. We customize our tours to suit your every need. Families, couples or Individuals we offer Nature & Adventure Tours, Honeymoon Packages, Hotel Accommodation, Trips to all Resorts across Guyana, Booking for flights, Transportation and lots more... We also do customizable packages to St. Lucia, Suriname, Brazil, etc. Our aim is to make your vacation a memorial one. So wait no longer contact us for your tour package(s) EXPLORE GUYANA

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Cortours Inc. 34 Grant 1651, Crabwood Creek, Corentyne/ Orealla, Corentyne River Tel: (592) 339-2430/ 339-2741 Fax: (592) 339-2741 Email: ganbros@yahoo.com/ cortoursinc@yahoo.com Cortours offers exceptional and exciting trips to many sites along the Corentyne River. The adventure of a lifetime begins at Crabwood Creek Seashore. Here you board a fully equipped covered speedboat for your comfort and safety. We offer trips to Orealla, Cow Falls and Wonotobo, which is our ultimate destination. Evergreen Adventures Inc. Pegasus Hotel – Seawall Wall Road, Kingston Pegasus Office Tel: - (592) 225-4483-4 Ogle Aerodrome, Ogle, East Coast Demerara Ogle Office Tel: (592) 222-8050, 222- 8053-55. Email: reservations@evergreenadventuresgy.com Website: www.evergreenadventuresgy.com Evergreen Adventures is a versatile and professional Tour Operator that specializes in nature and adventure Tourism, We offer exciting tours throughout Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana and North Brazil. Visit our Tour pages on our website and discover Northern South America. We will take care of you along the way. Our package tours can be tailored to fit your needs Hurakabra Tours 168 Century Palm Gdns. Durban Backlands, Lodge Tel: (592) 225-3557, 649-4497 Fax: (592) 226-0240 Email: gemmadhoo@gmail.com Website: www.hurakabragy.com Hurakabra Tours offers fully guiding and management for cruises visiting Guyana. We also day tours to the Essequibo and Mazaruni rivers, Kaieteur and Orinduik Falls and city tours. Overnight trips to Hurakabra and others. Amenities Professional tour guides, safe and comfortable boats with experienced captains, comfortable coaches for road transportation. A wide range of aquatic activities. Indoor and outdoor games, jungle walks, climbing rapids, bird watching, wild life spotting Old Fort Tours 91 Middle Street South Cummingsburg, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-1035/ 225-1037 Email: oldforttours_resort@hotmail.com Website: www.angcam.com Discover the wonders of the Essequibo River. Experience the adrenalin rush as you traverse the Marshall Rapids. Enjoy nature walks and the


cascading waterfall at Baracara. Get a chance to see the Forts and the Court of Policy now called the Museum. Roraima Tours Roraima Residence Inn 8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park, Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-9648. Fax: 2259646 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairways.com Discover the lost paradise with Roraima Tours – the only tour operator that allows clients to experience Guyanese hospitality and professionalism while utilizing a complete tour package with the Roraima BRAND

Roraima International Travel Agency R8 Eping Avenue, Bel Air Park Georgetown Tel: (592) 225-9647-8. Fax: (592) 225-9646 Email: ral@roraimaairways.com Website: www.roraimaairawys.com As an IATA Authorized Agent, Roraima International Travel Agency is a full-service IATA destination management company representing all major airlines with onward connections to the US, Canada, Europe and South America including LIAT, Caribbean Airlines, Delta Airlines, American Airlines, British Airways, Air Canada, Blue Wing, Copa Airlines and much more.

Savannah Inn Tours Lethem, Region 9 Tel: (592) 772-2035 Email: alfred@savannahguyana.com/ linda@savannahguyana.com Website: www.savannahguyana.com We organise tours to any place in the Rupununi and Brazil. Our bilingual staff can take you through to Boa Vista. Your comfort and pleasure is our business Timberhead Tropical Adventures Ltd 8-10 Providence, East Bank Demerara Tel: (592) 233-5179/ 233-5023 Fax: (592) 225- 0459 Email: timberhead@solutions200.net/ geb@solutions2000.net Website: www.timberheadguyana.com Wilderness Explorers Cara Suites, 176 Middle St., Georgetown Tel: (592) 227-7698. Fax: (592) 226-2085 Email: info@wilderness-explorers.com Website: www.wilderness-explorers.com Skype: wildernessguyana or tonywildex Wilderness Explorers has been offering quality nature and adventure experiences since 1994. Whether you want soft adventure or an arduous expedition to untouched places, let us help you make it a reality. At Wilderness Explorers we have a passion for Guyana, our region, and a desire to make every trip an adventure to remember. Our dedicated team is there to make sure your trip is the best it can be. For a wide choice of trips refer to our website or contact us.

TRAVEL AGENCIES Angelina’s Travel Agency 1995 Parika H/W. E.B. Essequibo Tel: (592) 260-4536/7. Fax: (592) 260-4536 Email: angellinastravel@hotmail.com Website: wwwangcam.com

About the Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG)

T

he Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana (THAG) was established in January 1991 by a number of persons working in the industry and is a member of the Private Sector Commission. It was initially called the Tourism Association of Guyana but evolved into Tourism and Hospitality Association of Guyana in recognition of the magnitude of the industry. It is the umbrella body of all tourism related restauranteurs, tour operators, travel agents, craft owners, jewelers, and transportation services, among others. THAG has pursued partnership with the Government of Guyana in development and expansion of various aspects of the tourism industry; generic marketing, training and development; positioning individual members locally, regionally and internationally to operate with the highest standards in the industry. THAG is headed by an Executive Board comprising of a President, Vice President, Treasurer and two Committee members. The Secretariat is headed by an Executive Director who is responsible for the day to day management of the association, sits on the Boards of various committees, organizes and participates in trade shows locally and overseas. THAG’s permanent staff also includes an Administrative Officer and Administrative and Marketing Assistant. THAG and the Government of Guyana, the Ministry of Tourism, Industry and Commerce and the Guyana Tourism Authority, have built a strong alliance to promote and develop Guyana’s many natural and cultural attributes as a tourism destination. Tourism & Hospitality Association of Guyana, Private Sector Commission Building Waterloo Street, Georgetown, Guyana. Tel: 011 592 225 0807. Fax: 011 592 225 0817 Email: thag@networksgy.com

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EXPLORE GUYANA


Events2011 calendar of

Special Events & Public Holidays

January

January 1 January 1

May

New Year’s Day Kashif & Shanghai Football Finals

February February 20 February 23 February 23 February February February February February February

Yuman-Nabi: Birth of the Prophet (Religious Holiday) Mashramani Flag Raising Ceremony Steel Pan Competition Tassa Drum Competition Children’s Costume Parade Masquerade Competition Chinese New Year Calypso Finals Nationwide

March March March 19/20 March

International Motor Racing Phagwah (HinduHoliday) Wedding Expo – Bridal Festival

April March/April April 22 April 23-25 April 23-25 April 23-25 April

Pakaraima Safari Cross country Good Friday (Christian Holiday) Easter Weekend Bartica Easter Regatta Rupununi Rodeo Linden Town Day

May 1 May 5 May 26

September

Labour Day (National Holiday) Indian Arrival Day (National Holiday) Independence Day (National Holiday)

June

September 1-30 September September September

Amerindian Heritage Mth. International Indigenous People Culture & Dance Festival Amerindian Pageant GUYEXPO (Last Week)

October

June 5 June

Environmental Day Environmental Awareness Week

July 4 July July

Caricom Day (First Monday) Berbice Expo Mahdia Expo

July

October October October October 26

Car & Bike Show National Trust Heritage Week Rockstone Fish Festival Diwali - Festival of Lights (Religious Holiday)

November

August August 1 Emancipation Day (Day of Commemoration/ National Holiday) August Jamzone 2011 (Splashmin’s Fun Park and Eco Resort) August Bartica Summer Regatta August Lake Mainstay Regatta August (3rd Week) Mining Week August Porkknocker’s Day

November 1-30 November 6 November November November November November November November

Tourism Awareness Month Eid-Ul-Adha - Feast of the sacrifice (Religious Holiday) Hospitality Week International Motor Racing New Amsterdam Town Day Bartica Town Day Main Street Lighting Up Rupununi Expo Rupununi Day

December December 25 December 26 December 26 December 31

Share the excitement when in Guyana

Christmas Day Boxing Day Main Big Lime Old Year’s Day

Annually Guyanese celebrate a number of special occasions based on its rich cultural heritage and diverse ethnic population. Many of these activities are celebrated across Guyana or staged in specific parts of the country. Be sure to plan your vacation to visit Guyana whether it be to celebrate Mashramani our local carnival, Phagwah the Hindu Spring festival, motor racing or all the thrills of International Cricket, the nation’s number one sport. EXPLORE GUYANA

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Explore Guyana 2011